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Jungle-Covered Ruins May Hold Surprising Hints (article)
Institute for Creation Research ^ | June 6:24, 2013 | Brian Thomas

Posted on 06/24/2013 8:54:30 AM PDT by fishtank

Jungle-Covered Ruins May Hold Surprising Hints by Brian Thomas, M.S.

The ancient and elaborate temple at Angkor Wat is not the only interesting site to see when visiting Cambodia. Archaeologists have been discovering hundreds of temples, many still buried beneath thick jungle growth, strewn across the whole surrounding area. A picture is emerging of buildings that connected a thriving society across a broad region. Could soon-to-be uncovered stone carvings somehow intersect with biblical history?

Australian archaeologist Damian Evans employed "lidar" technology to find new temples far faster than the old way—that of hacking through jungle and hoping to hit some valuable hint. Lidar uses reflected laser light to measure fine elevation details. Dr. Evans had focused on a mountainous area northeast of Angkor Wat named Phnom Kulen and found that roads and canals once connected temples and houses probably even beyond his mapped area in Cambodia's interior. Lidar revealed Mahendraparvata and two dozen additional hidden temples, mostly buried and untouched by looters.

Evans told Australian news source The Age that with lidar, "all of a sudden we saw an immediate picture of an entire city that no one knew existed."1 Even the local villagers had no idea that an ancient temple lay virtually beneath their feet.

The temple at Ta Prohm—with its tree root-draped stones providing a picturesque scene for visitors—lies fewer than three miles from the oft-visited major Angkor Wat complex. The Khmer people built it and the many surrounding temples during Europe's Middle Ages.

Ta Prohm is increasingly famous for its bas-relief of what appears to be a stegosaur, expertly carved into the temple stone many centuries ago—long before paleontological dinosaur reconstructions. Ta Prohm's central stele carving shows a date, translated onto the A.D. calendar, as 1186.2 Parrot, swan, water buffalo, and monkey carvings adorn the same structure, showing the ancient artist's expertise at reproducing known animals.

The nearest stegosaur fossils come from faraway China. It is therefore very unlikely that the ancients carved a stegosaur likeness based on fossils.

Dinosaur carvings, sculptures, and paintings within ancient ruins confront the view that dinosaurs lived and died millions of years before man.3 But they are just what one would expect within the context of biblical history. Genesis says that God created man and animals, including dinosaurs, on the same day of creation week.4

Did the ancient Khmer people personally observe stegosaurs, as the anatomically-correct rendering at Ta Prohm clearly suggests? If so, then those dinosaurs represent descendants of their kind that traveled on board Noah's Ark. This implies that later generations of stegosaurs migrated from the Ark landing site in the Middle East to Southeast Asia. They may have gone extinct from Cambodia through human interactions similar to those causing the 2010 extinction of the Javan Rhino from neighboring Vietnam.5

The next task for archaeologists will involve carefully removing the covering jungle from Mahendraparvata's ancient stone walls. Erected centuries before Angkor Wat, will its temple carvings reveal more dinosaur-looking creatures? And if so, will secular researchers choose to show findings that challenge their basic beliefs, or will they suppress evidence as they cling to secularized history?

References

Murdoch, L. 2013. The lost city. The Age. Posted on theage.com.au June 14, 2013, accessed June 18, 2013. Glaize, M. Revised 1993. A Guide to the Angkor Monuments.

Ta Prohm. English version posted February 1998 on theangkorguide.com, accessed June 18, 2013.

Morris, J. 2008. The Dinosaur Next Door. Acts & Facts. 37 (6): 13.

Job 40:15 appears to confirm the same day creation of man and dinosaurs, as the Lord told Job to "Look now at the behemoth [sauropod] which I made along with you."

Main, D. Javan Rhino Officially Extinct In Vietnam. LiveScience. Posted on livescience.com January 3, 2013, accessed June 19, 2013.

* Mr. Thomas is Science Writer at the Institute for Creation Research.

