Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

What books would you suggest? (vanity)
all of YOU freepers out there ^

Posted on 01/08/2002 2:39:30 PM PST by occam's chainsaw

Most of the reading I have done over the years has been of science fiction/fantasy books read simply for enjoyment. Now that I am a little older, I am becoming more interested in finding books which are educational as well as enjoyable. I have not read very much classical literature (the small Arkansas public school I attended had little to offer in Literature) and would consider reading some as long as it wasn't too tedious.

I was hoping that some of you more experienced & educated (self educated included of course) readers could offer some suggestions for me. Biographies, classics, historical novels, fiction/non fiction, are all open to consideration. I did read Rand's "The Fountainhead" years ago and enjoyed it very much. Please give me your suggested titles along with a brief description and/or reason you are suggesting each. I know I still have a lot to learn and I appreciate any help I can get.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS:
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-166 next last
Thanks in advance!
Occam's Chainsaw
1 posted on 01/08/2002 2:39:30 PM PST by occam's chainsaw
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
The Final Days and Hell To Pay are 2 books by the late Barbara Olson which are must reads!
2 posted on 01/08/2002 2:41:36 PM PST by princess leah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
I like Perretti and LaHaye. Also Gene Edwards has some nice writings, as well as Larry Burkett's "Illuminati".
3 posted on 01/08/2002 2:42:58 PM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Personally, I have long concidered Shogun, the long unedited version, to be a wonderful way to learn about Japan and its introduction to the West.

But really, I could go on for days.

BTW, love your screen name, I have used Occums Norelco in the past.

knews hound

4 posted on 01/08/2002 2:43:36 PM PST by knews_hound
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
I just picked up John Adams -- by David McCullough. It is very good so far. And educational.
5 posted on 01/08/2002 2:45:16 PM PST by Texaggie79
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: knews_hound
I got a Norelco for Christmas!
6 posted on 01/08/2002 2:45:21 PM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: knews_hound
This might sound kinda crazy but ABeka (a homeschool and private school curriculum publisher) history books are great. It is amazing how much we did not learn in govt. schools. These history books are great.
7 posted on 01/08/2002 2:45:24 PM PST by hsmomx3
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Try anything by C. S. Lewis - "Screwtape Letters" is very good. Also, there are several biographies of his life which are very informative and interesting.
8 posted on 01/08/2002 2:45:27 PM PST by Clifdo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
I, Claudius and Claudius The God are great.
9 posted on 01/08/2002 2:45:58 PM PST by Paul Atreides
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
I think this one would be perfect for you:


10 posted on 01/08/2002 2:46:04 PM PST by AAABEST
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Citizen Hearst by W.A. Swanberg.
W. R. had his hands in everything, especially politics.
Those times aren't so different than these.
11 posted on 01/08/2002 2:46:07 PM PST by PRND21
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Unintended Consequences is the greatest book ever written.
12 posted on 01/08/2002 2:46:08 PM PST by Rodney King
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
"Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand
13 posted on 01/08/2002 2:47:51 PM PST by One More Time
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Atlas Shrugged.
14 posted on 01/08/2002 2:48:35 PM PST by Doctor Doom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Soldier of the Great War by Mark Helprin

Pilars of the Earth by Ken Follett

Saurum by Edward Rutherford

The Devil's Candy by Julie Solomon

Hollywood vs. America by Michael Medved

A Distant Mirror by Barbara Tuchman

Mere Christianity by C. S. Lewis

The Screwtape Letters by C. S. Lewis

Debt of Honor by Tom Clancy

Red Storm Rising by Tom Clancy

Good Omens by Terry Pratchett (and another guy)

I could go on and on and sorry for the bad spelling.

15 posted on 01/08/2002 2:48:44 PM PST by Andyman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Just the other day I read that Myron Magnet's The Dream and the Nightmare: The Sixties Legacy to the Underclass is supposed to have influenced George W. Bush more than any other book except the Bible. Don't know if that is true, but it sure influenced me. I highly recommend it.
16 posted on 01/08/2002 2:49:06 PM PST by madprof98
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Chuck Colson's Favorite Books

BreakPoint - The following are books identified by Chuck Colson as having been critical to his intellectual and spiritual development.

C. S. Lewis, Mere Christianity (and anything else by Lewis, especially The Abolition of Man)

Francis Schaeffer. How Should We Then Live?

Francis Schaeffer. The God Who Is There.

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. The Gulag Archipelago.

G. K. Chesterton. The Everlasting Man.

Paul Johnson. Modern Times.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer. The Cost of Discipleship.

Fyodor Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov.

John Bunyan. The Pilgrim’s Progress.

Jerry Bridges. The Pursuit of Holiness.

Richard John Neuhaus. The Naked Public Square.

17 posted on 01/08/2002 2:50:25 PM PST by Delta-Boudreaux
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
"The Gallery of Regrettable Food," by James Lileks. The funniest book I have ever read.
18 posted on 01/08/2002 2:50:57 PM PST by IowaHawk
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
You might enjoy Tim O'Brien. Three of my favorites are "The Things They Carried", "Going After Cacciato", and "In the Lake of the Woods". The first two are Viet Nam war novels and the third is a mystery with Nam connections. I was very taken with all three.
19 posted on 01/08/2002 2:51:06 PM PST by Bahbah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
I thought the Clintons improved the Arkansas school system.

Do you mean to tell me that the Clintons lied?

I'm absolutely shocked!

20 posted on 01/08/2002 2:51:58 PM PST by Diver Dave
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
You owe it to yourself to consider the late Patrick O'Brian's 'Sea Series'. Twenty historically accurate novels address the adventures of an 18th century British naval captain, and his friend, the ships doctor. I believe the first in the series is called 'Captain and Commander' which is followed by nineteen others. All are available in 'trade-back' for about $15 each and many may be found in the library. Many have wondered why O'Brian never won the Pulitzer for his work.
21 posted on 01/08/2002 2:52:06 PM PST by Res Nullius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
About anything by Ambrose Bierce, Mark Twain, and "Confederacy of Dunces" by John Kennedy Toole. Oh, and "The Life and Selected Writings of Thomas Jefferson." And Marcus Aurelius. And "The Illuminatus Trilogy" by R.A. Wilson. And...(Stope me before I make you do book reports...)
22 posted on 01/08/2002 2:53:24 PM PST by Doctor Doom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Some of my personal recommendations are:

Dallas Willard, "The Divine Consipiracy"

C.S. Lewis, Mere Christianity

Chuck Swindol, Grace Awakening

23 posted on 01/08/2002 2:53:59 PM PST by Delta-Boudreaux
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
These are all Modern Classics.

My top recommendation: "Pillars of the Earth" by Ken Follett is awesome historical story about a man who wanted to build cathedrals in the middle ages, great book.

My second recommendation: "Bonfire of the Vanities" by Tom Wolfe (forget about the movie, the book is great and should be made into a new movie).

My third recommendation: "Atlas Shrugged" by Ayn Rand

My fourth recommendation: "The Gold Coast" by Nelson DeMille and anything else by him as well).

And, number five, even if you have seen the movie: "The Godfather" by Mario Puzo.

24 posted on 01/08/2002 2:56:09 PM PST by RobFromGa
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
"AMERICANS NO MORE" and subtitled "The Death of Citizenship" by Georgie Anne Geyer.
25 posted on 01/08/2002 2:57:24 PM PST by leprechaun9
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Please give me your suggested titles along with a brief description

Now is a good time to read The Shipping News by E. Annie Proulx and see the movie (or vice versa). She won the Pulitzer Prize in 1994.
A guy in the Northeast gets knocked around in life, finally meets a woman, has a daughter, loses woman in a car crash, and moves to Newfoundland for a fresh start. It kinda works out in the end. I saw it Dec 27, and it was okay.

Link to: The Shipping News

26 posted on 01/08/2002 2:57:33 PM PST by Oxylus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Clausewitz, "On War."

Nietzsche. (All of them.)

Machiavelli, "The Prince."

David Boaz, "Libertarian Reader."

Hayek, "The Road to Serfdom."

Anything by Von Mises or Milton Friedman

27 posted on 01/08/2002 2:57:39 PM PST by Doctor Doom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Conservatism:

The Politics of Prudence, Russell Kirk The Conservative Mind, Russell Kirk Ideas Have Consequences, Richard Weaver

When you have those out of the way, I'll give your a list of twenty more.

28 posted on 01/08/2002 2:58:26 PM PST by KC Burke
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Try "Lord of the Rings."

I think its out of print, so you may have to do some searching. They even made an animated movie version of it several years ago.

29 posted on 01/08/2002 2:58:44 PM PST by Ken H
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
The most important book not required in American schools -

THE ROAD TO SERFDOM by Friederich Hayek

It is the most concise, easy to understand treatise on why a free market economy and republican government is inherently superior to socialism and communism.
Regards,

30 posted on 01/08/2002 2:58:54 PM PST by john in orinda
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Don't give up on the Sci-Fi just yet. There's one I'll bet you haven't read.
Although it is not really science fiction, "The Last and First Men" by Olaf Stapledon from 1930 features vistas of hundreds of millions of years and the rise and fall of civilizations and entire races.
Definitely worth a read.


31 posted on 01/08/2002 2:59:07 PM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
The Holy Bible, by God
32 posted on 01/08/2002 2:59:55 PM PST by AlGone2001
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Anything by:
- Flannery O'Connor
- Walker Percy
- John Kennedy O'Toole (esp. Confederacy of Dunces)
- Walter Miller (esp. Canticle for Leibowitz)
- Mark Helprin (esp. A Winter's Tale)
- Graham Greene
33 posted on 01/08/2002 3:00:28 PM PST by ikanakattara
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Anything by Winston Churchill.
34 posted on 01/08/2002 3:01:18 PM PST by Taylor42
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
1. "The Red and the Black"

2. "The Count of Monte Cristo"

3. The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

4."The Sorrows of Young Werther"

5. "Huckleberry Finn".

6. "Travels with Charley."

7. "The Sun Also Rises".

8. "Gone with the Wind."

9. Any Shakespear plays.

10. Any Arthur Miller or Tennessee Williams plays.

35 posted on 01/08/2002 3:01:35 PM PST by Young Werther
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
"Unintended Consequences" by John Ross.

And my compliments once again on your screen name < g >

36 posted on 01/08/2002 3:02:04 PM PST by Jefferson Adams
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
A selection of Shakespeare's major plays and either Pride and Prejudice or Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen would be a good place to start for the British literature. Both authors show how little human nature has changed across the centuries. For beauty of the British language I'd start with the King James Bible and then I'd look for an old, and I do mean at least 50 year old, anthology of English poetry with a good deal of biographical detail on the poets. As a general rule, poetry written before about 1940 is worth reading but poetry after 1950 or so tends to be impenetrable.

Among American authors, Twain, Poe and Henry James are favorites. Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter was an acquired taste and I found James Fenimore Cooper to have created good plots deeply buried in thickets of bad prose. One 19th century American who may surprise readers is Ulysses Grant. His memoirs are top notch, but then again Twain was his editor. For influences like the transcendentalists, among them Emerson and Thoreau, I recommend a few excerpts from an old college textbook to get a flavor of what all the fuss was about instead of reading the entire works, but that is personal taste.

37 posted on 01/08/2002 3:03:35 PM PST by The Iron Duke
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Bahbah
I second this nomination! And *The Things They Carried* is a collection of stories, but the title story is by far and away the best.

Classics:

*MOBY DICK* by Herman Mehlville Anything by Charles Dickens Anything by Mark Twain *Jane Eyre* by Charlotte Bronte *As I Lay Dying* by William Faulkner *Uncle Tom's Cabin* by Harriet Beecher Stowe

I could go on and on, but that should get you started. :)

38 posted on 01/08/2002 3:05:12 PM PST by eaglebeak
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Bureaucracy and Liberalism, by Ludwig von Mises.(Two separate books)
39 posted on 01/08/2002 3:06:54 PM PST by SemperFidelis
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Anything by James A. Michener...they're novels but historically accurate
40 posted on 01/08/2002 3:08:32 PM PST by ThePoetsRaven
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Don Quixote
Animal Farm
1984
Fahrenheit 451
Z
The Crucible (play)
Henry V (part I) (Shakespeare)
Rhinocerous (play)
An Enemy of the People (play)

41 posted on 01/08/2002 3:11:37 PM PST by TomGuy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
If you are looking for true classics, The Great Books Foundation has a list of them at their website

A book that is mentioned there, "How to Read A book" by Mortimer Adler and Charles Van Doren is one recommended for high school 'Classical' homeschoolers who lean heavily on the classics and Great Books for their literature. I plan to read it before my kids do since I'm going to be reading most of what THEY read so we can discuss it.

I grew up in MS, and my English teachers didn't stress the Classics very much at all. Oddly, in my American Lit. class I don't remember reading ANYTHING by Eudora Welty, Walker Percy or Flannery O'Connor, three of the South's finest writers! I've had to educate myself in that genre since I finished school!

42 posted on 01/08/2002 3:12:42 PM PST by SuziQ
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
The Fifth Horseman.......Dominique/LaPierre

15-20 years old, but deals with nuclear terrorism. Unimaginable then, now......?????

43 posted on 01/08/2002 3:13:02 PM PST by ALASKA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Here are some of my faves:

History
The Civil War, a Narrative by Shelby Foote (Excellent history done in narrative form which makes it an enjoyable read)
Fiction
On the Road by Jack Kerouac (seminal work by the creator of the Beat Generation, prose is very unconventional but flows once you get the hang of it. For my money, a book that glorifies what is great about America, the freedom to go from place to place)
The Dharma Bums by Jack Kerouac (More conventional prose, a great story about freedom and adventure with Buddhism thrown in)
Little Big Man by Thomas Berger (Funny, historical, informative and tragic all at once. Great for it's unflinching look at native Amreicans)
1984 by George Orwell (The dire warning about encroaching government, a cry for freedom and individualism and an indictment of Stalinism and statism)
Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Hemingway said American literature begins and ends with this book, and he was right. Simply a great story written by America's greatest storyteller)

God there's so many more, I'll add them as I think of them.

44 posted on 01/08/2002 3:14:15 PM PST by drew
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Scipio Africanus: Greater Than Napolean (B.H. Lidell Hart)

Tesla: Man out of time (Margaret Cheney)

The Richest Man of Babylon (George S. Clason)

45 posted on 01/08/2002 3:17:17 PM PST by KirklandJunction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Liberalism, Ludwig von Mises
46 posted on 01/08/2002 3:22:08 PM PST by SemperFidelis
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #47 Removed by Moderator

To: occam's chainsaw
"Suicide of the West" (The definitive analysis of the pathology of liberalism) by James Burnham

Published by Arlington House in 1964
Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 64-14211
SBN 87000-056-x

I just ordered this used book from Amazon (yes, they do that) and started to read it. It is a bit dated, but fun and easy. It pegs liberals based on their beliefs. Thought provoking and fun.

The inside front sleeve says: " This is the book that dissects modern liberalism as no book ever has. James Burnham shows us that strange amalgam of self-righteousness, guilt, good intention, fuzzy logic, arrogance, double standard, selective indignation and selective compassion that produces the mind and psychology of the liberal.

"Burnham's insights search out the agonies of liberalism:
- Why liberalism is the ideology of suicide
- The common ancestors of liberalism and Communism.
- Why liberals sneer at patriotism.
- Very precisely: how liberalism lies at the root of race riots, murderous taxes, national surrender and the crime explosion -- and why liberals are helpless to do anything about their own follies.
- Why liberalism clashes with Christianity.
- The inner drive that impels liberals to war on the Right -- while giving the Left an ever-so-gentle tap on the wrist, at worst.
- EXTRA! Burnham's fascinating '39 Articles of Liberalism,' an intriguing test you, or anyone, can take to determine your 'ideological quotient.' You'll be astonished at how accurate it pinpoints anyone's political slant."

48 posted on 01/08/2002 3:24:34 PM PST by Cboldt
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Read anything by Lawrence Sanders. You'll learn how to make a great sandwich and eat it over the sink.
49 posted on 01/08/2002 3:27:57 PM PST by Temple Owl
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: occam's chainsaw
Witness -- Whittaker Chambers

The Conservative Mind -- Russell Kirk

Homage to Catalonia -- George Orwell

Modern Times -- Paul Johnson

The Civil War (3 volumes)-- Shelby Foote

As I Lay Dying -- William Faulkner

You can't go wrong spending a few months reading these books. Enjoy!

50 posted on 01/08/2002 3:28:40 PM PST by beckett
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-150151-166 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson