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Know Your Saints Quiz for families -- Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
CatholicCulture.org ^ | n/a | CatholicCulture

Posted on 10/27/2007 10:15:15 AM PDT by Salvation

 

Know Your Saints Quiz  

1. I am the apostle to the Gentiles whose letters you read in the Bible.

2. I am the first American citizen to be canonized whose work among the immigrants gave me the title of 'Patron of All Immigrants.'

3. I am the Carmelite saint whose "Little Way" shows us how offering joys and sorrows daily can make us a great saint.

4. I am the foster father of Christ and the patron of a happy death.

5. I am the cousin of Jesus who prepared the way for the Lord.

6. I am the woman who offered my veil to wipe Jesus' face when He was carrying His cross.

7. I am the apostle chosen by Christ to be head of His Church.

8. I am the missionary who made Ireland famous for its piety and learning.

9. I am the beloved apostle and the writer of the fourth gospel.

10. I am the cousin of the Blessed Virgin Mary whose baby was Presanctified.

11. I am the patron saint of music because I sang the praises of God while I was cruelly put to death.

12. I am the modern day saint who chose martyrdom rather than to be impure.

13. I am the mother of the Blessed Virgin Mary and the grandmother of Jesus.

14. I am the valiant young girl who led France to victory over England and then suffered death by being burned at the stake.

15. I am the 'Little Poverino' whose order is now the largest in the world and who so resembled Christ in my life that I was privileged to bear His sacred wounds in my own body.

16. I am the 'Wonder Worker' of Padua and a Doctor of the Church.

17. I am the Patron saint of schools who was once called the Dumb Ox by my classmates but who wrote many treatises on the faith. My teacher was St. Albert the Great.

18. I am the saint who reformed the Carmelite Order and who became the first woman Doctor of the Church.

19. I am the simple parish priest who was tormented by the devil because my great sanctity brought my people closer to God.

20. I am the Visitation nun to whom Jesus appeared showing His Sacred Heart and to whom He delivered His message of love and plea for reparation.

Choices:

St. Peter St. Therese of Lisieux
St. Anthony St. Joan of Arc
St. Elizabeth St. Anne
St. John the Baptist St. John the Apostle
St. Margaret Mary St. Patrick
St. Maria Goretti St. Paul
St. Teresa of Avila St. Cecilia
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton St. John Vianney
St. Joseph St. Thomas Aquinas
St. Francis Assisi St. Veronica

* 20 point bonus for those who know the century in which their saint lived.

* 5 points for each piece of information you know about your saint.



TOPICS: Catholic; History; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: catholic; catholiclist; saints
Too many people are trouncing all over threads that are meant for Catholic discussions, so I am labeling more threads "Catholic Caucus".

Catholic participation only, please.

This would be neat to print off and have for an activity on the Eve of All Hallows instead of dressing up as monsters, etc. for Halloween. Thus, bringing the real meaning back into the day.

FWIW, our Church is also having a vigil Mass! Great for families!

1 posted on 10/27/2007 10:15:16 AM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Lady In Blue; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; Catholicguy; RobbyS; ...
Catholic Discussion Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Catholic Discussion Ping List.

2 posted on 10/27/2007 10:16:42 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

“Catholic participation only, please.”

Including Catholics of the Orthodox persuasion, I presume! :)


3 posted on 10/27/2007 10:19:53 AM PDT by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated!)
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To: Kolokotronis; Religion Moderator

Sorry about that.

Religion Moderator:

Could you please change that to Catholic/Orthodox Caucus please.

Neat little quiz for the children, though!


4 posted on 10/27/2007 10:24:47 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

I’ll use this for my tenth grade RE class.


5 posted on 10/27/2007 10:43:06 AM PDT by Last Dakotan
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To: Last Dakotan

Great thought. But I was thinking more along the 4th or 5th grade.

Have the high schoolers really missed out on that much learning?

Pray for Religious Edcuation!


6 posted on 10/27/2007 11:01:34 AM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Neat quiz! When our son was searching Saints for a Confirmation name, we ran across St. Isidore of Seville, who is the Patron Saint of Computer Users and the Internet. The search was over; that was just too perfect for him. He’ll be confirmed on Nov. 18th. ;o)


7 posted on 10/27/2007 12:23:46 PM PDT by SuziQ
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To: Salvation

Thanks! I’m surprised that I know so many of them....now I’ll have to quiz the grandkids!


8 posted on 10/27/2007 12:28:19 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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To: SuziQ

Isidore—I’ll have to tell my son, he just got his master’s in computer science of some sort. Don’t ask me, I don’t understand this stuff. ;-D


9 posted on 10/27/2007 12:30:03 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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To: Kolokotronis; Salvation
6. I am the woman who offered my veil to wipe Jesus' face when He was carrying His cross.

This Saint in the Western tradition is known as St. Veronica. But in the Eastern tradition many know her as St. Bernice.

10 posted on 10/27/2007 12:43:04 PM PDT by TotusTuus
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To: TotusTuus

I mean to say they are referring to the same person. St. Veronica = St. Bernice.


11 posted on 10/27/2007 12:46:47 PM PDT by TotusTuus
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To: Salvation

We saw a film about St Maria Goretti eons ago when I was a school kid. I guess I was pretty impressed because that year I was St Maria Goretti for halloween. I don’t know if that was a good thing or not. : )


12 posted on 10/27/2007 12:57:54 PM PDT by radiohead (Dissolution of the IRS as we know it - Fred Thompson. Stop...You had me at "dissolution.")
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To: Salvation

I’m confused between #17 and #19 for St. John Vianney...


13 posted on 10/27/2007 1:02:53 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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To: Judith Anne

17 is St. Thomas Aquinas (13th century?), 19 is St. John Vianney (19th century).


14 posted on 10/27/2007 1:09:42 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("For is he not of noble birth? The first child born above the Earth!")
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To: Salvation

Well, I did quite well, only stumbling on St. Thomas Aquinas.


15 posted on 10/27/2007 1:27:53 PM PDT by Gumdrop
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To: Salvation
Pray for Religious Edcuation!

In addition to teaching on Wednesday nights I chair our parish's RE Board. In my opinion while prayer is great you have to get out there and do it.

Weekly our class touches on current events, some of which I pull off of FR. If you come across good material please pass it along.

Have the high schoolers really missed out on that much learning?

They are all over the place. Some have very little knowledge, some are ready for college theology classes. Depends on the parents.

16 posted on 10/27/2007 1:41:20 PM PDT by Last Dakotan
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To: Salvation

So where are the answers? :)


17 posted on 10/27/2007 2:43:04 PM PDT by defconw ( PRAY FOR SNOW!)
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To: Tax-chick

Thanks—I shouldn’t have missed it; we used to go to Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve at St. John Vianney parish in a small Missouri town...


18 posted on 10/27/2007 4:08:25 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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To: Judith Anne

You’re welcome. I don’t think I’ve been to a St. John Vianney church, although I’ve been to Mass in some small Missouri towns.

I knew all the saints (good at history). My daughter got 16, I think, without looking at the choices.


19 posted on 10/27/2007 4:11:58 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("Moonshine and bloodshed," said Newman. "A murder by moonlight," laughed Madame de Bellegarde.)
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To: Tax-chick

Mountain View, Missouri. There’s a very beautiful tinier one in Eminence, St. Sylvester Church. It was built by a St. Louis architect as his first commision, he later became very successful. When he died, he was buried out of the small church he designed and built. Wish I could think of his name.


20 posted on 10/27/2007 4:16:02 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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To: Judith Anne

I found them both on Google and GoogleEarth, but I didn’t see anything about the architect.


21 posted on 10/27/2007 4:29:53 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("Moonshine and bloodshed," said Newman. "A murder by moonlight," laughed Madame de Bellegarde.)
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To: Tax-chick

I sure wish I could remember his name. St. Syl’s is a mission church of St. John Vianney, and was built entirely out of local stone from a local farm. My husband played the organ there for probably 15 years, and played for the architect’s funeral.

I’ve got a bad case of CRS tonight. ;-D


22 posted on 10/27/2007 4:48:40 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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To: Judith Anne

My father is from Leonard, in Shelby County in the northeast. The Catholic Church there is St. Michael’s, but it’s closed except for funerals. A little white frame building, like the houses, nothing special architecturally.


23 posted on 10/27/2007 5:49:21 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("Moonshine and bloodshed," said Newman. "A murder by moonlight," laughed Madame de Bellegarde.)
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To: Tax-chick

People are moving away from MO rural areas, except older folks. There were about 25 families at St. Syl, but during the summer a lot of tourists come, because of the Alley Springs and Jacks Fork and Current Rivers.

We even saw friends we knew from our St. Louis County parish there.


24 posted on 10/27/2007 6:41:59 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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Comment #25 Removed by Moderator

To: Judith Anne

Cute, isn’t it?


26 posted on 10/27/2007 8:50:53 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: TotusTuus

I wasn’t aware of a different name for the Eastern Church.


27 posted on 10/27/2007 8:51:40 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: defconw

LOL! Don’t you have the answers?


28 posted on 10/27/2007 8:53:24 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: sandyeggo; All

**That was fun, but someone ought to devise a harder one, with more obscure saints. :)**

LOL! I just found it on Catholic Culture and thought it would be great for all of us.

Are you game for the harder ones? Send me an Freepmail with five questions each and I’ll put them together are an FR test! LOL!

All someone would have to do is look back over the calendars, pick a saint, and then do a search on FR.

For example, I know there are other younger saints besides St. Maria Goretti>


29 posted on 10/27/2007 8:58:22 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: sandyeggo

Who was the saint who is always depicted with all those arrows in his body? And one of my personal favorites is St. Fiacre, his statue is often confused with St. Francis, but St. Fiacre is the one with the shovel. ;-D


30 posted on 10/27/2007 8:59:16 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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PS, St.Fiacre is the patron of a lot of...ahem....interesting things, including taxicabs and gardens.


31 posted on 10/27/2007 9:00:52 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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Comment #32 Removed by Moderator

Comment #33 Removed by Moderator

To: sandyeggo

**Why the shovel?**

Patron saint of gardeners.


34 posted on 10/27/2007 9:14:51 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: sandyeggo

We are two saints who are doctors. (I believe also martyred.)


35 posted on 10/27/2007 9:15:30 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: sandyeggo

He asked his bishop for some land, and the bishop told him he could have as much land as he could dig a trench around. Well, miraculously, everywhere he dragged his shovel, the trench appeared, and he got a huge amount of land.

Apparently, he would not allow women anywhere around him (I think he felt susceptible). Such a curmudgeon! But there was a hotel named after him, he was a hermit and reputed to be very holy. Taxicabs were called fiacres after him.

http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/saintf13.htm

I have a statue just like the one in the picture on that site, in my garden.


36 posted on 10/27/2007 9:16:10 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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To: Salvation

Answer:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-religion/1902508/posts


37 posted on 10/27/2007 9:19:40 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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Comment #38 Removed by Moderator

To: Salvation

St. Gregory (the Gregorian chant pope) and St. Brendan (the explorer) are the ones my older grandsons are named after. Granddaughters are Rachel Elizabeth and Bethany Marie, their little brother is Jacob Robert.


39 posted on 10/27/2007 9:26:33 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Thank you St. Jude for favors granted.)
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To: Salvation
I wasn’t aware of a different name for the Eastern Church.

Yea, it's one of those things that only a religious nerd might know about, (such as the Pope;)

Berenike is the Greek for "bringer of victory". Veronika (verus - Latin="truth" and Ikon - Gr. = "image") makes her name "true image".

A wide tradition (small "t") in both the East and West has her as the woman who had a 12 year blood flow healed by Jesus in the synoptic Gospels. If her given name for Greek was Bernice, then Veronika would be a title given her because of the event meditated on in the 6th station of the Cross.

There is, of course, a whole story about her life (getting married to a Christian convert, carrying the veil around, etc.) post Resurrection of Jesus.

Christ imprinted His image in her heart before all else and she freely transformed her life to correspond to His Grace. That really is all that is important for us to reflect upon. Is His image imprinted in our hearts as well?

40 posted on 10/28/2007 1:54:08 AM PDT by TotusTuus
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To: Salvation

Well I know I have 17 of them right. Not sure about three, I’ll look them up I guess. LOL


41 posted on 10/28/2007 4:17:35 AM PDT by defconw ( PRAY FOR SNOW!)
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To: Judith Anne

Sebastian


42 posted on 10/28/2007 12:08:13 PM PDT by mockingbyrd (peace begins in the womb)
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To: Tax-chick

Pinging you to add to a more difficult quiz for adults.


43 posted on 10/31/2007 1:38:48 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Thanks, I’ll look at this later. I have to paint my fingernails blue right now!


44 posted on 10/31/2007 1:46:19 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("Moonshine and bloodshed," said Newman. "A murder by moonlight," laughed Madame de Bellegarde.)
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To: Salvation

About the quiz, I knew the major ones. About 50 percent.


45 posted on 10/31/2007 9:21:08 PM PDT by Ciexyz
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To: Judith Anne

St. Sebastian is the subject of numerous interesting depictions of art over the centuries. I remember checking out the links to said artwork on the Wikipedia website.


46 posted on 10/31/2007 9:31:35 PM PDT by Ciexyz
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To: All
American Catholic’s Saint of the Day

 

November 1, 2007
Feast of All Saints

The earliest certain observance of a feast in honor of all the saints is an early fourth-century commemoration of "all the martyrs." In the early seventh century, after successive waves of invaders plundered the catacombs, Pope Boniface IV gathered up some 28 wagonloads of bones and reinterred them beneath the Pantheon, a Roman temple dedicated to all the gods. The pope rededicated the shrine as a Christian church. According to Venerable Bede, the pope intended "that the memory of all the saints might in the future be honored in the place which had formerly been dedicated to the worship not of gods but of demons" (On the Calculation of Time).

But the rededication of the Pantheon, like the earlier commemoration of all the martyrs, occurred in May. Many Eastern Churches still honor all the saints in the spring, either during the Easter season or immediately after Pentecost.

How the Western Church came to celebrate this feast in November is a puzzle to historians. The Anglo-Saxon theologian Alcuin observed the feast on November 1 in 800, as did his friend Arno, Bishop of Salzburg. Rome finally adopted that date in the ninth century.

Comment:

This feast first honored martyrs. Later, when Christians were free to worship according to their conscience, the Church acknowledged other paths to sanctity. In the early centuries the only criterion was popular acclaim, even when the bishop's approval became the final step in placing a commemoration on the calendar. The first papal canonization occurred in 993; the lengthy process now required to prove extraordinary sanctity took form in the last 500 years. Today's feast honors the obscure as well as the famous—the saints each of us have known.

Quote:

“After this I had a vision of a great multitude, which no one could count, from every nation, race, people, and tongue. They stood before the throne and before the Lamb, wearing white robes and holding palm branches in their hands.... [One of the elders] said to me, ‘These are the ones who have survived the time of great distress; they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb’” (Revelation 7:9,14).



47 posted on 11/01/2007 8:14:04 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Tax-chick

bttt


48 posted on 11/02/2007 4:22:29 AM PDT by Tax-chick (When my mother ship lands, you're toast!)
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To: Salvation
Solemnity of All Saints

All Saints
Solemnity

November 1
 


Christ Glorified in the Court of Heaven
Fra Angelico - 1428-30, Tempera on wood - National Gallery, London
"The glorious company of the apostles praise Thee.
The goodly fellowship of the prophets praise Thee.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise Thee.
All Thy saints and elect with one voice do acknowledge Thee,
O Blessed Trinity, one God!"

-- Feast of All Saints (November 1), Antiphon at Lauds. from the Te Deum

Prayers - Scripture Readings | Family Activities

Origin of All Saint's Day as a feast of the Church
What makes this feast so important that the Church celebrates both the night before All Saints and the day after it?

The Church has always honored those early witnesses to the Christian faith who have died in the Lord. (The Greek word for "witness" is martyr.) During the first three hundred years Christians were serverly persecuted, often suffering torture and bloody death -- because they were faithful . They refused to deny Christ, even when this denial might have saved their own lives, or the lives of their children and families.

The early history of the Church is filled with stories of the heroic faith of these of witnesses to Christ's truth. The stories of these saints -- these baptized Christians of all ages and all states in life, whose fidelity and courage led to their sanctity or holiness -- have provided models for every other Christian throughout history.

Many of those especially holy people whose names and stories were known, the Church later canonized (that is, the Church formally recognized that the life of that person was without any doubt holy, or sanctified -- a "saint" who is an example for us.) The Church's calendar contains many saint's days, which Catholics observe at Mass -- some with special festivities.

But there were thousands and thousands of early Christian martyrs, the majority of whose names are known only to God -- and throughout the history of the Church there have been countless others who really are saints, who are with God in heaven, even if their names are not on the list of canonized saints.

In order to honor the memory -- and our own debt -- to these unnamed saints, and to recall their example, the Church dedicated a special feast day -- a sort of "memorial day" -- so that all living Christians would celebrate at a special Mass the lives and witness of those "who have died and gone before us into the presence of the Lord".

This feast that we know as All Saint's Day originated as a feast of All Martyrs, sometime in the 4th century. At first it was celebrated on the first Sunday after Pentecost. It came to be observed on May 13 when Pope St. Boniface IV (608-615) restored and rebuilt for use as a Christian church an ancient Roman temple which pagan Rome had dedicated to "all gods", the Pantheon. The pope re-buried the bones of many martyrs there, and dedicated this Church to the Mother of God and all the Holy Martyrs on May 13, 610.

About a hundred years later, Pope Gregory III (731-741) consecrated a new chapel in the basilica of St. Peter to all saints (not just to the martyrs) on November 1, and he fixed the anniversary of this dedication as the date of the feast.

A century after that, Pope Gregory IV (827-844) extended the celebration of All Saints to November 1 for the entire Church.

The vigil of this important feast, All Saint's Eve, Hallowe'en, was apparently observed as early as the feast itself.

Ever since then -- for more than a millennium -- the entire Church has celebrated the feast of All Saints on November 1st, and, of course, Hallowe'en on October 31.

It is a principal feast of the Catholic Church. It is a holy day of obligation, which means that all Catholics are to attend Mass on that day.

Prayers, Scripture Readings for All Saints
Collect
[That the prayers of all the saints will bring us forgiveness for our sins]

Father, all-powerful and ever-living God,
today we rejoice in the holy men and women
of every time and place.
May their prayers bring us your forgiveness and love.

We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, Your Son,
who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

or

[We rejoice and keep festival in honor of all the saints]

God our Father, source of all holiness,
the work of Your hands is manifest in Your saints, the beauty of
Your truth is reflected in their faith.

May we who aspire to have part in their joy
be filled with the spirit that blessed their lives,
so that having shared their faith on earth
may we also know their peace in your kingdom.

Grant this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

First Reading: Revelation 7:2-4, 9-14
I, John, saw another angel ascend from the rising of the sun, with the seal of the living God, and he called with a loud voice to the four angels who had been given power to harm earth and sea, saying, "Do not harm the earth or the sea or the trees, till we have sealed the servants of our God upon their foreheads." And I heard the number of the sealed, a hundred and forty-four thousand sealed, out of every tribe of the sons of Israel.

After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude which no man could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and tongues, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice, "Salvation belongs to our God who sits upon the throne, and to the Lamb!" And all the angels stood round the throne and round the elders and the four living creatures, and they fell on their faces before the throne and worshiped God, saying, "Amen! Blessing and glory and wisdom and thanksgiving and honor and power and might be to our God for ever and ever! Amen."

Then one of the elders addressed me, saying, "Who are these, clothed in white robes, and whence have they come?" I said to him, "Sir, you know." And he said to me, "These are they who have come out of the great tribulation; they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb.

Second Reading: 1 John 3:1-3
See what love the Father has given us, that we should be called children of God; and so we are. The reason why the world does not know us is that it did not know Him. Beloved, we are God's children now; it does not yet appear what we shall be, but we know that when He appears we shall be like Him, for we shall see Him as He is. And every one who thus hopes in Him purifies Himself as He is pure.

Gospel Reading:
When Jesus saw the crowds, He went up on the mountain, and when He sat down His disciples came to Him. And He opened His mouth and taught them, saying: "Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. "Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted. "Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth. "Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied. "Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy. "Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God. "Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God. "Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness' sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.

"Blessed are you when men revile you and persecute you and utter all kinds of evil against you falsely on My account. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward is great in heaven.

All Saints is a Holy Day of Obligation.
The principal activity for every Catholic family today is to go to Mass -- together, if possible. (Note Liturgical Calendar)
Other family activities:
    • After school, read (re-read) to your children Saint John's vision of the Resurrection of the Saints that we heard at Mass today. It is from the Book of Revelation (or the Apocalypse), chapter 7:2-4, 9-14.
    • Have them draw pictures of the descriptions it contains. Michelangelo's famous painting of the Last Judgment in the Sistine Chapel was inspired by this scripture passage. Your refrigerator is not the Sistine Chapel, but it's a good place to display the kids' pictures!
    • Talk (or read) to your children about the saints they are named for. If you don't already have a good "age-appropriate" book to read from, prepare in advance by looking up the saint on this web site, or by reading from, say, Butler's Lives of the Saints, and tell them the story in your own words.
    • Have each child choose a favorite saint, and make a booklet of their own about the saint's life. See the saint pages on this web site.
    • Help them focus on how this saint gave an example of unusual courage, or devotion, or dedication to others, and how we can learn from their example.
    • Take the children to a religious goods shop and allow the children to look for a medal or small statue of their own patron saint, or another favorite saint, along with a prayer card for that saint to use for bed time prayers. Ask your parish priest to bless these images for the children. (They can give them to the priest themselves for the blessings.
    • Teach children the great hymn For All the Saints (here from The Adoremus Hymnal).


49 posted on 11/01/2008 12:53:37 PM PDT by Salvation ( †With God all things are possible.†)
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