Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The 1904 Olympic Marathon May Have Been the Strangest Ever
The Smithsonian ^ | 8-7-12

Posted on 08/08/2012 10:13:31 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic

America’s first Olympics may have been its worst, or at least its most bizarre. Held in 1904 in St. Louis, the games were tied to that year’s World’s Fair, which celebrated the centennial of the Louisiana Purchase while advancing, as did all such turn-of-the-century expositions, the notion of American imperialism. Although there were moments of surprising and genuine triumph (gymnast George Eyser earned six medals, including three gold, despite his wooden leg), the games were largely overshadowed by the fair, which offered its own roster of sporting events, including the controversial Anthropology Days, in which a group of “savages” recruited from the fair’s international villages competed in a variety of athletic feats—among them a greased-pole climb, “ethnic” dancing, and mud slinging—for the amusement of Caucasian spectators. Pierre de Coubertin, a French historian and founder of the International Olympic Committee, took disapproving note of the spectacle and made a prescient observation: “As for that outrageous charade, it will of course lose its appeal when black men, red men and yellow men learn to run, jump and throw, and leave the white men behind them.”

The Olympics’ signal event, the marathon, was conceived to honor the classical heritage of Greece and underscore the connection between the ancient and modern. But from the start the 1904 marathon was less showstopper than sideshow, a freakish spectacle that seemed more in keeping with the carnival atmosphere of the fair than the reverential mood of the games. The outcome was so scandalous that the event was nearly abolished for good.

A few of the runners were recognized marathoners who had either won or placed in the Boston Marathon or had placed in previous Olympic marathons, but the majority of the field was composed of middle-distance runners and assorted “oddities.” Americans Sam Mellor, A.L. Newton, John Lordon, Michael Spring and Thomas Hicks, all experienced marathoners, were among the favorites. Another American, Fred Lorz, did all his training at night because he had a day job as a bricklayer, and earned his spot in the Olympics by placing in a “special five-mile race” sponsored by the Amateur Athletic Union. Among the leading oddities were ten Greeks who had never run a marathon, two men of the Tsuana tribe of South Africa who were in St. Louis as part of the South African World’s Fair exhibit and who arrived at the starting line barefoot, and a Cuban national and former mailman named Félix Carbajal, who raised money to come to the States by demonstrating his running prowess throughout Cuba, once trekking the length of the island. Upon his arrival in New Orleans, he lost all his money on a dice game and had to walk and hitchhike to St. Louis. At five feet tall, he presented a slight but striking figure at the starting line, attired in a white, long-sleeved shirt, long, dark pants, a beret and a pair of street shoes. One fellow Olympian took pity, found a pair of scissors and cut Carbajal’s trousers at the knee.

On August 30, at precisely 3:03 p.m., David R. Francis, president of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company, fired the starting pistol, and the men were off. Heat and humidity soared into the 90s, and the 24.85-mile course—which one fair official called “the most difficult a human being was ever asked to run over”—wound across roads inches deep in dust. There were seven hills, varying from 100-to-300 feet high, some with brutally long ascents. In many places cracked stone was strewn across the roadway, creating perilous footing, and the men had to constantly dodge cross-town traffic, delivery wagons, railroad trains, trolley cars and people walking their dogs. There were only two places where athletes could secure fresh water, from a water tower at six miles and a roadside well at 12 miles. James Sullivan, the chief organizer of the games, wanted to minimize fluid intake to test the limits and effects of purposeful dehydration, a common area of research at the time. Cars carrying coaches and physicians motored alongside the runners, kicking the dust up and launching coughing spells.

Fred Lorz led the 32 starters from the gun, but by the first mile Thomas Hicks edged ahead. William Garcia of California nearly became the first fatality of an Olympic marathon we he collapsed on the side of the road and was hospitalized with hemorrhaging; the dust had coated his esophagus and ripped his stomach lining. Had he gone unaided an hour longer he might have bled to death. John Lordon suffered a bout of vomiting and gave up. Len Tau, one of the South African participants, was chased a mile off course by wild dogs. Félix Carvajal trotted along in his cumbersome shoes and billowing shirt, making good time even though he paused to chat with spectators in broken English. On one occasion he stopped at a car, saw that its occupants were eating peaches, and asked for one. Being refused, he playfully snatched two and ate them as he ran. A bit further along the course, he stopped at an orchard and snacked on some apples, which turned out to be rotten. Suffering from stomach cramps, he lay down and took a nap. Sam Mellor, now in the lead, also experienced severe cramping. He slowed to a walk and eventually stopped. At the nine-mile mark cramps also plagued Lorz, who decided to hitch a ride in one of the accompanying automobiles, waving at spectators and fellow runners as he passed.

Hicks, one of the early American favorites, came under the care of a two-man support crew at the 10-mile mark. He begged them for a drink but they refused, instead sponging out his mouth with warm distilled water. Seven miles from the finish, his handlers fed him a concoction of strychnine and egg whites—the first recorded instance of drug use in the modern Olympics. Strychnine, in small doses, was commonly used a stimulant, and at the time there were no rules about performance-enhancing drugs. Hicks’ team also carried a flask of French brandy but decided to withhold it until they could gauge the runner’s condition.

Meanwhile, Lorz, recovered from his cramps, emerged from his 11-mile ride in the automobile. One of Hicks’ handlers saw him and ordered him off the course, but Lorz kept running and finished with a time of just under three hours. The crowd roared and began chanting, “An American won!” Alice Roosevelt, the 20-year-old daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt, placed a wreath upon Lorz’s head and was just about to lower the gold medal around his neck when, one witness reported, “someone called an indignant halt to the proceedings with the charge that Lorz was an impostor.” The cheers turned to boos. Lorz smiled and claimed that he had never intended to accept the honor; he finished only for the sake of a “joke.”

Hicks, the strychnine coursing through his blood, had grown ashen and limp. When he heard that Lorz had been disqualified he perked up and forced his legs into a trot. His trainers gave him another dose of strychnine and egg whites, this time with some brandy to wash it down. They fetched warm water and soaked his body and head. After the bathing he appeared to revive and quickened his pace. “Over the last two miles of the road,” wrote race official Charles Lucas, “Hicks was running mechanically, like a well-oiled piece of machinery. His eyes were dull, lusterless; the ashen color of his face and skin had deepened; his arms appeared as weights well tied down; he could scarcely lift his legs, while his knees were almost stiff.”

He began hallucinating, believing that the finish line was still 20 miles away. In the last mile he begged for something to eat. Then he begged to lie down. He was given more brandy but refused tea. He swallowed two more egg whites. He walked up the first of the last two hills, and then jogged down on the incline. Swinging into the stadium, he tried to run but was reduced to a graceless shuffle. His trainers carried him over the line, holding him aloft while his feet moved back and forth, and he was declared the winner.

It took four doctors and one hour for Hicks to feel well enough just to leave the grounds. He had lost eight pounds during the course of the race, and declared, “Never in my life have I run such a touch course. The terrific hills simply tear a man to pieces.” Hicks and Lorz would meet again at the Boston Marathon the following year, which Lorz won without the aid of anything but his legs.


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Extended News; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: athletics; doping; godsgravesglyphs; history; olympics

Cuban marathoner (and former mailman) Félix Carbajal Photo: Britannica.com

Fred Lorz, Olympic marathoner and practical joker, 1904. Photo: www.morethanthegames.co.uk

1 posted on 08/08/2012 10:13:36 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic; All

If anyone is intersted,

The marathon is still run from Marathon Greece (the original starting point) following the 2500 year old course to athens.

It is considered a “must do” event for all serious runners.

Just look up “athens marathon” on the net.


2 posted on 08/08/2012 10:24:44 AM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic

“Heat and humidity soared into the 90s, and the 24.85-mile course—which one fair official called “the most difficult a human being was ever asked to run over”—wound across roads inches deep in dust.”

I thought the marathon was 26.2 miles. Inflation strikes again?


3 posted on 08/08/2012 10:32:47 AM PDT by Stosh
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic

I love articles like this. Since everything about the modern Olympics (drinks, clothes, condom sponsorships) seems to be an advertising opportunity, it’s nice to read a “how it used to be” story and get a few giggles out of it as well. Thanks for posting.


4 posted on 08/08/2012 10:38:10 AM PDT by roostercashews (A gun doesn't make you safer, but knowing how to use one does.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic
Both the 1900 and 1904 Olympics were absolute disasters. The Olympics almost didn't survive. The only reason they did was the 1906 games in Athens which, though recognized at the time, are no longer recognized by by the International Olympic Committee.

This is a disgrace. The 1906 games were run efficiently and were such a success that the Olympic movement was able to survive its previous two disasters to become what they are today. Yet the official Olympic records and museum exclude them.

Since the IOC is one of the most corrupt organizations on earth we can be sure they will never do the right thing. But if they did, they would restore these games to official Olympic recognition.

5 posted on 08/08/2012 10:49:55 AM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (Ki-hagoy vehamamlakhah 'asher lo'-ya`avdukh yove'du; vehagoyim charov yecheravu!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Zionist Conspirator

Bring back Tug O’ War!


6 posted on 08/08/2012 10:55:43 AM PDT by TurboZamboni (Looting the future to bribe the present)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Stosh
>Blockquote>“Heat and humidity soared into the 90s, and the 24.85-mile course—which one fair official called “the most difficult a human being was ever asked to run over”—wound across roads inches deep in dust.”

I thought the marathon was 26.2 miles. Inflation strikes again?

The now traditional distance of 26 miles 385 yards dates from the 1908 London Olympics. It began that year at Windsor Castle (or Buckingham Palace; I forget which) so the royals inside could view the start. When they finished the race it was 26 miles 385 yards. For some reason (don't ask me why) that then became the traditional Marathon distance.

The actual route between Marathon and Athens (the course of the original 1896 Marathon) is actually a little shorter than this.

7 posted on 08/08/2012 10:57:03 AM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (Ki-hagoy vehamamlakhah 'asher lo'-ya`avdukh yove'du; vehagoyim charov yecheravu!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Stosh

Ugh! HTML fault. My bad!


8 posted on 08/08/2012 10:58:57 AM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (Ki-hagoy vehamamlakhah 'asher lo'-ya`avdukh yove'du; vehagoyim charov yecheravu!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic

re Marathon:

What an incredible event!

Thank you for posting this great article.


9 posted on 08/08/2012 1:33:54 PM PDT by Museum Twenty (If every truth & hidden motivation were to tumble out, not one supporter would turn against him.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic
There were seven hills, varying from 100-to-300 feet high, some with brutally long ascents.

Which is worse, a 300 foot hill with a 300 foot ascent or a 300 foot hill with a 4000 foot ascent?
10 posted on 08/08/2012 1:38:15 PM PDT by aruanan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic

Reminds me a bit of the very early days of the Indy 500, when in 1913 a Frenchman names Jules Goux is reported to have consumed 6 bottles of Champagne during the race, although recently, the PCPolice appear to be trying to minimize the amount of alcohol consumed to 6 pints or even six sips and only at pit stops. I even remember, when I first heard about this that the figure was some really prodigious amount, on the order of 15 or 16 bottles. He won by over 13 minutes. Go figure.


11 posted on 08/08/2012 1:55:35 PM PDT by ADemocratNoMore (Jeepers, Freepers, where'd 'ya get those sleepers?. Pj people, exposing old media's lies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Zionist Conspirator
The only reason they did was the 1906 games in Athens which, though recognized at the time, are no longer recognized by by the International Olympic Committee.

Wow! I thought I knew the Olympics, but I never heard of that. I did find out this week that the early games lasted months.

Competitions were spread out over as long as a half-year, so there wasn't much excitement or sense that "an event" was happening.

The 1906 Olympics or "Intercalated Games" pioneered the current format, and I guess that's why the Olympics survived. Why aren't they recognized by the IOC?

Marathon story: Postal employee on workers’ comp caught running Boston Marathon

12 posted on 08/08/2012 1:59:12 PM PDT by x
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
If anyone is certifiably crazy and into self-abuse, they ought to try an ultra-marathon. Generally 500+ miles, these races can last anywhere from 7-10 days or longer.

One of the most unusual ultra-marathoners was an Australian named Cliff Young, who ran his first such race, the 544-mile Westfield Sydney-Melbourne, at age 61. Amazingly, he was able to run the race without stopping to sleep (something he'd learned while herding his family's flock of 2000 sheep on foot), taking just 5 days, 15 hours, and 4 minutes. This was almost two days shorter than the previous record.

13 posted on 08/08/2012 2:01:54 PM PDT by Stonewall Jackson ("I must study politics and war that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Stonewall Jackson

Bookmark


14 posted on 08/08/2012 2:32:51 PM PDT by publius911 (Formerly Publius 6961, formerly jennsdad)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Zionist Conspirator

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1906_Intercalated_Games


15 posted on 08/08/2012 2:44:52 PM PDT by packrat35 (Admit it! We are almost ready to be called a police state!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Zionist Conspirator

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1906_Intercalated_Games


16 posted on 08/08/2012 2:47:09 PM PDT by packrat35 (Admit it! We are almost ready to be called a police state!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic
Len Tau, one of the South African participants, was chased a mile off course by wild dogs.

I think I know a way to make the current event much more TV-friendly...

17 posted on 08/08/2012 2:54:57 PM PDT by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: x
Wow! I thought I knew the Olympics, but I never heard of that. I did find out this week that the early games lasted months.

Actually, the first Olympiad in Athens in 1896 was also an "event" spread over just a week or so in April, and it was very well organized. After that, though, came the deluge.

The Olympics of 1900, 1904, 1908, 1920, and 1924 also were spaced out over months (over only three in the case of the 1924 games). 1912 was an exception for some reason. Apparently, though, the modern scheduling format didn't become a fixture until 1928.

The 1906 Olympics or "Intercalated Games" pioneered the current format, and I guess that's why the Olympics survived. Why aren't they recognized by the IOC?

Originally Coubertin wanted the games held in different international venues, beginning with Paris in 1900. But the Greeks not only wanted the games first (hence Athens in 1896), but they wanted to be the permanent host. A compromise was arrived at wherein the regular Olympics would be held in different worldwide locations while Athens would host an "intercalated games" every four years in years between Olympiads. Thus the 1906 games were intended to be the first of many (they were to be followed by similar games in 1910, 1914, 1918, etc.). Unfortunately, no other "intercalated games" ever materialized because of the precarious political situation in Greece and the Balkans in those days (with two separate wars just before WWI). So the record of the 1906 games just sort of hang there, belonging to nothing.

For a while they decided to recognize them as the special "tenth anniversary games," but as the years passed they continued to stick out like a sore thumb among otherwise orderly Olympiads, so eventually they were de-recognized altogether. For that reason the results, records, and medals are not part of Official Olympic history or the Olympic Museum in Switzerland.

The International Society of Olympic Historians, however, does recognize them as official Olympic Games . . . for all the lousy good that does.

18 posted on 08/08/2012 3:04:51 PM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (Ki-hagoy vehamamlakhah 'asher lo'-ya`avdukh yove'du; vehagoyim charov yecheravu!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Zionist Conspirator

piece of trivia: Coubertin’s heart (literally) is buried at a special location in ancient Olympia.


19 posted on 08/08/2012 3:10:04 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Zionist Conspirator

The king was lazy and they had to extend the course the additional 2.2 miles. Now marathoners are supposed to say something king related at 24 miles. Officially it is praise of the king/queen. Reality suggests runners say something else regarding the royal in power.


20 posted on 08/08/2012 3:12:35 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Stonewall Jackson

I thought ultra marathons were 100 miles.

500 miles must be the WTF-who-hid-the-finish-line marathons.

Not to be confused with the coast to coast australian race or the morocan dessert race.


21 posted on 08/08/2012 3:19:15 PM PDT by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
His biography was Bury My Heart at Aching Knee. .
22 posted on 08/08/2012 4:07:48 PM PDT by Erasmus (Zwischen des Teufels und des tiefen, blauen Meers)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory
The king was lazy and they had to extend the course the additional 2.2 miles. Now marathoners are supposed to say something king related at 24 miles. Officially it is praise of the king/queen. Reality suggests runners say something else regarding the royal in power.

Wow. I did not know that.

Thank you.

23 posted on 08/08/2012 4:59:14 PM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (Ki-hagoy vehamamlakhah 'asher lo'-ya`avdukh yove'du; vehagoyim charov yecheravu!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks afraidfortherepublic. Free e-book (registration req, see the page for details). To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


24 posted on 08/08/2012 5:08:34 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic
Held in 1904 in St. Louis, the games were tied to that year’s World’s Fair, which celebrated the centennial of the Louisiana Purchase while advancing, as did all such turn-of-the-century expositions, the notion of American imperialism.

Here we have another example of socialist history and from the Smithsonian no less. I grow tired of this creeping cancer. They continue to rewrite our history until we will not know it, certainly our kids don't.

25 posted on 08/08/2012 5:14:36 PM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Zionist Conspirator
Thanks for the information. I guess in the early Olympics, amateurism wasn't just for the playing field. It must have taken some time to be able to coordinate all the logistics.

And maybe before the Olympics became "the Olympics" -- with all the weight those words would carry -- the organizers had to settle for whatever they could get from cities, hotels, shipping and railroad companies, and athletic facilities.

26 posted on 08/08/2012 5:18:06 PM PDT by x
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: TurboZamboni; shibumi

And packs of wild dogs!


27 posted on 08/08/2012 7:25:12 PM PDT by Salamander (I laugh to myself at the men and the ladies who never conceived of us billion dollar babies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Salamander; TurboZamboni
Have the Tug-O-War over a pit - filled with the wild dogs.



"I die laughing!"


28 posted on 08/08/2012 7:34:34 PM PDT by shibumi (Cover it with gas and set it on fire.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: shibumi

Even better!

:)


29 posted on 08/08/2012 8:44:17 PM PDT by Salamander (I laugh to myself at the men and the ladies who never conceived of us billion dollar babies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: longtermmemmory; SunkenCiv

“500 miles must be the WTF-who-hid-the-finish-line marathons.”

For the last time, it wasn’t me!

And even if it WAS me, you didn’t see or hear anything. Neither did SunkenCiv.


30 posted on 08/08/2012 9:16:30 PM PDT by Altariel ("Curse your sudden but inevitable betrayal!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: tet68
To be fair, that is how the nation tended to portray itself at the time. The nation was flush with victories over the Spanish and the annexation of territory in the Caribbean and Pacific - the Great White Fleet would set sail in only a few months. The theme of "America stepping onto the stage" as a major global power was a common one.


31 posted on 08/08/2012 9:36:31 PM PDT by JerseyanExile
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic

hills, varying from 100-to-300 feet high, some with brutally long ascents?

How about a 7,000 foot ascent? In 10 days come on out for the third oldest continuously run marathon in America, the Pikes Peak Marathon. Please bring your own oxygen bottle(s).

http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/course.htm


32 posted on 08/08/2012 10:00:51 PM PDT by cookcounty (Kagan and Sotomayor side with Joe Wilson: -------Obama DID lie!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic

hills varying from 100-to-300 feet high, some with brutally long ascents?

How about a marathon with a 7,000 foot ascent? In 10 days come on out for the third oldest continuously run marathon in America, the Pikes Peak Marathon. Halfway point is at the 14,110 foot summit, then plunge back down for 13 rock-filled miles. Please bring your own oxygen bottle(s).

http://www.pikespeakmarathon.org/course.htm


33 posted on 08/08/2012 10:03:14 PM PDT by cookcounty (Kagan and Sotomayor side with Joe Wilson: -------Obama DID lie!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cookcounty
St. Louis is a great place in that you can have all the oxygen a runner will ever need...

Provided the runner can breathe it in the form of a hot thick syrup.

There's a reason that St. Louis is a baseball town and not a marathon town. Yuck. It's even humid in winter.

If it were neccessary to do a marathon there, then the runners should be given a beer at every stop.

34 posted on 08/08/2012 10:22:20 PM PDT by piasa (Attitude adjustments offered here free of charge)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: aruanan

A 300’ hill is not a big deal if it has a very long ascent but the author here doesn’t tell us how long they were. We used to have a race in my home town that was called “The Longest Mile”. It ran from the shores of Lake Champlain at ~100 feet in elevation to the UVM green at ~300 feet. 200’ over a mile is rough but over 5 miles would be easy.


35 posted on 08/09/2012 1:30:48 AM PDT by Straight Vermonter (Posting from deep behind the Maple Curtain)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: ADemocratNoMore
in 1913 a Frenchman names Jules Goux is reported to have consumed 6 bottles of Champagne during the race

Ah! The Frogs had sense enough to drink their ethyl alcohol instead of putting it in the gas tank!

36 posted on 08/10/2012 11:33:38 AM PDT by Ole Okie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0086713/

The First Olympics (Athens) was one of my favorite movies. Don’t know how true it was, but the team appeared to try and figure out the various sports for training by reviewing ancient illustrations from vases and such.


37 posted on 08/12/2012 10:08:53 AM PDT by marsh2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: marsh2

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mCTP1wSUqK0

A great clip from that movie


38 posted on 08/12/2012 10:18:59 AM PDT by marsh2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson