Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Palm Sunday
Fisheaters ^ | n/a | Fisheaters

Posted on 03/15/2008 11:14:07 PM PDT by Salvation

Palm Sunday

by Giotto

 

 
 
Today, this "Second Sunday of the Passion," is the memorial of Christ's "triumphant," but misunderstood, entry into Jerusalem, the day that begins Holy Week. This entry into Jerusalem is seen as the prophetic fulfillment of Zacharias 9:9-10 :
Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Sion, shout for joy, O daughter of Jerusalem: BEHOLD THY KING will come to thee, the just and saviour: he is poor, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass. And I will destroy the chariot out of Ephraim, and the horse out of Jerusalem, and the bow for war shall be broken: and he shall speak peace to the Gentiles, and his power shall be from sea to sea, and from the rivers even to the end of the earth.

Before the Mass is the Blessing of the Palms, which includes an Antiphon, Psalms, and Gospel reading. Then comes the Procession with hymns, when we carry the palms either around the church or outside, weather permitting, and then the Mass, during which there is a very long reading sung in 3 parts by 3 deacons (or priest and deacons such as the case may be) -- a long recitation of the Passion, including Matthew 26:36-75 and Matthew 27:1-60. Prepare for a very long Mass!

Carrying palms (or olive or willow branches, etc., if palms aren't available) in procession goes way back into the Old Testament, where it was not only approved but commanded by God at the very foundation of the Old Testament religion. In the fall of the year, after the harvest, when the people gathered for the Feast of Tabernacles God said in Leviticus 23:40:

And you shall take to you on the first day the fruits of the fairest tree, and branches of palm trees, and boughs of thick trees, and willows of the brook: And you shall rejoice before the Lord your God.

Again we read of palms in the II Machabees 10:6-8:

And they kept eight days with joy, after the manner of the feast of the tabernacles, remembering that not long before they had kept the feast of the tabernacles when they were in the mountains, and in dens like wild beasts. Therefore they now carried boughs and green branches and palms, for him that had given them good success in cleansing his place. And they ordained by a common statute, and decree, that all the nation of the Jews should keep those days every year.

And in the 7th chapter of the Apocalypse, we see that those who were "sealed" are seen by John carrying palms:

Apocalypse 7:9-10:
After this, I saw a great multitude, which no man could number, of all nations and tribes and peoples and tongues, standing before the throne and in sight of the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palms in their hands. And they cried with a loud voice, saying: Salvation to our God, who sitteth upon the throne and to the Lamb.

The palms are blessed before the High Mass today. Vested in red cope and standing at the Epistle side of the Altar, the priest recites a short prayer, and then reads a lesson from the book of Exodus which tells of the children of Israel coming to Elim on their way to the Promised Land, where they found a fountain and seventy palm trees. It was at Elim that God sent them manna.

After a few verses from the New Testament, the priest reads the story of Christ's triumphal entry into Jerusalem the Sunday before His death, and about how the people put palms in the Savior's path and sang hosannas because, ironically, they expected a temporal victory by the One they thought would be the great military leader who would conquer the Romans.

Then we pray, begging God that we may in the end go meet Christ, that we may enter with Him into the eternal Jerusalem. The following preface and prayers ask God to bless the palms, that they may be sanctified and may be a means of grace and divine protection to those who carry them and treasure them with faith.

The palms are distributed to the people at the Communion rail. The priest will press the palm against your lips so you can kiss it, and then kiss his hand. Alternatively, the palms may be handed out by the altar boys. In any case, Scripture and prayers follow, and then a procession of clergy, servers, and people through the church or outside around the church.


Customs

When Mass is finished, we take the palms home and hang them over crucifixes or holy pictures (I don't know how universal this is, but an Italian and French custom is to break off a piece of the palm and, while praying to St. Barbara for relief, burn it in times of great storms or natural disasters). Another custom is to shape the palm into Crosses before hanging them (see below). The people of Italy and Mexico shape palms into extremely elaborate and beautiful figures. Also, men in some places will wear a piece of it in their hats or pin it to their lapels, and a piece should also be placed with one's sick call set.

Some of these same palm branches are saved and burned the next year to make the ashes for the next Ash Wednesday -- the palms, which symbolize triumph, and the ashes, which sympbolize death and penitence, forming a great symbolic connection between suffering and victory. The next year, when we get new palms, the old palms are burned and their ashes buried.

Now, this day has in the past sometimes been called "Fig Sunday" because just after Christ's entry into Jerusalem, He cursed the fig tree:

Mark 11:12-14
And the next day when they came out from Bethania, he was hungry. And when he had seen afar off a fig tree having leaves, he came if perhaps he might find any thing on it. And when he was come to it, he found nothing but leaves. For it was not the time for figs. And answering he said to it: May no man hereafter eat fruit of thee any more for ever. (also Matthew 21:18-19)

This cursing is undoubtedly a reference to what would happen to those of Israel who rejected the Messias, as revealed in this parable:

Luke 13:6-9
He spoke also this parable: A certain man had a fig tree planted in his vineyard, and he came seeking fruit on it, and found none. And he said to the dresser of the vineyard: Behold, for these three years I come seeking fruit on this fig tree, and I find none. Cut it done therefore: why cumbereth it the ground? But he answering, said to him: Lord, let it alone this year also, until I dig about it, and dung it. And if happily it bear fruit: but if not, then after that thou shalt cut it down.

Because of the cursing of the fig tree, the eating of figs is customary, and here are a few ways to do so:

Ways to eat Figs

At this time of year, the figs you can get will be dried. First, snip off any stems, then plump them up by letting them boil in water for 5 minutes or so, and letting them stand in the water until cool. Now, some options:
Figs
1) Slice deep crosses into the tops of 8 oz. of figs and spread open. Blend together 12 oz. of cream cheese and 4 oz. of Gorgonzola or blue cheese. Cut crosses into the figs and stuff with the cheese mixture. Top with a pecan half, chill, and serve cold.

