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Taliban lead attacks on U.S. bases and government sites across Afghanistan
McLatchy ^ | 4/16/12 | Jonathan S. Landay and Ali Safi

Posted on 04/16/2012 7:20:11 AM PDT by Baynative

Taliban-led insurgents opened a spring offensive Sunday with a wave of coordinated suicide missions, firing at embassies and government offices from seized buildings in Kabul and attacking U.S. bases and police stations in three eastern provinces.

The strikes, which seemed to catch U.S.-led forces and Afghan authorities by surprise, sparked fierce firefights in Kabul and two other cities that underscored the insurgency's lethality as U.S. combat troops gird for the second phase of a withdrawal due to end in 2014.

(Excerpt) Read more at mcclatchydc.com ...


TOPICS: Breaking News; Foreign Affairs; Government; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: afghanistan; attacks; obamaswars; taliban

1 posted on 04/16/2012 7:20:16 AM PDT by Baynative
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To: Baynative

Yes, we can!


2 posted on 04/16/2012 7:22:24 AM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (For every black person murdered by a white, thirty-nine white people are murdered by blacks.)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

I’m sure Obama is loving every second of this


3 posted on 04/16/2012 7:26:16 AM PDT by eak3
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To: Baynative

Bring our men and women home!


4 posted on 04/16/2012 7:28:33 AM PDT by moovova
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To: Baynative
It's settled down now.

Please pray for our troops and civilians in Afghanistan.

5 posted on 04/16/2012 7:30:49 AM PDT by ohioWfan (Proud Mom of a Bronze Star recipient!)
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To: Baynative
although I wasn't paying close attention to Fox and Friends (wife talking over), Geraldo was reporting from Afghanistan and I believe he was making a big deal of Ambassador Crocker insisting it was not the Taliban but another terrorist organization which was strong enough to attack many targets all over the country.

true or not true, I know not. But what is true is that Crocker is pushing this so called “peace” process with the Taliban and could just be trying to give Taliban cover.

What he may not realize is that peace in our eyes is different from peace in the eyes of Islam. Peace to them is, you lay down your arms and we keep on killing - that is their credo - “kill the infidel.”

6 posted on 04/16/2012 7:34:12 AM PDT by elpadre (AfganistaMr Obama said the goal was to "disrupt, dismantle and defeat al-hereQaeda" and its allies.)
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To: Baynative

Afghanistan
Is Obama’s version of
Vietnam.


7 posted on 04/16/2012 7:40:10 AM PDT by left that other site
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To: Baynative

I am amazed at how little this is being covered by the MSM. It is similar to the Tet Offensive—a massive military defeat for the VC and NVA, but a political victory thanks to the MSM.


8 posted on 04/16/2012 7:41:18 AM PDT by kabar
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To: Baynative
Taliban lead attacks on U.S. bases and government sites across Afghanistan

I don't for one moment believe this. We have it on the best authority that, "Look, the Taliban per se is not our enemy. That's critical," Biden said. "There is not a single statement that the president has ever made in any of our policy assertions that the Taliban is our enemy, because it threatens U.S. interests." I'm sure this is all a friendly greeting from Obama's allies, and the media are simply misinterpreting the explosions and injuries because a few journalists don't understand the local culture.

9 posted on 04/16/2012 7:43:30 AM PDT by Pollster1 (Can we afford as much government as welfare-addicted voters demand?)
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To: Baynative

What media talking head will be the first to blame the ‘previous administration’ for failing in Afghanistan per DNC directives?


10 posted on 04/16/2012 7:45:00 AM PDT by Le Chien Rouge
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To: Baynative

Love that picture.


11 posted on 04/16/2012 7:53:28 AM PDT by commonguymd (Freedom is a myth anymore it seems)
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Click his tootsies!

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Donate monthly and help to end FReepathons


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12 posted on 04/16/2012 8:20:41 AM PDT by TheOldLady (FReepmail me to get ON or OFF the ZOT LIGHTNING ping list)
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To: kabar

Its not much like the Tet offensive.

Viet Cong and NVA had over 100,000 men in the initial attacks alone.

Counting the numbers involved there seems to have been fewer than a hundred men in yesterdays attacks, all in all.

Granted that these hundred are “disposable”.

Granted there were probably a couple of times more intelligence, logistics, recruitment and training people involved.

But still this is a trivial threat.


13 posted on 04/16/2012 8:24:12 AM PDT by buwaya
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To: commonguymd
"Love that picture."

I've studied it several times. It says a lot.

14 posted on 04/16/2012 8:24:56 AM PDT by Baynative (Please check this out - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFIcZkEzc8I)
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To: Baynative

like we didn’t know it was coming


15 posted on 04/16/2012 8:27:24 AM PDT by SF_Redux (Sarah stands for accountablility and personal responsiblity, democrats can't live with that)
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To: Baynative

Anyone have ANY idea what the hell we are doing over there?


16 posted on 04/16/2012 9:13:19 AM PDT by Joe Boucher ((FUBO) Hey Mitt, F-you too pal)
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To: Baynative
How does one make peace with a viper? Defang the things and they'll still strike.

Talibunnies are not our friends. Crocker is croaking like the mythical frog that gave the scorpion a ride over the river.

Meanwhile an Islamic Lord from the UK took out a ten million dollar hit against Bush and Obama. Guess obama ain't muslime enough:

http://www.jihadwatch.org/2012/04/uks-muslim-lord-offers-10-million-pound-reward-for-capture-of-obama-and-bush.html

17 posted on 04/16/2012 9:15:32 AM PDT by Karliner ( Jeremiah 29:11, Romans 8:28, Romans 8:38"...this is the end of the beginning."WC)
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To: Joe Boucher
(Does)"Anyone have ANY idea what the hell we are doing over there?"

It seems not.

I have deep sympathy for our troops who are killing time serving as targets while Obama postures for his reelection.

18 posted on 04/16/2012 9:29:48 AM PDT by Baynative (Please check this out - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFIcZkEzc8I)
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To: buwaya

It is all about perception. I was in Vietnam during the Tet Offensive. I understand the difference in terms of scale, but most Americans are not informed or engaged. The MSM will shape their views. In this case, they will protect Obama and minimize whatever happened. It doesn’t fit their narrative.


19 posted on 04/16/2012 10:03:22 AM PDT by kabar
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To: kabar

Maybe you weren’t around during the Tet Offensive, but I remember it well. What caught America’s attention was that after years of serious fighting and hundreds of thousands of troops and repeated assurances that we were on our way to victory, Tet showed us that there was no secure area anywhere in Vietnam. Our own embassy was almost overrun. Sure we beat them back, just like we won every major engagement. We had too much firepower, etc..But it showed us that we were a long way from “winning” the war and made many people wonder what we were doing there.


20 posted on 04/16/2012 10:58:10 AM PDT by juno67 (ui)
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To: juno67

I was in Danang, Vietnam during the Tet offensive. I remember it very well.


21 posted on 04/16/2012 11:04:13 AM PDT by kabar
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To: kabar

I guess you remember it very well indeed. I was just speaking as an average American stateside who watched the events on TV, as presented by the “media.” The term “mainstream media” had not been invented yet because there were no real alternatives available.


22 posted on 04/16/2012 11:23:18 AM PDT by juno67 (ui)
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To: kabar

I guess you remember it very well indeed. I was just speaking as an average American stateside who watched the events on TV, as presented by the “media.” The term “mainstream media” had not been invented yet because there were no real alternatives available.


23 posted on 04/16/2012 11:23:36 AM PDT by juno67 (ui)
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To: juno67
But it showed us that we were a long way from “winning” the war and made many people wonder what we were doing there.

No, we were actually winning the war. The Tet Offensive was a desperate attempt to change the direction of the war. The result was that a large portion of the VC was wiped out in the mistaken belief that the offensive would cause a popular uprising supporting them. Unfortunately, it was portrayed as a defeat for us, but the reality on the ground was much different. Once Walter Cronkite declared the war unwinnable, public and political support started to decline rapidly.

Here is a good site to track the timeline of the war in Vietnam

I would also recommend the Boston Manifesto, which destroys many of the myths about the war including John Kerry's "heroism."

24 posted on 04/16/2012 12:28:29 PM PDT by kabar
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To: Baynative

I thank God my son is out of that hell-hole now. Prayers up for our soldiers who are still there and trying to fight Obozo’s lost war. IMHO our soldiers should be brought home right now if this feckless Pres__ent is unwilling to allow our troops to win.


25 posted on 04/16/2012 12:58:29 PM PDT by SoldierDad (Proud dad of an Army Soldier who has survived 24 months of Combat deployment.)
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To: Joe Boucher

According to my son, who, thanks to God, has been back from that hell-hole since the end of January, there is no military mission in Afghanistan anymore.


26 posted on 04/16/2012 1:02:33 PM PDT by SoldierDad (Proud dad of an Army Soldier who has survived 24 months of Combat deployment.)
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To: kabar

It wasn’t about Walter Cronkite. It was seeing that the enemy was still capable of mounting attacks simultaneously across the entire country, and nearly overrunning our embassy that made people stop and wonder.

You weren’t in the US, but what caused the public and popular support to decline rapidly was not only the Tet offensive, but, even more importantly, the end of student deferments. Once middle class and upper class kids lost their exemption from military service, their parents started asking much more serious questions about just what was going on in Vietnam. That was the beginning of the end of the war.


27 posted on 04/16/2012 2:05:56 PM PDT by juno67 (ui)
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To: SoldierDad

Its really a police mission.
That should be handled by the locals.

Much like Iraq has been handled by the locals, fairly well so far, everything considered.


28 posted on 04/16/2012 2:13:16 PM PDT by buwaya
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To: Baynative

Heavens! It’s a quagmire! Just like Vietnam! But Fireless Leader knows what to do! He’ll negotiate!/s


29 posted on 04/16/2012 2:18:53 PM PDT by Eleutheria5 (End the occupation. Annex today.)
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To: juno67
It wasn’t about Walter Cronkite. It was seeing that the enemy was still capable of mounting attacks simultaneously across the entire country, and nearly overrunning our embassy that made people stop and wonder.

"As the TET offensive continued into February, the anchorman for the CBS evening news, Walter Cronkite, traveled to Vietnam and filed several reports. Upon his return, Cronkite took an unprecedented step of presenting his "editorial opinion" at the end of the news broadcast on February 27th. "For it seems now more certain than ever," Cronkite said, "that the bloody experience of Vietnam is to end in a stalemate." After watching Cronkite's broadcast, LBJ was quoted as saying. "That's it. If I've lost Cronkite, I've lost middle America."

You weren’t in the US, but what caused the public and popular support to decline rapidly was not only the Tet offensive, but, even more importantly, the end of student deferments. Once middle class and upper class kids lost their exemption from military service, their parents started asking much more serious questions about just what was going on in Vietnam. That was the beginning of the end of the war.

I didn't spend the entire time in Vietnam during my 7 years of service, 1965-72--just one year in country and another 8 months off the coast. I was aware of what was going on in the US, including having two brothers who got student deferments. The reality is that student deferments ended in 1971 almost at the end of the war.

The Military Selective Service Act of 1967 expanded the ages of conscription to the ages of 18 to 35. It still granted student deferments, but ended them upon either the student's completion of a four-year degree or his 24th birthday, whichever came first. The act was amended in 1971 ending student deferments except for Divinity students, who received a 2-D Selective Service classification.

According to the Veteran's Administration, 9.2 million men served in the military between 1964 and 1975. Nearly 3.5 million men served in the Vietnam theater of operations. From a pool of approximately 27 million, the draft raised 2,215,000 men for military service during the Vietnam era. It has also been credited with "encouraging" many of the 8.7 million "volunteers" to join rather than risk being drafted.

Of the nearly 16 million men not engaged in active military service, 96% were exempted (typically because of jobs including other military service), deferred (usually for educational reasons), or disqualified (usually for physical and mental deficiencies but also for criminal records to include draft violations). Draft offenders in the last category numbered nearly 500,000 but less than 10,000 were convicted or imprisoned for draft violations. Finally, as many as 100,000 draft eligible males fled the country.

With the end of active U.S. ground participation in Vietnam, December 1972 saw the last men conscripted, who were born in 1952 and who reported for duty in June 1973. On February 2, 1972, a drawing was held to determine draft priority numbers for men born in 1953, but in early 1973 it was announced that no further draft orders would be issued. In March 1973, 1974, and 1975 the Selective Service assigned draft priority numbers for all men born in 1954, 1955, and 1956, in case the draft was extended, but it never was

30 posted on 04/16/2012 3:38:01 PM PDT by kabar
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To: juno67

Interesting memories. I was a little kid during the Tet offensive. It was on tv. My father, a WW2 vet and an old Indo-China hand, commented on how well the journalists were covering it.

He shook his head, and brought up the topic of Den Bein Fu. He always said it would go no better for the Americans than it did for the French. He said this although he loved US servicemen - he said they saved everyone in Aust during WW2.

He lived long enough to see the Soviets invade Afghanistan, and of course he was easily able to predict that would be a disaster.


31 posted on 04/16/2012 9:41:38 PM PDT by BlackVeil
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To: kabar

In Australia, the draft affected comparatively few people, yet the social impact was immense.

One still meets Vietnam vets. They often have that “look”. What a war ...


32 posted on 04/16/2012 9:44:41 PM PDT by BlackVeil
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To: SoldierDad

SoldierDad,
I just said a prayer thanking GOD for your sons safe return.
Which I figure is about 999,999,999 short of how many you offered up.

Your answer is about what I figure.


33 posted on 04/17/2012 1:56:09 AM PDT by Joe Boucher ((FUBO) Hey Mitt, F-you too pal)
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To: buwaya

IMO, our troops should be brought home now. The Afghan government, the Taliban, and Al Queda should be placed on notice that if there are any further instances of terrorism that is traced to any group in Afghanistan the U.S. WILL NOT PLACE BOOTS ON THE GROUND, but will bomb the crap out of Afghanistan, and to hell with collateral damage.


34 posted on 04/17/2012 7:39:58 AM PDT by SoldierDad (Proud dad of an Army Soldier who has survived 24 months of Combat deployment.)
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To: Joe Boucher

I give thanks to you for your prayer. I wasn’t keeping track, but, yes, many times per day over the course of his deployment, beginning with his pre-deployment training, I offered prayers for his and his fellow soldier’s safety. I continue to offer prayers for those still deployed, and for the leaders who command them, and for this war to come to a conclusion so our soldiers can come home.


35 posted on 04/17/2012 7:44:13 AM PDT by SoldierDad (Proud dad of an Army Soldier who has survived 24 months of Combat deployment.)
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To: kabar
Thanks for your thoughtful response. It's a funny thing trying to figure out history, even when you lived through it. Brings to mind Napoleon's remark, "History is a set of lies, agreed upon." To me, Cronkite's remark seems prescient in retrospect, though unremarkable as millions of people had come to the same conclusion. Much as if today someone said something along the same lines about Afghanistan. On the other hand, if Cronkite were alive today and said that the war in Afghanistan was likely to end without a clear cut victory on our part, would some historians later claim that that was the reason we didn't stick around until we “won” the war there?

As to the draft, I forgot when it ended, but I remember very clearly the drawing in December 1969 when myself and millions of other draft age college students were assigned their numbers, in preparation for the end of deferments. I got a high number and the draft board skipped over me, but for the first time, millions of “safe” college students no longer felt safe. We were in the mix. I noticed a big difference in the antiwar demonstrations thereafter. Whereas before, the demonstrators were pretty much the more radical elements of the campus, by 1970 and 1971, the support was much broader, (I was at the University of Texas). Now who can say with any certainty why that was? I obviously have my opinion, which I have stated already. In fact that experience led me to the conclusion that we should not abandon the draft in favor of a volunteer armed forces, because I felt that if the general public were exempted from serving in our wars, then we would be more likely to get involved in them when we shouldn't, or stay in those future wars longer than we should. (My belief is that it should be politically costly to fight wars when the general population is not willing to fight in them.) By the way, most accounts indicate that Nixon came to the same conclusion, feeling that if he did away with the draft, the opposition to the war would drop.

One last comment about Cronkite. When LBJ was quoted as saying “If I lost Cronkite, I've lost middle America” I attributed that to LBJ's six sense politically. To me, Cronkite was a little slow intellectually, not as interesting as Huntley/Brinkley who I preferred, but he was the very archetype of the bedrock middle American. He was the embodiment of their values, their hopes and dreams and their reaction to the world. LBJ was right to look out of his bubble in D.C. and see what Cronkite made of what was going on. Because when he lost Cronkite after Tet, he had also lost much of middle America. But Cronkite was not the cause.

As to the reporting on the Tet offensive, how would you expect the media to report on such a massive attack? What was shocking at the time was that the communists were capable of launching a simultaneous attack against more than 100 cities and towns in Vietnam, and almost overrunning our embassy. That was what shocked us at the time, that they had the capability to launch such attacks. I suppose the media could have just reported, “There were some communist attacks in Vietnam yesterday, but they were quickly subdued.” But, really, that's not why we have a free press. They have an obligation to tell us what's going on, regardless. At least, I hope they feel that way.

Well, that's my take on what happened.

36 posted on 04/17/2012 4:36:34 PM PDT by juno67
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To: BlackVeil

It’s too bad that all that accumulated wisdom such as your dad’s is not accessed by politicians worldwide. George Bush says he never asked his father’s advice on the wars in Iraq or Afghanistan. I think it would have been helpful.


37 posted on 04/18/2012 2:30:12 AM PDT by juno67
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