Article posted on June 24, 2013.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: creation; jungle

Images from the ICR article.

1 posted on 06/24/2013 8:54:30 AM PDT by fishtank
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To: fishtank

2 posted on 06/24/2013 8:55:54 AM PDT by ThomasMore (Islam is the Whore of Babylon!)
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To: fishtank

Why would an intact city simply be vacated by everyone, all creatures, etc and left so long as to be covered by plants and simply disappear into history?


3 posted on 06/24/2013 8:57:35 AM PDT by edcoil (When given a choice, take both.)
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To: SunkenCiv

ping


4 posted on 06/24/2013 8:57:39 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: edcoil

re:#3 Neutron bomb.


5 posted on 06/24/2013 9:00:15 AM PDT by Dedbone
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To: edcoil

Because they elected a Kenyan mulatto with no leadership experience to “lead them”. His promise was hope and change. History does repeat itself.


6 posted on 06/24/2013 9:04:07 AM PDT by BatGuano (You don't think I'd go into combat with loose change in my pocket, do ya?)
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To: edcoil

They promoted a manchurian tribal leader, who actually was a soldier for their arch enemy?


7 posted on 06/24/2013 9:05:21 AM PDT by C210N (When people fear government there is tyranny; when government fears people there is liberty)
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To: fishtank

Interesting but looks suspiciously new.

The explaination that the back is leaves is ridiculous but the other thought that a film company may have created it makes me wonder.

http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/dinosaur/2009/03/stegosaurus-rhinoceros-hoax/


8 posted on 06/24/2013 9:12:47 AM PDT by Beowulf9
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To: edcoil
Why would an intact city simply be vacated by everyone, all creatures, etc and left so long as to be covered by plants and simply disappear into history?

Good question. Ask the Anasazi in New Mexico. Except we can't, because they left their intact city about 1,000 years ago, too.

9 posted on 06/24/2013 9:13:22 AM PDT by SamuraiScot
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To: edcoil

Bushes fault...........Pun intended!.................


10 posted on 06/24/2013 9:13:29 AM PDT by Red Badger (Want to be surprised? Google your own name......Want to have fun? Google your friend's names........)
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To: SamuraiScot

Property taxes...............


11 posted on 06/24/2013 9:13:57 AM PDT by Red Badger (Want to be surprised? Google your own name......Want to have fun? Google your friend's names........)
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To: Red Badger

They all moved to the suburbs...


12 posted on 06/24/2013 9:19:30 AM PDT by Youngman542012
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To: fishtank

I was going to claim that the stegasaurus never existed but that was the triceratops. But the carving isn’t necessarily a stegasaurus, it may be a small reptile that went extinct during the Angkor Wat days, which isn’t that long ago. People back then were very busy building canals and reservoirs to double the growing season for rice to feed the ever increasing population. A lot of earth was moved, some land was drained and other places were flooded. I can see some animals going extinct.

But the most mysterious thing about the carving is that it is the only one. Something as awesome as a huge stegasaurus should have been in more artwork. And I would have expected it to be depicted in Indian or Chinese art even if the animal lived only in the Khmer region. Very strange.


13 posted on 06/24/2013 9:20:32 AM PDT by RadiationRomeo (Step into my mind and glimpse the madness that is me)
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To: edcoil

The Chinese might be able to explain that.


14 posted on 06/24/2013 9:26:51 AM PDT by meatloaf (3)
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To: SamuraiScot

I know that is the weird part, there are cities that were around then still in use and populated to this day and yet, a hand-full had everyone and everything leave, no new tribes moving into sections, nothing, simply just gone for years and years.


15 posted on 06/24/2013 9:27:04 AM PDT by edcoil (When given a choice, take both.)
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To: fishtank

Cambodia? Apparently it was seared, seared into their memories!


16 posted on 06/24/2013 9:27:40 AM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: RadiationRomeo

Agree.


17 posted on 06/24/2013 9:30:34 AM PDT by AEMILIUS PAULUS (It is a shame that when these people give a riot)
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To: edcoil

Biologic is one reason. If it was place they thought made people sick/die....


18 posted on 06/24/2013 9:49:08 AM PDT by Mechanicos (When did we amend the Constitution for a 2nd Federal Prohibition?)
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To: fishtank

I remember reading a similar story on Cambodia around 1957. I think it was in “My weekly Reader” but it could have been something else.


19 posted on 06/24/2013 9:54:34 AM PDT by yarddog (There Are Three Things That Remain--Faith, Hope, and Love--and,the Greatest of These is Love..)
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To: Beowulf9

The lack of weathering, referenced at your link, really strikes me. Having been to Ankor Wat and Ankor Thom, it just isn’t consistent with what I saw. Also, there is the minor problem of stegosaurs being extinct for 140 million years.


20 posted on 06/24/2013 10:04:11 AM PDT by JimSEA
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To: edcoil
there are cities that were around then still in use and populated to this day and yet, a hand-full had everyone and everything leave

Now that you mention it, Rome was depopulated for a long time (except for the cats!) after the decline of the Empire, and the Alhambra in Spain, which is the size of a town, was uninhabited except for a few squatters until Washington Irving got people interested in restoring it in the 19th century.

21 posted on 06/24/2013 10:10:23 AM PDT by SamuraiScot
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To: edcoil

It’s happening in Detroit right now.


22 posted on 06/24/2013 10:23:44 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: edcoil
"Why would an intact city simply be vacated by everyone, all creatures, etc and left so long as to be covered by plants and simply disappear into history?"

There is a term for it, it's called "Detroitification."

23 posted on 06/24/2013 10:34:40 AM PDT by Onelifetogive (I tweet, too... @Onelifetogive)
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To: Larry Lucido

J f’n K reference?


24 posted on 06/24/2013 10:38:29 AM PDT by jonno (Having an opinion is not the same as having the answer...)
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To: Larry Lucido

Excellent reference!


25 posted on 06/24/2013 11:01:07 AM PDT by edwinland
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To: JimSEA; All
Also, there is the minor problem of stegosaurs being extinct for 140 million years.

That is not really much of a problem. There is no question that the fossil record is extremely incomplete. It would only make sense that we would not find fossils of rare species. Nothing in the drawing shows how large the animal was, and we know that some reptiles survived the dinosaur era.

26 posted on 06/24/2013 11:32:09 AM PDT by marktwain (The MSM must die for the Republic to live. Long live the new media!)
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To: SamuraiScot

They all retired and moved to Ft. Lauderdale.


27 posted on 06/24/2013 11:36:45 AM PDT by Oberon (Big Brutha Be Watchin'.)
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To: fishtank
I find this interesting for a totally unrelated reason. Back during the Vietnam War I was involved in a project to "see through" the jungle canopy. The idea was to take photographs from multiple angles, then use the same math as is used in Computed Tomography to "reconstruct" what was under the canopy. We couldn't get it to work, for a variety of reasons.

LIDAR is an entirely different approach. The LIDAR pulse will be scattered by the canopy, and the pulse reflected from below the canopy will be further scattered, but so long as there is enough energy getting back to the LIDAR, the same processing as is used in RADAR will give an image of what's under the canopy. The image will be somewhat blurred because the scattering will give multiple echoes from the same object, but apparently it's good enough to locate a temple.

What this means is that from now on, jungle or forest canopies will not suffice to hide insurgents, cocaine laboratories, or moonshiners. Get used to having your concealment stripped away.

28 posted on 06/24/2013 11:59:56 AM PDT by JoeFromSidney ( New book: RESISTANCE TO TYRANNY. Buy from Amazon.)
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To: edcoil

Mutant Teenage Ninja Stegosaurs.


29 posted on 06/24/2013 12:24:55 PM PDT by Hostage (Be Breitbart!)
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