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Remembering the Gettysburg Reunion of 1913
Canada Free Press ^ | July 3, 2012 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.

Posted on 07/03/2012 3:28:07 PM PDT by BigReb555

Do you know who Gen. Robert Edward Lee, Major Gen. George Edward Pickett and Major Gen. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain were?

(Excerpt) Read more at canadafreepress.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: confederate; union; veterans
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As the USA celebrates her 236th birthday on July 4th, Independence Day, let’s pause to remember the events in America’s history that took place during this historic time.

With all the TV Shows, Public Television specials and Hollywood movies, wouldn’t it be nice to see a weekly show that focused on the historic times in our nation’s history?

Do you know who Gen. Robert Edward Lee, Major Gen. George Edward Pickett and Major Gen. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain were? Are children still taught about these men and all those who met on that hallowed ground of the War Between the States battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania? Some call the Gettysburg Battlefield the most haunted place in America because so many thousands died on that fateful-hot summer month of July 1863. There were more casualties there than any other battle of the War Between the States.

And did you know that….

Richard “Dick” Poplar a Black Confederate rode with the 13th Virginia cavalry. He was captured during the Confederate retreat from Gettysburg. Poplar then served 5 months at Fort Delaware and 14 months in Point Lookout Prison and refused to sign the Oath of Loyalty that would have freed him in the first month of his captivity. He proudly told his captors that he was a Jefferson Davis man. He survived this infamous prison by practicing his trade as a baker. Upon his death Poplar was given a full military funeral and was eulogized as a Son of the South.

It has been nearly a century since….

America celebrated her 137th birthday and from June 29 to July 4, 1913, 53,407 Confederate and Union Veterans of the War Between the States came to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania for a 50th Anniversary Reunion and encampment commemorating that fateful battle of 1863. Veterans came from 47 of the 48 states of the Union and the Chief Surgeon said of the event, quote “Never before in the world’s history had so great a number of men advanced in years been assembled under field conditions” unquote.

It was the largest combined reunion of War Between the States Veterans.

“Comrades and friends, these splendid statues of marble and granite and bronze shall finally crumble to dust, and in the ages to come, will perhaps be forgotten, but the spirit that has called this great assembly of our people together, on this field, shall live forever.” -----Dr. Nathaniel D. Cox at 1913 Gettysburg Reunion The youngest Veteran was reported to be 61 and the oldest was 112 years young.

The United States and Confederate flags flew side by side at the Gettysburg soldier’s reunion of honored men who had been enemies on the field of battle.

The State of Pennsylvania hosted the 1913 reunion at the insisting of state Governor John K. Tener. Tener also encouraged other states to arrange rail transportation for the participants. Down South in Dixie, the United Daughters of the Confederacy helped raise money for the transportation and uniforms for their Confederate Veterans.

The soldiers of Blue and Gray, Black and White, came with heads held high and full of war stories. It is written that the hosts did not count on Black Confederates attending the meeting and had no place to put them but the White Confederates made room for their Southern brothers. Black Union veterans also attended this event.

It is written that nearly 700,000 meals were served that included fried chicken, roast pork sandwiches, ice cream and Georgia watermelon. The temperature soared to 100 degrees and many thousands of veterans were treated for heat exhaustion and several hundred more were hospitalized. The United States Army was also present in support and it’s written that the old men loved the attention. The Boy Scouts, whose organization was just a few years old at the time, were also there to help.

A highlight of the reunion was the Confederate Veterans walk on the path of Gen. George Pickett’s charge that was greeted, this time, by a handshake from the Union Veterans.

President Woodrow Wilson said about these men, “These venerable men crowding here to this famous field have set us a great example of devotion and utter sacrifice. They were willing to die that the people might live. But their task is done. Their day in turned into evening. They look to us to perfect what they established. Their work is handed to us, to be done in another way but not in another spirit. Our day is not over; it is upon us in full tide.”

The War Between the States Sesquicentennial, 150th Anniversary, runs 2011 through 2015. The Georgia Division Sons of Confederate Veterans joins the nation in remembering this historic time in our nation’s history. See information at: http://www.150wbts.org/

1 posted on 07/03/2012 3:28:21 PM PDT by BigReb555
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To: BigReb555

Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain..20th Maine!


2 posted on 07/03/2012 3:35:52 PM PDT by WellyP (question!)
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To: All

1st Minnesota Infantry - July 2, 1863


3 posted on 07/03/2012 3:37:26 PM PDT by MplsSteve (General Mills is pro-gay marriage! Boycott their products!)
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To: BigReb555

Yes, thanks to Ken Burns, the Shaaras, and the two decent things Ted Turner ever did (and can anyone talk him into finishing it?).

School didn’t do jack squat but tell me that there was a Civil War that freed the slaves.


4 posted on 07/03/2012 3:38:02 PM PDT by ExGeeEye (Romney Sucks. Mutiny Now, or something.)
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To: BigReb555

I remember all three

Especially Chamberlain....whose regiment was profiled in The Killer Angels....in Military History while in college we studied Gettysburg and was really moved by Chamberlain and his men.

Though I believe Chamberlain was just a Colonel at the time


5 posted on 07/03/2012 3:39:00 PM PDT by SeminoleCounty (Sad....George Zimmerman is in jail for rightfully defending himself...while Eric Holder walks free)
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To: WellyP
"Do you know who Gen. Robert Edward Lee, Major Gen. George Edward Pickett and Major Gen. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain were?"

But if you were to ask do you know 'The Situation' Snookie, Kim, Sonja, Ramona, Lady Gaga, Teresa Giudice and Joe G-to-the-Orga, Ryan Seacrest.....etc you might get some answers.
6 posted on 07/03/2012 3:42:55 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: BigReb555

Oh...forgot to mention...

You would never see a current professor at a Liberal Arts college lead a regiment to war....more likely that professor is whining on behalf of the enemy

That is what makes Chamberlain truly remarkable.


7 posted on 07/03/2012 3:43:33 PM PDT by SeminoleCounty (Sad....George Zimmerman is in jail for rightfully defending himself...while Eric Holder walks free)
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To: Kartographer

Some of those names sound vaguely familiar.


8 posted on 07/03/2012 3:46:39 PM PDT by ExGeeEye (Romney Sucks. Mutiny Now, or something.)
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To: BigReb555
I have been a history student for many years. BUT, Civil War history I have read only makes me very sad.

One of my ancestors was born in Texas during The Republic. He fought in the Civil War and was captured. He was sent to New York to prison, when released he walked back to Texas.

Other of my ancestors were burned out of Alabama during Reconstruction because they resisted the Carpet Baggers and Scalawags. The survivors went GTT (Gone to Texas)

Remember that Sam Houston refused to take Texas to the Civil War. He went to OK to live with the Indians.

The Civil War was the US’s greatest tragedy. For both North & South.

It amazes me today how this subject is treated here on FR. History does not record the abuses after that War, only the sense of overcoming that lead us into “Reconstruction”. Not since that time have we seen such dark times as we now face.

This troubles me greatly.

9 posted on 07/03/2012 3:47:54 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
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To: SeminoleCounty

Yes, Chamberlain was elected Col. by his volunteer regiment, and had to learn military tactics from a handbook along the way.

BTW, there is a phenomenal painting, I think called “Ghosts of Gettysburg?” or “Chamberlain at Gettysburg” about the reunion, showing an aged Chamberlain looking over Little Round Top as a ghostly battle takes place. I think Chamberlain died shortly after that reunion.


10 posted on 07/03/2012 3:50:53 PM PDT by LS ("Castles Made of Sand, Fall in the Sea . . . Eventually (Hendrix))
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To: BigReb555
Several years ago, while I was actively researching the 54th and 55th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry units, I had the honor of meeting the grandson of the last surviving enlisted member of the 54th. Eli George Biddle was his name. His grandson's name was George Coblyn. George lived in Lexington, Ma., and kindly opened his home to me and a fellow researcher. We stayed in touch for many years, but sadly, George passed away a few years ago. He is sorely missed.

George in his own right was an Army vet...a full-bird Colonel when he retired from the service. He'd joined back when segregation in the military was still law. He first started with the Triple Nickel paratroopers unit, but when their hopes for seeing action dwindled, he left the unit and transferred to an infantry unit. Ended up in Italy in WWII. In Korea, he saw action at Heartbreak Ridge. He never talked much about his service time. He was more interested in heralding his grandfather's being one of the first to enlist in the famous 54th, and it's last surviving member.

One of the stories George related to me was that his grandfather had attended the last Gettysburg Reunion. At one point during the reunion, the Union and Confederate vets lined up on opposing sides at the site of Pickett's Charge, marched across the fields, and met at the stone wall. Along the way, Eli Biddle was wondering if the Confederate vet he would meet would be willing to shake his hand. He took a wait and see attitude, and was pleased to find that the CSA vet he was paired off with held his hand out and vigorously shook Eli's hand, then said to Eli: "All those years ago, we were shooting at each other, and you know...I'm glad we missed."

11 posted on 07/03/2012 3:51:45 PM PDT by mass55th (Courage is being scared to death - but saddling up anyway...John Wayne)
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To: BigReb555
The United States and Confederate flags flew side by side at the Gettysburg soldier’s reunion of honored men who had been enemies on the field of battle.

There is less gallant, forgiving detachment and more bad feeling and vindictiveness about this war now than there was in 1913—when the men who tried to kill each other in the field were still living.

That's because the PC concern about "hate" and "the legacy of slavery" is entirely insincere. It is just part of the shop-worn, Communist-scripted war against all our institutions.

It is time for Northern and Southern patriots to unite (as they are doing in the TEA Party) to overcome and destroy every last institution of the Left and its culture, and keep only enough of its tedious, mind-numbing books to serve as a warning to future generations.

We will pray tomorrow for the souls of our country's noble warriors. May we once again deserve to be their heirs.

12 posted on 07/03/2012 3:52:34 PM PDT by SamuraiScot
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To: SeminoleCounty

That’s true. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain did not become a Brigadier General until almost a year later. At the end of the war, he was a Brevet Major General.


13 posted on 07/03/2012 3:52:46 PM PDT by reg45 (Barack 0bama: Implementing class warfare by having no class!)
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To: ExGeeEye
Which the first list or the second? ;-)
14 posted on 07/03/2012 3:59:45 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: reg45

chamberlain was selected by grant to take the confederate surrender at appomatax. he annoyed many dc pols (yes they were vile creatures back then too) by having his troops salute the rebs as they marched in and stacked arms. confederate general john b. gordon, on horsebsck, responded with a salute of his own to chamberlain and the yanks.
most southern soldiers never held a grudge against federal soldiers, just the carpetbaggers and northern scum that came south after the war to loot and blunder. of course, in the current posos we have a southern carbetbagger going north,


15 posted on 07/03/2012 4:01:13 PM PDT by bravo whiskey (If the little things really bother you, maybe it's because the big things are going well.)
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To: BigReb555

Longstreet was right about that charge at the center on the third day.
General Lee should have listened to his “Old War Horse”.


16 posted on 07/03/2012 4:01:31 PM PDT by Pompah
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To: ExGeeEye

Gods and Generals showed the Confederates as human, even likeable. That was unforgivable in some circles.


17 posted on 07/03/2012 4:01:40 PM PDT by Ingtar ("As the light begins to fade in the city on the hill")
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To: reg45

Bvt. Maj. Gen. Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain
32nd Governor of Maine
In office
January 2, 1867 – January 4, 1871
Preceded by Samuel Cony
Succeeded by Sidney Perham
Personal details
Born Lawrence Joshua Chamberlain
(1828-09-08)September 8, 1828
Brewer, Maine
Died February 24, 1914(1914-02-24) (aged 85)
Portland, Maine
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Fanny Chamberlain
Children Grace Dupee (Chamberlain) Allen (b. 1856), Infant Son (unnamed) (d. 1857), Harold Wyllys Chamberlain (b. 1858), Emily Stelle Chamberlain (d. 1860), Gertrude Loraine Chamberlain (d. 1865)
Residence Brunswick, Maine (His house is preserved as a historical landmark to this day.)
Alma mater Bowdoin College
Profession Educator, Military
Religion Congregationalist
Military service
Nickname(s) Lion of the Round Top
Allegiance United States of America
Union
Service/branch United States Army
Union Army
Years of service 1862–66
Rank Brevet Major General
Brigadier General
Commands 20th Maine Infantry
3rd Brigade, 1st Division, V Corps
1st Brigade, 1st Division, V Corps
1st Division, V Corps
Battles/wars American Civil War
Battle of Fredericksburg
Battle of Gettysburg
Second Battle of Petersburg
Battle of White Oak Road
Battle of Five Forks
Appomattox Campaign

Awards Congressional Medal of Honor

Son of Maine


18 posted on 07/03/2012 4:09:22 PM PDT by WellyP (question!)
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To: BigReb555

My 2nd great grandfather Hiram Winn-50th NY engineers- as at that reunion. I found a newspaper article about him and a bunch of other veterans heading to the reunion. Another great uncle George Amner Bosworth-76th NYSV Co.H-was killed on July 1,1863 @ Gettysburg.


19 posted on 07/03/2012 4:11:40 PM PDT by leenie312
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To: BigReb555

Must read “Killer Angels!”

One of my favorite quotes, “a good solder most love the Army. A good officer must not be afraid to destroy the thing he loves!”

Let’s not forget the dedication of the “Eternal Flame” at Gettysburg in 1936. There were 1,500 veterans of the “War of Northern aggression” in attendance. The last veteran died in 1954!

God Bless Robert E. Lee!


20 posted on 07/03/2012 4:15:46 PM PDT by cpa4you (CPA4YOU)
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To: WellyP

I love Chamberlain’s story. His professor’s logic was impeccable. Out of ammunition. In danger of being flanked. Can’t retreat. Can’t hold. Only one thing to do - charge!


21 posted on 07/03/2012 4:19:38 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: SamuraiScot; rockrr
There is less gallant, forgiving detachment and more bad feeling and vindictiveness about this war now than there was in 1913—when the men who tried to kill each other in the field were still living.

That's because the PC concern about "hate" and "the legacy of slavery" is entirely insincere. It is just part of the shop-worn, Communist-scripted war against all our institutions.

Hmmm ... so it couldn't have anything to do with nobody wanting to rock the boat on segregation ... interesting ...

It is time for Northern and Southern patriots to unite (as they are doing in the TEA Party) to overcome and destroy every last institution of the Left and its culture, and keep only enough of its tedious, mind-numbing books to serve as a warning to future generations.

You do realize that the big-time progressive Woodrow Wilson presided over the reunion and spoke there.

Even then it was hard to keep ideologies separate, let alone destroy them.

22 posted on 07/03/2012 4:25:08 PM PDT by x
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To: Texas Fossil
"The Civil War was the US’s greatest tragedy. For both North & South."

Lt. Thomas Chamberlain: "Where'd you get captured?"
Confederate Prisoner: "Railroad cut just west of Gettysburg town. Wasn't a pretty sight. Many a good boy lost a young and promising life. Some were blue, some were grey."
From the movie 'Gettysburg' (1993)
23 posted on 07/03/2012 4:28:51 PM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: ExGeeEye

that is sarcasm right?


24 posted on 07/03/2012 4:33:57 PM PDT by Nifster
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To: SamuraiScot

you are only pARTIlly correct. the animosity comes from other sourves and was evident even in the 20s.


25 posted on 07/03/2012 4:37:00 PM PDT by Nifster
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To: SamuraiScot

that should have been partially correct


26 posted on 07/03/2012 4:38:57 PM PDT by Nifster
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To: Kartographer

The result of that war that was positive was: it advanced the settling of Texas by at least 75 years.

They simply wanted to be left alone to live their lives in peace. Still do.


27 posted on 07/03/2012 4:45:56 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
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To: Nifster

Not really. I mean I could tell you that one of them sings, another displays astonishing vulgarity in a TV “reality” series...but don’t nail me down to specifics, and a couple of them I just don’t remember hearing before.


28 posted on 07/03/2012 4:54:49 PM PDT by ExGeeEye (Romney Sucks. Mutiny Now, or something.)
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To: ExGeeEye

I have also always been fascinated by another officer, highly regarded... Major General John Reynolds, of the Iron Brigade. Killed on the first day, defending McPherson’s woods. The Iron Brigade was virtually destroyed that day. Of course, since it was five regiments of “westerners”, it got little notice in the eastern press (I think the same thing happened in Turner’s movie.)

