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Dei Verbum (Catholics and the Bible)
Catholic Exchange ^ | December 18, 2007 | Mickey Addison

Posted on 12/18/2007 1:52:09 PM PST by NYer

Some Christians believe that Catholics are not encouraged to read the Bible.  In fact, the opposite is true...and why wouldn't it be, after all, the Bible is a Catholic book.  What do I mean by that?

The Catholic Church, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, wrote the Bible.  The Catholic Church assembled the Canon (List) of books in the Bible, and the Catholic Church has safeguarded the Bible for 2,000 years.  The Church treasures Sacred Scripture because it is the Word of God.  The Church loves Holy Writ, so much so that she orders her prayer and worship around it.

First, let me dispel the idea that Catholics are not encouraged to read the Bible.  On the contrary, we are exhorted to spend time in God's Word often.  St Jerome, a famous Bible scholar (A.D. 342-420) and Catholic monk, wrote, "Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ."  He translated the Bible into Latin, the common tongue of the day, and his translation (Latin Vulgate) was the translation for 1,000 years.  Far from withholding the Holy Book from the people, the Catholic Church ensured that the Bible would be available to anyone who wanted it by preserving the definitive translation of it.

Listen to what the Second Vatican Council says about Sacred Scripture: "The Church has always venerated the divine Scriptures just as she venerates the body of the Lord, since, especially in the sacred liturgy, she unceasingly receives and offers to the faithful the bread of life from the table both of God's word and of Christ's body. She has always maintained them, and continues to do so, together with sacred tradition, as the supreme rule of faith, since, as inspired by God and committed once and for all to writing, they impart the word of God Himself without change, and make the voice of the Holy Spirit resound in the words of the prophets and Apostles" (Dei Verbum, #21).

Ah...I hear someone murmur from the back row...what about the Council of Trent?  Didn't that council forbid Catholics to read the Bible?  No, exactly the opposite.  The Council Fathers wrote, "...the synod, following the examples of the orthodox Fathers, receives and venerates with an equal affection of piety and reverence all the books both of the Old and New Testament, seeing that one God is the author of both..." (April 8, 1546).  What the Council forbade was the reading of unapproved translations of Sacred Scripture since they could not vouch for the authenticity of any version not reviewed by Biblical scholars guided by the Magesterium of the Church.  To do otherwise would have given the "seal of approval" to potentially heretical books masquerading as the Bible and in the theological and political turmoil of 16th century Europe, there were plenty of "Bibles" out there that didn't measure up.  (If you have ever taken a gander at the New World Translation, the "Bible" of Jehovah's Witnesses, you would understand how egregious doctrinal errors can be spread through a faulty translation.)

The Second Vatican Council, echoing the constant teaching of the Church, decreed the necessity for the Bible to be accessible to the faithful and ecumenical if possible: "Easy access to Sacred Scripture should be provided for all the Christian faithful...But since the word of God should be accessible at all times, the Church by her authority and with maternal concern sees to it that suitable and correct translations are made into different languages, especially from the original texts of the sacred books. And should the opportunity arise and the Church authorities approve, if these translations are produced in cooperation with the separated brethren as well, all Christians will be able to use them" (DV #22).

Today, with the myriad of translations, the surest way to know that your Bible is trustworthy is to look for the imprimatur ("let it be printed") by a bishop on the inside cover.

 Jesus Christ established the Church on Pentecost, under the leadership of the Apostles and the guidance of the Spirit.  The Apostles and their followers are the ones who began to write the letters and books that would become the New Testament.  Jesus didn't flip an armload of scrolls to His followers and tell them to "figure it out for yourself, you've got the Spirit"; He gave the Apostles the authority to teach and guide in His Name.  Most of the books of the New Testament were written in the first 100 years after the Resurrection, by men who either met Christ in Person on earth, or by men who knew the Apostles.  In other words, Catholics wrote the Bible under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.

How did the Church assemble Sacred Scripture into the Bible we know today?  The Council of Trent (A.D. 1546) decreed the definitive list, but the canon of Scripture they promulgated was merely formalizing the decrees of earlier synods of bishops on the same subject.  The Synod of Hippo (A.D. 393) and the three of Carthage (A.D. 393, 397, and 419), where St Augustine likely played a leading role, drew up the canon of Scripture that Trent later ratified.  Frankly, it wasn't until the 16th century that a decree from Rome on the Canon was even necessary, since almost everyone used the Latin Vulgate anyway.

To appreciate how much the Church treasures Sacred Scripture, one need only spend a day in prayer with her.  The hours of the day are marked with Lauds, Vespers, and Compline, where Psalms and Canticles are sung and passages from the Bible prayed over.  Other times of the day are marked with the Angelus or Regina Caeli, prayers that recount the joy of the Gospel's Incarnation and Resurrection narratives.  Most importantly, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass immerses us in Scripture as we participate in the Sacrifice of Christ on Calvary.  Most of the prayers and all of the four readings come from the Bible, a journey through salvation history at each celebration.

Finally, one last, and perhaps the most important, comment about the Bible.  While it is true that the Church is immersed in Scripture, it is also true that Revelation is not confined to the 72 books of the Bible.  The Bible itself records that Jesus did many other signs in the presence of (his) disciples that are not written in this book (Jn 20:30). 

Because the Bible is the Church's book, it is not intended to be read apart from the Liturgy and Sacred Tradition of the Church. 

Immerse yourself in the Bible...it's a very Catholic thing to do!


TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; Theology; Worship
KEYWORDS: bible; catholic; scripture
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Mickey Addison is a career military officer, and has been a catechist at the parish level since 2000. He and his wife have been married for 19 years and they have two children. He can be reached at addisoncrew@gmail.com.

This article was previously published on the
Rosary Army website and is used by permission.
1 posted on 12/18/2007 1:52:10 PM PST by NYer
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To: Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...

Ping!


2 posted on 12/18/2007 1:52:40 PM PST by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
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To: NYer
The Catholic Church, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, wrote the Bible.

Excuse me????

3 posted on 12/18/2007 2:03:22 PM PST by BubbaBasher (WWW.TWFRED08.COM)
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To: BubbaBasher

Exactly. I missed the part where John, Paul, Matthew et. al. were Catholics.

Don’t get me started.


4 posted on 12/18/2007 2:05:52 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
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To: NYer

“Most of the books of the New Testament were written in the first 100 years after the Resurrection”

More like by the time John wrote Revelation around 70AD they were all written. I guess he is counting the Gnostic gospels. He should try reading one if he wants to talk about it.


5 posted on 12/18/2007 2:09:58 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
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To: BubbaBasher
Excuse me????

Perhaps they meant re-wrote it.

6 posted on 12/18/2007 2:19:34 PM PST by Always Right
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To: NYer

Say What?

The average person couldn’t read at all at the time Latin or otherwise, but many years later, when Wycliff translated the Bible into english, people were killed by the Church:

One of Wycliffe’s followers, John Hus, actively promoted Wycliffe’s ideas: that people should be permitted to read the Bible in their own language, and they should oppose the tyranny of the Roman church that threatened anyone possessing a non-Latin Bible with execution. Hus was burned at the stake in 1415, with Wycliffe’s manuscript Bibles used as kindling for the fire. The last words of John Hus were that, “in 100 years, God will raise up a man whose calls for reform cannot be suppressed.” Almost exactly 100 years later, in 1517, Martin Luther nailed his famous 95 Theses of Contention (a list of 95 issues of heretical theology and crimes of the Roman Catholic Church) into the church door at Wittenberg. The prophecy of Hus had come true! Martin Luther went on to be the first person to translate and publish the Bible in the commonly-spoken dialect of the German people; a translation more appealing than previous German Biblical translations. Foxe’s Book of Martyrs records that in that same year, 1517, seven people were burned at the stake by the Roman Catholic Church for the crime of teaching their children to say the Lord’s Prayer in English rather than Latin.


7 posted on 12/18/2007 2:40:47 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: Soliton

First, Foxe’s Book of Martyrs is propaganda. More importantly, the issue wasn’t Wycliffe translating the Bible into English - it was his heretical teachings.


8 posted on 12/18/2007 2:43:27 PM PST by Pyro7480 ("Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, esto mihi Jesus" -St. Ralph Sherwin's last words at Tyburn)
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To: Pyro7480

do you deny that the Church burned people at the stake for owning a non-latin bible?


9 posted on 12/18/2007 2:49:00 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: Pyro7480

do you deny that the Church burned people at the stake for owning a non-latin bible?


10 posted on 12/18/2007 2:49:10 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: topcat54; Dr. Eckleburg; Gamecock; Frumanchu; HarleyD
The Catholic Church, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, wrote the Bible.

Anybody care to comment?

11 posted on 12/18/2007 2:49:15 PM PST by Alex Murphy ("Therefore the prudent keep silent at that time, for it is an evil time." - Amos 5:13)
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To: Resolute Conservative
I missed the part where John, Paul, Matthew et. al. were Catholics.

The Catholic Church was founded by Jesus. Of course his disciples were Catholic.

12 posted on 12/18/2007 2:50:56 PM PST by Petronski (Reject the liberal superfecta: huckabee, romney, giuliani, mccain)
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To: Soliton
do you deny that the Church burned people at the stake for owning a non-latin bible?

Anyone who was burned, was burned because they were convicted of heresy. "Owning a non-latin bible" is not a heresy and never was.

Do you deny that Catholics, with the approval of the Church, translated the scriptures into English and its predecessor languages beginning in the 8th century?

Do you deny that there were at least 14 Catholic editions of the Bible just in the High German language before Luther?

Do you deny that, in 1480, the Cologne Bible, one of those Catholic versions, contained this paragraph in its prologue:

"All Christians should read the Bible with piety and reverence, praying the Holy Ghost, who is the inspirer of the Scriptures, to enable them to understand . . . The learned should make use of the Latin translation of St. Jerome; but the unlearned and simple folk, whether laymen or clergy . . . should read the German translations now supplied, and thus arm themselves against the enemy of our salvation [i.e. Satan]."

Don't believe everything you've been told.

13 posted on 12/18/2007 2:57:24 PM PST by Campion
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To: Alex Murphy

Make sure they comment on post number 13, as well.


14 posted on 12/18/2007 2:58:17 PM PST by Campion
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To: Campion

You can have your own beliefs but not your own history.

The Catholic Church murdered people who disagreed with its teachings. This is because the Church had become corrupted and wanted to control the figurative keys to heaven. The Roman Church had interpreted their scripture to fit their narative, primarily to justify Peter as the foundation of the Church in the face of other claims.

It was this hubris that led to the Protestant reformation.


15 posted on 12/18/2007 3:02:12 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: Resolute Conservative
I missed the part where John, Paul, Matthew et. al. were Catholics.

Or Moses for that matter.

16 posted on 12/18/2007 3:02:36 PM PST by Between the Lines (I am very cognizant of my fallibility, sinfulness, and other limitations.)
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To: Resolute Conservative

I don’t really want to get you started but if they weren’t Catholics what were they? I’m truly curious.


17 posted on 12/18/2007 3:04:06 PM PST by tiki (True Christians will not deliberately slander or misrepresent others or their beliefs)
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To: Soliton
The Catholic Church murdered people who disagreed with its teachings.

Protestants murdered Catholics who disagreed with its teachings. Your point?

18 posted on 12/18/2007 3:04:09 PM PST by Pyro7480 ("Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, esto mihi Jesus" -St. Ralph Sherwin's last words at Tyburn)
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To: Campion

Although there were earlier attempts of an English translation of the Bible, the first whole translation of the Bible into the English language is ascribed to John Wycliffe (1384), who was an English theologian and religious reformer.


19 posted on 12/18/2007 3:04:37 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: NYer
The Catholic Church, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, wrote the Bible.

All of the Bible was written by Torah-observant Jews
( except for the doctor Luke who was gentile)
under the guidance of the Ru'ach HaKodesh.
shalom b'SHEM Yah'shua
20 posted on 12/18/2007 3:05:13 PM PST by Uri’el-2012 (you shall know that I, YHvH, your Savior, and your Redeemer, am the Elohim of Ya'aqob. Isaiah 60:16)
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To: Petronski

I do not remember seeing the word “Catholic” in the Book of Acts or anywhere else in my KJV.


21 posted on 12/18/2007 3:05:58 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
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To: Soliton
Although there were earlier attempts of an English translation of the Bible, the first whole translation of the Bible into the English language is ascribed to John Wycliffe (1384), who was an English theologian and religious reformer

Which is fine. Keep in mind that the "English language" per se didn't exist until shortly before that time. (Try reading Chaucer's Canterbury Tales in the original Middle English if you don't believe me.)

Venerable Bede translated portions of the Scriptures into Anglo-Saxon back in the 8th or 9th Century.

22 posted on 12/18/2007 3:07:03 PM PST by Campion
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To: tiki

Hebrews and Gentiles chosen by Christ to spread His Word.

Someone/thing is quite full of themselves.


23 posted on 12/18/2007 3:08:59 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
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To: Soliton
You can have your own beliefs

Gosh, thanks, I guess.

but not your own history.

Okay. Likewise, I'm sure.

The Catholic Church murdered people who disagreed with its teachings.

And Protestants did the same. Take my namesake, St. Edmund Campion, for example, who was hung, drawn, and quartered by Protestants for saying Mass and hearing confessions.

Not to mention that Protestants killed other Protestants who disagreed with their teachings. There was a period of time in England when it was possible to be executed for refusing to deny the Pope's supremacy ... and to be accompanied to your execution by a fellow prisoner, condemned for rejecting transubstantiation!

24 posted on 12/18/2007 3:11:36 PM PST by Campion
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To: tiki
RE: 17

I don’t really want to get you started but if they weren’t Catholics what were they? I’m truly curious.

Acts 11:26b "...And the disciples were called Christians first in Antioch."

25 posted on 12/18/2007 3:13:33 PM PST by El Cid (Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved, and thy house...)
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To: Campion

“Venerable Bede translated portions of the Scriptures into Anglo-Saxon back in the 8th or 9th Century.”

these were local attempts with no evidence of Papal authority. If you have a contemporaneous source, please share it.

The Church burned the Wycliff Bibles and Wycliff.


26 posted on 12/18/2007 3:14:47 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: Resolute Conservative

Irrelevant.


27 posted on 12/18/2007 3:16:59 PM PST by Petronski (Reject the liberal superfecta: huckabee, romney, giuliani, mccain)
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To: Soliton
From the translator's preface to the 1611 "Authorised Version" (the KJV):

To this may be added Theodoret, as next to him, both for antiquity, and for learning. His words be these, "Every Country that is under the Sun, is full of these words (of the Apostles and Prophets) and the Hebrew tongue (he means the Scriptures in the Hebrew tongue) is turned not only into the Language of the Grecians, but also of the Romans, and Egyptians, and Persians, and Indians, and Armenians, and Scythians, and Sauromatians, and briefly into all the Languages that any Nation uses. (Theodor. 5. Therapeut.) So he. In like manner, Ulfilas is reported by Paulus Diaconus and Isidor (and before them by Sozomen) to have translated the Scriptures into the Gothic tongue: (P. Diacon. li. 12.) John Bishop of Sevil by Vasseus, to have turned them into Arabic, about the year of our Lord 717; (Vaseus in Chron. Hispan.) Bede by Cistertiensis, to have turned a great part of them into Saxon: Efnard by Trithemius, to have abridged the French Psalter, as Beded had done the Hebrew, about the year 800: King Alfred by the said Cistertiensis, to have turned the Psalter into Saxon: (Polydor. Virg. 5 histor.) Methodius by Aventinus (printed at Ingolstadt) to have turned the Scriptures into Slavonian: (Aventin. lib. 4.) Valdo, Bishop of Frising by Beatus Rhenanus, to have caused about that time, the Gospels to be translated into Dutch rhythm, yet extant in the Library of Corbinian: (Circa annum 900. B. Rhenan. rerum German. lib 2.) Valdus, by divers to have turned them himself into French, about the year 1160: Charles the Fifth of that name, surnamed the Wise, to have caused them to be turned into French, about 200 years after Valdus his time, of which translation there be many copies yet extant, as witnesses Beroaldus. Much about that time, even in our King Richard the second’s days, John Trevisa translated them into English, and many English Bibles in written hand are yet to be seen with divers, translated as it is very probable, in that age. So the Syrian translation of the New Testament is in most learned men’s Libraries, of Widminstadius his setting forth, and the Psalter in Arabic is with many, of Augustinus Nebiensis’ setting forth. So Postel affirms, that in his travel he saw the Gospels in the Ethiopian tongue; And Ambrose Thesius alleges the Psalter of the Indians, which he testifies to have been set forth by Potken in Syrian characters. So that, to have the Scriptures in the mother tongue is not a quaint conceit lately taken up, either by the Lord Cromwell in England, (Thuan.) or by the Lord Radevile in Polony, or by the Lord Ungnadius in the Emperor’s dominion, but hath been thought upon, and put in practice of old, even from the first times of the conversion of any Nation; no doubt, because it was esteemed most profitable, to cause faith to grow in men’s hearts the sooner, and to make them to be able to say with the words of the Psalms, "As we have heard, so we have seen." (#Ps 48:8)

28 posted on 12/18/2007 3:18:22 PM PST by Campion
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To: El Cid

“Acts 11:26b “...And the disciples were called Christians first in Antioch.”’

You’re being disingenius. There were protestants even then called Christians.


29 posted on 12/18/2007 3:20:52 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: Soliton
these were local attempts with no evidence of Papal authority

Papal authority was never required; only the authority of the local ordinary.

Bede is a canonized saint, BTW.

The Church burned the Wycliff Bibles and Wycliff.

Wycliff died from a stroke. He was posthumously condemned for heresy and his body was burned. Wycliff's bibles were burned because they were full of heretical notes.

30 posted on 12/18/2007 3:21:55 PM PST by Campion
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To: Soliton
There were protestants even then

Now you're trying to have your own history.

31 posted on 12/18/2007 3:22:42 PM PST by Campion
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To: El Cid
And the disciples were called Christians first in Antioch

And it was the bishop of Antioch, some 70 or so years later, who gives us the first recorded use of the term "Catholic Church" to describe the Christian community.

32 posted on 12/18/2007 3:24:33 PM PST by Campion
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To: Campion

This is historically incorrect:

You may want to try a non-catholic source. There is no known version of the full Bible in English or it’s predecessors before Wycliff. There is evidence of small portions like Psalms and The Gospels being translated earlier, but not by order of the Church. The Church changed its dogma and policies repeatedly over the centuries, but when there were enough people able to read in English, the Church fought to destroy the Bibles.


33 posted on 12/18/2007 3:27:55 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: Petronski

Maybe to you. What else do you “add to” or “subtract from” the Word?


34 posted on 12/18/2007 3:28:38 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
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To: Resolute Conservative

If you want to talk about “subtracting” from the Word, then you should look up Luther.


35 posted on 12/18/2007 3:29:40 PM PST by Pyro7480 ("Jesu, Jesu, Jesu, esto mihi Jesus" -St. Ralph Sherwin's last words at Tyburn)
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To: Resolute Conservative

The premise of your question is false. It was Martin Luther, after all, who tore entire books out of the Bible.


36 posted on 12/18/2007 3:30:09 PM PST by Petronski (Reject the liberal superfecta: huckabee, romney, giuliani, mccain)
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To: Campion

“And it was the bishop of Antioch, some 70 or so years later, who gives us the first recorded use of the term “Catholic Church” to describe the Christian community.’

For the first 280 years of Christian history, Christianity was banned by the Roman empire, and Christians were terribly persecuted. This changed after the “conversion” of the Roman Emperor Constantine. Constantine “legalized” Christianity at the Edict of Milan in A.D. 313. Later, in A.D. 325, Constantine called together the Council of Nicea, in an attempt to unify Christianity. Constantine envisioned Christianity as a religion that could unite the Roman Empire


37 posted on 12/18/2007 3:32:35 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: Campion

“Now you’re trying to have your own history.”

unlike Roman Catholic, “protestant” does not signify an organized church but people who disagreed with the orthodoxy of the establishment. As a Catholic you would just have called them heretics.


38 posted on 12/18/2007 3:37:22 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: Alex Murphy; NYer; Dr. Eckleburg; Gamecock; Frumanchu; HarleyD
"The Catholic Church, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, wrote the Bible."

Anybody care to comment?

That's an absolutely true statement when all the term are properly interpreted in light of what the Bible teaches.

"for prophecy never came by the will of man, but holy men of God spoke as they were moved by the Holy Spirit." (2 Peter 1:21)

"God, who at various times and in various ways spoke in time past to the fathers by the prophets, has in these last days spoken to us by His Son, whom He has appointed heir of all things, through whom also He made the worlds; " (Heb. 1:1,2)

Moses, David, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Peter, Paul, James, Luke, etc were all members of God's one holy covenant people (Catholic church).

The error, of course, is in believing the "catholic church" is limited to a particular sect with its headquarters in a certain Italian city.

39 posted on 12/18/2007 3:39:50 PM PST by topcat54 ("The selling of bad beer is a crime against Christian love.")
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To: topcat54

“Moses, David, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Peter, Paul, James, Luke, etc were all members of God’s one holy covenant people (Catholic church).”

“From the time Jesus left earth (30 AD) until the second half of the second century (150 AD), there was a struggle between two factions. One was what one might call Pauline Christianity and the other Judeo-Christianity. It was only very slowly that... Pauline Christianity triumphed over Judeo-Christianity.”


40 posted on 12/18/2007 3:44:53 PM PST by Soliton (Freddie T is the one for me! (c))
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To: Resolute Conservative
Exactly. I missed the part where John, Paul, Matthew et. al. were Catholics.Don’t get me started.

They nor anybody else at that time called themselves "Catholic" or "catholic" simply because the word means widespread or universal. The absence of the word in your New Testament, therefore, is entirely attributable to the fact that the Christian church was in its infancy.

The combination "the Catholic Church" (he katholike ekklesia) is found for the first time in the letter of St. Ignatius to the Smyrnaeans, written about the year 110. The words run: "Wheresoever the bishop shall appear, there let the people be, even as where Jesus may be, there is the universal [katholike] Church."

The evangelists who wrote the Gospels are the foundation stones of the universal (or Catholic) Church.

41 posted on 12/18/2007 4:00:20 PM PST by marshmallow
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To: NYer
The Catholic Church, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, wrote the Bible. The Catholic Church assembled the Canon (List) of books in the Bible, and the Catholic Church has safeguarded the Bible for 2,000 years.

1. GOD wrote the Bible via the Holy Spirit, and none of the Apostles were Catholics as any sane person would define the term.

2. Athanasius compiled the canonical list of books included in the New Testament - his time predates the split between Orthodox and Catholic, so claiming him as Catholic is not entirely correct. This is dissembling.

3. The Vulgate was not as accurate as later versions, and, further, translation from Latin into languages that the people spoke such as German, English, etc. was fought by the Catholic church for many years.

42 posted on 12/18/2007 4:19:11 PM PST by ikka
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To: NYer
The Catholic Church, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, wrote the Bible.

I didn't know that Moses, David, Paul, Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Peter, Jude, et al, were Catholic. News to me!

I have been teaching the Bible for 30 years, and never ran across this tidbit. Amazing!

43 posted on 12/18/2007 4:48:11 PM PST by LiteKeeper (Beware the secularization of America; the Islamization of Eurabia)
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To: topcat54
Moses, David, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Peter, Paul, James, Luke, etc were all members of God's one holy covenant people (Catholic church).

You will have to excuse some of us. We just presumed when the author of the article said,"The Catholic Church, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, wrote the Bible" that he meant the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church and not the God's one holy covenant people Catholic church.

The error, of course, is in believing the "catholic church" is limited to a particular sect with its headquarters in a certain Italian city.

The error would be the author's capitalization of "Catholic Church" if he meant to say "catholic church." Capitalizing it indicates that it is a denomination headquartered in Rome, and not the universal church (church catholic).

44 posted on 12/18/2007 5:00:16 PM PST by Between the Lines (I am very cognizant of my fallibility, sinfulness, and other limitations.)
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To: NYer

NYer, this is undoubtedly one of the worst articles I have seen on the FR religion board. Why the Latin Church would allow this puerile drivel to be published under its name is absolutely beyond me. Whoever is responsible for this should be ashamed and the editor of this site fired.

If this Mickey Addison is typical of Latin rite catechists, I can only say that its no wonder the Latin Church here is in the sorry state its in.


45 posted on 12/18/2007 5:10:38 PM PST by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated!)
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To: Soliton

What was the lingua franca of (Western) Europe in the 4th Century? 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th?

You would be surprised. It starts with an L and ends in N.

And don’t even attempt to quote Foxe as an authoritative source.


46 posted on 12/18/2007 5:32:33 PM PST by StAthanasiustheGreat (Vocatus Atque Non Vocatus Deus Aderit)
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To: Resolute Conservative

And you are KJV only?


47 posted on 12/18/2007 5:33:38 PM PST by StAthanasiustheGreat (Vocatus Atque Non Vocatus Deus Aderit)
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To: Alex Murphy
The Catholic Church, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, wrote the Bible.

LOL!!! I can't think of ONE authentic Catholic church father listed in the scriptures. I suppose they could try to claim Peter, but that's 2 books out of 66. :O)

48 posted on 12/18/2007 5:35:40 PM PST by HarleyD
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To: Always Right

“Perhaps they meant re-wrote it.”

No, that was Luther.


49 posted on 12/18/2007 5:39:15 PM PST by G Larry (HILLARY CARE = DYING IN LINE!)
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Comment #50 Removed by Moderator


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