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Happy 377th Birthday, Army National Guard
Heritage ^ | December 13, 2013 | Clark Irvine

Posted on 12/13/2013 2:57:35 PM PST by 1rudeboy

Created by the members of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1636 to defend the earliest American community, the Army National Guard celebrates its 377th birthday today.

Originally a militia group made up of all able-bodied colonists over the age of 16, the National Guard in its current form wasn’t created until 1916. Its citizen-soldier members have fought and died in every major American conflict since 1637.

National Guard units have been essential to the war effort for the past 12 years in both Iraq and Afghanistan, while also answering the call to duty in local and state communities across the nation. Known as the country’s first responders, the National Guard has reacted quickly to disasters such as 9/11, Colorado forest fires, and Hurricane Sandy. These citizen-soldiers will continue to play an important role in future security efforts both at home and abroad.

The Guard’s responsibilities have grown since its inception. In addition to natural disasters, the Guard provides critical support in the event of a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosive (CBRNE) attack. Even during natural disasters, these forces can come in handy as nuclear power plants and other industrial sites have the potential to release such hazardous materials. As new threats emerge and reductions elsewhere in the military create more security gaps, the nation will increasingly call upon its citizen-soldiers.

The National Guard has defended America at home and abroad for nearly 400 years. Yet, budget reductions under the Obama Administration threaten its ability to respond rapidly in the future, putting lives and national security at risk. These cuts have included large projected personnel reductions and a smaller commitment from the federal government. As we honor those Citizen-Soldiers who have protected the homeland for nearly 400 hundred years, we should also reflect on the constitutional obligation of Congress to provide for the common defense. They can do so by providing the Guard and other armed forces the resources they need to preserve national security.


TOPICS: Announcements; Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 12/13/2013 2:57:35 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy

The national guard and the militia are not the same thing. The anti gun crowd always want to connect the two.


2 posted on 12/13/2013 3:04:28 PM PST by DesertRhino (I was standing with a rifle, waiting for soviet paratroopers, but communists just ran for office.)
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To: 1rudeboy

I was in the National Guard 1994-2000. My dad was a Marine who served two tours in Vietnam (flying choppers). He used to joke that I was “part-time help”. I would remind him that we were 140 years older than the Corps.


3 posted on 12/13/2013 3:04:48 PM PST by MuttTheHoople (Nothing is more savage and brutal than justifiably angry Americans. Don’t believe me? Ask the Germa)
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To: 1rudeboy

But that said. A robust national guard, heavily based upon the rifle, combined with a small professional military, would be a fine national defense.

Such nations are also not usually involved in decades long wars.


4 posted on 12/13/2013 3:07:02 PM PST by DesertRhino (I was standing with a rifle, waiting for soviet paratroopers, but communists just ran for office.)
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To: 1rudeboy

1st Battalion, 121st Infantry Regiment, was established in 1860
as the "Independent Volunteer Battalion" of Macon, Georgia.
After many transformations throughout the years,
it exists today as a unit of the Georgia National Guard.

Several of my ancestors were members back in the 1860's
and I was a member from 1971-1977.
1st Battalion 121st Infantry - "Faciendum Est" - It Shall Be Done

5 posted on 12/13/2013 3:18:21 PM PST by Repeal The 17th (We have met the enemy and he is us.)
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To: DesertRhino

The National Guard is part of the militia.

Title 10, Section 311 (Dick Act) divides the militia into the organized militia (National Guard) and the unorganized militia (male adults not in the NG between 17 and 15, and younger than 65 for those who held a position as an officer.

There is also a Naval Militia, from which the US could get people to operate under letters of marque and reprisal.


6 posted on 12/13/2013 3:23:13 PM PST by donmeaker
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To: 1rudeboy

Think Silent Cal used them after the Boston mayor tweaked the local cops in 1919. He was more peeved at the mayor than the striking PD.


7 posted on 12/13/2013 3:26:18 PM PST by Insigne123 (It is the soldier, not the community organizer, who gives us freedom of the press)
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To: 1rudeboy

377? Wow.. OL’ HOnky gettin’ down and oppressing the masses and building a new world that would eventually become the beacon to those seeking peace and prosperity from across the globe.. Is that all? Thanks!


8 posted on 12/13/2013 3:28:05 PM PST by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi)
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To: 1rudeboy

I know the Guard likes to brag they go back to colonial times. However, the current “National Guard” is no longer is true “state” militia. Drill Pay and Annual Training pay come directly from the Federal Government. IF the federal money stopped, then there would be no National Guard.

I have been in the Army National Guard, and I currently serve in the U.S. Army Reserve. The only “real” difference between the two is that “most of the time” the Guard falls under Title 32 of USC instead of Title 10. So, they can do “law enforcement” and not violate posse commutatis.


9 posted on 12/13/2013 3:34:25 PM PST by Sola Veritas (Trying to speak truth - not always with the best grammar or spelling)
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To: 1rudeboy

Gratuitous post for an outfit I have done business with in the past when it comes to military wear. I had an issue with them last week due to the fact that they listed upcoming dates of significance. They had listed kwanzaa on 12/26 and I sent them a note asking why the phony holiday. They actually called me and after I explained ron karenga and his phony holiday they said they would remove it. They did and now list Boxing Day on 12/26. Awesome response and I like their gear as well. Customize it to suit your service. Here’s the link. Oh, and happy birthday National Guard.

http://www.vision-strike-wear.com/


10 posted on 12/13/2013 3:42:33 PM PST by rktman (Under my plan(scheme), the price of EVERYTHING will necessarily skyrocket! Period.)
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To: 1rudeboy

Today’s National Guard was authorized by the Militia (Dick) Act of 1903. Here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Militia_Act_of_1903

The claim of 377 years for the National Guard is not really true. Prior to 1903, the various state militias were creatures of their states. Performance of state militia performance, when called to national service, was always a problem; both in leadership, abilities, and equipment.


11 posted on 12/14/2013 12:01:18 AM PST by MasterGunner01
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To: 1rudeboy

I spent time in the Guard in late 60’s to the late 70’s, after serving as a draftee in the Army. I never felt that I was in the Army while in the guard, it was different. After the draft ended in the early 70’s I saw how the guard strength diminished. I was in a 700 man Bn. that eventually ended up at about a single company strength level. The Armory was eventually closed and the Unit disbanded. It seemed that every state had a Division in the 50’s and 60’s. Are there any full ARNG divisions left? (I’m guessing that Alaska does.)


12 posted on 12/20/2013 8:44:42 AM PST by Bringbackthedraft (Remember Ty Woods? Glenn Doherty ? Forgot already?)
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To: 1rudeboy
Created by the members of the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1636 to defend the earliest American community

The Virginians had already constituted a militia to defend themselves for more than a quarter of a century by then.

13 posted on 12/20/2013 8:50:47 AM PST by EternalVigilance
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To: EternalVigilance

I wonder if the Spanish had a militia in Florida in the 1500’s?


14 posted on 12/20/2013 9:06:56 AM PST by Bringbackthedraft (Remember Ty Woods? Glenn Doherty ? Forgot already?)
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To: Bringbackthedraft

That was more like a Spanish military presence. I’ve walked on the ramparts of the fort at St. Augustine. Pretty darned impressive for its time.


15 posted on 12/20/2013 11:01:24 AM PST by EternalVigilance
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To: Bringbackthedraft

Yes they did.


16 posted on 12/23/2013 7:07:00 AM PST by I got the rope
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To: DesertRhino

The militia per Title 10, section 311 consists of the organized militia (national guard) and the unorganized militia.


17 posted on 01/02/2014 4:53:18 AM PST by donmeaker (A man can go anywhere on earth, and where man can go, he can drag a cannon.)
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To: 1rudeboy

The most decorated Division in the US Army is a National Guard Division which served in Iraq. The majority of its streamers came from WW I, where it steamed rolled any German Division that took them on. Of course, it may have been a little lop sided since the German divisions were about 9-10K strong up against a Division of 27K. They entered WW II in March of 45 as an active Division, where they probably out numbered the Germans for the 2nd time considering it was at the tail end of the war.


18 posted on 01/15/2014 8:46:46 PM PST by Bringbackthedraft (Remember Ty Woods? Glenn Doherty ? Forgot already?)
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