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India on path-breaking nuclear research
Times of India ^ | MAY 07, 2005 | IANS

Posted on 05/07/2005 8:28:33 AM PDT by The Incredible One

KOLKATA: In a major leap for India's nuclear research, scientists here have reached the advanced stage of constructing a superconducting cyclotron that could break the monopoly of the West in the field.

To be operational in two years, this powerful cyclotron being developed at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC) here, namely K500, would be the seventh of its kind in the world.

There are three such cyclotrons in the US, one in Canada, one in Italy and one in the Netherlands.

"K500 would be indigenous and three times more powerful than the existing cyclotron here operational since 1980.

"It will be used by our scientists for carrying out highly advanced research experiments in nuclear science," the centre's director Bikash Sinha said.

"The majority of components were fabricated in the country and some of them, including the superconducting coil, at the VECC itself."


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: india; nuclear; nuke; physics; science
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1 posted on 05/07/2005 8:28:34 AM PDT by The Incredible One
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To: The Incredible One

There have been some very sharp Indian physicists and mathmaticians. It's perfectly possible that in a few decades, India will have as good - and as original - a technology as the West.


2 posted on 05/07/2005 8:35:10 AM PDT by Grut
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To: Grut

What energy range? How large a magnetic field? Beam intensity? Not a syncrotron?


3 posted on 05/07/2005 9:28:40 AM PDT by dr huer
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To: dr huer
What energy range? How large a magnetic field? Beam intensity? Not a syncrotron?

No idea and it really doesn't matter; the Indians are starting something they have every chance of turning into an open-ended process, so energy range etc. will eventually be whatever they want them to be.

4 posted on 05/07/2005 9:45:25 AM PDT by Grut
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To: The Incredible One

Then maybe they will reach the same dead end that most have reached after building these things.


5 posted on 05/07/2005 9:51:37 AM PDT by Dallas59 (" I have a great team that is going to beat George W. Bush" John Kerry -2004)
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To: Dallas59
Yes. It will do so, mostly. Hopefully, every failure will be a lesson on the way not to do it.
6 posted on 05/07/2005 10:26:39 AM PDT by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: Grut; The Incredible One

<< There have been some very sharp Indian physicists and mathmaticians. It's perfectly possible that in a few decades, India will have as good - and as original - a technology as the West. >>

Perfectly possible?

Very possible, indeed.

And absolutely certain that in the meanwhile the West -- and particularly America -- will have better and even more inovative technology than we can yet even begin to imagine.


7 posted on 05/07/2005 11:14:38 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: The Incredible One; Gengis Khan

BUMPping


8 posted on 05/07/2005 11:15:19 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: Brian Allen; The Incredible One; KevinDavis; Cincinatus' Wife; PatrickHenry; freepatriot32; ...
Colliders help scientists study particle physics, which has been essential in breaking barriers in theoretical research in atomic and quantum physics. The argument goes that if we could build a bigger accelerator, which is a huge (miles in circumference or length) gun for firing particles and studying how they behave when they collide, we could find answers to questions as essential as "Are there smaller elements than those that make up quarks?" And "is there a unified theory that actually makes sense?" And "What happened at the beginning of the universe?" Of course these all have weapons applications!

So who's leading the world in colliders? It looks like America is losing its former leadership, and Europe is taking over. Now we read that India is developing its own equipment.

What are we doing about it?

Mostly Republicans killed our super collider project in 1993. As "vanesch" in that link said:

The Killing of the Superconducting Supercollider

The Democrats are generally seen as pro-science, who want to shell in big bucks for research. And of coure, superconducting supercollider has little to do with defeating communism at this point so I'd expect the Republicans to vote against it. Still... I'm soo confused...

I think the killing of the SSC was somehow sad but justified. The management of the project went completely wrong, and if I remember well, it had already spend 4 times the initial planned budget when it was 1/4 through the project. Even though I'm a particle physicist, and even though I think that the SSC was a great idea which was sad to close down, I can fully understand that when a project is approved, and it is slowly turning out that it will cost about 20 times more than initially proposed, you get the door on your nose.
Notice that Amdt. 983 to H.R. 2445 (Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 1994) kills the super-collider project.

Now notice who voted against it in the greatest numbers: Republicans.

Peter Woit, a Mathematics prof at Columbia, writes:

The only plan on the table for the US to get back into the high energy accelerator business is the International Linear Collider (ILC), but the question of how such a machine would be financed, and whether it would even be constructed in the US at all, remains up in the air. In a very real sense, the future of experimental high energy physics in the US after 2010 is a very large question mark.
He's reacting to this article which I found summarized:
Monday, 7 February, was a grim day for the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). "You wake up, you go to a presentation, and you find out you're dead," says Fermilab physicist Joel Butler. Butler is co-spokesperson of an experiment known as BTeV--a multimillion-dollar project that would allow scientists to study the properties of the bottom quark. But that Monday, when the new Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman took to the podium to announce the department's budget request for 2006, BTeV scientists were horrified to discover that their project had been canceled. -- High-Energy Physics: Exit America?
Leadership in science requires commitment and determination. We had it in the mid-20th century. It looks like we're losing it to me, and I don't see Republicans stepping up to the challenge of reversing the trend.

So far, Republican leadership in physics and space exploration has been weak. I was optimistic about it after President Bush's early speeches after taking office, but where are the results?

9 posted on 05/07/2005 12:55:44 PM PDT by risk
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To: risk
So far, Republican leadership in physics and space exploration has been weak.

Forget leadership in physics. With the way things are going we will be lucky to get classes that teach Darwin. Bigotry from the Christian Right is one of the biggest threats facing science today!!!

10 posted on 05/07/2005 12:58:53 PM PDT by The Incredible One (Mohammed is a true "Profit" of God)
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To: The Incredible One; risk

To confuse "science" with the feral gummint's squandering of the confiscated wealth of America's [Of the world's, that is] most creative, innovative, industrious and productive Men, is but to measure how far we have travelled down fasciSSocialism's dead-end track!

And that don't take no [Feral and/or any other gummint doled] "scientist" to figger!

And as for the bigotted remarks in one of your posts about the "Christian Right" and Charley Darwin and his theories, it don't take no great intellect, neither, to note that, in all of its recorded history, Mankind has never seen such scientific, productive, industrious, innovative, creativity, musical and every other form of artistic expression -- and every other and/or every other kind of progress -- than it witnessed when this Christian Nation was unequivocal about its Christianity.

And "scientists" either done book larned the kids down the village school or worked for private employers, who either witnessed their progress and measured their usefulness -- or sacked them!


11 posted on 05/07/2005 1:24:09 PM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: risk
NASA has -- or had -- a program for doing basic research into advanced propulsion systems. Such research will take us into the future. But funding's just about dried up.
12 posted on 05/07/2005 1:51:41 PM PDT by PatrickHenry (<-- Click on my name. The List-O-Links for evolution threads is at my freeper homepage.)
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To: The Incredible One

I'm not convinced that the issue with evolution is as critical as the things we can do directly with science like space exploration, enticing students into engineering, and research like this. I realize the "scientific method" is an important concern for you, but biology and genetics research "in the present" is just as interesting as the study of origins, if not more. I'm just trying to point out that not so much is lost just because some fundamentalist Christians want to undermine an objective scientific approach to the origin of the species.


13 posted on 05/07/2005 1:51:43 PM PDT by risk
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To: Brian Allen

I don't see anything in your comments that could help us compete with India and Europe on ground breaking physics research.


14 posted on 05/07/2005 1:54:17 PM PDT by risk
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Comment #15 Removed by Moderator

To: risk
The people in the Physics Forum list have it backwards. A "Yea" vote was against the Bumpers amendment to kill the SSC, and the Republicans (led by Phil Gramm, the SSC's biggest cheerleader) were overwhelmingly for it. The few Repubs who did vote against Nay it were RINOs like Jeffords. The Dems who voted yea-Feinstein, Leiberman, Bennett Johnston-are well known for their strong support of pro-science policy, regardless of who sponsors it. Such supposedly "pro-science" Dems as Kerry, Kennedy and Wellstone voted against tabling the Bumpers amendment for no good reason other than blind partisanship, although Mark Warner probably voted Nay so that the Jefferson lab, which was his own baby, would get more funding.
16 posted on 05/07/2005 2:08:39 PM PDT by RightWingAtheist (Creationism is not conservative!)
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To: Dallas59
Americans love large circular race tracks...........

Indianapolis Raceway, Daytona Speedway, and Churchill Downs to name a few.

17 posted on 05/07/2005 2:33:48 PM PDT by CROSSHIGHWAYMAN (NO PRISONERS!!)
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To: RightWingAtheist
The people in the Physics Forum list have it backwards.

They understood that just fine. Yea meant kill the collider. That's what's bothering them. I see a lot of Republicans voting Yea.

18 posted on 05/07/2005 2:40:07 PM PDT by risk
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To: Brian Allen

Bigoted is better than dumb. So I win against you.


19 posted on 05/07/2005 2:43:32 PM PDT by The Incredible One (Mohammed is a true "Profit" of God)
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To: vishnu6
What do you expect from a party which doesn't believe in evolution and thinks the second coming will be tomorrow?

That's unfair. Evolution isn't something that one needs to "believe." (Nothing in science should require belief in anything.) It's a very minor issue, in fact, as to whether or not evolution applies to our development. One can study much about biology and never even worry about that question. Physics, chemistry, and astronomy -- the issues related to this thread -- do not require faith in evolution or faith in God to study.

The Republican disinterest in this project has nothing to do with religion. It has more to do with budget strategies and pork. It has a lot to do with junk spending the Democrats are sapping our government with. And it has a lot to do with how the State Department spends our tax dollars overseas. There just isn't enough left over for real challenging projects like these that could propel America forward into the lead again in physics.

20 posted on 05/07/2005 2:45:59 PM PDT by risk
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To: risk

<< I don't see anything in your comments that could help us compete with India and Europe on ground breaking physics research. >>

Who says we must?

Americans -- of every etnicity -- already vanguard the world's scientists, chemists, pharmacists, physicists, engineers, creators, innovators, producers and industrialists -- have for two hundred years -- and have no real challengers in sight.

And the only "challenge" comes from self-deluding dead and decadent Euro-peons, whose Neo-Soviet is already coming apart around their ears and whose soon-to-be-ghastly collapse will occupy them for at least the next fifteen years? Or is, you say, being mounted by various of the planet's third-world Hell-hole states -- most of which haven't yet figgured out how to form a government acceptable to their populations and/or still build the 1948 Morris Oxfords they call "automobiles?" These will "challenge" our superiority in every field of Human endeavor? Those states that are -- if they're lucky -- struggling to catch up to being within thirty years behind us -- and/or to get hundreds of millions of their subjects out of the middle ages-like poverty and serfdom and squalor in which they subsist?

Dream on.


21 posted on 05/07/2005 2:52:56 PM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: risk
No, a Yea vote was to table the Bumpers amendment, meaning to kill it. The vast majority of Republicans voted to table, with the Dems being split. Although the Senate voted to table the amendment, Congress, also controlled by Dems, did not.

The word "table" is a real slippery one, as most people seems to think it means a vote to keep an amendment than to kill it.

22 posted on 05/07/2005 3:00:24 PM PDT by RightWingAtheist (Creationism is not conservative!)
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To: The Incredible One

<< Bigoted is better than dumb. So I win against you. >>

Wanna bet?

First I am not in competition here -- it is my prayer that I might compliment those whose aspirations match mine -- and FRee-Republic's.

And second, if I was, I'd put my 188 IQ on the block -- and see if you came up even to my knees -- any day you wish to risk your further humiliation.


23 posted on 05/07/2005 3:00:27 PM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: Brian Allen
Who says we must [use the federal government to encourage ground breaking physics research]?

I'd like to remind you about Nagasaki and Hiroshima. I'd like to remind you about the Norton Bomb sight, and the strategic bomber. I'd also like to point out that game theory, research produced by von Neumann, actually helped us win WWII. In fact, without it, we might have lost. When the Japanese were trying to understand what had happened to them at the end of WWII, one of the generals complained that they had relied too much on spirit and not enough on science and engineering.

I don't mind that you disagree with me, but I'm just pointing out that there are dangers in trying to do without massive infrastructure spending on development in space and physical sciences research. That spending put us ahead for WWII, and it put us ahead during the Cold War. We'll need to stay ahead of the Chinese and Europeans if we want to maintain strategic superiority.

If you've got other ideas about how to encourage (or simply allow) private industry to enter into these fields and stay ahead of the EU and China, then let's hear it.

Americans -- of every etnicity -- already vanguard the world's scientists, chemists, pharmacists, physicists, engineers, creators, innovators, producers and industrialists -- have for two hundred years -- and have no real challengers in sight.

I don't know what "etnicity" has to do with it, but I think it's dangerous to assume that a lead we had in the 1950s translates into a permanent lead. That lead was obtained through a massive investment of federal research and development spending that launched private industry and government labs to very high levels of achievement.

We won the cold war partly with capitalism-fueld federal spending on space and weapons research.

24 posted on 05/07/2005 3:02:29 PM PDT by risk
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To: RightWingAtheist
From H.R.2445: 17. S.AMDT.983 to H.R.2445 To reduce funds for General Science and Research Activities and terminate the Superconducting Super Collider program for the purposes of reducing the deficit in the Federal Budget. Sponsor: Sen Bumpers, Dale [AR] (introduced 9/29/1993) Cosponsors (16) Latest Major Action: 9/30/1993 Motion to table SP 983 agreed to in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 57-42. Record Vote No: 296.
25 posted on 05/07/2005 3:10:55 PM PDT by risk
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To: risk; vishnu6
"To: vishnu6

"What do you expect from a party which doesn't believe in evolution and thinks the second coming will be tomorrow? That's unfair. Evolution isn't something that one needs to "believe..."

vishnu is an anti-Christian troll. I guess a hindu.

26 posted on 05/07/2005 3:13:39 PM PDT by monkeywrench
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To: RightWingAtheist
Sorry, I was evidently still confused about the meaning of "table." But what about vote 269, which passes Rep Slattery's H.AMDT.147?

AMENDMENT DESCRIPTION:
Amendment terminates funding for the Superconducting Super Collider Project by deleting $400 million appropriated for the project.

AMENDMENT PURPOSE:
An amendment to terminate the Superconducting Super Collider Project by eliminating $400 million of the funding for the project, retaining $220 million to pay for costs relating to termination of the project.

27 posted on 05/07/2005 3:24:46 PM PDT by risk
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To: The Incredible One; All

It sounds as though you are a bigot your-self!

Science did not produce freedoms and human rights as mentioned in our constitutions. It was produced from the moral and religious convictions of a majority who were in consensus regarding Judeo Christian beliefs and values. Our "creator" has "endowed" us with rights, not the sciences!


Indeed, without a prevailing sense of Judeo Christian morality in Western Societies from the middle ages to the early 20th century, the modern sciences that have given us so much would never developed.

Science and scientific Lysenko type politicians(who try to use science to destroy Christian influence in America) need to remember that modern science was rooted early in western Judeo Christian consensus and science practitioners run the risk of loss of inspiration....like a river cut off from its source...or a nose cut off to spite one's face!

Science has never created a Bill of Rights; only an A priori
thirst for liberty in the American soul has done so...a thirst that can never be measured, objectively quantified and studied with rigid methodology. The American system is based on true Tautology, a nonfalsifiable arguement in which it is believed that Almighty God rules the affairs of men...raising some nations up while pulling others down!

So I ask you...who are the true bigots?


28 posted on 05/07/2005 3:53:04 PM PDT by mdmathis6
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To: mdmathis6; The Incredible One

I don't think Christianity and faith have anything to do with India's bid for superiority in physics and America's tepid, bipartisan response. There is a fundamentalist Hindu belief that India has been blessed with the potential for scientific and mathematical superiority. Faith can move mountains when it helps human beings to achieve their true potential. Besides, I see false dichotomies in both the argument that Christians can't be good scientists (or support exceptionally high quality science) and biological theories of species origin having any relation to God's existence or not. The Victorians started losing their faith when they started buying into the theory of evolution. That may say more about the depth of their faith than anything else.


29 posted on 05/07/2005 5:32:05 PM PDT by risk
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To: monkeywrench

He sure is feisty.


30 posted on 05/07/2005 5:33:40 PM PDT by risk
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To: risk

Sorry about deviating from the thread...but I couldn't let that charge of "christian bigotry" stand!


31 posted on 05/07/2005 5:42:16 PM PDT by mdmathis6
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To: risk

That's true, a majority of Congressional Republicans voted to kill the SSC...but so did the overwhelming majority of Dems as well. It's interesting to note that Henry Waxman voted to kill the SSC, as did Dennis Hastert...whose district encompasses Fermilab.


32 posted on 05/07/2005 5:42:35 PM PDT by RightWingAtheist (Creationism is not conservative!)
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To: RightWingAtheist

Thanks for persisting in correcting my mistaken view of the "table" notion. It looks like... THEY WAFLED!


33 posted on 05/07/2005 5:44:34 PM PDT by risk
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To: Brian Allen
I'd put my 188 IQ on the block

What version of the IQ test did you take?

At my college, I took an IQ test, but the cap or highest score one could get was 145.

I do know earlier tests allowed for higher scores.

Former COS John Sununu used to brag about his score (180).

34 posted on 05/07/2005 6:51:26 PM PDT by Sonny M ("oderint dum metuant")
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To: Sonny M

<< Former COS John Sununu used to ... [Kid?] about his score. [180]

And, to prove the worth of a high IQ, Bill Clinton, one of the most stupid men to ever drop a brown one between two shoes -- and to boot a full-blown Narcissistic psychotic -- about his alleged 182.

I originally scored on the Cattell Test, the CAT - Cognitive Abilities Test and for Mensa and Triple-Nine.

On the modern test I score around 149.

But 188 has a nicer ring to it. [Particularly when, as just now, some dawk is calling me stupid. (I'm sometimes pretty darned foolish -- but stupid I am not)]


35 posted on 05/07/2005 7:26:55 PM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: Brian Allen
And, to prove the worth of a high IQ, Bill Clinton, one of the most stupid men to ever drop a brown one between two shoes -- and to boot a full-blown Narcissistic psychotic -- about his alleged 182

Yea, but billy boy, like everything else, lied.

In 2000 when the whole bs story about iq's was going on, it came out that Clinton, along with Bush sr, and Reagan and various other presidents and canidates, had never taken an IQ test.

Al Gore did, I think he came out at around 115 or something, pretty much in the model of average (between 100 and 115).

36 posted on 05/07/2005 7:31:30 PM PDT by Sonny M ("oderint dum metuant")
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To: Sonny M; Brian Allen

Why don't you two genuises start a new thread on your IQ scores?


37 posted on 05/07/2005 7:37:02 PM PDT by cicero's_son
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To: risk
Thanks, and for what it's worth, I am on your side in this thread's main argument :).

I'm surprised no one has yet noted one of the big reasons for the Indian sci-tech boom: a move away from the command economy and a bigger emphasis on free-market policies over the past twenty years. This was also the main reason that Ireland became the "Celtic Tiger" of European R & D.

38 posted on 05/07/2005 8:13:15 PM PDT by RightWingAtheist (Creationism is not conservative!)
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To: RightWingAtheist
With big-ticket items like defense research, space exploration, particle accelerators and atomic physics, oceanic exploration/development, and so forth, I think there is a legitimate role for "big" government to play. It can leverage the nation's need for strategic progress on a large scale with funding and focus. The spinoffs should be encouraged to flourish however. Business can thrive on top of "big" (little 'b') government.
39 posted on 05/07/2005 9:08:58 PM PDT by risk
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To: risk

Exactly.


40 posted on 05/07/2005 9:21:28 PM PDT by RightWingAtheist (Creationism is not conservative!)
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To: RightWingAtheist

I meant to suggest as well that an accelerated "privatization with patriotism as the basic set of rules" program could accompany most of these "infrastructure" pushes. New companies should be encouraged to do their own research and sell their own products to (American and Coalition) customers.


41 posted on 05/07/2005 9:42:08 PM PDT by risk
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To: cicero's_son
Why don't you two genuises start a new thread on your IQ scores?

I don't believe in them.

My mother capped her IQ test, which gives her ammo to knock on me (I scored a 129). I still don't think they mean a damn thing.

I've always hated the fact that its used in any kind of way, and when SCOTUS actually had the stupidity to make it a point of law, I was infuriated.

If anything, you, and me, and others should be fighting against these idiot tests and for the point of law and not allowing these things to be a way for criminals to get off.

42 posted on 05/08/2005 12:55:35 AM PDT by Sonny M ("oderint dum metuant")
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To: Sonny M

<< Al Gore did, I think he came out at around 115 or something, pretty much in the model of average. [Between 100 and 115] >>

If Al-Fredo Gore-leone's IQ is even 85, I will donate my next twelve month's income to LA's Midnight Mission!

Once but a mobbed-up Florida Florida 'court's' machination or two and a re-hung chad or ten from being the world's most dangerous dullard, triple college drop-out, Gore, is surely really close to being retarded!


43 posted on 05/08/2005 1:08:37 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: Brian Allen
Once but a mobbed-up Florida Florida 'court's' machination or two and a re-hung chad or ten from being the world's most dangerous dullard, triple college drop-out, Gore, is surely really close to being retarded!

I took an IQ test and did well.

Please do not tell me you give them credibility.

And for the record, Gore lost every single case, including before democratic judges, except for the Florida Supreme Court (and the last one was a split decision by one vote, with no republicans).

Gores test came at Harvard.

He claims his score and Harvard has confirmed it, either way, I think he is proof that his score prooves the point, these tests are stupid.

Before 2000, check his opinions on IQ scores, He was right then, they are useless and stupid.

Gore is an idiot.

The people who supported him, believed him, which is him calling them idiots.

Gore is just an arrogant elitist who thinks that he's smarter then the average person and is angry that not enough people voted for him, so in his mind, they are idiots.

Please do not give credence to these stupid tests, they do nothing, and no one has ever cared anyway.

44 posted on 05/08/2005 1:19:45 AM PDT by Sonny M ("oderint dum metuant")
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To: Sonny M; cicero's_son

<< Why don't you two genuises start a new thread on your IQ scores? >>

OK.

Let's start it from here:

<< I don't believe in them. >>

Yair.

I know what yah mean.

My pet hate is the metric measurement of distance. After all, what kind of savant would base the whole kerboodle on the alleged distance [One metre] around Napoleon's waist?

And I don't go much on kilograms and pounds and milligrams and feet and miles and kilojoules and millicuries and the measurement of altitudes and pressures and tensions, too.

And did I mention that I am also not fond of my taylors' measuring tape? [Which, by the year, continues to grow longer!]

But, darn me!

All of those really mean units of measurement of all of those things just ignore how my Mommy -- who capped her IQ test -- and I feel.

And carry on being just that: All of those darned fixed and scientific measurements of all of those darned things!


45 posted on 05/08/2005 2:39:03 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: Sonny M

<< Please do not give credence to these stupid tests, they do nothing, and no one has ever cared anyway. >>

You care -- or how else to justify #44 -- and the others?

But relax -- they're only measurements -- and you'd not fell any less about miles and yards just because the road to my house is longer than the road to yours.

Would you?

<};^)~< -- Best ones -- B A


46 posted on 05/08/2005 2:44:17 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: Brian Allen

... taylors' measuring tape -- or the tailor's either!


47 posted on 05/08/2005 2:45:32 AM PDT by Brian Allen (I fly and can therefore be envious of no man -- Per Ardua ad Astra!)
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To: risk; RightWingAtheist

yes, a free market does help the funding of developments in science and research. ethnicity has little to do with is. if a society places emphasis on science and mathematics and is backed up by state/private funding it can come up with path breaking research.

the old soviet union was an example of state funding. in our country it was a healthy mix of state/private funding that contributed to research. increasingly china and india will give us a run for our money.

(PS: about creationism versus evolution - the debate is importatnt. read James Michener's Space to understand more. )


48 posted on 05/08/2005 7:38:17 AM PDT by The Incredible One (Mohammed is a true "Profit" of God)
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To: Brian Allen
My pet hate is the metric measurement of distance.

You got me on that one.

I'm am the guy who wants to keep the metric system down.

I'm not against measuring intelligence, I just don't think IQ tests do a good job of it.

I am bothered by the fact that we have to much faith in such an imperfect system of measuring intelligence.

Nothing more then that.

If it was a better test, then I'd be a supporter.

49 posted on 05/08/2005 9:45:51 AM PDT by Sonny M ("oderint dum metuant")
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To: Brian Allen
But relax -- they're only measurements -- and you'd not fell any less about miles and yards just because the road to my house is longer than the road to yours.

If IQ tests were as accurate as measurements to your house, I'd be a proponent.

I'll admit, maybe I'm sometimes a I'm demanding, but I want a better and more accurate test.

I think the SAT's do a better job then the IQ test, and that's still leaves alot of room to be desired.

If the test was better, and more accurate, I'd be a supporter.

I do think we can measure intelligence the way we measure everything else, we just haven't succeeded in doing so, and we have accepted imperfection with the IQ test which is halting progress in getting a better method of measurement.

50 posted on 05/08/2005 9:49:30 AM PDT by Sonny M ("oderint dum metuant")
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