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Keyword: lidar

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  • Archaeologists on the trail of a completely preserved, almost 2,000 years old settlement

    02/15/2019 11:37:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    PAP - Science in Poland, ^ | Szymon Zdziebiowski (szz/ zan/ kap/)
    Cultivated fields with bounds, farms, buildings and even roads - archaeologists discovered a completely preserved layout of an ancient settlement from nearly 2,000 years ago in the Tuchola Forest. It is a unique site in Europe, emphasize the authors of the discovery. The area of the Tuchola Forest on the border of the Kuyavian-Pomeranian province and the Pomeranian province is overgrown with a thick forest. It is one of the least-explored areas in terms of archaeology in Poland... According to the researchers, the relics come from the first centuries of our era... Archaeologists remind that after hundreds of years, old...
  • Laser scanning reveals 'lost' ancient Mexican city 'had as many buildings as Manhattan'

    02/17/2018 10:15:51 AM PST · by mairdie · 48 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 15 Feb 2018 | Nicola Davis
    The approach, known as light detection and ranging scanning (lidar) involves directing a rapid succession of laser pulses at the ground from an aircraft. The time and wavelength of the pulses reflected by the surface are combined with GPS and other data to produce a precise, three-dimensional map of the landscape. Crucially, the technique probes beneath foliage - useful for areas where vegetation is dense. ... The team also found that Angamuco has an unusual layout. Monuments such as pyramids and open plazas are largely concentrated in eight zones around the city's edges, rather being located in one large city...
  • Exclusive: Laser Scans Reveal Maya "Megalopolis" Below Guatemalan Jungle

    02/02/2018 11:30:31 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 38 replies
    nationalgeographic.com ^ | Tom Clynes | Tom Clynes
    [S]cholars digitally removed the tree canopy from aerial images of the now-unpopulated landscape, revealing the ruins of a sprawling pre-Columbian civilization that was far more complex and interconnected than most Maya specialists had supposed. “The LiDAR images make it clear that this entire region was a settlement system whose scale and population density had been grossly underestimated,” said Thomas Garrison, an Ithaca College archaeologist....who specializes in using digital technology for archaeological research. The project mapped more than 800 square miles (2,100 square kilometers) of the Maya Biosphere Reserve in the Petén region of Guatemala, producing the largest LiDAR data set...
  • Angkor Wat Yields Astounding Buried Towers & Spiral Structure

    12/10/2015 8:43:58 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    Live Science ^ | 12/9/2015 | Owen Jarus,
    The massive structure - almost a mile long - contains a spiral design, with several rectangular spirals that form a giant structure, archaeologists say. "This structure, which has dimensions of more than 1,500 m × 600 m (about 1 mile by 1,970 feet) is the most striking discovery associated with Angkor Wat to date. Its function remains unknown and, as yet, it has no known equivalent in the Angkorian world," Roland Fletcher, a University of Sydney professor, said in a statement put out by the university. Today, the spiral structure is hard to make out on the ground, having been...
  • The Lost City of Cambodia

    06/02/2016 6:44:29 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 10 replies
    The Smithsonian ^ | April 2016 | Joshua Hammer
    Jean-Baptiste Chevance senses that we’re closing in on our target. Paused in a jungle clearing in northwestern Cambodia, the French archaeologist studies his GPS and mops the sweat from his forehead with a bandanna. The temperature is pushing 95, and the equatorial sun beats down through the forest canopy. For two hours, Chevance, known to everyone as JB, has been leading me, along with a two-man Cambodian research team, on a grueling trek. We’ve ripped our arms and faces on six-foot shrubs studded with thorns, been savaged by red biting ants, and stumbled over vines that stretch at ankle height...
  • Drought Doomed Ancient City of Angkor

    01/04/2012 3:43:34 PM PST · by Captain Beyond · 14 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 1-4-2012 | Charles Choi
    Mary Beth Day, University of Cambridge Bayon temple, constructed by Angkorian King Jayavarman VII in the late 12th century. The faces may be representations of Buddha, the bodhisattva Lokesvara, Jayavarman VII, or a combination. The ancient city of Angkor — the most famous monument of which is the breathtaking ruined temple of Angkor Wat — might have collapsed due to valiant but ultimately failed efforts to battle drought, scientists find. The great city of Angkor in Cambodia, first established in the ninth century, was the capital of the Khmer Empire, the major player in southeast Asia for nearly five centuries....
  • REVEALED: Australia's raiders of the lost wat

    08/13/2007 4:55:10 PM PDT · by BlackVeil · 8 replies · 517+ views
    Canberra Times ^ | 14 August 2007 | Rosslyn Beeby
    Australian archaeologists using complex radar and satellite technology to map the medieval city of Angkor have discovered more than 70 new temples scattered across a vast area of farmland and forests in north-west Cambodia. University of Sydney archaeologist Damian Evans said, "It's huge. We've mapped a massive settlement stretching well beyond the main temples of the World Heritage tourist area in Siem Reap. "We've found the city was roughly five times bigger than previously thought." The newly discovered ruins of the ancient Khmer empire metropolis sprawl across 1000sqkm "about 20km in every direction" outside the United Nations listed World Heritage...
  • Sprawling Angkor Brought Down By Overpopulation, Study Suggests

    08/13/2007 8:23:51 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies · 912+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 8-13-2007 | Susan Brown
    Sprawling Angkor Brought Down By Overpopulation, Study Suggests Susan Brown for National Geographic News August 13, 2007 Cambodia's long-lost temple complex of Angkor is the world's largest known preindustrial settlement, reveals a new radar study that found 74 new temples and more than a thousand manmade ponds at the site. But urban sprawl and its associated environmental devastation may have led to the collapse of the kingdom, which includes the renowned temple of Angkor Wat, the study suggests. Ever since the late 16th century, when Portuguese traders spied the towers of the monument poking through a dense canopy of trees,...
  • Map reveals ancient urban sprawl (bad enviro-policy blamed).

    08/14/2007 4:44:29 AM PDT · by Jedi Master Pikachu · 16 replies · 697+ views
    BBC ^ | August 14, 2007
    The researchers disovered at least 74 new temples The great medieval temple of Angkor Wat in Cambodia was once at the centre of a sprawling urban settlement, according to a new, detailed map of the area.Using Nasa satellites, an international team have discovered at least 74 new temples and complex irrigation systems. The map, published in the journal PNAS, extends the known settlement by 1000 sq km, about the size of Los Angeles. Analysis also lends weight to the theory that Angkor's residents were architects of the city's demise. "The large-scale city engineered its own downfall by disrupting its...
  • Radar reveals vast medieval Cambodian city: study

    08/16/2007 10:04:41 AM PDT · by Renfield · 9 replies · 220+ views
    Yahoo news ^ | 8-13-07
    CHICAGO (AFP) - Archaeologists using radar imagery have shown that an ancient Cambodian settlement centered on the celebrated temple of Angkor Wat was far more extensive than previously thought, a study released Monday said. The medieval settlement surrounding Angkor, the one-time capital of the illustrious Khmer empire which flourished between the ninth and 14th centuries, covered a 3,000 square kilometer area (1,158 square miles). The urban complex was at least three times larger than archaeologists had previously suspected and easily the largest pre-industrial urban area of its kind, eclipsing comparable developments such as Tikal a Classic Maya "city" in Guatemala....
  • Airborne laser uncovers ancient hidden city near Angkor Wat

    06/18/2013 11:17:16 AM PDT · by Squawk 8888 · 13 replies
    National Post ^ | June 18, 2013 | Kristen Gelineau
    SYDNEY, Australia — Airborne laser technology has uncovered a network of roadways and canals, illustrating a bustling ancient city linking Cambodia’s famed Angkor Wat temple complex. The discovery was announced late Monday in a peer-reviewed paper released early by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The laser scanning revealed a previously undocumented formally planned urban landscape integrating the 1,200-year-old temples. The Angkor temple complex, Cambodia’s top tourist destination and one of Asia’s most famous landmarks, was constructed in the 12th century during the mighty Khmer empire. Angkor Wat is a point of deep pride for Cambodians, appearing...
  • The Hidden City of Angkor Wat

    06/21/2013 7:07:41 AM PDT · by Renfield · 26 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | 6-20-2013 | Richard Stone
    In the year 802 C.E., the founder of the medieval Khmer empire, Jayavarman II, anointed himself "king of the world." In laying claim to such a grandiose title, he was a little ahead of his time: It would be another few centuries before the Khmers built Earth's largest religious monument, Angkor Wat, the crowning glory of a kingdom that stood in what is today northwestern Cambodia. But Jayavarman II had good reason to believe that his nascent kingdom, in the sacred Kulen hills northeast of Angkor, was a record-holder. Airborne laser scanning technology, or LiDAR, has revealed the imprint of...
  • Jungle-Covered Ruins May Hold Surprising Hints (article)

    06/24/2013 8:54:30 AM PDT · by fishtank · 28 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | June 6:24, 2013 | Brian Thomas
    Jungle-Covered Ruins May Hold Surprising Hints by Brian Thomas, M.S. The ancient and elaborate temple at Angkor Wat is not the only interesting site to see when visiting Cambodia. Archaeologists have been discovering hundreds of temples, many still buried beneath thick jungle growth, strewn across the whole surrounding area. A picture is emerging of buildings that connected a thriving society across a broad region. Could soon-to-be uncovered stone carvings somehow intersect with biblical history? Australian archaeologist Damian Evans employed "lidar" technology to find new temples far faster than the old way—that of hacking through jungle and hoping to hit some...
  • Revealed: Cambodia's vast medieval cities hidden beneath the jungle

    06/11/2016 7:23:18 AM PDT · by C19fan · 16 replies
    UK Guardian ^ | June 10, 2016 | Lara Dunston
    Archaeologists in Cambodia have found multiple, previously undocumented medieval cities not far from the ancient temple city of Angkor Wat, the Guardian can reveal, in groundbreaking discoveries that promise to upend key assumptions about south-east Asia’s history. The Australian archaeologist Dr Damian Evans, whose findings will be published in the Journal of Archaeological Science on Monday, will announce that cutting-edge airborne laser scanning technology has revealed multiple cities between 900 and 1,400 years old beneath the tropical forest floor, some of which rival the size of Cambodia’s capital, Phnom Penh.
  • Ancient Egyptian City Spotted From Space

    06/05/2007 6:39:35 PM PDT · by BGHater · 31 replies · 1,642+ views
    Live Science ^ | 05 June 2007 | Heather Whipps
    Satellites hovering above Egypt have zoomed in on a 1,600-year-old metropolis, archaeologists say. Images captured from space pinpoint telltale signs of previous habitation in the swatch of land 200 miles south of Cairo, which digging recently confirmed as an ancient settlement dating from about 400 A.D. The find is part of a larger project aiming to map as much of ancient Egypt's archaeological sites, or "tells," as possible before they are destroyed or covered by modern development. "It is the biggest site discovered so far," said project leader Sarah Parcak of the University of Alabama at Birmingham. "Based on the...
  • 17 lost pyramids discovered in Egypt by space scientists

    05/25/2011 6:12:24 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 10 replies
    msnbc.com ^ | May 25, 2011 | msnbc.com staff and news service reports
    Seventeen lost pyramids are believed to have been found in Egypt by a team of space archaeologists from Alabama, according to a report. Sarah Parcak and her team at a NASA-sponsored laboratory at the University of Alabama at Birmingham made the discoveries using a satellite survey, and also found more than 1,000 tombs and 3,000 ancient settlements in infrared images that show up buildings underground, BBC News reported. The BBC said that two of the suspected pyramids had been confirmed by initial excavations. "We were very intensely doing this research for over a year. I could see the data as...
  • Space: The Final [Archaeological] Frontier

    12/02/2004 5:27:51 PM PST · by Constitution Day · 22 replies · 627+ views
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | November/December 2004 issue | P.J. Capelotti
    Space: The Final [Archaeological] Frontier Volume 57 Number 6, November/December 2004 by P.J. Capelotti Illustrations by James Jean Summer 2205 During a preliminary survey of late twenty-first-century mining outposts in the asteroid belt, Dr. Gan Shishu, director of the Institute for Space Archaeology at the China National Space Administration, recognized a unique opportunity. Leaving her field team as they continued to document the massive Halliburton gantry on asteroid Q36, she piloted her team's one-person archaeoprobe L.S.B. Leakey toward a strange-looking artifact nearby that had been drifting in heliocentric orbit for more than two centuries. Science fiction? Not any longer....
  • Long-lost Roman roads discovered on flood maps: Hi-tech Lidar data...

    01/12/2016 10:42:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Aerial flood maps of Britain are revealing more than just at-risk regions - they have also led to the discovery of several Roman roads. Amateur archaeologists have been able to use the flood-mapping technology to trace the paths of Roman roads which have remained buried under the land for some 1,600 years. The aerial flood maps were created by aircraft equipped with laser scanners which measure the distance between the aircraft and the ground. Using light detection and ranging (Lidar) technology, the Environment Agency was able to detect the areas of Britain which are most at risk of flooding. The...
  • Honduras to make archeological dig for mysterious 'White City'

    01/09/2016 3:03:59 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | January 7, 2016 | AFP, editors
    A view of the Rio Platano biosphere reserve in Honduras, where explorers over the past century have claimed several times to have spotted the White City Honduras said Thursday it was starting a major archeological dig for a mysterious, ancient "White City" supposedly hidden in jungle in its northeast that explorers and legends have spoken of for centuries. "Today a group of archeologists and scientists is traveling to the White City to start excavations in coming days," President Juan Orlando Hernandez said in a speech to private universities. The hope is that they will uncover incontrovertible proof of the existence...
  • Ancient 'lost city' home to a vanished civilisation found deep in jungles of Honduras

    03/03/2015 2:39:00 PM PST · by BBell · 51 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | 3/3/15 | Philip Sherwell
    The jungle-choked remains of a "lost city", abandoned by a mysterious civilisation several centuries ago and long fabled for reports of its gold and "monkey children", have been uncovered in the depths of the rainforests of Honduras. A team of American and Honduran archaeologists, aided by the bushcraft and survival skills of former British SAS soldiers, has just emerged from one of the most remote locations on Earth with news of their stunning discovery. The expedition was seeking the site of the legendary "White City", also known as the "City of the Monkey God", a goal for Western explorers since...