I’ve always thought the story of Kate Hewitt and Reynolds would make a great movie. Where did she disappear to after she apparently joined a convent after Reynolds’ death?


29 posted on 07/03/2012 4:59:26 PM PDT by Sigurdrifta
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To: Sigurdrifta

Wikipedia article on Reynolds:

“Kate Hewitt had agreed with Reynolds that if he were killed in the war and they could not marry, she would join a convent. After he was buried, she traveled to Emmitsburg, Maryland, and joined the St. Joseph Central House of the Order of the Daughters of Charity (now part of Mount Saint Mary’s University).”


30 posted on 07/03/2012 5:03:06 PM PDT by ExGeeEye (Romney Sucks. Mutiny Now, or something.)
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To: SamuraiScot

Excellent.


31 posted on 07/03/2012 5:12:58 PM PDT by metesky (Brethren, leave us go amongst them! - Rev. Capt. Samuel Johnston Clayton - Ward Bond, The Searchers)
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To: ExGeeEye

Yes I know, but it appears she did not stay there. (see “Gettysburg: A Meditation on War and Values”, paperback edition, 1997, p 74, by Kent Gramm, based on Reynolds’ biographer, Edward Nichols.)

She seems to have just disappeared from view.


32 posted on 07/03/2012 5:31:04 PM PDT by Sigurdrifta
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To: BigReb555
I was there for the dedication of the Gibbon's monument at the 125th Anniversary. I pulled a six horse hitch as Confederate and Union for the anniversary on the park. We pulled it from Ewell's area to Little Round Top. It was a memorable time. The first man killed from the South at Gettysburg was a member of the 14th Tennessee, the first Northerner was from the 8th Illinois Cavalry.
33 posted on 07/03/2012 5:32:27 PM PDT by vetvetdoug
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To: ExGeeEye

And now I am worried. Did Roberts teach you history??


34 posted on 07/03/2012 6:17:15 PM PDT by Nifster
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To: Texas Fossil
It amazes me today how this subject is treated here on FR. History does not record the abuses after that War, only the sense of overcoming that lead us into “Reconstruction”. Not since that time have we seen such dark times as we now face.

How do you figure? As best I've seen there isn't an aspect of the War Between The States that hasn't been covered. And nothing off limits either. Point in fact, here we are talking about secession and its roots in American history.

35 posted on 07/03/2012 6:18:05 PM PDT by rockrr (Everything is different now...)
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To “Edelweiss”

America, country mine
We pray that you ‘ere remain free.
World’s last light, pure and bright
Of liberty, n’opportunity.

Our best and brightest lend strength, their own
Blessing lands to sow freedom

America, country mine
Give our full measure to save thee


36 posted on 07/03/2012 6:18:27 PM PDT by combat_boots (The Lion of Judah cometh. Hallelujah. Gloria Patri, Filio et Spiritui Sancto.)
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To: Texas Fossil

I was born in 1939, my father was born in 1886, my paternal grandfather was born in 1840. and he fought for the Confederacy.

This seems so odd to me, only two generations removed from that sad war.


37 posted on 07/03/2012 6:27:38 PM PDT by Sea Parrot (Don't ever think that the reason I am peaceful is because I forgot how to be violent)
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To: BigReb555

A recording of the rebel yell:

http://www.nellaware.com/blog/the-rebel-yell.html


38 posted on 07/03/2012 6:30:40 PM PDT by sergeantdave (Public unions exist to protect the unions from the taxpaying public)
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To: Sea Parrot

My wife’s “grandfather” was born before the Civil War in NC. That is amazing to me. He outlived 3 wives.


39 posted on 07/03/2012 6:35:27 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one)
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To: Sea Parrot
President Tyler has you beat!

Former President John Tyler’s (1790-1862) grandchildren still alive


By Eric Pfeiffer, Yahoo! News
Jan 25, 2012

Former President John Tyler, born 221 years ago, still has two living grandchildren. The one-term president isn't a well-known historical figure; he's probably best remembered for helping to push through the annexation of Texas in 1845, shortly before leaving office.

So, how is it possible that a former president who died 150 years ago would still have direct descendents alive today? As it turns out, the Tyler men were known for fathering children late in life. And that math is pretty outstanding when added up:

John Tyler was born in 1790. He became the 10th president of the United States in 1841 after William Henry Harrison died in office. Tyler fathered Lyon Gardiner Tyler in 1853, at age 63. Then, at the age of 71, Lyon Gardiner Tyler fathered Lyon Gardiner Tyler Jr. in 1924 and four years later at age 75, Harrison Ruffin Tyler. Both men are still alive today.

That means just three generations of the Tyler family are spread out over more than 200 years. President Tyler was also a prolific father, having 15 children (8 boys and 7 girls) with two wives.

How many people alive can say "My Grandfather was born in the 18th Century!"?

40 posted on 07/03/2012 6:55:55 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: cpa4you
From
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Woolson

Albert H. Woolson
Albert Henry Woolson (February 11, 1848 – August 2, 1956), was the last surviving member of the Union Army, which fought in the American Civil War. He was also the last surviving Civil War veteran on either side whose status is undisputed. (At least three men who followed him in death claimed to be Confederate veterans, but their status as Civil War veterans has been debunked.)

41 posted on 07/03/2012 6:56:21 PM PDT by preacher (Communism has only killed 100 million people: Let's give it another chance!)
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To: x

Woodrow Wilson also thought that “The Birth of a Nation” was a great movie and the quote, “like writing history” is attributed to him.


42 posted on 07/03/2012 6:57:07 PM PDT by Sea Parrot (Don't ever think that the reason I am peaceful is because I forgot how to be violent)
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To: Sea Parrot

I have a cousin born in 1931 that is the seventh son of the seventh son. His great grandfather (my ggg grandfather) was born in 1794.


43 posted on 07/03/2012 7:06:51 PM PDT by Oklahoma
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CSA veterans at the Gettysburg veterans reunion of 1913.

44 posted on 07/03/2012 7:16:46 PM PDT by mcmuffin ("Wanting your country back is not the same thing as working to take it back.")
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GAR Veterans at the 1913 reunion.

45 posted on 07/03/2012 7:18:31 PM PDT by mcmuffin ("Wanting your country back is not the same thing as working to take it back.")
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To: sergeantdave
Thank you so much for posting that. I've always imagined the Rebel Yell was akin to the Marines Oooooraaaaaahhh! They are vastly different.

Fascinating to hear it.

Semper Fi,

TS

46 posted on 07/03/2012 7:20:48 PM PDT by The Shrew (www.wintersoldier.com; www.tstrs.com; The Truth Shall Set You Free!)
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Gettysburg reunion 1913

This clipping from the July 2, 1913, Daily News shows some of the contingent of local Civil War veterans who attended the 50th anniversary reunion of the Battle of Gettysburg in Gettysburg, Pa. They are pictured at the New York Central Station in Batavia before leaving on their trip

47 posted on 07/03/2012 7:23:47 PM PDT by mcmuffin ("Wanting your country back is not the same thing as working to take it back.")
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Great read here- HIDDEN HISTORY: A Civil War reunion in Gettysburg, 1913
48 posted on 07/03/2012 7:27:02 PM PDT by mcmuffin ("Wanting your country back is not the same thing as working to take it back.")
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To: mcmuffin

Full suit and tie in July, how did they do that?


49 posted on 07/03/2012 7:36:36 PM PDT by central_va ( I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: sergeantdave

Thanks for that link!

My Uncle Ben, from North Carolina via northern Alberta , shouted a version of that in my boyhood ear back in 1950. His grandpappy was a CSA vet, of course. Annual visits across the line to Wenatchee were always entertaining. ;^)

He hated President Truman, of course, although he was a dead ringer for him!

He gave me bourbon and sugar water in a highball glass - I was six at the time!

He was unreconstructed, as they used to say.


50 posted on 07/03/2012 7:47:33 PM PDT by headsonpikes (Mass murder and cannibalism are the twin sacraments of socialism - "Who-whom?"-Lenin)
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