2) Quarter figs. Cut thin slices of prosciutto in half lengthwise. Wrap each quarter in the prosciutto so it resembles a rose. Sprinkle with fresh lime juice and freshly ground black pepper.

3) Coarsely chop 1/2 cup pecans and mix with 8 oz. cream cheese. Slice figs in half lengthwise and spoon cheese mixture into each half.

4) Cut a slit into Calimyrna figs and stuff each with a pistachio. Slice a piece of Canadian-style bacon in half lengthwise. Top the bacon with a fresh leaf of basil, and wrap both around a fig. Place seam-side down on a jellyroll pan that has been sprayed with cooking spray. Bake in a pre-heated 425 degree oven for 8-10 minutes until bacon is brown.

The Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday following Palm Sunday are another traditional time of cleaning. Just as the house is cleaned during Advent in preparation for Christmas, and just as Shrovetide is spent cleaning in preparation for Lent, these days are spent in preparation of the greatest Feast of the Church year: the Feast of Easter. By Wednesday night, the house should be spotless so that the days of the Sacred Triduum (Holy Thursday, Friday, and Saturday) can be devoted to Christ's Passion.


 How to make palm Crosses to tuck behind
picture frames and hang on your wall

Take a palm that is about 2 feet long and 1/2" wide (if it tapers at the top, this is good!). Hold the palm upright, so the tapered end points toward the ceiling.
Then bend the top end down and toward you so that the bend is about 5 or 6 inches from the bottom of the palm.
About a third of the way from the bend you just made, twist the section you've pulled down to the right, forming a right angle.

About an inch and a half away from the "stem" of the cross, bend this arm of the palm back behind the palm so that it is now facing to your left. Make the bend at a good length to form the right arm of the Cross.

Folding that same section at a point that equals the length on the right side, bend it on the left side and bring the end forward over what is now the front of the cross.

From the very center of the Cross, fold that arm up and to the upper right (in a "northeast" direction) so that it can wrap around where the upright post of the Cross and the right arm intersect.
Fold this down and to the left behind the Cross...

...and then fold it toward the right so that it is parallel and under the transverse arms of the Cross.
Bring it up behind the Cross again, this time folding it up toward the "northwest" direction.

Tuck the tapered end into the transverse section you made in step 7...

...and pull through.

Turn the Cross over; this side will be the front. Trim the tapered end if necessary, remembering that the palm is a sacramental and any part you trim away should be kept and respected as a sacramental! Use that piece for burning during storms.


Reading

from Dom Gueranger's "The Liturgical Year"

Eearly in the morning of this day, Jesus sets out for Jerusalem, leaving Mary His Mother, and the two sisters Martha and Mary Magdalene, and Lazarus, at Bethania. The Mother of sorrows trembles at seeing her Son thus expose Himself to danger, for His enemies are bent upon His destruction; but it is not death, it is triumph, that Jesus is to receive to-day in Jerusalem. The Messias, before being nailed to the cross, is to be proclaimed King by the people of the great city; the little children are to make her streets echo with their Hosanna to the Son of David; and this in presence of the soldiers of Rome's emperor, and of the high priests and pharisees: the first standing under the banner of their eagles; the second, dumb with rage.

The prophet Zachary had foretold this triumph which the Son of Man was to receive a few days before His Passion, and which had been prepared for Him from all eternity. ' Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Sion! Shout for joy, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold thy King will come to thee; the Just and the Saviour. He is poor, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt, the foal of an ass.' Jesus, knowing that the hour has come for the fulfilment of this prophecy, singles out two from the rest of His disciples, and bids them lead to Him an ass and her colt, which they would find not far off. He has reached Bethphage, on Mount Olivet. The two disciples lose no time in executing the order given them by their divine Master; and the ass and the colt are soon brought to the place where He stands.

The holy fathers have explained to us the mystery of these two animals. The ass represents the Jewish people, which had been long under the yoke of the Law; the colt, upon which, as the evangelist says, no man yet hath sat, is a figure of the Gentile world, which no one had ever yet brought into subjection. The future of these two peoples is to be decided a few days hence: the Jews will be rejected, for having refused to acknowledge Jesus as the Messias; the Gentiles will take their place, to be adopted as God's people, and become docile and faithful.

The disciples spread their garments upon the colt; and our Saviour, that the prophetic figure might be fulfilled, sits upon him, and advances towards Jerusalem. As soon as it is known that Jesus is near the city, the Holy Spirit works in the hearts of those Jews, who have come from all parts to celebrate the feast of the Passover. They go out to meet our Lord, holding palm branches in their hands, and loudly proclaiming Him to be King. They that have accompanied Jesus from Bethania, join the enthusiastic crowd. Whilst some spread their garments on the way, others cut down boughs from the palm-trees, and strew them along the road. Hosanna is the triumphant cry, proclaiming to the whole city that Jesus, the Son of David, has made His entrance as her King.

Thus did God, in His power over men's hearts, procure a triumph for His Son, and in the very city which, a few days later, was to clamour for His Blood. This day was one of glory to our Jesus, and the holy Church would have us renew, each year, the memory of this triumph of the Man-God. Shortly after the birth of our Emmanuel, we saw the Magi coming from the extreme east, and looking in Jerusalem for the King of the Jews, to whom they intended offering their gifts and their adorations: but it is Jerusalem herself that now goes forth to meet this King. Each of these events is an acknowledgment of the kingship of Jesus; the first, from the Gentiles; the second, from the Jews. Both were to pay Him this regal homage, before He suffered His Passion. The inscription to be put upon the cross, by Pilate's order, will express the kingly character of the Crucified: Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews. Pilate, the Roman governor, the pagan, the base coward, has been unwittingly the fulfiller of a prophecy; and when the enemies of Jesus insist on the inscription being altered, Pilate will not deign to give them any answer but this: ' What I have written, I have written.' To-day, it is the Jews themselves that proclaim Jesus to be their King: they will soon be dispersed, in punishment for their revolt against the Son of David; but Jesus is King, and will be so for ever. Thus were literally verified the words spoken by the Archangel to Mary, when he announced to her the glories of the Child that was to be born of her: ' The Lord God shall give unto Him the throne of David, His father; and He shall reign in the house of Jacob for ever.' Jesus begins His reign upon the earth this very day; and though the first Israel is soon to disclaim His rule, a new Israel, formed from the faithful few of the old, shall rise up in every nation of the earth, and become the kingdom of Christ, a kingdom such as no mere earthly monarch ever coveted in his wildest fancies of ambition.

This is the glorious mystery which ushers in the great week, the week of dolours. Holy Church would have us give this momentary consolation to our heart, and hail our Jesus as our King. She has so arranged the service of to-day, that it should express both joy and sorrow; joy, by uniting herself with the loyal hosannas of the city of David; and sorrow, by compassionating the Passion of her divine Spouse. The whole function is divided into three parts, which we will now proceed to explain.

The first is the blessing of the palms; and we may have an idea of its importance from the solemnity used by the Church in this sacred rite. One would suppose that the holy Sacrifice has begun, and is going to be offered up in honour of Jesus' entry into Jerusalem. Introit, Collect, Epistle, Gradual, Gospel, even a Preface, are said, as though we were, as usual, preparing for the immolation of the spotless Lamb; but, after the triple Sanctus! Sanctus! Sanctus! the Church suspends these sacrificial formulas, and turns to the blessing of the palms. The prayers she uses for this blessing are eloquent and full of instruction; and, together with the sprinkling with holy water and the incensation, impart a virtue to these branches, which elevates them to the supernatural order, and makes them means for the sanctification of our soul and the protection of our persons and dwellings. The faithful should hold these palms in their hands during the procession, and during the reading of the Passion at Mass, and keep them in their homes as an outward expression of their faith, and as a pledge of God's watchful love.

It is scarcely necessary to tell our reader that the palms or olive branches, thus blessed, are carried in memory of those wherewith the people of Jerusalem strewed the road, as our Saviour made His triumphant Entry; but a word on the antiquity of our ceremony will not be superfluous. It began very early in the east. It is probable that, as far as Jerusalem itself is concerned, the custom was established immediately after the ages of persecution. St. Cyril, who was bishop of that city in the fourth century, tells us that the palm-tree, from which the people cut the branches when they went out to meet our Saviour, was still to be seen in the vale of Cedron. Such a circumstance would naturally suggest an annual commemoration of the great event. In the. following century, we find this ceremony established, not only in the churches of the east, but also in the monasteries of Egypt and Syria. At the beginning of Lent, many of the holy monks obtained permission from their abbots to retire into the desert, that they might spend the sacred season in strict seclusion; but they were obliged to return to their monasteries for Palm Sunday, as we learn from the life of Saint Euthymius, written by his disciple Cyril. In the west, the introduction of this ceremony was more gradual; the first trace we find of it is in the sacramentary of St. Gregory, that is, at the end of the sixth, or the beginning of the seventh, century. When the faith had penetrated into the north, it was not possible to have palms or olive branches; they were supplied by branches from other trees. The beautiful prayers used in the blessing, and based on the mysteries expressed by the palm and olive trees, are still employed in the blessing of our willow, box, or other branches; and rightly, for these represent the symbolical ones which nature has denied us.

The second of to-day's ceremonies is the procession, which comes immediately after the blessing of the palms. It represents our Saviour's journey to Jerusalem, and His entry into the city. To make it the more expressive, the branches that have just been blessed are held in the hand during it. With the Jews, to hold a branch in one's hand was a sign of joy. The divine law had sanctioned this practice, as we read in the following passage from Leviticus, where God commands His people to keep the feast of tabernacles: And you shall take to you, on the first day, the fruits of the fairest tree, and branches of palm-trees, and boughs of thick trees, and willows of the brook, and you shall rejoice before the Lord your God. It was, therefore, to testify their delight at seeing Jesus enter within their walls, that the inhabitants, even the little children, of Jerusalem, went forth to meet Him with palms in their hands. Let us, also, go before our King, singing our hosannas to Him as the conqueror of death, and the liberator of His people.

During the middle ages, it was the custom, in many churches, to carry the book of the holy Gospels in this procession. The Gospel contains the words of Jesus Christ, and was considered to represent Him. The procession halted at an appointed place, or station: the deacon then opened the sacred volume, and sang from it the passage which describes our Lord's entry into Jerusalem. This done, the cross which, up to this moment, was veiled, was uncovered; each of the clergy advanced towards it, venerated it, and placed at its foot a small portion of the palm he held in his hand. The procession then returned, preceded by the cross, which was left unveiled until all had re-entered the church. In England and Normandy, as far back as the eleventh century, there was practised a holy ceremony which represented, even more vividly than the one we have just been describing, the scene that was witnessed on this day at Jerusalem: the blessed Sacrament was carried in procession. The heresy of Berengarius, against the real presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, had been broached about that time; and the tribute of triumphant joy here shown to the sacred Host was a distant preparation for the feast and procession which were to be instituted at a later period.

A touching ceremony was also practised in Jerusalem during to-day's procession, and, like those just mentioned, was intended to commemorate the event related by the Gospel. The whole community of the Franciscans (to whose keeping the holy places are entrusted) went in the morning to Bethphage. There, the father guardian of the holy Land, being vested in pontifical robes, mounted upon an ass, on which garments were laid. Accompanied by the friars and the Catholics of Jerusalem, all holding palms in their hands, he entered the city, and alighted at the church of the holy sepulchre where Mass was celebrated with all possible solemnity.

This beautiful ceremony, which dated from the period of the Latin kingdom in Jerusalem, has been forbidden for now almost two hundred years, by the Turkish authorities of the city.

We have mentioned these different usages, as we have doneothers on similar occasions, in order to aid the faithful to the better understanding of the several mysteries of the liturgy. In the present instance, they will learn that, in to-day's procession, the Church wishes us to honour Jesus Christ as though He were really among us, and were receiving the humble tribute of our loyalty. Let us lovingly go forth to meet this our King, our Saviour, who comes to visit the daughter of Sion, as the prophet has just told us. He is in our midst; it is to Him that we pay honour with our palms: let us give Him our hearts too. He comes that He may be our King; let us welcome Him as such, and fervently cry out to Him: 'Hosanna to the Son of David!'

At the close of the procession a ceremony takes place, which is full of the sublimest symbolism. On returning to the church, the doors are found to be shut. The triumphant procession is stopped; but the songs of joy are continued. A hymn in honour of Christ our King is sung with its joyous chorus ; and at length the subdeacon strikes the door with the staff of the cross; the door opens, and the people, preceded by the clergy, enter the church, proclaiming the praise of Him, who is our resurrection and our life.

This ceremony is intended to represent the entry of Jesus into that Jerusalem of which the earthly one was but the figure--the Jerusalem of heaven, which has been opened for us by our Saviour. The sin of our first parents had shut it against us; but Jesus, the King of glory, opened its gates by His cross, to which every resistance yields. Let us, then, continue to follow in the footsteps of the Son of David, for He is also the Son of God, and He invites us to share His kingdom with Him. Thus, by the procession, which is commemorative of what happened on this day, the Church raises up our thoughts to the glorious mystery of the Ascension, whereby heaven was made the close of Jesus' mission on earth. Alas l the interval between these two triumphs of our Redeemer are not all days of joy; and no sooner is our procession over, than the Church, who had laid aside for a moment the weight of her grief, falls back into sorrow and mourning.

The third part of to-day's service is the offering of the holy Sacrifice. The portions that are sung by the choir are expressive of the deepest desolation; and the history of our Lord's Passion, which is now to be read by anticipation, gives to the rest of the day that character of sacred gloom, which we all know so well. For the last five or six centuries, the Church has adopted a special chant for this narrative of the holy Gospel. The historian, or the evangelist, relates the events in a tone that is at once grave and pathetic; the words of our Saviour are sung to a solemn yet sweet melody, which strikingly contrasts with the high dominant of the several other interlocutors and the Jewish populace. During the singing of the Passion, the faithful should hold their palms in their hands, and, by this emblem of triumph, protest against the insults offered to Jesus by His enemies. As we listen to each humiliation and suffering, all of which were endured out of love for us, let us offer Him our palm as to our dearest Lord and King. When should we be more adoring, than when He is most suffering?

These are the leading features of this great day. According to our usual plan, we will add to the prayers and lessons any instructions that seem to be needed.

This Sunday, besides its liturgical and popular appellation of Palm Sunday, has had several other names. Thus it was called Hosanna Sunday, in allusion to the acclamation wherewith the Jews greeted Jesus on His entry into Jerusalem. Our forefathers used also to call it Pascha Floridum, because the feast of the Pasch (or Easter), which is but eight days off, is to-day in bud, so to speak, and the faithful could begin from this Sunday to fulfil the precept of Easter Communion. It was in allusion to this name, that the Spaniards, having on the Palm Sunday of 1513, discovered the peninsula on the Gulf of Mexico, called it Florida. We also find the name of Capitilavium given to this Sunday, because, during those times when it was the custom to defer till Holy Saturday the baptism of infants horn during the preceding months (where such a delay entailed no danger), the parents used, on this day, to wash the heads of these children, out of respect to the holy chrism wherewith they were to be anointed. Later on, this Sunday was, at least in some churches, called the Pasch of the competent,, that is, of the catechumens, who were admitted to Baptism; they assembled to-day in the church, and received a special instruction on the symbol, which had been given to them in the previous scrutiny. In the Gothic Church of Spain, the symbol was not given till to-day. The Greeks call this Sunday Baïphoros, that is, Palm-bearing.



TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; History; Theology
KEYWORDS: catholic; catholiclist; lent; palmsunday
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-67 next last
For your information and discussion.
1 posted on 03/15/2008 11:14:11 PM PDT by Salvation
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: All
Palm Sunday

HOSANNA (Palm) SUNDAY - Shanini Sunday

Being Catholic: Sacred Things, Palm Branches

Passion (Palm) Sunday

Pope Opens Holy Week With Palm Sunday Mass

Traditions Related to Palm Sunday

HOMILIES PREACHED BY FATHER ALTIER ON PALM SUNDAY FROM 2001-2005.

Palm Sunday (In Art)

Palm Sunday (Artistic Representations)

RELIGIOUS HISTORY: On Palm Sunday, the path to Golgotha

Palm Sundays

History of Palm Sunday

Annie's "Palm Sunday" Page,

PALM SUNDAY ACCORDING TO THE BYZANTINE RITE TRADITION"

Palm Sunday to Pascha: Orthodox Customs

 

2 posted on 03/15/2008 11:19:41 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Lady In Blue; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; Catholicguy; RobbyS; ...
King of Endless Glory Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the King of Endless Glory Ping List.

3 posted on 03/15/2008 11:21:06 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Pinged from Terri Dailies

8mm


4 posted on 03/16/2008 4:30:43 AM PDT by 8mmMauser (Jezu ufam tobie...Jesus I trust in Thee)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Salvation; Pyro7480

Just finished watching the beautiful, live coverage of Palm Sunday services from the Vatican. I have forgotten why the Latin Church reads the Passion on Palm Sunday. This is a day of joy - the triumphant arrival of Jesus in Jerusalem. The Passion does not take place until Friday, so why those readings today?


5 posted on 03/16/2008 4:53:56 AM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: NYer

I wondered that myself, but it is perhaps due to the fact that Good Friday is not a day of obligation. That way, everyone hears the Passion account prior to mass on Easter next week.

It is still worth going to Good Friday service, though, because that is the only time we read the Passion from the Gospel of John, and because of all the differences between that service and a regular Sunday Mass. The Holy Thursday and Easter Vigil services are different too, and special.


6 posted on 03/16/2008 8:27:09 AM PDT by BaBaStooey ("Awake, O sleeper, and arise from the dead, and Christ will give you light." Ephesians 5)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: NYer

I think it’s because Palm/Passion Sunday is the beginning of the Passion (Holy Week) and Holy Thursday/Good Friday are not Holy Days of Obligation. Not sure so don’t go by me. My 15 yr old asked that today also. Both she and her older sister were in The Passion Play (put on and produced by the teen youth group) so it confused her also.

Someone here may know the correct reason.


7 posted on 03/16/2008 2:29:49 PM PDT by Twink
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Twink; BaBaStooey; Mrs. Don-o

Thank you both for your educated guesses. I’m pinging Mrs. Don-o - perhaps she can shed some light on this :-)


8 posted on 03/16/2008 4:12:27 PM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: NYer

A day of joy, yes, and that is recalled in the Gospel at the beginning of Mass with the blessing of the palms and sprinkling of the congregation with Holy Water.

However, were not some of the same people who were singing “Hosanna in the highest” the same ones who a few days later were saying, “Crucifiy him.”

It is so realistic. The Passion according to St. John will be read on Good Friday.


9 posted on 03/16/2008 4:33:30 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: NYer; Salvation
I really don't know!

Here's an answer to that very question from Fr. Pat McCloskey. Here is another reflection from Fr. Raniero Cantalamessa.

It occurs to me that for people unable to come to church on Good Friday (for example, because of work schedules), Palm Sunday would be the only time they can hear a Liturgical reading of the Passion all year.

10 posted on 03/16/2008 4:54:23 PM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Try this for Fr. McCloskey:

http://www.americancatholic.org/messenger/Mar2002/Wiseman.asp

11 posted on 03/16/2008 5:02:20 PM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Mrs. Don-o; NYer
And from today's Gospel at the Blessing of the Palms: (my emphasis added)

**And when he entered Jerusalem the whole city was shaken and asked, “Who is this?” And the crowds replied, “This is Jesus the prophet, from Nazareth in Galilee.”

So we see, even as Jesus entered the city, some people were upset and possibly wondering what they could do or should do next.

12 posted on 03/16/2008 5:04:37 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Mrs. Don-o
Thanks for that link.

Why Is the Passion Read on Palm Sunday?

Q: Last year on Palm Sunday they read two Gospel passages: Jesus' entry into Jerusalem and then the Passion. As a child, I remember only the entry into Jerusalem story being read on Palm Sunday. Did the Church move the Passion account to Sunday to make sure more people heard it?

Also, when Jesus comes into Jerusalem everyone cheers. Five days later they call for his execution. That is a big turnaround in only five days! Did throwing the moneychangers out of the Temple account for that change?

Finally, why is red the liturgical color for Palm Sunday?

A: There is a Passion account in each Gospel. For centuries, the Gospel of John's account was read on Good Friday and the Gospel of Matthew was read on Palm Sunday (Passion Sunday now). So that all accounts are read, since 1969 the Catholic Church reads on Palm Sunday in rotation: Matthew (Year A—2002), Mark (Year B) and Luke (Year C). The accounts of Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem are read in the same rotation.

The question of the crowd's turnaround from Palm Sunday to Good Friday is an important one. The Gospels may have created the impression in our minds that everyone in Jerusalem hailed Jesus as Messiah on Palm Sunday and that by Good Friday everyone in Jerusalem sought Jesus' death. In fact, neither statement is true.

Matthew 26:5 says that the Jewish leaders feared a riot among the people if Jesus was seized during the Passover festival. Mark 15:11 says that the chief priests "stirred up the crowd to have him [Pilate] release Barabbas for them instead." That crowd did not speak for all Jewish people in Jerusalem. Luke 23:50 says that, although he was a member of the Sanhedrin, Joseph of Arimathea did not consent to their plan. In fact, the Palm Sunday/Good Friday time span does not represent a shift from total acceptance of Jesus to total rejection of him.

Red is used liturgically on Palm Sunday and on Good Friday because that is the color for martyrs. These two feasts mark the last days of Jesus, the innocent one who died for the guilty.


13 posted on 03/16/2008 5:10:07 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

There are also slight differences between the Gospel accounts, which is interesting. In Matthew’s Passion read today, the two criminals mock and ridicule Jesus even while hanging from their own crosses. In Mark’s and John’s Passion, the two criminals are mentioned, and that’s it. It is only in Luke’s Passion that the “good criminal” is redeemed.

This year, we heard Matthew’s Passion, which is sort of a downer for someone hoping to hear the “good criminal” being redeemed part.


14 posted on 03/16/2008 5:44:52 PM PDT by BaBaStooey ("Awake, O sleeper, and arise from the dead, and Christ will give you light." Ephesians 5:14)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: BaBaStooey

Yes, that is one difference.

There is also no mention of Herod in this Gospel. And if I remember correctly, Matthew’s Gospel is where we hear about Pilate’s wife.

Another thing, Matthew writes for the Jewish readers; he has lots of references to prophets and stanzas from the Old Testament.

We also hear in John’s Gospel about “This is Jesus, King of the Jews” being written in three languages.

Not many details about the Agony in the Garden in John’s Gospel either, perhaps because he had fallen asleep? LOL!

It’s really fun and enlightening to look at the Gospels and find the differencees, but there are so many similarities, we know that they all tell the same story, only from their own perspective.


15 posted on 03/16/2008 5:58:35 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Here's wishing everyone a blessed Holy Week.
16 posted on 03/16/2008 8:49:48 PM PDT by Ciexyz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ciexyz

I wish all my fellow believers in Jesus Christ - a very blessed Palm Sunday (yesterday) and Holy Week!

May the passion of our Lord Jesus reach through all the worries and cares of our lives and this world fade a bit as we meditate upon His love for His beloveds that took Him through this week those many years ago.

Whether you are Catholic or Protestant or Orthodox or completed Jew.....may thinking on the last week on earth of our Lord Jesus (in his pre-resurrected body) impact your heart and mind and actions - and mine as well.


17 posted on 03/16/2008 9:27:39 PM PDT by Freedom'sWorthIt
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Freedom'sWorthIt
Amen to that.

"Now set aside all earthly cares."

18 posted on 03/17/2008 6:12:11 AM PDT by Mrs. Don-o (Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me, a sinner.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: BaBaStooey

I’m looking for Roman Catholics to comment on something I found very odd.

Yesterday’s mass during the reading of the Gospel stated the Jesus Christ was hung between two “revolutionaries”...WHat is THAT all about?

It was in the seasonal missalette. Since when did the two men change from thieves to revolutionaries?

I’m going to post this on other threads with Catholic themes to see if it was just my parish or if others noticed it.


19 posted on 03/17/2008 6:26:25 AM PDT by Dick Vomer (liberals suck....... but it depends on what your definition of the word "suck" is.,)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Dick Vomer
Since when did the two men change from thieves to revolutionaries?

The revolutionary was the guy between the two thieves.

20 posted on 03/17/2008 6:28:50 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: NYer

There is no Mass performed on Good Friday, so maybe that’s why. Ans then on Easter it’ s ALL about celebrating the RISEN LORD.


21 posted on 03/17/2008 6:30:30 AM PDT by Ann Archy (Abortion.....The Human Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Dick Vomer

In my church, if I recall right, they were referred to as “criminals.”

In my New American Bible, which is where the lectionary readings are supposed to come from, they are actually referred to by Matthew as revolutionaries. In Mark, they are also revolutionaries. In Luke, they are criminals. In John, they are only referred to as “two others.”

I guess it all depends on the translation.


22 posted on 03/17/2008 6:50:14 AM PDT by BaBaStooey ("Awake, O sleeper, and arise from the dead, and Christ will give you light." Ephesians 5:14)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: BaBaStooey

thank you. The reason I was curious is that my father, who was a devout Catholic, told me that he always felt that if a thief could be by the side of Jesus and be saved that possibly he could somehow find his way to the Lord’s good grace.

He was a Marine that saw combat and from our conversations had difficulties justifying some of his actions.

It just struck me that a thief is more of a common criminal than a “revolutionary”. That Jesus was treated with such disrespect that he was placed with common thieves and not with those of “high crimes” such as treason.

Thanks again for taking the time to respond to my post. I’m a fallen Catholic trying to find my way back to the church and have difficulty controlling my temper when politics is injected into the church’s sermons.

Have a blessed Holy Week.


23 posted on 03/17/2008 7:08:19 AM PDT by Dick Vomer (liberals suck....... but it depends on what your definition of the word "suck" is.,)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Dick Vomer
From Douay Rheims version of the Bible -- in my book there is no better translation from the Vulgate:

Matthew 27

38 Then were crucified with him two thieves: one on the right hand, and one on the left.

full version found here:

Douay Rheims

24 posted on 03/17/2008 7:08:52 AM PDT by vox_freedom (John 16:2 yea, the hour cometh, that whosoever killeth you, will think that he doth a service to God)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

I am in no way deserving of our Lord’s love and forgiveness. But my spirit is joyous because of His love for all of us.


25 posted on 03/17/2008 7:11:46 AM PDT by stevio (Crunchy Con - God, guns, guts, and organically grown crunchy nuts.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Salvation; Twink; BaBaStooey; Mrs. Don-o; Ann Archy; Kolokotronis; redhead
Thank you, Salvation, for posting that information. However, (perhaps I'm slow to grasp), I still don't find the answer to the question in the response.

Q: Last year on Palm Sunday they read two Gospel passages: Jesus' entry into Jerusalem and then the Passion. As a child, I remember only the entry into Jerusalem story being read on Palm Sunday. Did the Church move the Passion account to Sunday to make sure more people heard it?

A: There is a Passion account in each Gospel. For centuries, the Gospel of John's account was read on Good Friday and the Gospel of Matthew was read on Palm Sunday (Passion Sunday now). So that all accounts are read, since 1969 the Catholic Church reads on Palm Sunday in rotation: Matthew (Year A—2002), Mark (Year B) and Luke (Year C). The accounts of Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem are read in the same rotation.

In fact, in the pre VCII Church, the Passion account was also read on Palm Sunday and we all stood for its reading. My mother always referred to Palm Sunday as having the longest Mass of the year. I notice, however, in the response that the writer refers to Palm Sunday as Passion Sunday. Is that true? Indeed, I did notice the Holy Father vested in red, which would make sense.

Perhaps, as someone commented, there is no Mass on Good Friday in the Latin Church. We have the Liturgy of the Signing of the Chalice in the morning (The Anaphora of the Apostles also known as III Peter and by the Syriac word Sharrar, which the Maronite Church shares in common with the Church of Edessa, is the oldest Anaphora in the Catholic Church).

Yesterday, we celebrated Hosanna (Shaneeneh) Sunday with the blessing of the palms and a procession down the street, singing Hosanna in the Highest! The Church was packed - children were dressed in their finest clothes - little girls in gowns, boys in suits and ties - all carrying candles festooned with flowers and palms. Thursday of the Mysteries is the Liturgy and Washing of the Feet. On Friday evening, we will celebrate Great Friday of the Crucifixion with the Liturgy of the Burial of the Lord in the evening.

These all seem to follow the historical sequence of events. Out of curiosity, I have pinged redhead to understand how the Byzantines celebrated yesterday and Kolokotronis for some insight into how the GOC celebrate Holy Week.

26 posted on 03/17/2008 9:47:23 AM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: NYer

The Eastern churches have some wonderful traditions. There is a Byzantine Catholic church in a nearby town, but I have never looked into it before.

My parents once were on vacation and found a Maronite church. They had to call me on the phone, since I am supposed to be their “church expert.” I told them, yes, they are Catholic, and they’re Lebanese, and Danny Thomas, etc. etc. etc.

My dad’s boss is Lebanese and he described seeing all the old guys walking into church as an interesting experience, since he saw about a hundred or so guys who all looked like his boss walking into church.

I’ve never seen a Maronite liturgy, but for my parents, who are used to what they are familiar with, and happy with their little routine, they were a little bit freaked out.


27 posted on 03/17/2008 12:51:05 PM PDT by BaBaStooey ("Awake, O sleeper, and arise from the dead, and Christ will give you light." Ephesians 5:14)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: NYer

I’m not answering your original question. My parish always reads one Gospel passage (Jesus’ entry...) before the palm/blessing procession. Then, during the Gospel the Passion is read (standing). I don’t recall it ever being any different. I’ve always thought of Palm Sunday as the longest Mass of the year, other than the Easter Vigil which is different than Easter Sunday Mass.


28 posted on 03/17/2008 12:51:06 PM PDT by Twink
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Dick Vomer

I like to look at all the examples of people who were very far gone, and came to the church, and in some cases, became saints, like St. Augustine.

Father John Corapi is a more modern example. Which isn’t to say I’m placing him on the same level as Augustine, but he has a powerful speaking voice and also an interesting past. Feel free to check him out on YouTube. He went from being a military man, to a successful businessman, to a man with a lot of money and a drug problem, to broke and homeless, and eventually, a Catholic priest.

My personal belief on the subject is that no one is beyond the reach of God. Even Bobby Fischer had a Catholic burial. My favorite bible quote from St. Paul’s letter to the Ephesians (which he wrote while in prison) is related to this idea, that we all have the ability to awake and arise from the death of sin, and Christ will give us light. St. Paul himself is an example of someone who was in terrible sin and not only found his way to Christ, but did many great things in His service.

God Bless and have a blessed Holy Week as well.


29 posted on 03/17/2008 12:56:38 PM PDT by BaBaStooey ("Awake, O sleeper, and arise from the dead, and Christ will give you light." Ephesians 5:14)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

Comment #30 Removed by Moderator

To: BaBaStooey; Twink
I’ve never seen a Maronite liturgy, but for my parents, who are used to what they are familiar with, and happy with their little routine, they were a little bit freaked out.

:-)

Well, you don't describe what they saw, much less where they saw it but I can attest to the fact that the first time I attended a Maronite liturgy, I felt like a fish out of water. The entire liturgy is chanted back and forth between the priest and the congregation. All of the elements are there but there are certain differences in their placement. Take for example, the exchange of peace. The priest touches the gifts and then passes the 'peace' to an acolyte who passes it to two children who serve as peace bearers. They bring the peace to the first person of each pew who passes it on to the next one and so on. What moved me most, however, was the Qadeeshat (Trisgion). This ancient prayer goes back to the origins of the Church and is celebrated at the liturgies of all the Eastern Churches.

Holy One
Holy Mighty One
Holy Immortal One

Response: Have mercy on us!

The priest and congregation face the Tabernacle as they chant this prayer 3 times. If it sounds familiar to you, that is because our Lord asked St. Faustina to include it at the conclusion of the Divine Mercy Chaplet. Essentially, all traces of this ancient prayer had disappeared in the Latin Church. Our Lord must love this prayer in order to have made such a request of St. Faustina, don't you think?

The following is a description of the Maronite Divine Liturgy.

The Maronite Liturgy is called Service of the Holy Mysteries and derives from the Syriac :.ministering at the altar". Liturgy, Qourbono and other words are used.

The entire liturgy (prayers, gestures, music, art, and architecture) reflects from beginning to end, glory to God for His loving mercy and the call of the worshipper to forgiveness and rebirth.

The attitude of the Maronite worshiper is unworthiness of and readiness for the second coming of the Lord Jesus. "Blessed is he who has come and will come in the name of the Lord" (Maronite Liturgy).

The believer is likened to a ship opening its sails to the Holy Spirit and making its maiden voyage home to the harbor of safety.

The Holy Spirit is the principal minister in the liturgy. He is the beginning, the end and the perfection of all things.

The Service of the Holy Mysteries develops three themes: 1) humanity's creation in God's image; 2)deep awareness of God's mercy toward sinful people; 3) joyful praise of the Trinity.

The tone of the service is simple and direct in the monastic spirit of its founder, St. Maron. A balance is achieved between the hiddenness and presence of God in Jesus.

The worshiper becomes involves in a human-divine drama which unfolds before and within him and makes once a sharer in the Kingdom. The Mysteries/Sacraments become the meeting point for the believer and God.

The communal aspect of worship is emphasized by the fact that the community is absorbed in a continuous dialogue with the celebrant who mediates on behalf of Christ the High Priest, and the deacon who serves an instructing and coordinating role.

When you have the chance, take some time to visit the above liturgy link. You can then share that information with your parents.

The Eastern churches have some wonderful traditions. There is a Byzantine Catholic church in a nearby town, but I have never looked into it before.

You should read up on the Byzantine Tradition and visit this Church, at least once. The Vatican II Council declared that "all should realize it is of supreme importance to understand, venerate, preserve, and foster the exceedingly rich liturgical and spiritual heritage of the Eastern churches, in order faithfully to preserve the fullness of Christian tradition" (Unitatis Redintegrato, 15).

Bottom line is this. If you are happy and well catechized at your local RC parish, then you should remain where you are. If there are issues with liturgical abuse, as some of us have discovered, then the Eastern Catholic Churches are definitely worth exploring as an alternative. There you will experience the very rich heritage of the Catholic Church but from an eastern spirituality. In the Maronite and Chaldean Churches, one hears the words of Consecration chanted in the language of our Lord and Savior; it is like being at the Last Supper. The Maronite Church is monastic in origin and the priestly vestments are simple; versus the Byzantine Church with its heavily decorated vestments, vessels and iconostasis.

Ultimately, the objective of any search is to find the best means to worship our Lord, God and Savior, Jesus Christ.

31 posted on 03/17/2008 4:41:08 PM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: NYer

I attended the Maronite Church in South Philly often. A few friends (Lebonese Catholics, RC not Maronites, attended at times so I went with them).

It was a little different but easy to follow (but would probably be more difficult for those who are older). My friends’ dad is a palestinian catholic and a couple of the kids attended the Eastern Rite or Greek Orthodox (sorry, not sure of the correct words) and attended a few times with them. It was a bit more difficult to follow than the Maronite.


32 posted on 03/17/2008 4:51:19 PM PDT by Twink
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Salvation; All

You “guys” make me feel so much better.

I have a bad case if the pouty lip “weebies.” cause I got called into work yesterday, and I’m scheduled on Easter Sunday.

I feel like I’m looking in through the window to the Holy Week candy store. :o(


33 posted on 03/17/2008 4:52:29 PM PDT by papertyger (changing words quickly metastasizes into changing facts -- Ann Coulter)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mrs. Don-o

Thank you.


34 posted on 03/17/2008 6:43:20 PM PDT by Freedom'sWorthIt
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: papertyger

It sounds like you have the opportunity then to attend the Easter Vigil.

I love the Easter Vigil, with its extra readings. It also reminds me of the story from before I was born when my dad and grandfather once both gave up beer for Lent the same year. They attended the Easter Vigil, stopped at a party store on the way home, and split a 12 pack that same night after Mass. Makes me kinda laugh thinking about it.

This month, I am on usher duty at my church, for the 8:00 AM mass, so I don’t think the Easter Vigil is part of my plans. However, our parish has the honor of having Bishop Carlson celebrating mass on Easter Sunday, so I’m really looking forward to that.


35 posted on 03/17/2008 7:44:51 PM PDT by BaBaStooey ("Awake, O sleeper, and arise from the dead, and Christ will give you light." Ephesians 5:14)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: BaBaStooey
It sounds like you have the opportunity then to attend the Easter Vigil.

Believe it or not, it has already been announced that there would be no Mass on Saturday nor Sunday night, but you got my gears grinding...our parish is a small one and I'll bet one of the bigger ones will have a celebration I can attend

Thanks!

36 posted on 03/17/2008 8:32:39 PM PDT by papertyger (changing words quickly metastasizes into changing facts -- Ann Coulter)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: papertyger

I know what you are saying. My priest actually says mass at two nearby parishes because there is a shortage of priests. So while my church will have the Easter Vigil, the two nearby churches will not. However, they will both have masses on Sunday.

It is sadly, a common occurance these days.


37 posted on 03/18/2008 7:24:21 AM PDT by BaBaStooey ("Awake, O sleeper, and arise from the dead, and Christ will give you light." Ephesians 5:14)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: nickcarraway; Lady In Blue; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; Catholicguy; RobbyS; markomalley; ...

There is so much information on this thread about Palm Sunday that I am “forced” to ping all of you to it. (LOL!)

Enjoy — and have a blessed Holy Week!


38 posted on 04/05/2009 4:35:33 PM PDT by Salvation ( †With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Twink
Our parish had a beautiful procession today.

After Mass we had an Easter egg hunt for the children.

A few of us put out the eggs about an hour before Mass.

After Mass we gathered the children together and looking out of the field found that squirrels had been busy opening up the plastic eggs and eating the treats.

They got into at least two dozen of them.

39 posted on 04/05/2009 5:00:44 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free. Free Republic.com baby.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Twink
Our Mass is normally about an hour and 20 minutes.

Today's went about one hour 45 minutes.

The Vigil Mass is indeed the longest Mass of the year for us. It runs between 2 to 2 1/2 hours.

I want to make sure I get my rest in, earlier this week because we really decorate our Church and we can not even begin until after Good Friday services which do not begin until 8PM.

40 posted on 04/05/2009 5:18:53 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free. Free Republic.com baby.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: All
Being a recent convert to Catholism (I crossed the Tiber four years ago this Easter)I was wondering if all parishes have the tradition of visiting seven churches on Holy Thursday evening?

Many of our local parishes closed their doors after 11PM, alhthough our parish is going to remain open all night with the Knights standing guard until morning.

41 posted on 04/05/2009 5:31:43 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free. Free Republic.com baby.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: mware

Our last Good Friday Service starts at 8:30 pm.


42 posted on 04/05/2009 5:34:49 PM PDT by Salvation ( †With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

Yes, can’t start services until the sun goes down.


43 posted on 04/05/2009 5:35:36 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free. Free Republic.com baby.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

We do have Stations before Mass though so by the time the Stations of the Cross procession is over it is dark.


44 posted on 04/05/2009 5:37:43 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free. Free Republic.com baby.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: mware

We have a service in English for those who can’t come at night. 12:05 pm


45 posted on 04/05/2009 5:41:22 PM PDT by Salvation ( †With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
With times the way they are some folks are finding it hard to get off for Good Friday Services. Our priest is offering Stations twice. If we have good weather the one in the afternoon will be outside.
46 posted on 04/05/2009 5:51:19 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free. Free Republic.com baby.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
BTW I Love the directions for making the crosses out of palms.

My favorite is to make a crown out of the palms. I hang the crown over the painting I have of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. That reminds me I have to get some black cloth to cover the painting and my wall crucifix for Good Friday.

47 posted on 04/05/2009 5:53:55 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free. Free Republic.com baby.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mware

I didn’t think they did the black cloth covering things anymore.


48 posted on 04/05/2009 6:00:08 PM PDT by Salvation ( †With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Our prist is from Malta.

All the statues in our church are covered until Easter Vigil.

He told us he wanted us to focus on The Christ during Lent.

49 posted on 04/05/2009 6:03:54 PM PDT by mware (F-R-E-E, that spells free. Free Republic.com baby.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: mware; Salvation

We are having an “In the tomb with Jesus” on Friday evening into Saturday morning. At 9pm Friday the church will be totallly denuded of all signs and symbols and the Tabernacle door will be open and empty of any Eucharist. The church will be open all night until 7 am Saturday but during the night there will be 4 guided prayer, scripture reading, and periods of silence, and guided contemplation of the mystery of the Tomb of Christ. I am going to do this.


50 posted on 04/05/2009 6:08:56 PM PDT by Citizen Soldier (Made in USA and proud of it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-67 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson