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The Pope and Godless Capitalism
Townhall.com ^ | May 3, 2013 | Pat Buchanan

Posted on 05/03/2013 1:09:31 PM PDT by Kaslin

"This is called slave labor," said Pope Francis.

The Holy Father was referring to the $40 a month paid to apparel workers at that eight-story garment factory in Bangladesh that collapsed on top of them, killing more than 400.

"Not paying a just wage ... focusing exclusively on the balance books, on financial statements, only looking at personal profit. That goes against God!"

The pope is describing the dark side of globalism.

Why is Bangladesh, after China, the second-largest producer of apparel in the world? Why are there 4,000 garment factories in that impoverished country which, a few decades ago, had almost none?

Because the Asian subcontinent is where Western brands -- from Disney to Gap to Benetton -- can produce cheapest. They can do so because women and children will work for $1.50 a day crammed into factories that are rickety firetraps, where health and safety regulations are nonexistent.

This is what capitalism, devoid of a conscience, will produce.

Rescuers at the factory outside Dhaka have stopped looking for survivors, but expect to find hundreds more bodies in the rubble.

The Walt Disney Co., with sales of $40 billion a year, decided -- after an apparel plant fire in November took the lives of 112 workers -- to stop producing in Bangladesh. "The Disney ban now extends to other countries, including Pakistan," says The New York Times, "where a fire last September killed 262 garment workers."

Not long ago, the shirts, skirts, suits and dresses Americans wore were "Made in the USA" -- in plants in the Carolinas, Georgia and Louisiana, where the lower wages, lighter regulations and air conditioning that came after World War II had attracted the factories from New England.

The American idea was that the 50 states and their citizens should compete with one another fairly. The feds set the health and safety standards that all factories had to meet, and imposed wage and hour laws. Some states offered lower wages, but there was a federal minimum wage.

How did we prevent companies from shutting down here and going to places like today's Bangladesh to produce as cheaply as they could -- without regard for the health and safety of their workers -- and to send their products back here and kill the American factories?

From James Madison to the mid-20th century, we had a tariff.

This provided revenue for the U.S. government to keep other taxes low and build the nation's infrastructure. Tariffs prevented exploiters of labor from getting rich here on sweatshops abroad.

Tariffs favored U.S. companies by letting them compete for free in the U.S. market, while a cover charge was placed on foreign goods entering the U.S.A. Foreign producers would pay tariffs for the privilege of competing here, while U.S. companies paid income taxes.

Foreigners had to buy a ticket to the game. Americans got in free.

After all, it's our country, isn't it?

But in the late 20th century, America abandoned as "protectionism" what Henry Clay had called The American System. We gave up on economic patriotism. We gave up on the idea that the U.S. economy should be structured for the benefit of America and Americans first.

We embraced globalism.

The ideological basis of globalism was that, just as what was best for America was a free market where U.S. companies produce and sell anywhere freely and equally in the U.S.A., this model can be applied worldwide.

We can create a global economy where companies produce where they wish and sell where they wish.

As one might expect, the big boosters of the concept were the transnational corporations. They could now shift plants and factories out of the high-wage, well-regulated U.S. economy to Mexico, China and India, then to Bangladesh, Haiti and Cambodia, produce for pennies, ship their products back to the U.S.A., sell here at the same old price, and pocket the difference.

As some who were familiar with the decline of Great Britain predicted, this would lead inexorably to the deindustrialization of America, a halt to the steady rise in U.S. workers' wages and standard of living, and the enrichment of a new class of corporatists.

Meanwhile, other nations, believing yet in economic nationalism, would invade and capture huge slices of the U.S. market for their home companies, their "national champions." The losers would be the companies that stayed in the U.S.A. and produced for the U.S.A., with American workers.

And so it came to pass. U.S. real wages have not risen in 40 years.

In the first decade of the century, America lost 5 million to 6 million manufacturing jobs, one in every three we had, as 55,000 factories closed.

Since Bush 41 touted his New Word Order, we have run trade deficits of $10 trillion -- ten thousand billion dollars! Everybody -- the EU, China, Japan, Mexico, Canada -- now runs a trade surplus at the expense of the U.S.A.

We built the global economy -- by gutting our own.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: capitalism; pope
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1 posted on 05/03/2013 1:09:31 PM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin
I guess the Pope would prefer that there be no jobs and the people starve.
2 posted on 05/03/2013 1:11:19 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Islam is a religion of peace, and Moslems reserve the right to detonate anyone who says otherwise.)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

You are ridiculous *rme*


3 posted on 05/03/2013 1:14:05 PM PDT by Kaslin (He needed the ignorant to reelect him, and he got them. Now we all have to pay the consequenses)
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To: Kaslin

An unlimited flow of cheap crap. The new American system.


4 posted on 05/03/2013 1:19:42 PM PDT by don-o (He will not share His glory, and He will not be mocked! Blessed be the Name of the Lord forever!)
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To: Kaslin

What do you know? The new Pope is a Communist.


5 posted on 05/03/2013 1:20:41 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
I guess the Pope would prefer that there be no jobs and the people starve.

There are 100's of thousands in this world who would risk their lives to work in this factory for half as much.

6 posted on 05/03/2013 1:22:06 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: fwdude

There is a kingdom, not of this world.


7 posted on 05/03/2013 1:22:09 PM PDT by don-o (He will not share His glory, and He will not be mocked! Blessed be the Name of the Lord forever!)
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To: Kaslin; All

Does anyone know how extensive Walmart operations were in this building?


8 posted on 05/03/2013 1:22:25 PM PDT by gleeaikin
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To: don-o
He is advocating for "social justice." Where do we hear that all the time?

As soon as the RCC began advocating for Obamacare, I knew what side is was on.

9 posted on 05/03/2013 1:23:57 PM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
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To: Kaslin

I wouldn’t expect the Pope necessarily to understand economics but I would have thought Buchanan knew better than this.


10 posted on 05/03/2013 1:25:43 PM PDT by DManA
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To: fwdude

And you are full of it. *rme*


11 posted on 05/03/2013 1:29:35 PM PDT by Kaslin (He needed the ignorant to reelect him, and he got them. Now we all have to pay the consequenses)
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To: Kaslin
As I said on an earlier thread ...

In defense of the Pope, he was making this observation in the context of a factory building collapse that had killed hundreds of people. I suspect his comment was about the working conditions, not the wages.

In that case, it doesn't matter if they're getting paid $40/month or $40,000/month. The economic aspect of this story is secondary, isn't it?

12 posted on 05/03/2013 1:31:03 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I am the master of my fate ... I am the captain of my soul.")
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To: Kaslin

note: the article is by Pat Buchanan, he only quotes the Pope, briefly, at the start.

What Pat seems to forget is that the elimination of tarriffs have as part of their root the combination of high prices and poor quality driven by Union Labor in the US. Americans wanted to buy Japanese cars and electronics (Pat only sticks to textiles and avoids having to point out that the issue is larger and more complex) not only because they were cheaper, but also better than their US made counterparts.


13 posted on 05/03/2013 1:35:38 PM PDT by tanknetter
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To: Kaslin

More tariffs (taxes) is his solution? Just another old fool who thinks that more money for the government is the solution to everything.


14 posted on 05/03/2013 1:39:27 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (Inside every liberal and WOD defender is a totalitarian screaming to get out.)
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To: Kaslin

Perhaps the Pope should stick to spiritual matters rather than economic ones. The people in low wage countries are not prisoners, they are not starving. The wages they receive are livable in those locations. If they dont like the work they can try to get a different job. Furthermore, we are not responsible for building codes in haiti or India. Its not our fault some dimwit engineer inspected the building and declared it safe just before it collapsed.


15 posted on 05/03/2013 1:39:50 PM PDT by Brooklyn Attitude (Obama being re-elected is the political equivalent of OJ being found not guilty.)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

What people don’t realize is that people voluntarily leave their farms and come to these factories because the jobs there are - better - than what they had at home.

Just as they did in England during the Industrial Revolution.

But living conditions in peasant villages in 1800 England or 2013 Bangladesh are “quaint,” and we can idealize it, and anyway they’re back in the boonies where we don’t have to look at them.

People said - exactly - the same thing about factories in Japan, S. Korea, Malaysia, Taiwan, Vietnam, etc. Now those countries have worked their way above the entry level and are producing, or beginning to produce, good jobs and lives for their citizens.

It seems conservatives can accept that individuals may have to work their way up, but have trouble recognizing that countries do too. Liberals can’t recognize this necessity at all.

What’s the alternative? Giving people or countries stuff. Which at best has not proven itself to be a desirable alternative.


16 posted on 05/03/2013 1:41:17 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: tanknetter

Exactly! Thanks for putting into words what I was groping for.


17 posted on 05/03/2013 1:50:34 PM PDT by kitkat (STORM THE HEAVENS WITH PRAYERS FOR OUR COUNTRY)
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To: Kaslin

Capitalism extends naturally from God’s laws of private property...

do not steal and do not covet.


18 posted on 05/03/2013 1:54:58 PM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: Brooklyn Attitude

Christians, a fortiori the Pope — have the right and the duty to speak out on moral issues. Pope Francis is well within his competence in pointing out that a reductionist view of human life in which everything must give way to the free market is anti-human and irrational.

Free markets are a tool to produce useful information. When they become a religion or ideology they are out of control.


19 posted on 05/03/2013 2:00:37 PM PDT by Romulus
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To: Kaslin

I had read recently that the textile industry in Bangladesh receives special government advantages and it’s power is very influential there.

I would not look only at the wage issue in a developing country. Look at the corruption, and the ways that the rich people there are putting their thumb on the scales, not practicing real free market capitalism.


20 posted on 05/03/2013 2:01:36 PM PDT by married21
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To: MrB

Private property is a means to an end. It is not the end itself. It is not a moral absolute.


21 posted on 05/03/2013 2:02:15 PM PDT by Romulus
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To: Kaslin
You are ridiculous *rme*

You have the intellectual development of a two-year old.

And you think that makes you holy.

22 posted on 05/03/2013 2:10:24 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Islam is a religion of peace, and Moslems reserve the right to detonate anyone who says otherwise.)
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To: don-o

It’s not crap. I got some Donald Trump shirts, and was surprised to see that they were made in Bangladesh, after all his rants about China. They were surprisingly well made, and of nice material.


23 posted on 05/03/2013 2:12:15 PM PDT by Daveinyork (."Trusting government with power and money is like trusting teenaged boys with whiskey and car keys,)
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To: Romulus

“Christians, a fortiori the Pope — have the right and the duty to speak out on moral issues. Pope Francis is well within his competence in pointing out that a reductionist view of human life in which everything must give way to the free market is anti-human and irrational.”

Nice straw man since no one is arguing that everything must give way to free markets. Giving people jobs and paying the prevailing wage in their country is not immoral. I do think not providing a safe work place is immoral. Considering the cost of labor and the large profit margin on the products being produced the cost of putting up a solid building that is not a fire trap should be relatively inexpensive.


24 posted on 05/03/2013 2:14:06 PM PDT by Brooklyn Attitude (Obama being re-elected is the political equivalent of OJ being found not guilty.)
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To: tanknetter

Milton Friedman once said that free trade is a hard sell because it’s beneficiaries are many, and they do not know who they are, but it’s victims are few, and they know who they are.


25 posted on 05/03/2013 2:14:40 PM PDT by Daveinyork (."Trusting government with power and money is like trusting teenaged boys with whiskey and car keys,)
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To: Romulus

“Private property is a means to an end. It is not the end itself. It is not a moral absolute.”

Actually, Thou shall not steal, says that it is, much the same as Thou shalt not murder,confirms the sanctity of life.


26 posted on 05/03/2013 2:18:06 PM PDT by Daveinyork (."Trusting government with power and money is like trusting teenaged boys with whiskey and car keys,)
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To: Kaslin

I’m going to guess that the Pope is going to get slammed here for suggesting that these workers were being exploited as slave labor. Okay, I’m sure that plenty of both democrats and republicans are perfectly fine with financing sweatshops in the third world. Now, would anyone here reading this be willing to work under the exact same conditions and for the same exact wages that these people working in these sweatshops? Of course not! That’s why we exported all of these jobs in the first place! Why do you think the feds are fighting so hard for amnesty? We need dirt cheap compliant labor! Everybody knows that Americans are too stupid and lazy to do these jobs (although they did not too long ago). At least that’s what the government and their financial interests keep telling us. I really have to say that we have finally outdid the socialists and communists in destroying our own economy, and our country in the process.


27 posted on 05/03/2013 2:42:41 PM PDT by factoryrat (We are the producers, the creators. Grow it, mine it, build it.)
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To: Daveinyork

Sorry; you are mistaken. Human life always has priority over the rest of creation. Your money will not be going to heaven with you. Nor to the other place. Man is made for God, and all of creation exists only to help him achieve that end. Everything else in this world is passing away. God created private property not because it has absolute and eternal value, but to enable us to make free decisions to use it to give him glory. One of the chief ways we glorify God is in assisting the poor for his sake, and in exercising our endowments and faculties as advocate for the lowly and powerless.

Our Lord is quite clear about what becomes of people who assign an absolute value to their private property, imagining that it exists for their benefit and enjoyment in an absolute sense.


28 posted on 05/03/2013 2:49:46 PM PDT by Romulus
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To: Brooklyn Attitude

The problem is that in many countries “prevailing wages” are not set by anything resembling a free market. They are imposed by the powerful upon the weak, who are left with the choice of being cruelly exploited or else starving. It is the poor who are deprived of their property rights, because they’re being stripped of the only thing of value they have to sell, which is their labor. That is not justice, and it is likewise not just to support such structures of sin. In the world we inhabit, it’s frequently impossible to avoid buying from China or similar hell holes. But we can do our best — especially by making a moral decision to consume less.


29 posted on 05/03/2013 2:56:13 PM PDT by Romulus
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To: Kaslin

$40 a month in many third world countries is a living wage. I don’t know about Bangladesh, but I suspect it might be one of them.


30 posted on 05/03/2013 3:00:29 PM PDT by JimRed (Excise the cancer before it kills us; feed &water the Tree of Liberty! TERM LIMITS, NOW & FOREVER!)
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To: Kaslin

The South almost seceded in the 1830’s over high tariffs artificially raising the prices of goods. High sugar tariffs for the benefit of American sugar producers has cost us tons of jobs as candy companies move out of America to where they can get sugar at the real world market price.


31 posted on 05/03/2013 3:00:53 PM PDT by allmendream (Tea Party did not send GOP to D.C. to negotiate the terms of our surrender to socialism)
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To: Kaslin
I wish Pat would write more stuff like this promoting good old Hamiltonian Federalism instead of obsessing over Israel.

Of course, I doubt Pat's a 100% Federalist. They supported a national bank, and we all "know" who runs those, don't we??? [/sarcasm]

32 posted on 05/03/2013 3:15:36 PM PDT by Zionist Conspirator (Ki-hagoy vehamamlakhah 'asher lo'-ya`avdukh yove'du; vehagoyim charov yecheravu!)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

People defending exploitive labor practices are doing no favors to capitalism.

Also, the pope has always said that “social justice” comes from just or moral individuals doing what is right. You can’t possibly argue that this guy was doing what was right, moral or just.


33 posted on 05/03/2013 3:17:38 PM PDT by livius
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To: livius
People defending exploitive labor practices are doing no favors to capitalism.

$40 a week there ain't the same this as $40 a week here.

Or are you a good Communist and think that everybody should be payed a "living wage" regardless of the actual value of the product they are producing?

34 posted on 05/03/2013 3:36:27 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (Islam is a religion of peace, and Moslems reserve the right to detonate anyone who says otherwise.)
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To: JimRed

Yeah, but $40 a year isn’t. As a matter of fact I got an email forwarded to me which was about the 1910 Ford and the statistics for that year. For example in 1910 the average US wage in 1910 was 22 cents per hour and the average US worker made between $200 and $400 per year.


35 posted on 05/03/2013 3:45:32 PM PDT by Kaslin (He needed the ignorant to reelect him, and he got them. Now we all have to pay the consequenses)
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To: DManA
I wouldn’t expect the Pope necessarily to understand economics but I would have thought Buchanan knew better than this.

Really?



36 posted on 05/03/2013 4:32:44 PM PDT by rdb3
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To: Romulus

The Commandments say what they say, and are not subject to your interpretation.


37 posted on 05/03/2013 6:54:15 PM PDT by Daveinyork (."Trusting government with power and money is like trusting teenaged boys with whiskey and car keys,)
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To: rdb3

You’re right. Buchanan is a nut ball. I haven’t read him in a while.


38 posted on 05/03/2013 7:06:06 PM PDT by DManA
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To: fwdude

Calling you obtuse would be far too generous.


39 posted on 05/03/2013 7:48:57 PM PDT by A.A. Cunningham (Barry Soetoro can't pass E-verify)
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To: Kaslin

Thanks for posting the article.

“This is what capitalism, devoid of a conscience, will produce. “

Might I suggest is isn’t capitalism that is devoid of a conscience. Like ‘assault rifles’ and ‘reckless SUVs’ , these terms seem to apply the blame to inanimate objects.

The problem is, and always has been (as was oft lamented by God and the Angels in the Christian Bible) that man becomes devoid of conscience.


40 posted on 05/03/2013 8:06:06 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The monsters are due on Maple Street)
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To: fwdude
The new Pope is a Communist.

I get the idea you just read the excerpt, and not the whole article.

Do you remember why Jesus overturned the tables of the money changers ?

41 posted on 05/03/2013 8:11:03 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The monsters are due on Maple Street)
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To: Daveinyork

The Ten Commandments are ‘absolute truth’. Funny that! Centuries old advice is still relevant in today’s hip culture.


42 posted on 05/03/2013 8:17:47 PM PDT by antceecee (Bless us Father.. have mercy on us and protect us from evil.)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum; livius; Kaslin
Or are you a good Communist and think that everybody should be payed a "living wage" regardless of the actual value of the product they are producing?

I think what LIVIUS is saying is that you shouldn't have to work in a death trap of a building because of the greed of the owner.

GREED is one of the 'sins'... remember? The Pope is against it, and that is what this article was about.

43 posted on 05/03/2013 8:24:56 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The monsters are due on Maple Street)
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To: Daveinyork

Well they don’t interpret themselves. What authority are you relying on?


44 posted on 05/03/2013 9:23:00 PM PDT by Romulus
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To: Romulus

Thou shalt not steal.


45 posted on 05/04/2013 2:56:34 AM PDT by Daveinyork (."Trusting government with power and money is like trusting teenaged boys with whiskey and car keys,)
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To: Romulus

Furthermore, Saul (By G-D,Himself) was ordered to kill all the inhabitants of the enemy city, including the animals which are property. He killed the people, and kept (stole) the animals. This act of disobedience doomed his kingship, and short-circuited his dynasty. In addition the the Commandments, this implies that life and property are equal.

Note that he was not commanded to destroy the property and capture the people.


46 posted on 05/04/2013 4:53:28 AM PDT by Daveinyork (."Trusting government with power and money is like trusting teenaged boys with whiskey and car keys,)
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To: Daveinyork
He killed the people, and kept (stole) the animals. This act of disobedience doomed his kingship, and short-circuited his dynasty. In addition the the Commandments, this implies that life and property are equal.

I think it was more to demonstrate disinterest in plunder.

47 posted on 05/04/2013 5:05:18 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas
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To: fwdude
There are 100's of thousands in this world who would risk their lives to work in this factory for half as much.

Unless the people were forced to work at gunpoint, this is the sad truth.

The working conditions may seem cruel to us, but "good wages" are relative. This is the first (often ugly) step in economic development.

This kind of labor is far more effective in aiding populations than direct financial aid, which is almost always squandered.

48 posted on 05/04/2013 5:10:08 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas
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To: Romulus
Private property is a means to an end. It is not the end itself. It is not a moral absolute.

It's very close to it, though. It's implied in the Commandment, "Do not steal."

Free trade is a reality --a law of nature. If two parties are not coerced, or engaging in misrepresentation, there is nothing intrinsically wrong with tradiing. (With a few exceptions, like prostitution, etc.)

49 posted on 05/04/2013 5:16:57 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas

You think?


50 posted on 05/04/2013 5:44:38 AM PDT by Daveinyork (."Trusting government with power and money is like trusting teenaged boys with whiskey and car keys,)
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