Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Unstoppable rise of American English: Study shows young Britons copying US writing style
Daily Mail ^ | 05/29/2012 | By LAURA CLARK

Posted on 05/29/2012 5:14:15 PM PDT by SeekAndFind

The future of written English will owe more to Hollywood films than Dickens or Shakespeare, if the findings of a study into children’s writing are anything to go by.

The analysis of 74,000 short stories found that their written work was littered with Americanisms, exclamation marks and references to celebrities.

Researchers who looked at the entries to a national competition found they were increasingly using American words such as garbage, trash can, sidewalk, candy, sneakers, soda, cranky and flashlight.

The stories, written by pupils aged seven to 13, show how fairy cakes are referred to as cupcakes and a dinner jacket has become a tuxedo.

‘Smart’ is now often used for ‘clever’ and ‘cranky’ for ‘irritable’.

Celebrity culture also has a powerful influence on children’s work, with Simon Cowell and Argentinian footballer Lionel Messi among the famous names cropping up repeatedly.

But pupils are let down by basic spelling, punctuation and grammar, according to the study by Oxford University Press, which looked at the entries to BBC Radio 2’s ‘500 Words’ competition.

Children stumbled over simple spellings such as ‘does’ and ‘clothes’ and struggled to use the past tense correctly, often saying ‘rised’ instead of ‘rose’ or ‘thinked’ instead of ‘thought’.

Researchers also found that punctuation was underused, especially semi-colons and speech marks. Some did not know how to use capital letters.

However, exclamation marks were overused. Researchers found 35,171 examples in total, with some young writers using five at a time.

The study of more than 31million words will be compared with future research to see how written language evolves. Popular US fiction such as the Twilight vampire novels and films is thought to be fuelling the increasing use of American vocabulary and spelling.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: britain; english; uk; usa
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-4041-6061-8081-93 next last

1 posted on 05/29/2012 5:14:28 PM PDT by SeekAndFind
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

SPELLING IN BBC '500 WORDS' COMPETITION

AMERICAN WORD OCCURRENCES
BRITISH WORD OCCURRENCES
 Candy (1,879)
Sweets (2,448)
Cupcake (486)
Fairy cake (46)
Flashlight (99)
Torch (2,736)
Garbage truck (9)
Dustbin lorry (5)
Tuxedo (74)
Dinner suit (1)
Sneakers (38)
Trainers (555)
Trash can (38)
Dustbin (290)
Sidewalk (26)
Pavement (924)



2 posted on 05/29/2012 5:16:18 PM PDT by SeekAndFind (bOTRT)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

They’ll never replace the word, “brilliant”!


3 posted on 05/29/2012 5:17:36 PM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

Too bad this trend isn’t spreading to mexico.


4 posted on 05/29/2012 5:18:02 PM PDT by mamelukesabre
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

Oh, great, advise instead of advice, it’s instead of its, your instead of you’re, no difference among there, their, and they’re, and so on.


5 posted on 05/29/2012 5:18:21 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Let us prey!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jack Hydrazine

Or, “daft”!


6 posted on 05/29/2012 5:18:21 PM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (It's the end of the world as we know it and I feel fine!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

That is unfortunate. If the English speaking work cannot depend upon the Brits to uphold the standards of the English language, upon whom can they depend? upon?


7 posted on 05/29/2012 5:20:20 PM PDT by Jeff Chandler (Skiddle arink a dink a dink, Skiddle arink a doo)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

As much as I watch Top Gear I’m starting to think in british.


8 posted on 05/29/2012 5:23:55 PM PDT by cripplecreek (What does it profit a man if he gains the whole world but loses his soul?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

The end of the UK, as we know it.

Yanks have them from the west and muzzies are invading from the east and within.


9 posted on 05/29/2012 5:25:50 PM PDT by carriage_hill (All liberals & most demoncraps think that life is just a sponge bath, with a happy ending.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind
Researchers who looked at the entries to a national competition found they were increasingly using American words such as garbage, trash can, sidewalk, candy, sneakers, soda, cranky and flashlight. …
. . . as opposed to rubbish, bin, footpath, sweets, runners, “fizzy drinks”, cross, and torch.
The stories, written by pupils aged seven to 13, show how fairy cakes are referred to as cupcakes and a dinner jacket has become a tuxedo. ‘Smart’ is now often used for ‘clever’ and ‘cranky’ for ‘irritable’. …
Uh-oh. What next, “cookies” for “biscuits”, “fries” instead of “chips”, “sharpener” instead of “topper” (for pencils), or (specific to cars) hood instead of bonnet, trunk instead of boot, turn signal instead of indicator, tire instead of tyre, windshield instead of windscreen, ad nauseam . . . ?
But pupils are let down by basic spelling, punctuation and grammar, according to the study by Oxford University Press, which looked at the entries to BBC Radio 2’s ‘500 Words’ competition. Children stumbled over simple spellings such as ‘does’ and ‘clothes’ and struggled to use the past tense correctly, often saying ‘rised’ instead of ‘rose’ or ‘thinked’ instead of ‘thought’. …
They sure didn’t get that from American English.
10 posted on 05/29/2012 5:26:53 PM PDT by Olog-hai
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind
We should never apologise for the U.K. way of spelling, what we need to do is organise and recognise our right to the English Language.

Oh Bloody Hell, maybe we should all move to the Centre on this, colour me an optimist, but all this humour might spread to our good neighbours to the North too. That is if their labour party doesn't regain power like the democrats down here.

11 posted on 05/29/2012 5:27:20 PM PDT by KC_Lion (I am finished with listening to empty promises of the great GOP saving me in 4 more years.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: KC_Lion

RE: we should all move to the Centre on this

Centre or Center?


12 posted on 05/29/2012 5:29:53 PM PDT by SeekAndFind (bOTRT)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

Oh, this can’t happen! I watch Brit-coms with my wife, and big fan of Monty Python, so I love all of the Britishisms. I use “bleeding” a lot in spoken language. SAD!

Can we look on the bright side? At least they’re not using Muzzie words and catch-phrase, then we really would know England was in the loo.


13 posted on 05/29/2012 5:31:51 PM PDT by Thorliveshere
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

These people don’t realize that not everyone in the US uses those terms, Those are more cali-fortification.

I grew up in the mid-west, we called it pop and not soda for example.


14 posted on 05/29/2012 5:32:49 PM PDT by dila813
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

That’s no big surprise. Contemporary, British journalism looks like baby talk (lack of needed words, for one).


15 posted on 05/29/2012 5:33:35 PM PDT by familyop ("Wanna cigarette? You're never too young to start." --Deacon, "Waterworld")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Jack Hydrazine
It is never just brilliant. Try `absolutely brilliant.`
16 posted on 05/29/2012 5:34:04 PM PDT by deadrock
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: cripplecreek
My exposure to BSE came at an early age. Many relatives encouraged my passions for aviation and motorsport with books. Most of those books were printed in the UK and a grew up assuming that the spellings and grammar used in those books were in universal use. Added to this is the fact that I have been an anglophile since childhood.
17 posted on 05/29/2012 5:34:38 PM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four Fried Chickens and a Coke)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: KC_Lion

Spellcheck Hell


18 posted on 05/29/2012 5:37:50 PM PDT by Jeff Chandler (Skiddle arink a dink a dink, Skiddle arink a doo)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

Oh, nice ...


19 posted on 05/29/2012 5:39:17 PM PDT by Cloverfarm (This too shall pass ...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: dila813

Spot on! There are regional differences in American English that are not readily reflected in our pop culture.


20 posted on 05/29/2012 5:39:17 PM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four Fried Chickens and a Coke)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-4041-6061-8081-93 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson