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Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Catherine of Siena, 04-29-17
FranciscanMedia.org ^ | 04-29-17 | Fr. Don Miller, OFM

Posted on 04/29/2017 7:13:43 PM PDT by Salvation

Fr. Don Miller, OFM

Painting of Saint Catherine of Siena | Siena Cathedral Choir | photo by Sailko Image: Painting of Saint Catherine of Siena | Siena Cathedral Choir | photo by Sailko

Saint Catherine of Siena

Saint of the Day for April 29

(March 25, 1347 – April 29, 1380)

 

Saint Catherine of Siena’s Story

The value Catherine makes central in her short life and which sounds clearly and consistently through her experience is complete surrender to Christ. What is most impressive about her is that she learns to view her surrender to her Lord as a goal to be reached through time.

She was the 23rd child of Jacopo and Lapa Benincasa and grew up as an intelligent, cheerful, and intensely religious person. Catherine disappointed her mother by cutting off her hair as a protest against being overly encouraged to improve her appearance in order to attract a husband. Her father ordered her to be left in peace, and she was given a room of her own for prayer and meditation.

She entered the Dominican Third Order at 18 and spent the next three years in seclusion, prayer, and austerity. Gradually, a group of followers gathered around her—men and women, priests and religious. An active public apostolate grew out of her contemplative life. Her letters, mostly for spiritual instruction and encouragement of her followers, began to take more and more note of public affairs. Opposition and slander resulted from her mixing fearlessly with the world and speaking with the candor and authority of one completely committed to Christ. She was cleared of all charges at the Dominican General Chapter of 1374.

Her public influence reached great heights because of her evident holiness, her membership in the Dominican Third Order, and the deep impression she made on the pope. She worked tirelessly for the crusade against the Turks and for peace between Florence and the pope.

In 1378, the Great Schism began, splitting the allegiance of Christendom between two, then three, popes and putting even saints on opposing sides. Catherine spent the last two years of her life in Rome, in prayer and pleading on behalf of the cause of Pope Urban VI and the unity of the Church. She offered herself as a victim for the Church in its agony. She died surrounded by her “children” and was canonized in 1461.

Catherine ranks high among the mystics and spiritual writers of the Church. In 1939, she and Francis of Assisi were declared co-patrons of Italy. Pope Paul VI named her and Teresa of Avila doctors of the Church in 1970. Her spiritual testament is found in The Dialogue.


Reflection

Though she lived her life in a faith experience and spirituality far different from that of our own time, Catherine of Siena stands as a companion with us on the Christian journey in her undivided effort to invite the Lord to take flesh in her own life. Events which might make us wince or chuckle or even yawn fill her biographies: a mystical experience at six, childhood betrothal to Christ, stories of harsh asceticism, her frequent ecstatic visions. Still, Catherine lived in an age which did not know the rapid change of 21st-century mobile America. The value of her life for us today lies in her recognition of holiness as a goal to be sought over the course of a lifetime.


Saint Catherine of Siena is the Patron Saint of:

Europe
Fire Prevention
Italy



TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; History; Theology
KEYWORDS: catholic; saints
Fee free to post additional information about other saints who might share this feast day.
1 posted on 04/29/2017 7:13:44 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: All
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Catherine of Siena, 04-29-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Peter Chanel, 04-28-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Louis Mary Grignion de Montfort, 04-27-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Pedro de San José Betancur, 04-26-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Mark, 04-25-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint George, 04-23-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Adalbert of Prague, 04-22-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Anselm, 04-21-17

Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Conrad of Parzham, 04-20-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Gianna Beretta Molla, 04-19-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Benedict Joseph Labre, 04-17-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Bernadette Soubirous, 04-16-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Blessed Caesar de Bus, 04-15-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Blessed Peter Gonzalez, 04-14-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Martin I, 04-13-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Teresa of Los Andes, 04-12-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Stanislaus, 04-11-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Magdalen of Canossa, 04-10-17

Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Casilda, 04-09-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Julie Billiart, 04-08-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint John Baptist de la Salle, 04-07-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Crescentia Hoess, 04-06-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Vincent Ferrer, 04-05-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Isidore of Seville, 04-04-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Benedict the African, 04-03-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Francis of Paola, 04-02-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Hugh of Grenoble, 04-01-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Stephen of Mar Saba, 03-31-17

Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Peter Regalado, 03-30-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Ludovico of Casoria, 03-29-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Catharine of Bologna, 03-28-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Lazarus, 03-27-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Catherine of Genoa, 03-26-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Annunciation of the Lord, 03-25-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Blessed Oscar Arnulfo Romero, 03-24-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Turibius of Mogrovejo, 03-23-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Nicholas Owen, 03-22-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Blessed John of Parma, 03-21-17

Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Salvator of Horta, 03-20-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Joseph, Husband of Mary, 03-19-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Cyril of Jerusalem, 03-18-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, St. Patrick, 03-17-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Clement Mary Hofbauer, 03-16-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Louise de Marillac, 03-15-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Maximilian, 03-14-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Leander of Seville, 03-13-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Blessed Angela Salawa, 03-12-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint John Ogilvie, 03-11-17

Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Dominic Savio, 03-10-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Frances of Rome, 03-09-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, St. John of God, 03-08-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saints Perpetua and Felicity, 03-07-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Mary Ann of Jesus of Paredes, 03-06-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint John Joseph of the Cross, 03-05-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Casimir, 03-04-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, Saint Katharine Drexel, 03-03-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, St. Agnes of Bohemia, 03-02-17
Day by Day -- Saints for All, St. David of Wales, 03-01-17

2 posted on 04/29/2017 7:15:59 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...

Saint of the Day Ping!


3 posted on 04/29/2017 7:17:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
St. Catherine of Siena: Saint of the Eucharist
Time for Clergy to “Man Up” – How the Exhortation of St. Catherine of Siena is Still Needed Today!
St. Catherine of Siena: Even Demons Are Repulsed By Sins Against Nature

A remedy for Pride based on something Jesus told St. Catherine of Siena
A Word from the Lord and a Saint as to what Prayer Does
On St. Catherine of Siena
The Dialogue by St. Catherine of Siena (Online book)
St. Catherine of Siena, Virgin, Doctor of the Church 1380 (April 30)
St. Catherine of Siena: A Feisty Role for Sister Nancy Murray
9 Day Novena - St. Catherine of Siena - to protect Pope Benedict XVI
EWTN New Program - St. Catherine of Siena: Mystic and Reformer
Saint Catherine of Siena, Virgin (d.1380)
Catholic Caucus - St. Catherine of Siena

4 posted on 04/29/2017 7:22:50 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
From my upcoming book:

Christ moved her out of the seclusion of her room and urged her to engage in the love of her neighbor. Soon she was busy in the household of her parents, doing all kinds of menial work. Her desire for charity lead her out to the city, where she helped widows, strangers, and beggars from the wealth of her father's household. The father “cheerfully consented” (The Life of St. Catherine of Siena, Bl. Raymond of Capua. 2.2) to her alms-giving. Frequently, her Divine Spouse appeared to her under the guise of the destitute people she helped, even as those being helped were often demanding and ungrateful; it appears that her charity was always tested. She also served in the hospital, taking on most unpleasant duties. The sick, at times, were angry and self-centered; one woman, Tecca, dying of leprosy, mocked Catherine's kindness even as Catherine contracted the disease caring for her. Tecca died; Catherine washed her and buried her, and Catherine's leprosy was cured instantly. Another time, a nun under Catherine's care, named Palmerina, developed all-consuming hatred for her; in hatred Palmerina persisted right to her sudden death. Palmerina did not receive her last rites, due to the suddenness in which she died. Catherine prayed for her fervently, seeing herself as the cause of Palmerina's hate:
shall I, a wretched creature prove the occasion of loss to a soul created in thy image? is that the good thou wilt use me to effect? no doubt my sins have caused the whole, and yet I will continue to claim thy mercy until my sister see her error, and thou savest the soul of that beloved one from death. (Ibid 2.3)
Interesting that she prayed not for healing but for Palmerina's salvation upon death. That was granted:
A ray of light from heaven mercifully penetrated that soul in the midst of her agony, discovered to it this fault, and gave it all the graces necessary for salvation. Catharine knew it by revelation, and hastened to the house. As soon as Palmerina saw her, she bestowed on her every mark of joy and respect ; she accused herself of her fault aloud, and died shortly after, having received the Sacrament, with signs of the deepest contrition. (Ibid 2.3)
Possibly, this aspect: the unwillingness of the people to accept charity, – is the mark of the new age, the same age that is now in full swing ravaging us. When St. Nicholas gave the poor girls the dowry money, they did not ask for more, they just thanked him (and he told them to thank God instead). When St. Martin gave a half of his cloak to the beggar, the beggar did not ask for a whole cloak: the legend does not mention that he did, and surely it would be a remarkable ornament to the saint's feat if the beggar had been ungrateful. But when St. Catherine imitated these saints, the theme of ingratitude is constant. In Jesus' time we see fear of Him (“What have I to do with thee, Jesus, Son of the most high God? I beseech thee, do not torment me“, said the Gerasene demoniac, Luke 8:28), but not such demanding hostility as Catherine experienced so many times. Yet to us, children of modernity, the resentment of charity is commonplace: today's left has forgotten its original motivation of government support of the poor, replacing it with the rejection of any moral dimension that voluntary charity necessarily would have. The modern political movement was first to replace voluntary charity with welfare extracted by force as taxes, and now that that goal has been largely accomplished, the new goal of the left is to suppress altogether the charitable work of the Church while divorcing the government's support of its client class from any moral content.

[...]

The answer to our modern condition is prayer by those conscious of it, and that is also what St. Catherine did to restore Palmerina to eternal life. The effect of the prayer is double: it directs divine mercy to those prayed for, and it increases the clarity of vision for those who pray:
Catharine thanked our Lord with effusion of heart, and humbly entreated him to deign in future to show her the beauty of the souls who might have relations with her, so that she could become more devoted to their salvation. God granted this favour, saying "Because thou hast despised the world, to attach thyself wholly to me, who am the perfect Spirit; because thou hast prayed with faith and perseverance for the salvation of that soul; behold I endow thee with supernatural light, which will show thee either tho beauty or the deformity of all the souls that thou wilt meet. Thy interior sense will perceive the condition of minds, as thy exterior senses perceive the state of the body. And that will take place not only in respect to persons present, but for all those whose salvation may form the object of thy solicitude and thy prayers, even though they be absent, and thou hast never as yet Been them." The efficacy of that grace which God granted her was such, that from that moment she actually saw more distinctly the souls than the bodies of persons who approached her. (Ibid 2.3)
Indeed, St. Catherine told Fr. Raymond,
O Father, could you but see the beauty of a rational soul, you would sacrifice your life a hundred times, were it necessary, for its salvation. No, nought in this material world is comparable to its beauty. (Ibid 2.3)
Remarkable, isn't it? Palmerina curses and detracts, in her madness, and all the saint sees is the beauty of her rational soul. May we, too, see the rational soul of our civilization before we despair of its salvation.

5 posted on 04/30/2017 9:34:29 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex

BTTT for Saint Catherine of Siena!


6 posted on 04/29/2018 12:12:23 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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