Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

St. Francis de Sales on St. Joseph (Some Excerpts for St. Joseph's Day 2004)
Reflections of St. Francis de Sales on Living Jesus, compiled by Father Andrew V. Masters, S.V.D | late 16th - early 17th century AD | St. Francis de Sales

Posted on 03/19/2004 7:46:21 AM PST by Pyro7480

The Virtues of St. Joseph

"All virtues and perfections were then reflected absolutely in St. Joseph, so that it almost seemed as if he were as perfect and possessed all virtues in as high a degree as the glorious Virgin our Mistress." Conf XIX, On the Virtues of St. Joseph, p. 368

"Certainly St. Joseph is most justly said to resemble the palm (tree), always constant, persevering, strong, and valiant. There is a great difference between these four virtues. We call a man constant when he remains firm, and prepared to suffer the assaults of the enemy, without surprise or loss of coruage during the combat. Perseverance, however, has chiefly to do with a certain weariness of mind which comes upon us when we have suffered a long time, and this weariness is as powerful an enemy as we can meet with. Now, perseverance enables a man to disregard this enemy that he gains the victory over it by continual calmness and submission to the will of God. Strength makes a man vigorously resist the attacks of his enemies. And valor is a virtue which makes us not only hold ourselves in readiness to fight or to offer resistance when the occasion presents itself, but also to attack the enemy at the moment when he least expects it." Conf XIX, On the Virtues of St. Joseph, p. 378

St. Joseph's Constancy

"Now, our glorious St. Joseph was endowed with all these virtues (constancy, perseverance, strength, valor) and practiced them marvelously well. As regards his constancy, did he not display it wonderfully when seeing Our Lady with child, and not knowing how that could be, his mind was tossed with distress, perplexity, and trouble? Yet, in spite of all, he never complained, he was never harsh or ungracious towards his holy Spouse, but remained just as gentle and respectful in his demeanor as he had ever been. But what valor and strength did he not display in the victory which he gained over the two greatest enemies of man, the devil and the world? And that by the practice of a most perfect humility, as we have said, throughout the whole course of his life. The devil, who for want of humility, and because he would not accept if for his inseparable companion, was driven out of heaven and cast down into hell, is so great an enemy to the lowly virtue, that there is no sacrifice or invention he will not use to make men fall away from it - so much the more because it is a virtue which renders them infinitely pleasing to God. We may therefore well say, "Valiant and strong in humility; he will be conqueror at once of the devil and of the world, which is full of ambition, vanity, and pride." Conf XIX, On the Virtues of St. Joseph, p. 379


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; History; Orthodox Christian
KEYWORDS: francisdesales; joseph; saint
St. Joseph, model of purity and humility, and terror of demons, pray for us!


1 posted on 03/19/2004 7:46:22 AM PST by Pyro7480
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Dajjal; Canticle_of_Deborah; Siobhan; Desdemona; NYer; Salvation; ultima ratio; Loyalist
Ping!
2 posted on 03/19/2004 7:47:58 AM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ejo; AnAmericanMother; GirlShortstop; AKA Elena; Domestic Church; american colleen; Lady In Blue; ..
For your soul

ping

3 posted on 03/19/2004 8:03:34 AM PST by Siobhan (+Pray the Divine Mercy Chaplet+)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480
BUMP
4 posted on 03/19/2004 8:06:51 AM PST by nickcarraway
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480
St. Joseph bump!
5 posted on 03/19/2004 8:07:46 AM PST by pegleg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Diago; narses; Loyalist; BlackElk; american colleen; saradippity; Polycarp; Dajjal; ...
Thanks for this reminder that today is the feast of St. Joseph, that greatest of all saints and patrons (aside from the BVM). I HIGHLY recommend the following booklet, and you can buy them for as little as a dollar:

Favorite Prayers to St. Joseph published by TAN Books and Publishers

Great Saints have assured us that St. Joseph can assist us in needs of every kind. Nevertheless, he is particularly known for help in family problems, financial needs, protection of purity, defense against dangers, matters involving work or housing, and as Patron of a Happy Death.

Here are all the famous, beloved prayers to st. Joseph, including the Novena to St. Joseph, Prayer to Obtain a Special Favor, Litany to St. Joseph, 30 Days' Prayer, Memorare to St. Joseph, Ancient Prayer to St. Joseph ("found in the fiftieth year of Our Lord . . ."), Prayer for Purity, Prayer to Obtain a Conversion, Prayer for a Happy Death, Prayer in a Difficult Problem, Litany for a Dying Person, the Chaplet of St. Joseph, the Cord of St. Joseph, and much more.

This is a wonderful treasury of prayers and devotions for obtaining great favors from God through St. Joseph's powerful intercession!

ST. TERESA'S "GUARANTEE"
Words of St. Teresa of Avila
"To other Saints Our Lord seems to have given power to succor us in some special necessity - but to this glorious Saint, I know by experience, He has given the power to help us in all. Our Lord would have us understand that as He was subject to St. Joseph on earth - for St. Joseph, bearing the title of father and being His guardian, could command Him - so now in Heaven Our Lord grants all his petitions. I have asked others to recommend themselves to St. Joseph, and they, too, know the same thing by experience . . ."
-Autobiography, VI, 9

ST. JOSEPH'S VIRTUES
Words of Our lady to St. Bridget of Sweden
"St. Joseph was so reserved and careful in his speech that not one word ever issued from his mouth that was not good and holy, nor did he ever indulge in unnecessary or less than charitable conversation. He was most patient and diligent in bearing fatigue; he practiced extreme poverty; he was most meek in bearing injuries; he was strong and constant against my enemies; he was the faithful witness of the wonders of Heaven, being dead to the flesh and the world, living only for God and for heavenly goods, which were the only things he desired. He was perfectly conformed to the Divine Will and so resigned to the dispositions of Heaven that he ever repeated: 'May the Will of God ever be done in me!' He rarely spoke with men, but continually with God, whose Will he desired to perform. Wherefore, he now enjoys great glory in Heaven." (page 50)


6 posted on 03/19/2004 8:08:04 AM PST by Maximilian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian
Thanks for this reminder that today is the feast of St. Joseph, that greatest of all saints and patrons (aside from the BVM).

Agreed, bears repeating

7 posted on 03/19/2004 8:13:01 AM PST by pegleg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480
Here is a web page with a long list of prayers to St. Joseph:

St. Joseph Prayers, text for printing

8 posted on 03/19/2004 8:14:29 AM PST by Maximilian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Siobhan
Thank you!


9 posted on 03/19/2004 8:15:08 AM PST by AnAmericanMother (. . . Ministrix of Venery (recess appointment), TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary . . .)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian
Thanks Max. Sorry I didn't ping you originally. I use that prayer booklet every day. It was has been "loved" (meaning it is almost to the point of needing to be replaced). My favorite prayers in it are the Prayer to St. Joseph the Workman (composed by Pope St. Pius X), the "October Prayer to St. Joseph," the Morning Offering to St. Joseph, and the Daily Prayer for Protection.
10 posted on 03/19/2004 8:15:10 AM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480
I use that prayer booklet every day. It was has been "loved" (meaning it is almost to the point of needing to be replaced).

So do I. I buy 5 copies at a time, since they're cheaper that way, and I'm cheap, and then I have copies to pass out.

My favorite prayers in it are the Prayer to St. Joseph the Workman (composed by Pope St. Pius X), the "October Prayer to St. Joseph," the Morning Offering to St. Joseph, and the Daily Prayer for Protection.

It's easier and cheaper to buy the booklets from TAN than to print out lots of pages on your inkjet, but for those who want to start praying to St. Joseph today on his feast day, the web page I posted above has all the prayers from the booklet, including the ones you mention.

11 posted on 03/19/2004 8:21:07 AM PST by Maximilian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: pegleg

Prayer to Saint Joseph

Gentle and humble Saint Joseph,
you were chosen to be the
Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary
and the foster father
of our Savior Jesus.
Your life was guided by faith
with trust in the Lord
and his angels.
Be with me, as my spiritual father.
Guard me and protect me
wherever I go.
Keep my heart open to the needs
of others as yours was,
and help me to always
obey the will of God in my life.
Amen.
Concluding prayer from the breviary for today's Solemnity of Saint Joseph, husband of Mary:

Father,
you entrusted our Savior to the care of Saint Joseph.
By the help of his prayers
may your Church continue to serve its Lord, Jesus Christ,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, forever and ever. Amen.

12 posted on 03/19/2004 8:24:24 AM PST by COBOL2Java (If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you are reading this in English, thank a soldier.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian
Who do you get yours from? I found them cheapest at Our Lady of the Rosary Library's catalogue.
13 posted on 03/19/2004 8:38:07 AM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480
Who do you get yours from? I found them cheapest at Our Lady of the Rosary Library's catalogue.

I bought mine right from TAN. But I also noticed just yesterday when Our Lady of the Rosary Library came up on another thread, that that site is selling them below cost. They say that they are reselling them from TAN, but their price is much lower than TAN's. Probably they bought a thousand from TAN and are passing on the discounted price.

14 posted on 03/19/2004 8:43:27 AM PST by Maximilian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian
Thanks so much for posting that. Saint Joseph has been helping me for a long time now.

I have a request. Would anyone who wants to say this prayer, please?

O GLORIOUS PATRIARCH St. Joseph, who merited to be called "just' by the Holy Ghost, I urgently recommend to you the souls of M.C. and A.C., which Jesus redeemed at the price of His Precious Blood.

Thou knowest how deplorable is the state and how unhappy the life of those who have banished this loving Savior from their hearts, and how greatly they are exposed to the danger of losing Him eternally. Permit not, I beseech thee, that a soul so dear to me should continue any longer in its evil ways; preserve it from the danger that threatens it; touch the heart of the prodigal child and conduct him back to the bosom of the fondest of fathers. Abandon him not, I implore thee, till thou hast opened to him the gates of the Heavenly city, where he will praise and bless thee throughout eternity for the happiness which he will owe to thy powerful intercession. Amen.
15 posted on 03/19/2004 9:08:29 AM PST by dsc
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian
Every year the ladies of our parish get together and bake lots of sweetbreads, rolls etc. in celebration of the Feast of St. Joseph. This year, they had it yesterday since his feast day is today (a Friday). We have our fish fry and, of course, Stations. Everybody comes to the social hall in the evening and enjoys the goodies, coffee and punch. It's a lovely tradition. I missed it this year. I can't remember why we do it. Anybody else know?
16 posted on 03/19/2004 9:26:55 AM PST by sneakers
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: sneakers
Every year the ladies of our parish get together and bake lots of sweetbreads, rolls etc. in celebration of the Feast of St. Joseph... Everybody comes to the social hall in the evening and enjoys the goodies, coffee and punch. It's a lovely tradition. I can't remember why we do it. Anybody else know?

The feast of St. Joseph is a major feast day, especially in Italy where it's equivalent to St. Patrick's day for the Irish. Of course that would be St. Patrick's day the way it's celebrated in Ireland, not the over-the-top American version.

When I lived on the East Coast for some 20 years, there were Italian bakeries on every street corner. Each year they would make a special pastry only on March 19th -- Zeppolis, named for San Guiseppe. There would be long lines all day of people buying zeppolis. Since moving away from the East Coast I've had to learn to make them myself. You make a puff pastry batter and fill it with a pudding or ricotta filling. The traditional ones are fried, kind of like a doughnut, but we bake ours in the oven. Then there is also "Pasta di San Guiseppe," made with an anchovie tomato sauce and crumb topping. St. Joseph's feast day without these traditional foods would be like St. Patrick's day without corned beef and cabbage.

17 posted on 03/19/2004 9:56:23 AM PST by Maximilian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: sneakers
"We have our fish fry and, of course, Stations. Everybody comes to the social hall in the evening and enjoys the goodies, coffee and punch."

(Whine, snivel) Can I come live in your parish?
18 posted on 03/19/2004 10:04:54 AM PST by dsc
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Victoria Delsoul
Happy St. Joseph's Day Victoria.

I understnad that in Italy it is considered Father's Day, honoring St. Josehh's Day.

Have a great St. Joseph's Day!

19 posted on 03/19/2004 10:14:30 AM PST by Northern Yankee ( "Behold Mother... I make all things new." - Jesus of Nazareth)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian; sneakers; Pyro7480; Siobhan
You make a puff pastry batter and fill it with a pudding or ricotta filling.

My family never made it here in America but a friend of the family from Northern Italy is making it today for her husband. He is a carpenter and St. Joseph is the patron saint of carpenters.

The Sicilians also have a festival. According to my Mom, Sicily had a severe drought at one time. They prayed for water and invoked the intercession of their various patron saints in addition to St. Joseph as the patron saint of families. The Sicilians promised to feed the poor as thanks. Now, every year they have what they call "St. Joseph's Table" where they make and give away food to the poor.

Each region celebrates all the saints' feast days but in varying degrees according to local patrons and customs.

20 posted on 03/19/2004 10:16:34 AM PST by Canticle_of_Deborah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: dsc
LOL! Anytime you're in town dsc!


http://www.saintbernardparish.org/

21 posted on 03/19/2004 10:20:33 AM PST by sneakers
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: sneakers
Looks like a really active parish.

Eucharistic adoration, stations of the cross, K of C...

It must be very nice.
22 posted on 03/19/2004 10:41:47 AM PST by dsc
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: dsc; sneakers
It must be very nice.

I don't know -- you might want to reconsider after you take a look at the "altar":


23 posted on 03/19/2004 10:43:56 AM PST by Maximilian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian
While I much prefer traditional decor, I'm sure you'll agree that the orthodoxy and faith of the priests and parishoners would be more important.
24 posted on 03/19/2004 10:58:48 AM PST by dsc
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian
Actually, Max. I agree with you on the altar. But our priest has tried to make some changes since he's been here. The "fire" design on the wall behind the altar used to be orange and yellow. Also, he made sure we had a crucifix up front (above the altar). There was none before that. The two statues were not there before he came along either. And you should see the old "stations of the cross". He put up traditional stations. Considering what he's been given to work with, he's done a good job. The church was built in the 1970's.(Can't you tell!) If I had my druthers, the church would be more traditional-looking and the Tabernacle would be front and center, as it should be.
The people of our parish, though, are wonderful.
25 posted on 03/19/2004 11:10:58 AM PST by sneakers
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian
In the words of Sideshow Bob, "eeeugh."
26 posted on 03/19/2004 11:15:07 AM PST by Pyro7480 (Minister for the Conversion of Hardened Sinners,Tomas de Torquemada Gentlemen's Club)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: dsc
While I much prefer traditional decor, I'm sure you'll agree that the orthodoxy and faith of the priests and parishoners would be more important.

No I don't. This is a solid, visible, tangible symbol of the faith of the parish. Someone can say whatever he likes, but he cannot explain away this visible representation of what kind of faith they profess. "Actions speak louder than words."

That dive-bombing B-52 of a dove just came up in a thread the other day, in the context of being the symbol of evangelical ex-hippy "Jesus freaks," Calvary Chapel, and of being the symbol of the gay mafia in the Cleveland diocese (although rainbow-colored in that case).

Look at it this way: What if the design of that backdrop were a huge pentagram surrounding a horned goat. Would you still say that it's not necessary to have "traditional decor"? Would you be able to attend Mass in that location, no matter how orthodox the priest?

I especially object to 1. the lack of a high altar, 2. the absence of a tabernacle, 3. the assymetrical altar, 4. the lack of proper altar cloths, 4. the absence of 6 candles, 5. the lack of an area that feels like a sanctuary, 6. the presence of the "presider's chair" in the location where the high altar and tabernacle belong (replacing God with man), and these are just the substantial items which doesn't even get into the hideous aesthetics which would take a whole article of its own, the strange crucifix, and the symbolism of the "backdrop" which whether it is brown or orange still conveys a heterdox theology.

27 posted on 03/19/2004 12:48:34 PM PST by Maximilian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: sneakers
But our priest has tried to make some changes since he's been here.

He really needs to make some more sweeping changes.

Also, he made sure we had a crucifix up front (above the altar). There was none before that.

The one he put up looks rather strange, don't you think?

what he's been given to work with, he's done a good job.

On what sort of objective basis do you make that judgment?

If I had my druthers, the church would be more traditional-looking and the Tabernacle would be front and center, as it should be.

There are certain requirements that are non-negotiable. This church doesn't qualify as a place for a Catholic Mass.

The people of our parish, though, are wonderful.

If that's the case, then the pastor has no excuse. You might have said "The pastor has done all he can against the opposition of the liberal parishioners." But since you say that they are "wonderful," then the pastor should go in there this very week, rip out that hideous assymetrical altar, put in a tabernacle, replace the "dove and fire," have candles on the altar.

But I must admit some skepticism about how "wonderful" are the people who attend Mass in this building. They can't be very well educated in their faith or else they wouldn't tolerate something like this. They can't represent the "church militant" or they would have protested. They can't have a very deep devotion or they would have a tabernacle. They can't be very aware of Catholic liturgy or they would have at least 6 candles on the altar. They can't be very knowledgeable historically or they wouldn't tolerate such a revolutionary break with many hundreds of years of Catholic history. They can't be very Catholic or else they would realize that they are being taught protestantism -- whatever might come from the pulpit, this building is protestant, not Catholic.

Yesterday we had the thread from St. Leonard of Port Maurice in which he talked about the great majority of Catholic adults going to hell. What would make anyone think that this parish is an exception? Everything here screams that these people are following all the worst of the current trends.

28 posted on 03/19/2004 1:04:30 PM PST by Maximilian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480
Happy Feastday to dear St. Joseph, protector of our home and family, and of the Universal Church!
29 posted on 03/19/2004 1:20:11 PM PST by Palladin (Proud to be a FReeper!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian
Never mind, Max.


I'm sorry I brought it up.
30 posted on 03/19/2004 2:44:03 PM PST by sneakers
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: sneakers
Meanwhile, a blessed St. Joseph's Day to all.
31 posted on 03/19/2004 2:47:35 PM PST by sneakers
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: sneakers; Maximilian
It still sounds to me like this Church is headed in the right direction, even if it has some lingering architecture problems.

Maybe there's not money to rip out the fire design backdrop. Maybe the new priest is moving slowly and deliberately. Maybe the Bishop won't give permission. I don't know. At least he painted over the yellow and orange.

A new priest putting up traditional Stations sounds good. I'm not willing to write this church off because of the misdeeds of Modernist heretics who may be long gone by now.
32 posted on 03/19/2004 5:52:23 PM PST by dsc
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian
"Would you be able to attend Mass in that location, no matter how orthodox the priest?"

If I can attend Mass on a warship, I can attend it there. I wouldn't be thrilled by the architecture, but as long as the Mass was reverent and orthodox, I could put up with it for the sake of receiving the Eucharist.
33 posted on 03/19/2004 5:55:36 PM PST by dsc
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

Comment #34 Removed by Moderator

To: Pyro7480

BTTT!


35 posted on 01/24/2005 8:45:01 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480

BTTT on the Solemnity of St. Joseph, husband of the Blessed Virgin Mary, this year celebrated on 3-20-06!


36 posted on 03/20/2006 8:49:29 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480
American Catholic’s Saint of the Day

                              .
January 24, 2007
St. Francis de Sales
(1567-1622)

Francis was destined by his father to be a lawyer so that the young man could eventually take his elder’s place as a senator from the province of Savoy in France. For this reason Francis was sent to Padua to study law. After receiving his doctorate, he returned home and, in due time, told his parents he wished to enter the priesthood. His father strongly opposed Francis in this, and only after much patient persuasiveness on the part of the gentle Francis did his father finally consent. Francis was ordained and elected provost of the Diocese of Geneva, then a center for Calvinists. Francis set out to convert them, especially in the district of Chablais. By preaching and distributing the little pamphlets he wrote to explain true Catholic doctrine, he had remarkable success.

At 35 he became bishop of Geneva. While administering his diocese he continued to preach, hear confessions and catechize the children. His gentle character was a great asset in winning souls. He practiced his own axiom, “A spoonful of honey attracts more flies than a barrelful of vinegar.”

Besides his two well-known books, the Introduction to the Devout Life and A Treatise on the Love of God, he wrote many pamphlets and carried on a vast correspondence. For his writings, he has been named patron of the Catholic Press. His writings, filled with his characteristic gentle spirit, are addressed to lay people. He wants to make them understand that they too are called to be saints. As he wrote in The Introduction to the Devout Life: “It is an error, or rather a heresy, to say devotion is incompatible with the life of a soldier, a tradesman, a prince, or a married woman.... It has happened that many have lost perfection in the desert who had preserved it in the world. ”

In spite of his busy and comparatively short life, he had time to collaborate with another saint, Jane Frances de Chantal, in the work of establishing the Sisters of the Visitation. These women were to practice the virtues exemplified in Mary’s visit to Elizabeth: humility, piety and mutual charity. They at first engaged to a limited degree in works of mercy for the poor and the sick. Today, while some communities conduct schools, others live a strictly contemplative life.

Comment:

Francis de Sales took seriously the words of Christ, “Learn of me for I am meek and humble of heart.” As he said himself, it took him 20 years to conquer his quick temper, but no one ever suspected he had such a problem, so overflowing with good nature and kindness was his usual manner of acting. His perennial meekness and sunny disposition won for him the title of “Gentleman Saint.”

Quote:

Francis tells us: “The person who possesses Christian meekness is affectionate and tender towards everyone: he is disposed to forgive and excuse the frailties of others; the goodness of his heart appears in a sweet affability that influences his words and actions, presents every object to his view in the most charitable and pleasing light.”



37 posted on 01/24/2007 9:43:45 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pyro7480

I was not able to locate the prayers from the link you provided. This is an old thread... do by chance remember the name of the site?


38 posted on 03/22/2009 6:19:33 PM PDT by diamond6 (Is SIDS preventable? www.Stopsidsnow.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Maximilian; pyro

Oops, I sent the wrong message pyro, sorry. Max, the link you provided is not working. I’d love to check out the prayers.


39 posted on 03/22/2009 6:21:25 PM PDT by diamond6 (Is SIDS preventable? www.Stopsidsnow.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson