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Lawmakers Advance Effort to Legalize Raw Milk
Virginia Free Citizen ^ | March 30, 2014 | Kate Miller

Posted on 03/30/2014 1:34:38 PM PDT by RightSideNews

“As a producer of grass-fed beef, I am familiar with some of the difficulties small farmers face when marketing fresh food directly to consumers. Our bills would make it easier for families to buy wholesome milk directly from farmers by reversing the criminalization of dairy farmers who offer raw milk,” said Rep. Massie. “The federal government should not punish farmers for providing customers the foods they want, and states should be free to set their own laws regulating food safety.” Representative Pingree says this legislation supports small farmers. “Many consumers want to buy fresh, unpasteurized milk and regulations shouldn’t get between them and the farmer who wants to sell it,” said Representative Pingree. “Given how many food scares there have been involving large-scale producers, it just doesn’t make sense to spend money cracking down on small, local farmers who are producing natural, raw milk and cheese. The enforcement of raw milk regulations has been overzealous and needs to be reined in.”

(Excerpt) Read more at virginiafreecitizen.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government; News/Current Events; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: dairyfarmer; freemarket; milk; regulation

1 posted on 03/30/2014 1:34:38 PM PDT by RightSideNews
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To: RightSideNews

last time I drank raw milk I was 9 and I got Yellow Jaundice..AKA Hepatitis...


2 posted on 03/30/2014 1:39:21 PM PDT by Tennessee Nana
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To: RightSideNews

I find it encouraging that someone somewhere thinks using SWAT Teams against dairy farmers is ridiculous ...


3 posted on 03/30/2014 1:41:15 PM PDT by spodefly (This is my tag line. There are many like it, but this one is mine.)
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To: Tennessee Nana
I'm sure technology has progressed since then. Testing for disease can be carried out on a single chip now.

/johnny

4 posted on 03/30/2014 1:59:01 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper
I don't get the benefits of raw milk...

I'm sure I consumed some in my pre teens.

5 posted on 03/30/2014 2:03:57 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Rip it out by the roots.)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
I don't either. And, since I'm missing my spleen I've got a compromised immune system. I certainly wouldn't drink it.

However, a free people can determine what they consume without government telling them what they can and can't do.

This is about freedom from nanny government, not food safety.

/johnny

6 posted on 03/30/2014 2:07:50 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

I has good bacteria in it plus many people think it tastes better.

Its also necessary for cheese making.


7 posted on 03/30/2014 2:08:15 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: driftdiver
I've made cheese with powdered whole milk. Not great cheese, but cheese.

The microbes may help the flavor of specialty cheeses, but they aren't required. Any cheese making supply can provide pure cultures of required bacteria, along with rennet.

/johnny

8 posted on 03/30/2014 2:10:37 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper
My mom's father and step mother lived on 30 acres in S. Iowa. They had a Jersey cow that provided splendid milk. thick as a milkshake.
Then one day, stupid cousin hit the cow with his pickup while delivering corn for the cow. That was the end of “Ol Jerse.”
Damn !
9 posted on 03/30/2014 2:18:42 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Rip it out by the roots.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Perhaps i should have said good cheese.


10 posted on 03/30/2014 2:24:55 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: driftdiver
I wasn't making Port Salut, that's for sure. ;)

/johnny

11 posted on 03/30/2014 2:28:55 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Tennessee Nana

I drank raw milk every day of my life until the folks moved to town when I was 16 - apparently there are some immunities transmitted in the unpasteurized and unhomogenized version of that freshest of products.

The milk was generally consumed the day it was produced, as there was some concern about refrigeration. What cooling there was came about largely because of submerging the milk cans in fresh-flowing spring water, as mechanical means were not yet in widespread use in rural communities.


12 posted on 03/30/2014 2:30:33 PM PDT by alloysteel (Obamacare - Death and Taxes now available online. One-stop shopping at its best!)
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To: RightSideNews

I wish we could get it down here in FL. Its impossible to make cheese from the usual ultra-pasteurized milk.


13 posted on 03/30/2014 2:31:59 PM PDT by Jacquerie ( Article V.)
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To: RightSideNews

I don’t have the slightest interest in consuming raw milk, but I don’t see why other people shouldn’t have it.


14 posted on 03/30/2014 2:38:14 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Email your grandmother!)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

If you have problems with digestion, raw milk is a superb probiotic.


15 posted on 03/30/2014 2:48:41 PM PDT by Mamzelle
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To: Mamzelle

Purple berries do it for me..


16 posted on 03/30/2014 2:53:02 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Rip it out by the roots.)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
I don't get the benefits of raw milk...

Helped me get over some wicked acid reflux. Of course, this being Florida, I had to accidentally get from my 'pet's' supply.

17 posted on 03/30/2014 4:03:25 PM PDT by tbpiper
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To: driftdiver
Perhaps i should have said good cheese

Just when I was going to jump in.
18 posted on 03/30/2014 4:27:54 PM PDT by andyk (I have sworn...eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.)
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To: RightSideNews

This is just crazy talk. before you know it they will be letting people eat and drink what they please. What comes next, freedom of speech too? It’s a slippery slope.


19 posted on 03/30/2014 4:54:37 PM PDT by Colorado Doug (Now I know how the Indians felt to be sold out for a few beads and trinkets)
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To: RightSideNews

20 posted on 03/30/2014 5:06:04 PM PDT by Redcitizen (When a zombie apocalypse starts, Chuck Norris doesn't try to survive. The zombies do.)
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To: RightSideNews
I grew up on a dairy farm. the biggest concern with farmers selling raw milk to consumers is that farmers frequently treat cows with infections with antibiotics. The milk from these cows can potentially kill someone if they are allergic to antibiotics. Sometimes farmers screw up, treat the sick cow then forget to tell their fellow farm workers not to put the milk from the treated cow into the bulk tank with the rest of the milk. Also not to gross out anyone but sometimes accidents happen and a milking machine can fall off a cow into a pile of cow poop. Needless to say the bacteria that gets into the milk supply can be harmful to people in this situation. When a cow gives birth to a calf that milk in particular is super rich in nutrients and antibodies. That milk also has to be separated from the rest but I am not sure why other than it looks really yellow and thick, probably doesn't taste right. That said I grew up drinking raw milk and yes it does taste better. Store bought milk always tasted burnt to me. I never became sick from drinking raw milk. I think it can strengthen your immune system.
21 posted on 03/30/2014 5:33:35 PM PDT by 30 Govt.
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To: driftdiver

Blessed are the cheesemakers.


22 posted on 03/30/2014 6:49:08 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: RightSideNews; All
If the buyers and sellers of raw milk are residents of different states, then Congress can make laws to regulate such milk. This is because the Founding States made the Constitution's Commerce Clause, Clause 3 of Section 8 of Article I to grant Congress the specific power to legislatively regulate interstate and foreign commerce.

H O W E V E R ...

If a milk farmer sells his milk only to residents of the same state that the farmer is a resident of then, regardless what FDR's activist justices wanted everybody to think about the scope of Congress's Commerce Clause powers, the states have never delegated to Congress the specific power to regulate such commerce.

In fact, when FDR's activist justices decided cases which tested the limits of Congress's powers in the 1930s and 40s, they wrongly ignored that Thomas Jefferson had officially clarified the limits of Congress's Commerce Clause powers. Using terms like "does not extend" and "exclusively," Jefferson had clearly indicated that Congress has no business sticking its big nose into intrastate commerce.

“For the power given to Congress by the Constitution does not extend to the internal regulation of the commerce of a State, (that is to say of the commerce between citizen and citizen,) which remain exclusively (emphases added) with its own legislature; but to its external commerce only, that is to say, its commerce with another State, or with foreign nations, or with the Indian tribes.” –Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson’s Opinion on the Constitutionality of a National Bank : 1791.

But who cares what Jefferson said about the Commerce Clause? After all, Constitution-ignoring RINOs and Democrats will argue that the Constitution means only what the Supreme Court says that it means.

That being said, the problem is that FDR's puppet justices had also wrongly ignored that the Supreme Court had previously not only reflected on Jeffersons words about the limits of Congress's Commerce Clause powers, but had also used agriculture, in the context of the 10th Amendment nonetheless, to clarify that the states have never granted to Congress, via the Constitution, the specific power to regulate agricultural production.

”From the accepted doctrine that the United States is a government of delegated powers, it follows that those not expressly granted, or reasonably to be implied from such as are conferred, are reserved to the states, or to the people. To forestall any suggestion to the contrary, the Tenth Amendment was adopted. The same proposition, otherwise stated, is that powers not granted are prohibited. None to regulate agricultural production is given, and therefore legislation by Congress for that purpose is forbidden (emphasis added).” —United States v. Butler, 1936.

In fact, noting that I have yet to find references to any of the excerpts above in the Wickard v. Filburn opinion (corrections welcome), using terms like "some concept" and "implicit," here is what was left of the 10th Amendment after FDR's justices got finished with it.

“In discussion and decision, the point of reference, instead of being what was “necessary and proper” to the exercise by Congress of its granted power, was often some concept of sovereignty thought to be implicit (emphases added) in the status of statehood. Certain activities such as “production,” “manufacturing,” and “mining” were occasionally said to be within the province of state governments and beyond the power of Congress under the Commerce Clause.”—Wickard v. Filburn, 1942.

FDR's justices had reduced 10th Amendment-protected state sovereignty to a wives' tale imo.

So regardless of federal interference in intrastate commerce, including agriculture, since the time of Constitution-ignoring socialist FDR, the feds actually have no more power to make laws which regulate intrastate commerce, imo, than they have to regulate our 1st Amendment-protected freedoms.

Finally, the reason that the corrupt federal government is continually getting away with unconstitutional expanding its powers is because parents are not making sure that their children are being taught the federal government's constitutionally limited powers.

23 posted on 04/01/2014 1:38:46 PM PDT by Amendment10
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