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Argentina faces tough choices after U.S. debt ruling
Reuters ^ | 05 November 2010 | Guido Nejamkis and Hilary Burke

Posted on 11/10/2012 5:43:56 PM PST by Lorianne

Argentina could face a credit crisis a decade after its $100 billion default due to a U.S. court ruling that says the country must pay creditors, who still hold defaulted bonds, every time it services its restructured debt.

About 93 percent of Argentine bondholders agreed to swap their defaulted debt for new issues in 2005 and 2010, but "holdout" creditors who rejected the swaps continue to press in courts worldwide for full repayment on the bonds.

Late last month, a federal appeals court in New York ruled that Argentina violated bond provisions to treat all creditors equally when it made payments to creditors who accepted the swaps while refusing to pay the holdouts.

The decision sparked a sell-off in Argentine bonds, sent the price of protection against an Argentine default sky-high, and prompted Standard & Poor's to downgrade the country's sovereign credit rating.

Argentina has stayed out of global credit markets since its 2002 debt debacle partly due to fears the holdouts could block a new issue. It relies instead on the central bank's foreign reserves to pay debt, but its efforts to safeguard those funds using capital controls and import curbs have worsened an economic slowdown.

The government will appeal this latest court ruling and try to stave off its implementation for as long as possible.

U.S. judges have already ordered that Argentina pay holdouts several billion dollars in compensation for the default. But the creditors have largely been unable to collect since most Argentine assets are protected by U.S. sovereign immunity laws.

(Excerpt) Read more at reuters.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 11/10/2012 5:44:05 PM PST by Lorianne
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To: Lorianne

Remember that we’ll be in Argentina’s shoes before long.


2 posted on 11/10/2012 5:47:24 PM PST by familyop
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To: familyop; Kartographer

yes, yes we will


3 posted on 11/10/2012 5:50:13 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: Lorianne
"...U.S. court ruling that says the country must pay creditors, who still hold defaulted bonds, every time it services its restructured debt."

Holders of Greek bonds were forced to take "haircuts" (money simply taken from them). The same is likely for Italy and Spain, if that hasn't already happened to bondholders concerned with those nations. Something to consider. Some nations forced to pay the debts in full, while others aren't?

Some globalists here, BTW, have already been pushing to pay our own national debt by giving our lands with natural resources (oil, natural gas, etc.) to certain foreign creditors close to those globalists in trade over the past few decades.


4 posted on 11/10/2012 5:53:49 PM PST by familyop
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To: Lorianne

Coming soon, to a country near you!


5 posted on 11/10/2012 5:54:28 PM PST by Shadow44
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To: Lorianne

Guess Argentine creditors are much more important than those sucker GM creditors.


6 posted on 11/10/2012 6:04:26 PM PST by Da Coyote
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To: Lorianne

Kind of an amusing story about the Argentine Naval Vessel docked in Ghana. The authorities attempted to board her in accordance with a court order and the Argentine crew was basically ordered to “all hands on deck!” They repelled boarders so to speak, under threat of arms. In retaliation, Ghana cut off water and electricity to the ship. What to do, what to do...


7 posted on 11/10/2012 6:10:09 PM PST by donozark (The voices inside my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!)
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To: familyop
Some globalists here, BTW, have already been pushing to pay our own national debt by giving our lands with natural resources (oil, natural gas, etc.) to certain foreign creditors close to those globalists in trade over the past few decades.

You sound like a Paulbot conspiracy theorists with this "globalist" nonsense.

Saying that, I am not sympathetic with these creditors. They take a risk loaning countries like Greece, Argentina, etc, money and if they default, well, too bad. Creditors should be looking more closely at the country, how they vote and how fiscally responsible the people are as a nation before buying their bonds. Countries that are building massive social welfare states should be eyed suspiciously.

8 posted on 11/10/2012 6:24:25 PM PST by Longbow1969
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To: Lorianne

A very good heads up on what we may be instore for. This guy has lived it every day. Surviving Argentina!

http://ferfal.blogspot.com/


9 posted on 11/10/2012 6:30:45 PM PST by Patriot365
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To: donozark
They repelled boarders

Think about our case. What are ten aircraft carrier battle groups + planes worth? At $50B a piece, and I don't think they are worth that much, that is $500B. That is not even 1/2 of 1 years' deficit.

I apologize for frightening the children.

10 posted on 11/10/2012 6:31:22 PM PST by AndyJackson
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To: GeronL; familyop

The guys in the storeroom looking for our size.


11 posted on 11/10/2012 8:02:15 PM PST by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

heh.

Can’t get blood from that turnip, then its our turn to become the turnip when China starts collecting.


12 posted on 11/10/2012 8:06:10 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: Longbow1969
"You sound like a Paulbot conspiracy theorists with this 'globalist' nonsense."

That's a false accusation against a stranger, and it's nonsense. It's common knowledge that traitors have been conspiring with foreign communist nations against our US economy for decades to line their own pockets. It's also common knowledge that they participate in anti-Israel politics to keep their imports coming cheap. And many of them are the "Paulbots."


13 posted on 11/10/2012 8:08:06 PM PST by familyop
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To: Longbow1969
Countries that are building massive social welfare states should be eyed suspiciously

What country is not? Even South Korea is about to head in that direction, if they vote the wrong way real soon.

14 posted on 11/10/2012 8:08:40 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: Da Coyote

Very astute point


15 posted on 11/10/2012 8:14:16 PM PST by Lorianne (fedgov, taxporkmoney)
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To: Longbow1969
Destruction of the US Dollar
Patriot Action Network ^ | October 14, 2012 | Roger O'Daniel
5. When trading partners sell more stuff to the US than the US sells to them, the difference creates a balance of payments deficit. The USA needs to either borrow through a line of credit or buy the country's home currency from someone else at LIBOR exchange rates with US dollars. The largest creditor of the US Government is the FED who holds over $6 trillion of US debt in its account. The second largest creditor is Communist China with about $900 billion. Altogether, the United States owes obout 60 percent of the total debt of all other debtor nations combined.



16 posted on 11/10/2012 8:19:59 PM PST by familyop
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To: Kartographer

Well said.


17 posted on 11/10/2012 8:22:24 PM PST by familyop
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To: GeronL; Kartographer

There’s also the Monroe Doctrine. There’s much revisionism about that in paraphrasing around the Net, but European nations were forbidden to rob nations south of our southern border. But there they were, Spain, Italy and others (probably even US globals), owning up Argentina’s means of production and regulating against Argentinians competing against them. The socialism and recirculating debt finished Argentina, and we’ll have to reckon with it, too.

So have a look at nations that now have increasing revenues from manufacturing instead of so much recirculating debt. Conspicuous, eh? We need to deregulate, starting at local government levels, zoning in rural areas first.

Why local? For example, western culture countries developed math to make it more useful by way of encouraging competition and use in every level of society (see Greece’s ancient math limits, failures of elitism). We need millions of truly educated minds here through applied uses of technologies by many Americans rather than only offerings of programs of theory from the weird gatekeepers of the socially pathological academic racket (nearing similarity with Greeks who limited their math with adjuncts of pagan/social mumbo jumbo for approved/licensed intellectual leaders).


18 posted on 11/10/2012 8:48:22 PM PST by familyop
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To: familyop

I might have understood some of that.

:p


19 posted on 11/10/2012 8:50:32 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: familyop
Remember that we’ll be in Argentina’s shoes before long.

No kidding. Study Argentina's politics, its society, and economics - will give you a good road-map for the future of the USA.

20 posted on 11/10/2012 8:51:21 PM PST by PGR88
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To: familyop

Actually, my father said that Argentinian shoes are excellent quality.


21 posted on 11/10/2012 9:14:44 PM PST by DeaconBenjamin (A trillion here, a trillion there, soon you're NOT talking real money)
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To: GeronL

Sorry. My fault. I was trying to say that many Americans applying math, for example (only one major tool in technologies), to actual work with real materials would help to strengthen our economy, and ultimately, our nation. Limiting so much to theory in classrooms here will be detrimental—even to theoretical materials, eventually (revisionism, social sensitivities, etc.).

As for global and conglomerate interests using environmentalism, “property values,” etc., to prevent competition on local levels, I’ve personally met them (their relatives, employees, other associates) in commissioners’ meetings here and there—sometimes very unpleasant experiences (videos of all in favor of new, small producers, threats of lawsuits, other threats). There are zoning ordinances against any manufacturing, no matter how small, even in many very unpopulated and remote counties. That’s only one socialist obstacle against such business.

Socialism is a tool of those who want to use government for control over others for various reasons. It isn’t administered by rednecks or folks in slums. Thus, its very deceptive and multi-partisan nature in politics. Many interests use it, and not all of them ostensibly so.


22 posted on 11/10/2012 9:15:46 PM PST by familyop
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To: familyop

All very true


23 posted on 11/10/2012 9:20:56 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: GeronL

Some of my favorite employers said something to the effect, “Competition is healthy for business and good for the economy.” They occasionally even bought from each other in order to more quickly serve customers. I haven’t heard that from anyone since the ‘70s.


24 posted on 11/10/2012 9:23:03 PM PST by familyop
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To: familyop

Yep. Big Business now is all about shutting out competition using the power of government.


25 posted on 11/10/2012 9:32:10 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: familyop

I think because Chinese companies are tools of their government, there is a sense that we need to have greater cooperation between business and government in this country in order to compete. Where I come from, that is called “Fascism.”


26 posted on 11/10/2012 9:34:34 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: dfwgator

Very well said.


27 posted on 11/10/2012 9:47:12 PM PST by familyop
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