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Kodak's New York HQ housed secret underground nuclear reactor
Daily Mail ^ | 5-14-12 | unattributed

Posted on 05/14/2012 5:14:36 PM PDT by dynachrome

A Kodak industrial facility in New York, was home to a secret nuclear reactor containing weapons-grade uranium.

The research reactor was housed in an underground labyrinth in one of the buildings at the former Kodak Park site in Rochester and was the size of a fridge.

Kodak used it to check chemicals and other materials for impurities, as well

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events; US: New York
KEYWORDS: kodak; newyork; nuclear; reactor
Interesting
1 posted on 05/14/2012 5:14:47 PM PDT by dynachrome
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To: dynachrome

I have always believed some companies should have First Strike capability (and certainly the new Freedom Tower should).


2 posted on 05/14/2012 5:18:10 PM PDT by freedumb2003 ('RETRO' Abortions = performed on 84th trimester individuals who think killing babies is a "right.")
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To: dynachrome

I had a friend who worked at Kodak Park around 40 years ago. He was telling me how they built a swimming pool around the 6th floor of a building with a stainless tank. It was completed with diving board, ladders. The engineers made a last minute inspection before it was to be filled and prepared for use. They advised against ever filling the pool because the building would come down within hours. A couple years later they made the pool room a dark room where they developed wall size mural photographs.


3 posted on 05/14/2012 5:33:13 PM PDT by BerryDingle (I know how to deal with communists, I still wear their scars on my back from Hollywood-Ronald Reagan)
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To: dynachrome

I believe the first reactor built was in the basement of a sports building at a university.


4 posted on 05/14/2012 5:53:07 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: dynachrome

The first man made nuclear reactor was called the Chicago Pile-1 at the University of Chicago.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicago_Pile-1


5 posted on 05/14/2012 5:58:58 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: dynachrome

Eh, there was one for research in Robeson Hall at Va Tech. I’m sure it’s gone now.


6 posted on 05/14/2012 6:00:23 PM PDT by mikey_hates_everything
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To: dynachrome

There was one in Windsor Connecticut easily accessible on a dirt road. The S1C reactor was a prototype naval reactor designed for the United States Navy to provide electricity generation and propulsion on warships.

The nuclear reactor was built in Windsor, Connecticut as a prototype for the experimental USS Tullibee (SSN-597) submarine, though that boat was in fact powered by a S2C reactor. The propulsion plant was unusual in that the steam turbines powered an electric motor, rather than a set of reduction gears. The USS Tullibee was an early advanced-design, fast-attack submarine constructed by Electric Boat and commissioned in 1960.

There was a simple gate that kept out traffic and, I imagine some surveillance but as kids we often drove down the road pretty close and never got challenged.


7 posted on 05/14/2012 6:39:29 PM PDT by muir_redwoods (I like Obamacare because Granny signed the will and I need the cash)
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To: cripplecreek

Yep. You can actually go to the area where they buried some parts of it in a Cook County Forest Preserve southwest of Chicago.


8 posted on 05/14/2012 6:44:07 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer, but when it is, it is the only answer.)
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To: dynachrome
Cornell had one too and the decision to close the reactor was made in 2001 but not shut down iirc till 2003 or 2003
9 posted on 05/14/2012 6:55:46 PM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: Lurker
Unlike most reactors that have been built since, this first one had no radiation shielding and no cooling system of any kind. Fermi had convinced Arthur Compton that his calculations were reliable enough to rule out a runaway chain reaction or an explosion, but, as the official historians of the Atomic Energy Commission later noted, the "gamble" remained in conducting "a possibly catastrophic experiment in one of the most densely populated areas of the nation!"

LOL you never get anything done if you don't take some risks.
10 posted on 05/14/2012 6:57:11 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
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To: cripplecreek

Looking back on it, maybe we would all be better of if old Enrico’s math skills weren’t quite that sharp.


11 posted on 05/14/2012 6:59:25 PM PDT by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer, but when it is, it is the only answer.)
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To: dynachrome

There is one (forgivable) error in the article that I noticed: They show a picture of the Kodak office complex/Kodak Tower and caption it:

“Kodak’s headquarters in New York where the secret reactor is alleged to have been located”

#1) Yes it is New York, but people “not from around here” might think they mean NY City. It is in Rochester which is a couple hundred miles away from NYC.

#2) It is NOT where this reactor was located. Kodak Park is a few miles north of Kodak offices.

As an aside: Kodak park was huge and nearly fully self contained: They had their own fire dept, their own sewage treatment plant, their own savings bank for employees, they even had the ability to generate most or all of their own electricity. I think they may have even had their own railroad lines within the park at one time. It was truly an amazing place at one time.

Sure is sad to see what it has become.


12 posted on 05/14/2012 7:23:21 PM PDT by Nik Naym (It's not my fault... I have compulsive smartass disorder.)
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To: muir_redwoods

Weapons designer Ted Taylor was worried about such sites being targeted by terrorists seeking fissile material. John McPhee covered it in “The Curve of Binding Energy” back about 1973. In the book Taylor used the newly completed WTC as an example of a potential target for attack and how clean a yield you would need to bring them down....


13 posted on 05/14/2012 7:25:53 PM PDT by massatoosits
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To: cripplecreek
“I believe the first reactor built was in the basement of a sports building at a university.”

University of Chicago. My daughters room there overlooked
the monument on the site of the first atomic pile. This is
also (according to legend) where the term SCRAM came from.
The control rods were suspended so that they would drop to
quench the reaction and held by a rope. An ax was handy to
chop the rope. SCRAM meant “Safety Cut Rope Axe Man” or
something like that.

14 posted on 05/14/2012 7:32:11 PM PDT by CrazyIvan (Obama's birth certificate was found stapled to Soros's receipt.)
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To: CrazyIvan
“I believe the first reactor built was in the basement of a sports building at a university.” University of Chicago.

It was under the stands on the old sports field. The Regenstein Library is there now. The site is commemorated by some really ugly sculpture that a bunch of Japanese visit once a year. Of course, not on December 7th. They probably don't even know what happened then, based on what I've heard of world history in Japan. I know some Japanese girls at a party here at the U of Chicago didn't get it when they asked a Chinese friend of mine what city he was from in China and I said, "Let's hope not Nanking."
15 posted on 05/14/2012 7:44:57 PM PDT by aruanan
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To: aruanan

You’re right about the monument. It’s butt ugly.


16 posted on 05/14/2012 8:21:05 PM PDT by CrazyIvan (Obama's birth certificate was found stapled to Soros's receipt.)
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To: dynachrome
Nuclear reactors are much more common than people realize. At one time in the 1970s, Iowa State had at least four reactors - a 10 kwatt nuclear engineering test power reactor, a 5 megawatt heavy water test reactor/synchrotron for the Ames Lab, a materials testing/production reactor at the Ames Lab, and a test reactor for the metallurgy department. There might have been others since the Ames Lab used to be a major metals research center for the Dept. of Energy. Any place that makes radioisotopes for industrial, medical or research purposes probably has a couple of different kinds.

They're everywhere!

17 posted on 05/14/2012 8:54:33 PM PDT by VanShuyten ("a shadow...draped nobly in the folds of a gorgeous eloquence.")
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To: cripplecreek

“Chicago Pile-1 at the University of Chicago.”

Chicago Pile-2 is in the White House!


18 posted on 05/14/2012 9:01:15 PM PDT by HereInTheHeartland (We are the 53%. 47% of Americans pay no taxes; end the free ride...)
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To: VanShuyten
“since the Ames Lab used to be a major metals research center for the Dept. of Energy”

A important part of the Manhattan Project was done under Dr Frank Spedding at Iowa State.

19 posted on 05/14/2012 9:04:06 PM PDT by HereInTheHeartland (We are the 53%. 47% of Americans pay no taxes; end the free ride...)
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To: CrazyIvan

Close!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scram#Etymology


20 posted on 05/14/2012 9:46:46 PM PDT by PissAndVinegar
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To: aruanan
It is truly astonishing how ignorant some are of history. I
worked for a school system running the bus program for them.
On 9/11 we had an emergency meeting which I attended. After
it was over the superintendent of schools ask me to stay to
work out some details. (the guy was a pathetic, corrupt
politician) At this time we had little idea who had planned
the attack. I told him that whoever it was they might find
out, like Yamamoto, that they had awakened a sleeping giant
and filled him with a terrible resolve. A couple of weeks
later one of the teachers came to me and asked me what I had
said to him. I told her. She then told me that the guy had
been making fun of me, telling people that I had quoted a
Japanese cartoon character!
21 posted on 05/15/2012 6:09:55 PM PDT by CrazyIvan (Obama's birth certificate was found stapled to Soros's receipt.)
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