Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Farm Bill Squeaks By in Win for GOP Leaders (Updated)
Roll Call ^ | July 11, 2013 | Matt Fuller

Posted on 07/11/2013 10:17:02 PM PDT by george76

House GOP leaders took a big gamble Thursday in bringing a farm bill without food stamps to the floor, and it paid off — just barely.

The House passed the bill 216-208, inching across a 213-vote threshold without a single Democrat supporting the measure.

(Excerpt) Read more at blogs.rollcall.com ...


TOPICS: Extended News; Government; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections; US: Kansas; US: Nebraska; US: Ohio; US: Oklahoma
KEYWORDS: 113th; agriculture; boehner; congress; farmbill; foodstamps; usda; welfarestate

1 posted on 07/11/2013 10:17:02 PM PDT by george76
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: george76

That was a gamble?


2 posted on 07/11/2013 10:26:12 PM PDT by Pikachu_Dad (Impeach Sen Quinn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: george76

ONE BIG WIN!


3 posted on 07/11/2013 10:30:02 PM PDT by onyx (Please Support Free Republic - Donate Monthly! If you want on Sarah Palin's Ping List, Let Me know!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: george76
I know from reading other threads there is farmer spite among this readership.

In their defense, putting a soybean crop in costs about $130/acre. Corn $400/acre. cotton I don't know but high.

Then hope and pray for favorable winds, rains, and no natural catastrophes.

Next combines and tractors and cotton pickers costing hundreds of thousands of dollars a piece. cost of land unless your great grandfather got it and kept it during the depression or the dust bowl.

Farmers make a lot of money but keep very little.

My Caterpillar salesman said he planted two too many cotton crops on his father's farm in Mississippi in the 80’s and lost the farm.

Asset rich, cash poor.

I farm because I enjoy it. I plant soybeans because I can afford to plant this crop. We buy second hand older equipment. I have a fellow who can fix anything. Know how many parts on a combine can break? All of them.

Mark Twain: “No man can stand success, another’s that is.”

4 posted on 07/11/2013 10:30:14 PM PDT by urbanpovertylawcenter (where the law and poverty collide in an urban setting and sparks fly)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: george76

Christmas Tree tax!!!


5 posted on 07/11/2013 10:34:09 PM PDT by Drago
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: urbanpovertylawcenter
In their defense, putting a soybean crop in costs about $130/acre. Corn $400/acre. cotton I don't know but high.
Uh huh and your crops are probably already sold before you plant them.

What does an acre of soy yield? At what price?

6 posted on 07/12/2013 12:18:35 AM PDT by lewislynn (What does the global warming movement and the Fairtax movement have in common? Disinformation)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: george76

A bill loaded with subsidies. That this is viewed as a “win” by the GOP tells me what I need to know about the party.


7 posted on 07/12/2013 2:15:44 AM PDT by oblomov
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: urbanpovertylawcenter

….LET the farmer, so far as I am concerned, be damned forevermore. To Hell with him, and bad luck to him. He is a tedious fraud and ignoramus, a cheap rogue and hypocrite, the eternal Jack of the human pack. He deserves all that he ever suffers under our economic system, and more. Any city man, not insane, who sheds tears for him is shedding tears of the crocodile.

No more grasping, selfish and dishonest mammal, indeed, is known to students of the Anthropoidea. When the going is good for him he robs the rest of us up to the extreme limit of our endurance; when the going is bad be comes bawling for help out of the public till. Has anyone ever heard of a farmer making any sacrifice of his own interests, however slight, to the common good? Has anyone ever heard of a farmer practising or advocating any political idea that was not absolutely self-seeking–that was not, in fact, deliberately designed to loot the rest of us to his gain? Greenbackism, free silver, the government guarantee of prices, bonuses, all the complex fiscal imbecilities of the cow State John Baptists–these are the contributions of the virtuous husbandmen to American political theory. There has never been a time, in good seasons or bad, when his hands were not itching for more; there has never been a time when he was not ready to support any charlatan, however grotesque, who promised to get it for him. Only one issue ever fetches him, and that is the issue of his own profit. He must be promised something definite and valuable, to be paid to him alone, or he is off after some other mountebank. He simply cannot imagine himself as a citizen of a commonwealth, in duty bound to give as well as take; he can imagine himself only as getting all and giving nothing.

Yet we are asked to venerate this prehensile moron as the Ur-burgher, the citizen par excellence, the foundation-stone of the state! And why? Because he produces something that all of us must have–that we must get somehow on penalty of death. And how do we get it from him? By submitting helplessly to his unconscionable blackmailing by paying him, not under any rule of reason, but in proportion to his roguery and incompetence, and hence to the direness of our need. I doubt that the human race, as a whole, would submit to that sort of high-jacking, year in and year out, from any other necessary class of men. But the farmers carry it on incessantly, without challenge or reprisal, and the only thing that keeps them from reducing us, at intervals, to actual famine is their own imbecile knavery. They are all willing and eager to pillage us by starving us, but they can’t do it because they can’t resist attempts to swindle each other. Recall, for example, the case of the cottongrowers in the South. Back in the 1920’s they agreed among themselves to cut down the cotton acreage in order to inflate the price–and instantly every party to the agreement began planting more cotton in order to profit by the abstinence of his neighbors. That abstinence being wholly imaginary, the price of cotton fell instead of going up –and then the entire pack of scoundrels began demanding assistance from the national treasury–in brief, began demanding that the rest of us indemnify them for the failure of their plot to blackmail us.

The same demand is made sempiternally by the wheat farmers of the Middle West. It is the theory of the zanies who perform at Washington that a grower of wheat devotes himself to that banal art in a philanthropic and patriotic spirit–that he plants and harvests his crop in order that the folks of the cities may not go without bread. It is the plain fact that he raises wheat because it takes less labor than any other crop–because it enables him, after working no more than sixty days a year, to loaf the rest of the twelve months. If wheat-raising could be taken out of the hands of such lazy fellahin and organized as the production of iron or cement is organized, the price might be reduced by two-thirds, and still leave a large profit for entrepreneurs. But what would become of the farmers? Well, what rational man gives a hoot? If wheat went to $10 a bushel tomorrow, and all the workmen of the cities became slaves in name as well as in fact, no farmer in this grand land of freedom would consent voluntarily to a reduction of as much as 1/8 of a cent a bushel. “The greatest wolves,” said E. W. Howe, a graduate of the farm, “are the farmers who bring produce to town to sell.” Wolves? Let us not insult Canis lupus I move the substitution of Hyæna hyæna.

- H.L. Mencken


8 posted on 07/12/2013 2:21:45 AM PDT by oblomov
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: oblomov
. . . quoth the man who lived in the same house in the city of Baltimore for his entire life and never turned his hand to a day of physical work or meeting a payroll.

Cost of putting in a crop of Mencken bloviation: approaching zero.

9 posted on 07/12/2013 2:36:36 AM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: urbanpovertylawcenter

If the feds were not sucking the life out of the economy at every level and turn, you would have a wealthier market buying your produce at higher prices.

Taxes and subsidies are equally evil — stealing and receiving stolen goods are equally evil.


10 posted on 07/12/2013 4:02:49 AM PDT by Born to Conserve
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

Hear here!


11 posted on 07/12/2013 4:03:49 AM PDT by shove_it (long ago Orwell and Rand warned us about 0bama's America)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: urbanpovertylawcenter
Wife's cousin and his wife farm in SW Iowa.
They are reaching late 60s and no one else wants to sign up for the grinding work that farming requires.
12 posted on 07/12/2013 4:50:59 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (NRA Life Member)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: lewislynn; urbanpovertylawcenter
Uh huh and your crops are probably already sold before you plant them.

What does an acre of soy yield? At what price?

LOL!

Go ahead and tell him Mr. Farmer. From the tone of the question, I don't think LL is looking for the candid truth, but tell him anyway.

Especially the yield per acre! As a former farmer, I know that you know, so don't lie! THAT's always so predictable.

Oh, don't forget the price, I have a pretty good guess how much of your crop is pre-sold, so what do you think you're going to get for the rest? THAT'S so predictable too!

13 posted on 07/12/2013 8:03:39 AM PDT by Balding_Eagle (When America falls, darkness will cover the face of the earth for a thousand years.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Balding_Eagle
I plant soybeans because I can afford to plant this crop. ...From the tone of the question, I don't think LL is looking for the candid truth, but tell him anyway.
I don't want the candid truth? Or YOU are afraid to disclose the truth? From the lack of answers I'll safely assume the latter.

The only "tone" I hear is cry babies wanting more from the teet.

Crying about $130 to plant an acre of income producing product as if that's a lot of money? It costs more than that to plant a lawn on a postage stamp sized lot...You know like the lawn at your(taxpayer subsidized) 2nd home at the beach/lake/mountains.

14 posted on 07/12/2013 8:57:05 AM PDT by lewislynn (What does the global warming movement and the Fairtax movement have in common? Disinformation)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

Are you suggesting that a physical laborer or business owner would be in favor of agribusiness subsidies?


15 posted on 07/12/2013 1:40:17 PM PDT by oblomov
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: lewislynn

OK smarty pants, in my old neck of the woods, soybeans are $15.11 today at the close, down 48 cents from yesterday.

http://www.newvision.coop/

The new beans will be ready to sell about Septembe 1.

Name the 9-1-2013 price.

Come on, you KNOW you can do it. Name the price.


16 posted on 07/12/2013 2:24:55 PM PDT by Balding_Eagle (When America falls, darkness will cover the face of the earth for a thousand years.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: oblomov
No.

I'm suggesting that quoting in extenso a notorious bloviator with absolutely no first-hand knowledge of farming or business (and during the time of the Farm Revolt in the 1890s to boot) is not going to add a thing to the discussion.

17 posted on 07/12/2013 3:01:41 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: oblomov
Wrong Farm Revolt. 1890s was Kansas and Mary "Yellin'" Lease.

Mencken was a little later, in the 20s, but same idea.

18 posted on 07/12/2013 3:04:38 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

How is mocking the farm subsidies initiated under Harding (the 1922 Grain Futures Act) the same as bloviating (a word coined by Harding) about the Populist movement of circa 1896?

The Populists deserved to be mocked, of course, but were less deserving of ridicule than farm subsidies.


19 posted on 07/12/2013 3:52:43 PM PDT by oblomov
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Balding_Eagle
I'm in construction and you know prices so maybe you can tell me what lumber, concrete, copper pipe etc. will be in Sept. Oh yea and the weather too.

Get it cry baby?

20 posted on 07/13/2013 3:24:14 PM PDT by lewislynn (What does the global warming movement and the Fairtax movement have in common? Disinformation)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Balding_Eagle
soybeans are $15.11 today
I asked: "What does an acre of soy yield? At what price?

Maybe you don't know what yield means. I thought it was a commom term used by farmers.

Anyway, an acre of soy costs $130.00 to plant and the price is $15.11 so your "yield" would have to be 8.6 bushels?/ton? per acre to break even...so what's the average yield per acre of soy "smarty pants"?

21 posted on 07/13/2013 3:47:55 PM PDT by lewislynn (What does the global warming movement and the Fairtax movement have in common? Disinformation)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Balding_Eagle
By golly, should I tell LL that I don't farm for the money.

Beans are about 14$ a bushel, none of mine are presold. I know what my yield will be when I run the combine through the fields and the last bean is in the truck. Last year it was about 30 bushels per acre with the drought, but this year we hope for 80!

Combine 1980 JD 7720 with a 20 ft header.

Bean truck 1973 Chevy C60 dump bed.

Planter 1990’s JD 9300 eight row on 36 inches have to double plant the beans to get them on 18 inch rows

tractor 1983 JD 4850

sprayer JD 250 pull type Farming where God is truly your partner!

22 posted on 07/14/2013 12:31:01 AM PDT by urbanpovertylawcenter (where the law and poverty collide in an urban setting and sparks fly)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: urbanpovertylawcenter

I hear you.

I guess I can understand the ignorance of many of the other Freepers, they probably have never even driven through real farm country, let alone talk to a farmer.

One of them upthread was thanking the government for the abundance of food we have. Sad story.


23 posted on 07/14/2013 9:42:09 AM PDT by Balding_Eagle (When America falls, darkness will cover the face of the earth for a thousand years.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: lewislynn
Anyway, an acre of soy costs $130.00 to plant and the price is $15.11 so your "yield" would have to be 8.6 bushels?/ton?

It costs $100 to $150 just to rent the land.

24 posted on 07/14/2013 12:02:36 PM PDT by Balding_Eagle (When America falls, darkness will cover the face of the earth for a thousand years.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson