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Cause of death of Italian saint uncovered
BBC ^ | June 11, 2010

Posted on 06/11/2010 2:27:30 PM PDT by NYer

Santa Rosa mummy

Santa Rosa lies in a monastery in Viterbo near Rome

Researchers have used X-ray techniques to uncover the cause of death of a 700-year-old Italian saint.

Santa Rosa - who died when she was 18 or 19 years old - was most likely killed by a blood clot in the heart, say the Italian research team.

It is said the 13th Century saint had miraculous powers that allowed her to raise someone from the dead and to survive the flames of a burning pyre.

Her mummified remains are conserved in a monastery near Rome.

Santa Rosa is one of the most important saints in the Roman Catholic Church and is revered by thousands of peopleProfessor Ruggero D'Anastasio

The research team had been asked in 1995 to carry out some preservation work on the body, which was showing signs of damage.

As part of the restoration work, they were able to take X-rays using a mobile device.

Rare condition

Historical records suggested she may have died of tuberculosis, the researchers said, but they found no evidence she had the infection.

What they did find was that she had Cantrell's syndrome - a rare condition causing defects in the heart and surrounding tissues.

Now an X-ray of the heart has shown a dark area suggestive of a probably fatal blockage, according to a report published in The Lancet.

Study leader Professor Ruggero D'Anastasio said: "Santa Rosa is one of the most important saints in the Roman Catholic Church and is revered by thousands of people.

"In the future we hope to analyse the heart with more modern technologies."

(Excerpt) Read more at news.bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Catholic; History; Religion & Science
KEYWORDS: catholic; rita

1 posted on 06/11/2010 2:27:30 PM PDT by NYer
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To: netmilsmom; thefrankbaum; markomalley; Tax-chick; GregB; saradippity; Berlin_Freeper; Litany; ...

Ping!


2 posted on 06/11/2010 2:27:50 PM PDT by NYer ("God dwells in our midst, in the Blessed Sacrament of the altar." St. Maximilian Kolbe)
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To: NYer

Clinton?


3 posted on 06/11/2010 2:32:47 PM PDT by Jack Wilson
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To: NYer

She is a Christian Saint from Viterbo (in today’s Italy) NOT an Italian Saint.


4 posted on 06/11/2010 2:33:52 PM PDT by eleni121 (For Jesus did not give us a timid spirit , but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline)
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To: NYer

Bush’s fault.


5 posted on 06/11/2010 2:34:53 PM PDT by wny
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To: eleni121

Please explain.


6 posted on 06/11/2010 2:39:43 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: NYer

>> Researchers have used X-ray techniques to uncover the cause of death of a 700-year-old Italian saint. <<

Old age?

>> Santa Rosa - who died when she was 18 or 19 years old - <<

Oh, nevermind


7 posted on 06/11/2010 3:15:27 PM PDT by dangus
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To: trisham

I think the other poster means that when Santa Rosa died 700 years ago, Italy as a country, at that point in time, did not exist.


8 posted on 06/11/2010 3:17:47 PM PDT by july4thfreedomfoundation (I'm voting for Sarah Palin because she pisses off the right people.)
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To: july4thfreedomfoundation
Oh. Ok. :)

Thanks.

9 posted on 06/11/2010 3:25:12 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: eleni121; trisham
She is a Christian Saint from Viterbo (in today’s Italy) NOT an Italian Saint.

When did Viterbo separate itself from Italy?

10 posted on 06/11/2010 4:07:51 PM PDT by NYer ("God dwells in our midst, in the Blessed Sacrament of the altar." St. Maximilian Kolbe)
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To: NYer

More like ‘when did Italy become Italy’, FRiend.


11 posted on 06/11/2010 5:00:35 PM PDT by agere_contra (Obama did more damage to the Gulf economy in one day than Pemex/Ixtoc did in nine months)
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To: NYer

I have to admit, I have never heard of Santa Rosa. My loss - I shall find out more. Thank you for posting this!


12 posted on 06/11/2010 5:01:45 PM PDT by agere_contra (Obama did more damage to the Gulf economy in one day than Pemex/Ixtoc did in nine months)
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To: NYer
Col. Mustard, in the study, with a pipe...


13 posted on 06/11/2010 6:48:58 PM PDT by GreenLanternCorps ("Barack Obama" is Swahili for "Jimmy Carter".)
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To: NYer

You don’t get it.

Italy was formed in 1861.


14 posted on 06/11/2010 7:11:16 PM PDT by eleni121 (For Jesus did not give us a timid spirit , but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline)
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To: eleni121; NYer

True, yet “Italian” is a word used in the scripture (Acts 10:1). That would be 1c AD.


15 posted on 06/11/2010 7:57:35 PM PDT by annalex
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To: annalex

Italian is the NT is the Roman Empire equivalent of New Englander—a collection of political sub-units that are not themselves a sovereign political unit.


16 posted on 06/12/2010 5:02:47 AM PDT by Hieronymus
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To: annalex

Italic not Italian...very interesting but my main point regarding the headline is that the saint is Christian not Italian/Italic.

Even calling her Italic would not be correct.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Italic_peoples


17 posted on 06/12/2010 6:58:43 AM PDT by eleni121 (For Jesus did not give us a timid spirit , but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline)
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To: eleni121; Hieronymus
της καλουμενης ιταλικης

Same adjective. That there was no political entity "Italy" has nothing to do with the use of the word in either the article's context or the New Testament's

Nor is there a different adjective in the modern everyday use. Google for example, "ιταλικη κουζίνα".

Or even

Fra Angelico 1395-1455 ιταλικός ζωγράφος (Link)

18 posted on 06/12/2010 9:17:18 AM PDT by annalex
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To: annalex

The New Testament’s use of Italic is to describe a pagan centurion NOT a follower of Chrstian or a Christian saint.

Once the peninsula was Chrstianized the term Italian or Italic makes no sense.


19 posted on 06/12/2010 9:28:05 AM PDT by eleni121 (For Jesus did not give us a timid spirit , but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline)
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To: eleni121

So you would agree to the use of “Italian” in application to a medieval heretic, but not to a medieval saint?


20 posted on 06/12/2010 9:38:16 AM PDT by annalex
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To: annalex

Genoese...Bolognese... Sicilian...ravenna...Paduan...etc. those terms make sense when describing those inhabiting these regions/City states of the Italian peninusla in that time.

Most “journalists” don’t know these things.

But once again gently...Saint Rosa is a Christian saint born in Vitervo. Describing her “Italian” makes almost as much sense as calling Saint Nicholas a Turk (gasp). Ethnicity makes little sense when discussing Christinity.


21 posted on 06/12/2010 11:10:43 AM PDT by eleni121 (For Jesus did not give us a timid spirit , but a spirit of power, of love and of self-discipline)
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To: annalex; eleni121

Interesting discussion.

Words generally have shades of meaning, and if one is to read carefully, one must put them into historical context. Identical spelling of an adjective does not mean that its use in two widely distinct contexts may be presumed to be identical. “Virginian” in 1763 would be related to yet distinct from the same term in 1784 or in 1820 or in 1863 or in 1963. The 19th century unification of the Italian peninsula is responsible for the common modern notion of what Italian means, which is related to yet not identical with past usages. At the time of St. Rosa’s death, Italian identity would be minimal—most of the wars that the governments on the peninsula were involved with were with each other, or at least against each other as parts of complex alliances.

The BBC guy is being sloppy, but given the level of education that his readers have, it is easiest to perpetuate the fiction that the present social/political units have largely existed from time immemorial.


22 posted on 06/12/2010 7:35:12 PM PDT by Hieronymus
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To: eleni121
Italic people?

Didn't they build leaning towers? :-)

23 posted on 06/12/2010 7:43:10 PM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: Larry Lucido

And were the Romans italic?


24 posted on 06/12/2010 7:48:29 PM PDT by firebrand
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To: firebrand

Only if they didn’t close their tags.


25 posted on 06/12/2010 7:49:34 PM PDT by Larry Lucido
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To: Larry Lucido

LOL!


26 posted on 06/13/2010 3:00:11 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: eleni121; Hieronymus

I would say, from the vantage point of the same fact that Italy was not a nation state till 19c, — that you two should not bring the modern assumption about ethnicity needing a state in to medieval contexts.

“Italian” means as much and as little as “Greek”, “English” or “French”. It identifies the country (not the state) of birth, the native language, physiognomy, etc. It has nothing to do with political structures.

It is not the same as describing a Byzantine bishop as a “Turk” because the Turks did not settle in Asia Minor till centuries later.

It would be nice — although a tad pedantic — to identify St. Rosa with greater precision (as what, Lazian?) but it is not necessary. There si nothign wrong with the adentification int he article. Again, the adjective “Italian” as we just saw, existed since at least 1c.


27 posted on 06/13/2010 6:26:54 PM PDT by annalex
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To: Larry Lucido
Damn Italians!
28 posted on 06/15/2010 1:48:35 PM PDT by SuziQ
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