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Earth Day: Hail Fossil Fuels, Energy Of The Future
investors.com ^ | 4/21/2014 | MARK J. PERRY

Posted on 04/22/2014 6:04:09 AM PDT by rktman

On Earth Day, according to various advocates, "events are held worldwide to increase awareness and appreciation of the Earth's natural environment." As we observe the event Tuesday, it might be a good time to appreciate the fact that Americans get most of their plentiful, affordable energy directly from the Earth's "natural environment" in the form of fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, and petroleum).

It's largely those energy sources that fuel our vehicles and airplanes; heat, cool and light our homes and businesses; power our nation's factories; and in the process significantly raise our standard of living.

Shouldn't that be part of "increasing our awareness and appreciation of Earth's natural environment" — to celebrate Mother Earth's bountiful natural resources in the form of abundant, low-cost fossil fuels?

(Excerpt) Read more at news.investors.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: einhorn; energy; gasandoil; iraeinhorn; lenin; leninsbirthday; petroleum; vladimir; vladimirlenin
WOO HOO! I almost forgot about it being erf day today. Gotta power up some stuff and drive around for no particular reason to show my support for gaia and all the resources she provides us to use. Turn it up to "11" and rock on.
1 posted on 04/22/2014 6:04:09 AM PDT by rktman
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To: rktman

Today is “Turn On Everything And Leave It On Day.”


2 posted on 04/22/2014 6:08:34 AM PDT by wastedyears (I'm a pessimist, I say plenty of negative things. Consider it a warning of sorts.)
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To: rktman

Have you seen this video? It says it all.

http://www.ijreview.com/2014/04/131476-watch-prius-owner-completely-flip-farmer-family-driving-truck/


3 posted on 04/22/2014 6:15:41 AM PDT by Daveinyork
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To: wastedyears
Today is “Turn On Everything And Leave It On Day.”

I actually find that to be counterproductive to the cause of conservatives. Using energy I don't need and giving more money to to the energy companies and feds (taxes) is not 'conservative'.

That being said, I have to run a bunch of errands today, meaning I will be driving around town quite a bit. I will not 'limit' that driving , as my way of protest.

Basically, I'm ignoring Earth Day.

Earth Day is just a 'game' the liberals play where they pick ONE DAY to 'be' conservative, and are totally wasteful the other 364 days.

4 posted on 04/22/2014 6:18:15 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (Lost my tagline on Flight MH370. Sorry for the inconvenience.)
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To: Daveinyork

LOL! It’s either their way or the highway. Talk about irrational people who will not compromise. At least they’re dedicated.


5 posted on 04/22/2014 6:21:05 AM PDT by rktman (Ethnicity: Redneck. Race: Daytona 500)
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To: rktman
We ran out of $25/barrel oil here in the US, so the price went up to $100/ barrel and we have a lot more oil available now.

Eventually, hopefully not sooner than later, we will run out of $100/barrel oil and the price will go up to $250/barrel, leading to another increase in availability.

6 posted on 04/22/2014 6:28:56 AM PDT by Ben Ficklin
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To: rktman

“fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, and petroleum)”

There is some reasonable evidence that natural gas and higher hydrocarbons can be produced abiotically — no need for dead dinosaurs.

http://www.green-planet-solar-energy.com/abiotic-oil.html


7 posted on 04/22/2014 6:29:08 AM PDT by Zuse
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To: Zuse

Exactly!

Oil is organic and produced naturally by “mother earth”.


8 posted on 04/22/2014 6:32:07 AM PDT by newfreep
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To: Zuse

Yeah, I’ve been curious for a long time as to just how many dead dinosaurs there are? Anybody do a calculation to estimate just how many of these endangered species it would have taken to provide the amount of petroleum products we’ve taken out of the ground over the years? Massive die offs in certain areas? Or did someone just pile them up at central locations? :>} I’m thinkin’ abiotic oil is more likely. How else can abiotic oil be ‘splained?


9 posted on 04/22/2014 6:33:41 AM PDT by rktman (Ethnicity: Redneck. Race: Daytona 500)
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To: rktman

Don’t ever forget “earth day” was created to celebrate the 100th birthday of Vladimir Lenin - one of obamatollah’s communist godfathers.


10 posted on 04/22/2014 6:34:56 AM PDT by newfreep
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To: rktman; Zuse; newfreep
Oil doesn't come from dead dinosaurs. It can come from different sources but mostly algae. Some oil can come from plankton.

Back in earlier geologic periods when the earth was warmer and CO2 levels were higher, there were large warm shallow seas in the basins. These conditions combined with sunlight would generate huge algae growth. Some might say continuous algae blooms, followed by die offs. The algae would settle and be covered over cutting off oxygen. Then under time, temperature and pressure, oil is created.

So we produce oil/gas from these basins like the Permian Basin, the Williston Basin, or the Fort Worth Basin.

I'm not aware of any oil companies producing abiotic oil.

11 posted on 04/22/2014 6:53:46 AM PDT by Ben Ficklin
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To: rktman

She sure created a lot of global warming with her rant.


12 posted on 04/22/2014 7:20:05 AM PDT by Daveinyork
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To: Ben Ficklin

Can’t we have both? A nearly inexhaustible supply of methane deep down plus biological activity? What do you think about deep-water wells miles offshore? Do you think the planet is growing (expanding)?


13 posted on 04/22/2014 7:25:57 AM PDT by Zuse
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To: rktman

I think its more than the dinosaurs...plant life too.

But I’m with you. Oil is more or less consistent across the planet, as if it is all the same age, was formed under similar conditions, and formed over the same period of time...which I find odd.

And to my knowledge, we never get an impurity that hints of previous life. I.E. no splinters of petrified wood, pieces of fossilized bone, etc....which I find odd.

And we don’t find ‘half oil’, as in a substance somewhere between living plant and crude oil...even though we poke holes all over the planet, in search of oil....which I find odd.

And we find oil at great depths. There are 8,000 feet deep wells. I understand the plates crash into each other and form mountains and valleys, etc....but it sure is hard to imagine that a pocket of oil 2 miles down used to be on the surface.

So I think abiotic oil is possible.


14 posted on 04/22/2014 7:42:02 AM PDT by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: lacrew
And we don’t find ‘half oil’, as in a substance somewhere between living plant and crude oil.

Yes we do. Canadian Oil Sands don't actually contain oil, they contain bitumen. Since it is thermally immature it needs to be upgrade to syncrude, or can can be mixed (thinned) with naphtha or condensate to send to refinery.

Shale fields like the Green River formation don't actually contain oil either. The petroleum has to be cooked out of the rock (retorted) which release kerogen. Kerogen is made into a syncrude like bitumen.

More thermally mature fields have more natural gas, the fluids tend to lighter with less heavier oils.

15 posted on 04/22/2014 8:27:29 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: lacrew
And to my knowledge, we never get an impurity that hints of previous life.

And to further increase your knowledge, all oil contains biomarkers. Each oil from different fields is unique enough that a tanker at sea can be analyzed to tell where it came from.

Using Oil Biomarkers in Petroleum Exploration
http://www.oiltracers.com/services/exploration-geochemistry/oil-biomarker-summary.aspx

You might also consider why oil/gas is only sourced from sedimentary basins and never from igneous rock.

16 posted on 04/22/2014 8:30:10 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Ben Ficklin
These conditions combined with sunlight would generate huge algae growth.

How did that algae grow on Titan?

17 posted on 04/22/2014 8:33:34 AM PDT by Starstruck (If my reply offends, you probably don't understand sarcasm or criticism...or do.)
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To: Starstruck

Titan does not have sufficient oxygen in it’s atmosphere.

Methane, ethane and like, depending on the ratio of carbon to hydrogen, is the lowest energy form of those two elements, when there is insufficient oxygen.

On earth, those elements eventually form CO2 and H20.


18 posted on 04/22/2014 8:43:23 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Starstruck
Also note the long chain hydrocarbons found in crude oil (paraffins, naphthenes, aromatics and asphaltics) are far more complex than methane and ethane found in oxygen deficient atmospheres.
19 posted on 04/22/2014 8:47:58 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

Just wondering how Titan can have oceans of hydrocarbons without algae and dinosaurs.


20 posted on 04/22/2014 8:51:46 AM PDT by Starstruck (If my reply offends, you probably don't understand sarcasm or criticism...or do.)
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To: Starstruck

But without sufficient oxygen.

If you start with hydrogen and carbon from a big bang or similar event, entropy will eventually leave you with mostly methane, some ethane etc depending on the ratio of carbon to hydrogen.

But they don’t have oceans of paraffins, naphthenes, aromatics and asphaltics that make up crude oil.


21 posted on 04/22/2014 8:55:34 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

Well I’ve certainly got a bit of an education today. Fascinating really.

But I’m still not ready to completely dismiss the abiotic theory. The Wikipedia page on it is generally unfavorable, but it gives examples of why the theory is still supported by some.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abiogenic_petroleum_origin

Here is a link to a site that is more tilted towards abiotic theory:

http://www.viewzone.com/abioticoil.html

At the bottom of the page is a scientific paper, with some interesting info (a lot of the chemistry admittedly above my head).

The crux of the theory in the paper: No matter how deep in the earth we drill (up to 7 miles), we encounter hydrocarbon gases. They propose that heat and pressure can cause many rocks to outgas these gases..and it isn’t outlandish to suppose that some micro-organism can synthesize these gases.

I don’t know. We know a lot about our planet...but there is a lot we don’t know - for example, how we can find helium 7 miles down.


22 posted on 04/22/2014 9:17:10 AM PDT by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: lacrew
No matter how deep in the earth we drill (up to 7 miles), we encounter hydrocarbon gases.

In sedimentary basins. Places where sediment from the surface has accumulated.

We don't find that in igneous rock, where the mantle has pushed up from the deep.

23 posted on 04/22/2014 9:41:04 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

I think there are still some mysteries out there. Didn’t the Soviets drill very deep and find hydrogen?

I’m probably thinking about this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kola_Superdeep_Borehole

Deep in granite...and they found hydrogen.


24 posted on 04/22/2014 10:01:42 AM PDT by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: lacrew

My suggestion is to stay away from source that agenda driven folks can easily edit or post as they want.

If you look at some writings on Kola that are focused on geology, you will find it described differently.

http://www.wirelinedrilling.com/sites/default/files/Kozlovsky%20Kola%20Deepest%20Well%20.pdf


25 posted on 04/22/2014 10:29:43 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: lacrew

Also, if you use translation software (or read Russian)

http://superdeep.pechenga.ru/


26 posted on 04/22/2014 10:45:46 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: thackney

Well I admit I have learned a lot today...and abiotic oil seems less and less likely.

The article is fascinating really...says the hole went over 800 meters horizontally off of vertical!

.....and found sedimentary rock at the bottom.


27 posted on 04/22/2014 1:19:20 PM PDT by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: lacrew
....and found sedimentary rock at the bottom.

1.2 inches of compressed sedimentation every 1,000 years x 400 million years. The whole world doesn't get that type of accumulation, but what do you think is happening in the ocean outside the Mississippi, Nile and Amazon River?

If you ever want to really learn some of the basics in the geology side of it, I recommend:

Nontechnical Guide to Petroleum Geology, Exploration, Drilling & Production, 3rd Ed.: 3rd Edition

Cheapest I found is $57 @:
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/listing/2691735085691?r=1&cm_mmc=GooglePLA-_-TextBook_NotInStock_75Up-_-Q000000633-_-2691735085691

It also gives a good over view past the geology and through to the production.

If you learn a bit about how a petroleum trap works and is formed, and particularly multiple layers with sealing rock above each layer, and different grades of oil at each layer, abiotic gets less and less feasible.

28 posted on 04/22/2014 1:39:00 PM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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