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History (Religion)

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  • The Philosophers and the Jews: Black Eggs and White Cheese

    07/22/2014 8:26:25 PM PDT · by Phinneous · 3 replies
    www.TheYeshiva.net ^ | July 2010 | Rabbi Joseph Isaac Jacobson (Yosef Yitzchak)
    Full title: The Philosophers and the Jews: Black Eggs and White Cheese The Secret of Jewish Resilience. The Inner Story of The Three Weeks Note: only 40 min long and the rabbi translates everything, very little 'yeshivish' (annoying mix of English, Hebrew, and Yiddish) A beautiful explanation on polar opposite sides of the Jewish calendar-- the 3 weeks between the 17th of the Jewsish month of Tammuz (the day the walls of Jerusalem fell to Nebuchadnezzar) and the 9th of Av (the day of the destruction of both Holy Temples) AND the 3 weeks between Rosh Hashana and [the day...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: KOIMESIS, 07-22-14

    07/22/2014 8:22:08 AM PDT · by Salvation · 2 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-22-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at randomKOIMESIS The feast of the "Falling Asleep" of the Blessed Virgin Mary, or Mary's Dormition, as celebrated in the Byzantine Liturgy. All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.
  • Muslims Declare War Against Catholicism, And Attack Priests And Monks...

    07/21/2014 6:35:19 PM PDT · by markomalley · 15 replies
    Shoebat ^ | 7/21/2014 | Theodore Shoebat and Walid Shoebat
    Muslims in Iraq have declared war against Catholicism, attacking monks and priests and forcing them to leave immediately. They forced monks and priests to leave the beautiful monastery of Deir Behnam. The history of the monastery of Deir Behnam goes back to the fourth century AD and is associated with the story of the Assyrian Prince Sennacherib II who built it after converting to Christianity with his sister Sarah and forty of his followers at the hands of St. Matthew.It was built by the Assyrian king Sennacherib II as penance for killing his son, Behnan. Today, the fate of St....
  • Catholic Word of the Day: THE UPPER ROOM, 07-21-14

    07/21/2014 8:10:38 AM PDT · by Salvation · 1 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:THE UPPER ROOM This was the room in which Jesus and his Apostles shared the Last Supper the night before he was crucified. According to Mark it was a large chamber furnished with couches and suitable for a dining room (Mark 14:14-15). It may have been a room erected on the roof, because most homes were one-story structures. Possibly it became a meeting place, because after the Ascension of Jesus, Luke reports that the Apostles and Mary returned to Jerusalem and "went to the upper room where they were staying" (Acts 1:12-14). According to tradition, the...
  • Iraqi Patriarch: For the first time in the history of Iraq, Mosul is now empty of Christians

    07/19/2014 7:21:21 AM PDT · by markomalley · 13 replies
    Radio Vaticana ^ | 7/19/2014
    The last Christian families still present in Mosul are leaving the city and are heading towards Iraqi Kurdistan. The exodus was caused by the proclamation on Thursday by the self-proclaimed Islamic Caliphate that Christians must pay a special tax or be killed. Islamists have for the past two days been marking the doors of homes belonging to Christians and Shia Muslims living in the city. “For the first time in the history of Iraq, Mosul is now empty of Christians,” said Chaldean Patriarch Louis Sako in an interview with the AFP news agency. The Patriarch said as late as last...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: CALUMNY, 07-19-14

    07/19/2014 7:14:50 AM PDT · by Salvation · 4 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-19-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random: CALUMNY  Injuring another person's good name by lying. It is doubly sinful, in unjustly depriving another of his good name and in telling an untruth. Since calumny violates justice, it involves the duty of making reparation for the foreseen injury inflicted. Hence the calumniator must try, not only to repair the harm done to another's good name, but also to make up for any foreseen temporal loss that resulted from the calumny, for example, loss of employment or customers. (Etym. Latin calumnia, a false accusation, malicious charge; from calvi, to deceive.) All items in...
  • The Prodigal Father: Benedict XVI on Fathering

    07/18/2014 8:10:34 PM PDT · by Salvation · 24 replies
    CE.com ^ | July 18, 2014 | Dave McClow
    The Prodigal Father: Benedict XVI on Fathering July 18, 2014 Dave McClow The “prodigal father” is the story of our time.  It is the story of fatherlessness in our families.  Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI is and has always been highly aware of the crisis of fatherhood and its implications for society (see my previous blog).  He knows that when fatherhood is gutted, “something in the basic structure of human existence has been damaged” (The God of Jesus Christ, p. 29).  But he is also supremely insightful about what happens in the family, both positively and negatively, because of fathers! Let’s start...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: HUR, 07-18-14

    07/18/2014 7:47:59 AM PDT · by Salvation · 8 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-18-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:HUR An Israelite aide to Moses. During a battle with the Amalekites, the Israelites fought bravely so long as Moses stood on the hilltop holding aloft the staff of God. But when his arms tired and the staff wavered, the efforts of his men waned. So Aaron, his brother, and Hur seated Moses on a stone to rest him, and supported his arms to that the staff remained high and steady (Exodus 17:10-12). The battle ended triumphantly for the Israelites. Further evidence of confidence in Hur: when Yahweh summoned Moses to climb the mountain to receive...
  • Priestly Ordination To Men Alone

    07/17/2014 6:46:58 PM PDT · by walkinginthedesert · 49 replies
    In a historic vote, the Church of England today approved female bishops. The vote was far from even being close. Women will be bishops in the Church of England after a historic vote in the General Synod, ending 40 years of not being able to do so. An overwhelming 81 per cent of Synod members backed the change, during the sitting in York, and 75 per cent of the laity supported the move.There will no doubt be a great push of the Feminist movement to use this event to further their causes for whatever reasons they may be. There will...
  • That Church of England Vote…What Was That About?

    07/17/2014 10:58:01 AM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 45 replies
    http://www.patheos.com ^ | July 17, 2014 | Fr. Dwight Longenecker
    With hindsight, we can see that the real battle in the Church of England has been with her founding principles. She was founded in the Protestant Revolution on an essentially liberal principle: that the circumstances and situation in the current culture determine the identity and mission of the church. She was now, and always has been the Church of ENGLAND. Therefore, the circumstances, personalities and cultural factors determine which way she will go. As society became increasingly secular, liberal and antipathetic to a Catholic worldview, the Catholic tendency in the Church of England could not survive. From the first discussions...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: REVOLUTION, 07-17-14

    07/17/2014 8:00:19 AM PDT · by Salvation · 1 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-17-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:REVOLUTION A radical and generally violent effort to overthrow a civil government or constitution. Essential to a revolution is that the change of regime is not brought about by peaceful evolution or mutual agreement between the power that withdraws and the power that takes over the new government. Revolutions are caused either by the masses or by an act of high officials in the government. In the latter case it is called a coup d'état. In the twelfth century John of Salisbury (1115-80), followed by others, held that the murder of a tyrant was permissible even...
  • Yes, they ate Locust. A Review of Some the Common Foods at the Time of Jesus

    07/17/2014 4:58:01 AM PDT · by NYer · 39 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | July 17, 2014 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    Generally speaking, the Israelites of Christ’s time were frugal eaters. Frankly until about 100 years ago, frugality in eating was more imposed than chosen. The food was more scarce and less convenient than today. It’s availability was seasonable, and all the elements needed to be made from scratch, including hauling in the water from wells etc.Bread was the essential, basic food. So basic was it that in Hebrew “to eat bread” and “to have a meal” in the same thing. Bread was treated with great respect and many rules existed to preserve that reverence. Any crumbs of over the size...
  • Jesus didn’t care about being nice or tolerant

    07/16/2014 8:37:18 PM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 39 replies
    http://themattwalshblog.com ^ | July 15, 2014 | Adam Walsh
    There is no shortage of heresies these days. If you want to adopt some blasphemous, perverted, fun house mirror reflection of Christianity, you will find a veritable buffet of options. You can sift through all the variants and build your own little pet version of the Faith. It’s Ice Cream Social Christianity: make your own sundae! (Or Sunday, as it were.) And, of all the heretical choices, probably the most common — and possibly the most damaging — is what I’ve come to call the Nice Doctrine. The propagators of the Nice Doctrine can be seen and heard from anytime...
  • Concerns Over Girl Scouts Persist Following USCCB Investigation

    07/16/2014 11:09:59 AM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 28 replies
    http://www.ncregister.com ^ | July 16, 2014 | BRIGID CURTIS AYER
    WASHINGTON — Tensions between Girl Scouts’ messaging and Catholic teaching have led to a national boycott of Girl Scout cookies, the ousting of Girl Scouts from parishes, and a significant drop in Catholic membership in the Girl Scouts. Now a panel of U.S. bishops has released the results of a two-year investigation into Girl Scouts’ problematic messaging, ties to Planned Parenthood, and continued advocacy of so-called reproductive rights by the organization’s international affiliate, the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS). Their findings indicate that the concerns continue to persist, regarding the problematic connections between the Girl Scouts...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: JUS JURANDUM, 07-16-14

    07/16/2014 8:05:46 AM PDT · by Salvation · 2 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07*16-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:JUS JURANDUM A sworn oath. Any one of the oaths that the Church at times requires of the faithful, and especially of her priests. Such was the Oath Against Modernism, required of those teaching in seminaries, prescribed by Pope St. Pius X. All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.
  • Ten Things to Remember if Pope Francis Upsets You

    07/15/2014 7:36:08 PM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 58 replies
    http://www.patheos.com ^ | July 15, 2014 | Fr. Dwight Longenecker
    Many conservative Catholics are experiencing a range of negative feelings about Pope Francis. When a headline screams that he stated that 2% of Catholic clergy are pedophiles, that he “promises to solve the celibacy problem” that he doesn’t want to convert Evangelicals or that he doesn’t judge a homosexual who “searches for the Lord and has goodwill” they experience confusion, anger, resentment, bewilderment and fear. Some have given up on Pope Francis. Others say he is “the false prophet” who will accompany the anti Christ in the end times. Others don’t like his dress sense, grumble about his media gaffes...
  • (Cloistered) Sisters fill their convent to the seams

    07/15/2014 1:25:41 PM PDT · by NYer · 9 replies
    OSV ^ | July 15, 2014 | Thomas L. McDonald
    Along with Mass and adoration, the Dominican sisters at the Monastery of Our Lady of the Rosary in Summit, N.J., gather for prayer seven times a day. Courtesy photo Within the walls of the Monastery of Our Lady of the Rosary in Summit, New Jersey, rows of simple crosses mark the graves of sisters who have gone before. It’s a potent symbol of life in the monastery, where women enter cloistered life intending never to leave, even in death.These Dominican nuns have been in this place of peace for almost 100 years, sustaining the Church every day through their prayer...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: DECRETALS, 07-15-14

    07/15/2014 7:53:22 AM PDT · by Salvation · 2 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-15-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:DECRETALS A letter carrying authoritative decisions on matters of discipline, or the Pope's reply when he has been appealed to on a matter of discipline. The term is also applied to a collection of certain decretals such as Liber Sextus Decretalium, compiled by Pope Boniface VIII (1235-1303). (Etym. Latin decretale, a decree.) All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.
  • The Subterranean Temple

    07/15/2014 4:39:23 AM PDT · by Phinneous · 26 replies
    Chabad.org ^ | 1981 | Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, ZT'L
    I am asleep, but my heart is awake Song of Songs 5:2 Our sages tell us that “when King Solomon built the Holy Temple, knowing that it was destined to be destroyed, he built a place in which to hide the Ark, [at the end of] hidden, deep, winding passageways.”1 It was there that King Josiah placed the Ark twenty-two years before the Temple’s destruction, as related in the Book of Chronicles.2
  • Bastille Day and the Catholic Book that Caused the French Revolution

    07/14/2014 8:34:10 PM PDT · by matthewrobertolson · 12 replies
    Catholic Analysis ^ | 14 July 2014 | Matthew Olson
    In recognition of Bastille Day, I, in this special Monday episode, discuss "the book that caused the French Revolution": Les Liaisons Dangereuses (The Dangerous Liaisons), written by Pierre Choderlos de Laclos. The book -- perhaps somewhat unintentionally -- set off pious sentiment against the Ancien Regime, and its influence carries on today. WATCH ON YOUTUBE(Alternative link, via Vimeo.) Summary:I start off the show with a brief primer on Bastille Day and immediately begin a summary of the characters and events in this novel, breaking down its story of lust and love. I then cite some of its distinctively Catholic elements....
  • How A ‘Mohawk Saint’ Can Inspire Us All

    07/14/2014 7:19:37 PM PDT · by Salvation · 16 replies
    CE.com ^ | 07-14-14 | Stephen Beale
    How A ‘Mohawk Saint’ Can Inspire Us All Stephen Beale Recently canonized Saint Kateri Tekakwitha obviously has a special meaning for Native Americans, but she’s already being held up as a powerful inspiration for other faithful Christians in many other ways.One is reminded of St. Paul, who wrote in 1 Corinthians 9 that he had “become all things to all, to save at least some.” Much the same could be said about St. Kateri regarding the many ways she can inspire Christians at different points in their faith journeys—based on reactions to her canonization in the Catholic News Service and First...
  • So to Speak: Catholic museum is small, but it rates tops

    07/14/2014 8:58:44 AM PDT · by NYer · 5 replies
    Dispatch ^ | July 13, 2014 | Joe Blundo
    The top-rated tourist attraction in Columbus is not our highly regarded zoo. It’s an obscure museum of religious artifacts.So says TripAdvisor, the influential travel website (www.tripadvisor.com) that uses consumer reviews to compile rankings.In fact, you won’t find the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium anywhere on the TripAdvisor list of 70 or so Columbus destinations.Why? It’s in Powell. By TripAdvisor’s organizational principles, the zoo isn’t a Columbus attraction. (TripAdvisor’s Columbus site, however, has articles on the zoo.)In a way, I’m happy about the situation because, although the zoo doesn’t need TripAdvisor’s help to attract tourists, the Jubilee Museum does. And it deserves...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: TEN PLAGUES, 07-14-14

    07/14/2014 7:29:54 AM PDT · by Salvation · 1 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-14-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:TEN PLAGUES  The ten calamities sent by God on the Egyptians to make Pharaoh release the children of Israel (Exodus 7, 12). Seven of the plagues were done through Moses or Moses and Aaron' the fourth, fifth, and tenth were directly worked by God. They were, in sequence: water turned to blood, multitude of frogs, swarms of gnats, pest of flies, disease that killed all the cattle, epidemic of boils, torrential hailstorm, plague of locusts, darkness for three days, death of all the firstborn among the Egyptians. All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John...
  • The First Epistle Of Clement To The Corinthians St. Clement Of Rome (Ecumenical Caucus)

    07/13/2014 1:14:53 PM PDT · by narses · 13 replies
    EWTN ^ | circa AD 95 – 97
    THE FIRST EPISTLE OF CLEMENT TO THE CORINTHIANS St. Clement of Rome Chap. I. The salutation. Praise of the Corinthians before the breaking forth of schism among them. THE Church of God which sojourns at Rome, to the Church of God sojourning at Corinth, to them that are called and sanctified by the will of God, through our Lord Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, from Almighty God through Jesus Christ, be multiplied. Owing, dear brethren, to the sudden and successive calamitous events which have happened to ourselves, we feel that we have been somewhat tardy in turning our...
  • The Feeding of the Four Thousand

    07/13/2014 11:37:32 AM PDT · by NYer · 25 replies
    Catholic Answers ^ | July 7, 2014 | Jimmy Akin
    In the Gospels, the most famous miracle associated with Jesus—other than the Resurrection—is the Feeding of the Five Thousand. It’s recorded in all four Gospels.But Matthew and Mark record an additional, similar miracle, known as the Feeding of the Four Thousand. The numbers connected with this miracle are a little different (four thousand people are fed, they use seven loaves and “a few small fish,” and they pick up seven baskets of leftovers), but it’s the same basic type of miracle.That may be why Luke and John chose not to record it: Given the space limitations on ancient books,...
  • Finding My Way Home: The Eucharist drew me back [Johnnie Bernhard]

    07/12/2014 5:58:41 PM PDT · by Salvation · 100 replies
    WAU.org ^ | July 2014 | Johnnie Bernhard
    Finding My Way Home The Eucharist drew me back. By: Johnnie BernhardI was baptized in the Catholic Church as an infant. My family later left the Church, and it took me fifty years to find my way home. Through all those years, I never forgot the peace I found in the Eucharist.Even as a practicing Protestant most of my adult life, I continued to search out Catholic churches wherever I lived, hiding in a pew in the back of the church, always a spectator, always longing to recapture the peace I found in the Eucharist. I could never really...
  • Holy Smoke! Why do we use incense in worship?

    07/12/2014 3:53:00 PM PDT · by NYer · 53 replies
    Catholic Education ^ | July 11, 2014 | Fr. DWIGHT LONGENECKER
    Our altar boys practically fight for the honor of being the thurifer. That's the name for the server who carries the thurible — the censer — in the procession at Mass.  They like being thurifer because they get to wear the more ornate lace surplice, and they know thurifer is the most complicated job and is reserved for the older, more experienced boys. The use of incense is optional for most Masses.  It's used to purify the coffin at funerals and to bless statues and images.  However, many Catholic priests choose not to use incense at Mass, and the...
  • Catholic Word Of The Day: Chapter House, 07-12-14

    07/12/2014 9:47:21 AM PDT · by Salvation · 3 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-12-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:CHAPTER HOUSE A building attached to a cathedral or monastery where certain meetings were held, business carried out, the martyrology read, and daily tasks assigned. the name arose from the practice of conducting the chapter of faults in this building. All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.
  • The Mystery of the Copper Scroll

    07/11/2014 3:37:23 PM PDT · by robowombat · 25 replies
    CBN News Middle East Bureau ^ | Saturday, July 11, 2009 | Chris Mitchell
    The Mystery of the Copper Scroll By Chris Mitchell CBN News Middle East Bureau Chief Saturday, July 11, 2009 JERUSALEM, Israel - In 1947, a Bedouin shepherd wandered the hills of Qumran in search of a missing sheep. He threw a stone into a cave, hoping to drive the lost animal outside. Instead, the sound of shattered pottery drew the shepherd inside the cave. There he stumbled on the greatest archaeological find of the 20th century: the Dead Sea Scrolls. The Copper Scroll In the years that followed, archaeologists found eleven caves and more than 900 documents here at Qumran....
  • Catholic Word of the Day: ILLUMINISM, 07-11-14

    07/11/2014 8:27:06 AM PDT · by Salvation · 3 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-11-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:ILLUMINISM A form of Gnosticism, it appears in the history of Christian heresy as a belief in one's own divine enlightenment, with a sense of mission to enlighten others, contrary to the express teachings of the Church's magisterium. All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.
  • Why Sola Scriptura Honestly Scares Me

    07/10/2014 8:05:46 PM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 274 replies
    http://www.patheos.com ^ | July 22, 2013 | Ryan Adams
    Being raised in a Protestant home, the Scriptures were (and in many ways still are) the end-all-be-all of the faith for me. However, there is a reason I am no longer a Protestant. This reason has many branches but all points back to one thing, context. Given the necessity of context, I find the whole idea of “Scripture Alone” horrifying. What it is: Sola Scriptura is the idea that Christianity ought to be based off of “Scripture Alone” (which is the English translation of “Sola Scriptura”), that is to say, it should be without ritual, or the teaching authority of...
  • What Was the Climate and Weather Of Israel Like at the Time of Jesus?

    07/10/2014 1:12:27 PM PDT · by NYer · 26 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | July 10, 2014 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    The climate in Palestine, both today, and at the time of Jesus has two distinct seasons. The wet or rainy season is from the middle of October to the middle of April. The dry or summer season lasts from the middle of June until the middle of September. It is quite dry in these months and rainfall is very unusual. Although the temperature is summer can get very hot, it often does not feel this way. Cool breezes and low humidity are typical, making the summers very pleasant, especially in areas directly on the coast or on the higher slopes...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: FETICIDE, 07-10-14

    07/10/2014 6:58:57 AM PDT · by Salvation · 1 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-10-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:FETICIDE The direct killing of an unborn child. It is always murder and therefore gravely sinful. (Etym. Latin fetus, the young in the womb + -cidium, a killing.) All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission. 
  • A Vindication of Tradition (Catholic Caucus)

    07/09/2014 1:33:20 PM PDT · by NYer · 7 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | July 9, 2014 | James Kalb
    Modern times don’t like the authority of tradition, any more than they like prejudice or deeply rooted social stereotypes. We know more today than people did in the past, so why should we view the unreflective habits and attitudes they happened to fall into as somehow binding?People today believe in science, which relies on observations that can be repeated and checked; expert bureaucracies, which base their decisions on the latest objective studies; and free markets, which determine prices by reference to current supply and demand. Those methods have been enormously successful in many important settings, and they don’t care...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: TYCHISM, 07-09-14

    07/09/2014 7:29:08 AM PDT · by Salvation · 1 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-09-114 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:TYCHISM A theory that chance is an objective fact in the universe and that it is not merly due to human ignorance. It is commonly associated with the idea that evolution takes place casually and without planned direction by some guiding intelligence. (Etym. Greek tyche, fortune, chance.) All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.
  • Catholic Word of the Day: MANTELLETTA, 07-08-14

    07/08/2014 8:11:47 AM PDT · by Salvation · 4 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-02-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:MANTELLETTA A sleeveless outer garment fastened at the neck, reaching to the knees, open in front, worn by cardinals, bishops, abbots, and certain prelates of the papal court. (Etym. Latin dimin. of mantellum, cloak, veil.) All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.
  • Has Islam ever been peaceful?

    07/08/2014 3:17:45 AM PDT · by matthewrobertolson · 18 replies
    Catholic Analysis ^ | 6 July 2014 | Matthew Olson
    In this episode, I answer the title’s question, perhaps one of the biggest on everyone’s minds today: Has Islam ever been peaceful? I herein go through some of the most important historical battles and events for Muslims, also mentioning the Qur’an when relevant. WATCH ON YOUTUBE (Alternative link, via Vimeo.) Summary: I start out the show by running through Islam's violent beginnings, then transition into its tyrannical rule in Jerusalem and Cordoba. Then, I talk about the key battles of Covadonga and Lepanto, at which Islam was curtailed. Next, I skim over the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire....
  • Was Dietrich Bonhoeffer gay? A new biography raises questions

    07/07/2014 8:15:41 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 27 replies
    Religion News ^ | 07/05/2014 | Sarah Pulliam Bailey
    A new biography is raising questions about the life and relationships of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, an anti-Nazi dissident whose theological writings remain widely influential among Christians. Both left-leaning and right-leaning Christians herald the life and writings of Bonhoeffer, who was hanged for his involvement in the unsuccessful plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler in 1944. Bonhoeffer was engaged to a woman at the time of his execution, observing that he had lived a full life even though he would die a virgin. The new biography, “Strange Glory: A Life of Dietrich Bonhoeffer,” from University of Virginia religious studies professor Charles Marsh, implies...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: BAPTISM OF MARTYRDOM, 07-07-14

    07/07/2014 7:23:04 AM PDT · by Salvation · 1 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-07-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:BAPTISM OF MARTYRDOM  Also called baptism of blood. It is the patient endurance of fatal torture inflicted out of hatred for Christ or the Christian faith or Christian virtue. All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.
  • Risking Hell for Harvard

    07/07/2014 4:53:19 AM PDT · by NYer · 2 replies
    The Catholic Thing ^ | July 7, 2014 | Brad Miner
    The development of education was job one when Coadjutor Bishop John Joseph Hughes came to New York in 1837. As one expert explains:  eight makeshift parochial schools, meeting in church basements or rented halls, had on register about 5000 Catholic children. An additional 7000 either lacked accommodation or made no effort to go to school.  Public aid had been given to some of these basement schools by the Free School Society, but in 1825, when it became the Public School Society, funding for denominational schools (Catholic and Baptist) ceased. The Society wasn’t unwilling to educate Catholic children; it just intended...
  • The Faith of Our Fathers: Was the faith of the Founding Fathers deism or Christianity?

    07/06/2014 8:09:22 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 9 replies
    Stand to Reason ^ | Greg Koukl
    Was the faith of the Founding Fathers deism or Christianity? What does the answer mean for us today? Both the secularists and the Christians have missed the mark.There's been a lot of rustle in the press lately--and in many Christian publications--about the faith of the Founding Fathers and the status of the United States as a "Christian nation." Home schooling texts abound with references to our religious heritage, and entire organizations are dedicated to returning America to its spiritual roots. On the other side, secularists cry "foul" and parade their own list of notables among our country's patriarchs. They...
  • The Trouble With Calvin – Pt. 2 [Unconditional Election]

    07/06/2014 3:44:34 AM PDT · by GonzoII · 17 replies
    Tim Staples' Blog ^ | May 19, 2014 | Tim Staples
    The Trouble With Calvin – Pt. 2 In my last post, I began a series of critiques of John Calvin’s famous “five points,” most often referred to using the acronym, TULIP, which represents Total Depravity, Unconditional Election, Limited Atonement, Irresistibility of Grace, and The Perseverance of the Saints (“once saved, always saved”). In this installment, we’ll deal with Unconditional Election.Calvin’s idea of Unconditional Election simply means that God “elected” certain men for salvation and others for damnation from all eternity, rooted in texts of Scripture, as we will see below, like Romans 9:10-12:And not only so, but also when Rebecca had conceived...
  • Khilafa Rising (Cover the keyboard with your prayer rug)

    07/05/2014 3:44:17 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 28 replies
    The American Muslim ^ | July 4, 2014 | Rev. Frank Julian Gelli
    Who is afraid of a rising Middle East Khilafa, the Arabic word for Caliphate? Lots. Muslims like Shia, Kurds, most Sufis, Alawis, sundry Arab secularists. And Arab Christians of course. All fearing their lives, women, sacred buildings and properties being treated as war loot. Western leaders too are shaking in their boots: good! A nemesis is unfolding. A sort of retributive justice, maybe of divine origins. A paying back for the 2003 illegal, unjustified aggression on Iraq. Engineered by the two scoundrels, Bush and Blair. But the roots of evil reach far back. To WWI, the catastrophic, suicidal, mad all-European...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: OUR LADY OF LUJÁN, 04-05-14

    07/05/2014 8:19:27 AM PDT · by Salvation · 33 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 06-05-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:OUR LADY OF LUJÁN Argentine shrine, forty miles west of Buenos Aires. Its main object of devotion is a small doll-like statue of the Blessed Virgin; her head is surrounded by a golden aureole and is crowned with hundreds of diamonds and other precious stones. The Basilica of Our Lady of Luján is the most important pilgrimage center in Argentina. According to legend, in 1639 a peasant from Cordova, wishing to revive his neighbors' "belief in their early faith," ordered two statues from Brazil, one of the Immaculate Conception, the other the Blessed Virgin and her...
  • Catholic priest ordained in America - 1793

    07/04/2014 9:33:27 PM PDT · by Salvation · 12 replies
    History.com ^ | not given | History.com
    May 25, 1793: Catholic priest ordained in America   In Baltimore, Maryland, Father Stephen Theodore Badin becomes the first Catholic priest to be ordained in the United States. Badin was ordained by Bishop John Carroll, an early advocate of American Catholicism, and appointed to the Catholic mission in Kentucky.In colonial America, there were few English-speaking Catholics outside of Maryland, which was established in 1634 as a haven for Roman Catholics persecuted in England. In 1735, some 100 years after the establishment of Maryland, John Carroll was born in Baltimore into a prominent Catholic family. As secondary Catholic education was...
  • Hobby Lobby 4th July Message

    07/04/2014 8:28:19 PM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 4 replies
    http://www.hobbylobby.com ^ | July 4, 2014 | Hobby Lobby
    Hobby Lobby wishes everyone a blessed 4th of July.
  • Those Blasted Presbyterians: Reflections on Independence Day

    07/04/2014 10:22:04 AM PDT · by ReformationFan · 15 replies
    The Chief End of Man ^ | 7-4-14 | Don Sweeting
    “We are subject to the men who rule over us, but subject only in the Lord. If they command anything against him, let us not pay the least regard to it.” Book Four, Calvin’s Institutes “I fix all the blame of these extraordinary proceedings upon the Presbyterians.” So one colonist loyal to King George wrote to friends in England. Around the same time, Horace Walpole spoke from the English House of Commons to report on these “extraordinary proceedings” in the colonies of the new world. “There is no good crying about the matter,” he said. “Cousin America has run off...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: ETHOS, 07-04-14

    07/04/2014 8:15:24 AM PDT · by Salvation · 1 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 07-04-14 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term (selected at random:ETHOS  The spirit of a people or culture, or, more technically, the totality of the ideas and attitudes held by a specific community in relation to behavior. All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission. 
  • Nun Who Challenged Billy the Kid is on the Road to Sainthood

    07/04/2014 6:59:19 AM PDT · by NKP_Vet · 11 replies
    http://www.patheos.com ^ | June 26, 2014 | Tony Rossi
    The Archdiocese of Santa Fe announced Wednesday it is exploring sainthood for an Italian-born nun who challenged Billy the Kid, calmed angry mobs and helped open New Mexico territory hospitals and schools. Archbishop Michael Sheehan said he has received permission from the Vatican to open the “Sainthood Cause” for Sister Blandina Segale, an educator and social worker who worked in Ohio, Colorado and New Mexico. Segale, a nun with the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati, came to Trinidad, Colorado, in 1877 to teach poor children and was later transferred to Santa Fe, where she co-founded public and Catholic schools. During...
  • St. George Utah Temple: 1st operating temple [Dead 'Founding Fathers...appeared' in Mormon temple?]

    07/04/2014 6:49:54 AM PDT · by Colofornian · 110 replies
    Announcement: 9 November 1871 Groundbreaking and Site Dedication: 9 November 1871 by Brigham Young Private Dedication: 1 January 1877 by Wilford Woodruff, Erastus Snow, and Brigham Young Dedication: 6–8 April 1877 by Daniel H. Wells (with Brigham Young presiding) SNIP The St. George Utah Temple is the first temple where endowments for the dead were performed. The Founding Fathers of the United States of America appeared twice to Wilford Woodruff in the St. George Utah Temple asking why their temple work had yet not been performed on their behalves. A striking painting depicting this singular event hangs in the temple...