Keyword: physics

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  • Air Show Math

    09/14/2014 8:19:53 PM PDT · by rey · 72 replies
    Vanity | 14 Sept. 2014 | Rey
    I home school a young girl. In years past, we have gone to the local air show and done such things as measure the tops and bottom of wings and rotos and figure the ratio or difference between the area of the top of the wing versus the bottom and estimated which wings had more lift than others. We measure how much area the wheels occupied on the ground and consulted with the crew chief what the tire pressure was and calculated the weight of the plane. In years past we were able to see F18s form a vapor cone...
  • Schrödinger's cat caught on quantum film

    08/27/2014 7:37:18 PM PDT · by Sparklite · 68 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 27 August 2014 | Penny Sarchet
    Schrödinger's cat is the poster child for quantum weirdness. Now it has been immortalised in a portrait created by one of the theory's strangest consequences: quantum entanglement. These images were generated using a cat stencil and entangled photons. The really spooky part is that the photons used to generate the image never interacted with the stencil, while the photons that illuminated the stencil were never seen by the camera.
  • The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin?

    08/10/2014 8:20:11 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 13 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 7/29/14
    The Quantum Cheshire Cat: Can neutrons be located at a different place than their own spin? Jul 29, 2014 Enlarge The basic idea of the Quantum Cheshire Cat: In an interferometer, an object is separated from one if its properties -- like a cat, moving on a different path than its own grin. Credit: TU Vienna / Leon Filter The Cheshire Cat featured in Lewis Caroll's novel "Alice in Wonderland" is a remarkable creature: it disappears, leaving its grin behind. Can an object be separated from its properties? It is possible in the quantum world. In an experiment, neutrons travel...
  • NASA: New "impossible" engine works, could change space travel forever

    08/02/2014 12:16:09 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 73 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | August 1, 2014 | Jesus Diaz
    Until yesterday, every physicist was laughing at this engine and its inventor, Roger Shawyer. It's called the EmDrive and everyone said it was impossible because it goes against classical mechanics. But the fact is that the quantum vacuum plasma thruster works and scientists can't explain why. Shawyer's engine is extremely light and simple. It provides a thrust by "bouncing microwaves around in a closed container." The microwaves are generated using electricity that can be provided by solar energy. No propellant is necessary, which means that this thrusters can work forever unless a hardware failure occurs. If real, this would be...
  • Update on Podkletnov gravity modification work and rumors

    06/18/2014 1:36:15 AM PDT · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Next Big Future ^ | 5-14-2014 | Brian Wang
    American Antigravity interviewed Eugene Podkletnov to discuss recent (2004 to 2013) experimental antigravity research in gravity modification and superconductors. For nearly two decades Dr. Podkletnov has been researching the link between gravitation and high-temperature superconductors, and just recently published the peer-review results of new experiments he’s conducted to measure the speed of a force-beam projected by a stationary superconducting apparatus he’s developed. Podkletnov is well-known for his experiments involving YBCO superconductors, which produced a gravity-shielding effect that was investigated by NASA and has been the subject of many peer-review papers. He describes continuing his experiments in this area, and indicates...
  • Low-Cost Fusion Project Steps Out of the Shadows and Looks for Money

    06/14/2014 3:40:55 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 12 replies
    NBC News ^ | June 13, 2014 | Alan Boyle
    A hush-hush nuclear fusion project that's received $12 million from the U.S. Navy is now sharing what it calls encouraging results — and looking for private investment. For years, EMC2 Fusion Development Corp. has had to conduct its research into what's known as Polywell fusion outside public view because the Navy wanted it that way. Now the Navy is phasing out its funding, and EMC2 Fusion is planning a three-year, $30 million commercial research program to see if its unorthodox approach can provide a fast track to cheap nuclear fusion power. "The goal is, we want to get a set...
  • Scientists discover how to turn light into matter after 80-year quest

    05/19/2014 3:08:29 AM PDT · by markomalley · 24 replies
    Physics ^ | 5/18/2014
    Imperial College London physicists have discovered how to create matter from light - a feat thought impossible when the idea was first theorised 80 years ago. In just one day over several cups of coffee in a tiny office in Imperial's Blackett Physics Laboratory, three physicists worked out a relatively simple way to physically prove a theory first devised by scientists Breit and Wheeler in 1934.Breit and Wheeler suggested that it should be possible to turn light into matter by smashing together only two particles of light (photons), to create an electron and a positron – the simplest method of...
  • Physicists Discover How to Change the Crystal Structure of Graphene

    05/01/2014 9:41:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 11 replies
    SciTech Daily ^ | May 1, 2014 | NA
    Graphene trilayers can be stacked in two different configurations, which can occur naturally in the same flake. They are separated by a sharp boundary. (Image: Pablo San-Jose ICMM-CSI) A team of researchers has discovered how to change the crystal structure of graphene, a finding that could lead to smaller and faster microprocessors.A University of Arizona-led team of physicists has discovered how to change the crystal structure of graphene, more commonly known as pencil lead, with an electric field, an important step toward the possible use of graphene in microprocessors that would be smaller and faster than current, silicon-based technology.Graphene consists...
  • Proving uncertainty: First rigorous formulation supporting Heisenberg's famous 1927 principle

    04/29/2014 10:27:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-29-2014 | Provided by American Institute of Physics
    Nearly 90 years after Werner Heisenberg pioneered his uncertainty principle, a group of researchers from three countries has provided substantial new insight into this fundamental tenet of quantum physics with the first rigorous formulation supporting the uncertainty principle as Heisenberg envisioned it. In the Journal of Mathematical Physics, the researchers reports a new way of defining measurement errors that is applicable in the quantum domain and enables a precise characterization of the fundamental limits of the information accessible in quantum experiments. Quantum mechanics requires that we devise approximate joint measurements because the theory itself prohibits simultaneous ideal measurements of position...
  • Could this particle rewrite modern physics? Discovery of 4-quark hadron...

    04/16/2014 7:00:40 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 26 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | April 16, 2014 | Jonathan O'Callaghan
    Scientists at CERN have confirmed the existence of a new 'exotic' particle International team used the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) detector The particle was first detected in 2007 but it has only now been confirmed Dubbed Z(4430), the discovery challenges existing models of physics It may also indicate that a new type of neutron star, a quark star, existsIn the early 1930s, scientists were fairly confident they understood subatomic physics. That was until dozens of new elementary particles were discovered in the 1950s, forcing scientists to rewrite their models. Now a new particle, first detected in 2007 but not...
  • New Super-Accurate Atomic Clock Tells Time Like No Other

    04/03/2014 6:09:54 PM PDT · by zeestephen · 67 replies
    NBC News ^ | 03 April 2014 | James Eng
    "It has an accuracy that's equivalent to about one second in 300 million years." - "If we've learned anything in the last 60 years of building atomic clocks, we've learned that every time we build a better clock, somebody comes up with a use for it that you couldn't have foreseen."
  • Univ. of Leicester students: Noah’s Ark would've floated w/ two each of 35,000 species of animal

    04/03/2014 3:39:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 49 replies
    News Corp Australia ^ | April 4, 2014
    NOAH’S Ark would have floated — even with two of every animal on board, physicists have determined based on the weight of the beasts and the buoyancy of the boat. The students from the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Leicester who came to this conclusion used the dimensions for the boat that were given in the Bible. In the book of Genesis, Noah is commanded to build an ark which is 300 cubits long, 50 cubits wide and 30 cubits high to house himself, his family and two of every species of animal. For the study,...
  • American Physical Society: The First Major Scientific Institution To Reject Global Warming ?

    03/21/2014 9:18:28 AM PDT · by Innovative · 41 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | March 20, 2014 | James Delingpole
    The American Physical Society (APS) has signalled a dramatic turnabout in its position on "climate change" by appointing three notorious climate skeptics to its panel on public affairs (POPA). If that list looks impressive, perhaps it's worth reminding ourselves of Hal Lewis's theory as to why so many scientific institutions have fallen for the scam. There are indeed trillions of dollars involved, to say nothing of the fame and glory (and frequent trips to exotic islands) that go with being a member of the club. Your own Physics Department (of which you are chairman) would lose millions a year if...
  • New Israeli Lab Seeks to Punch a Hole in Spacetime, Literally

    03/14/2014 5:34:30 PM PDT · by lbryce · 40 replies
    Haaretz ^ | March 14, 2014 | do Efrati
    Imagine that something is happening before your eyes, but you can’t see it — not because you have eye trouble or because it’s a microscopic event, but because of something like Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak. Two years ago, researchers from Cornell University made that fantasy come true, on a tiny scale. They not only hid the existence of a brief event — the movement of a light ray from one point to another — but also the fact that it had been hidden. One of the lead researchers on that study, Moti Friedman, is now setting up his own physics...
  • Closing the 'free will' loophole: Using distant quasars to test Bell's theorem

    02/26/2014 9:08:05 AM PST · by onedoug · 94 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 20 Feb 2014 | MIT Team
    Astronomers propose an experiment that may close the last major loophole of Bell's inequality -- a 50-year-old theorem that, if violated by experiments, would mean that our universe is based not on the textbook laws of classical physics, but on the less-tangible probabilities of quantum mechanics. Such a quantum view would allow for seemingly counterintuitive phenomena such as entanglement, in which the measurement of one particle instantly affects another, even if those entangled particles are at opposite ends of the universe. Among other things, entanglement -- a quantum feature Albert Einstein skeptically referred to as "spooky action at a distance"...
  • Speed of light may not be constant, physicists say (Whoops)

    04/29/2013 6:40:36 PM PDT · by equalator · 59 replies
    Fox Live Science ^ | 4-29-2013 | Jesse Emspak
    The speed of light is constant, or so textbooks say. But some scientists are exploring the possibility that this cosmic speed limit changes, a consequence of the nature of the vacuum of space. The definition of the speed of light has some broader implications for fields such as cosmology and astronomy, which assume a stable velocity for light over time. For instance, the speed of light comes up when measuring the fine structure constant (alpha), which defines the strength of the electromagnetic force. And a varying light speed would change the strengths of molecular bonds and the density of nuclear
  • The First Test That Proves General Theory of Relativity Wrong

    02/20/2014 3:47:32 PM PST · by Kevmo · 290 replies
    Softpedia.com ^ | March 24th, 2006, 12:39 GMT · | By Vlad Tarko
    http://news.softpedia.com/news/The-First-Test-That-Proves-General-Theory-of-Relativity-Wrong-20259.shtml According to Einstein's theory of general relativity, a moving mass should create another field, called gravitomagnetic field, besides its static gravitational field. This field has now been measured for the first time and to the scientists' astonishment, it proved to be no less than one hundred million trillion times larger than Einstein's General Relativity predicts. According to Einstein's theory of general relativity, a moving mass should create another field, called gravitomagnetic field, besides its static gravitational field. This field has now been measured for the first time and to the scientists' astonishment, it proved to be no less than...
  • Baby Steps on the Road to Fusion Energy

    02/13/2014 1:06:21 AM PST · by neverdem · 5 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 12 February 2014 | Daniel Clery
    Dr. Eddie DewaldA millimeter-sized fuel capsule inside its target can, or hohlraum. As it approaches its fifth birthday, the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a troubled laser fusion facility in California, has finally produced some results that fusion scientists can get enthusiastic about. In a series of experiments late last year, NIF researchers managed to produce energy yields 10 times greater than produced before and to demonstrate the phenomenon of self-heating that will be crucial if fusion is to reach its ultimate goal of “ignition”—a self-sustaining burning reaction that produces more energy than it consumes.“This is a very significant achievement, and...
  • Why Hawking is Wrong About Black Holes

    02/01/2014 1:03:35 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 57 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | February 1, 2014 | Brian Koberlein on
    Black holes can radiate in a way that agrees with thermodynamics, and the region near the event horizon doesn’t have a firewall, just as general relativity requires. So Hawking’s proposal is a solution to a problem that doesn’t exist.
  • Parallel Worlds Exist And Will Soon Be Testable, Expert Says

    01/16/2014 12:31:17 PM PST · by GrandJediMasterYoda · 84 replies
    themindunleashed.org ^ | 1/16/14 | By: Dick Pelletier
    Parallel Worlds Exist And Will Soon Be Testable, Expert Says By: Dick Pelletier Is there another you reading this article at this exact moment in a parallel universe? Dr. Brian Greene, author of The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos, believes that this freakish quirk of nature may exist; and he discusses its amazing possibilities in this 3-minute TV interview. A growing number of cosmologists agree with Greene that we are but one of many universes and at least one of these other worlds lies close to ours, maybe only a millimeter away. We can’t...
  • Are we living in a HOLOGRAM? Physicists believe our universe just a projection of another cosmos

    12/16/2013 3:47:30 AM PST · by NYer · 74 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | December 12, 2013 | ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD
    The universe is a hologram and everything you can see - including this article and the device you are reading it on - is a mere projection. This is according to a controversial model proposed in 1997 by theoretical physicist Juan Maldacena.Until now the bizarre theory had never been tested, but recent mathematical models suggest that the mind-boggling principle could be true.Professor Maldacena's model suggests that the universe exists in nine dimensions of space and one of time.Now Japanese researchers have attempted to tackle this problem by providing mathematical evidence that the holographic principle might be correct, according to a...
  • New superconductor theory may revolutionize electrical engineering

    12/08/2013 6:38:56 PM PST · by Utilizer · 28 replies
    Phys.org ^ | December 6, 2013 | Bill Steele
    High-temperature superconductors exhibit a frustratingly varied catalog of odd behavior, such as electrons that arrange themselves into stripes or refuse to arrange themselves symmetrically around atoms. Now two physicists propose that such behaviors – and superconductivity itself – can all be traced to a single starting point, and they explain why there are so many variations. This theory might be a step toward new, higher-temperature superconductors that would revolutionize electrical engineering with more efficient motors and generators and lossless power transmission. -snip- Most subatomic particles have a tiny magnetic field – a property physicists call "spin" – and electrical resistance...
  • Nobel-Winning Physicist Rebukes Atheist Extremists

    10/13/2013 11:40:21 AM PDT · by CHRISTIAN DIARIST · 18 replies
    The Christian Diarist ^ | October 13, 2013 | JP
    The atheist community hailed last year’s scientific confirmation of the existence of the Higgs boson, for which the British theoretical physicist Peter Higgs was co-recipient this past week of the Nobel Prize in Physics. Higgs had theorized, all the way back in 1964, that there must be something that gives subatomic particles their mass, which enables them to form atoms, which, in turn, form molecules, all of which is integral to creation as we know it. That something turned out to be the Higgs boson. And its discovery, declared Dan Barker, co-president of the so-called Freedom From Religion Foundation, an...
  • Higgs Boson, Key to the Universe, Wins Nobel Physics Prize

    10/08/2013 6:58:33 AM PDT · by lbryce · 45 replies
    Reuters via Yahoo ^ | October 8, 2013 | Simon Johnson and Johan Ahlander
    Britain's Peter Higgs and Francois Englert of Belgium won the Nobel Prize for physics on Tuesday for predicting the existence of the Higgs boson particle that explains how elementary matter attained the mass to form stars and planets. The insight has been hailed as one of the most important in the understanding of the cosmos. Without the Higgs mechanism all particles would travel at the speed of light and atoms would not exist.
  • Humans Could Walk On Water (Ig Nobel Prize)

    10/02/2013 10:02:26 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Ig Nobel Prize in physics goes to research about walking on water on the moon.Every year in December, the Swedish Academy of Sciences hands out Nobel Prizes for the most important discoveries in science. A few months before, in less grand circumstances, the magazine Annals of Improbable Research The Ig Nobels are given to research that ‘first makes people laugh, and then makes them think’. The categories vary year to year but mostly cover science and engineering, with peace and literature occasionally thrown in, too. Previous awards have been handed out to projects like minimizing the risk of colonoscopy...
  • A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics

    09/19/2013 5:59:05 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 40 replies
    SimonsFoundation.org ^ | 9/17/13 | Natalie Wolchover
    A Jewel at the Heart of Quantum Physics Artist’s rendering of the amplituhedron, a newly discovered mathematical object resembling a multifaceted jewel in higher dimensions. Encoded in its volume are the most basic features of reality that can be calculated — the probabilities of outcomes of particle interactions. Physicists have discovered a jewel-like geometric object that dramatically simplifies calculations of particle interactions and challenges the notion that space and time are fundamental components of reality.“This is completely new and very much simpler than anything that has been done before,” said Andrew Hodges, a mathematical physicist at Oxford University who has...
  • This physics grad student made a mind-blowing Bohemian Rhapsody cover

    09/18/2013 3:01:18 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 35 replies
    io9 ^ | September 17, 2013 | Robert T. Gonzalez
    Question: What do you get when you mix a cappella, sock puppets, string theory and Queen? Answer: The geekiest (and astonishingly good, musically speaking) cover of "Bohemian Rhapsody" EVAR. Easily the greatest physics-themed cover of the classic we've ever heard.
  • Physics: Quantum quest

    09/16/2013 1:40:34 PM PDT · by neverdem · 28 replies
    Nature News ^ | 11 September 2013 | Philip Ball
    Physicists have spent a century puzzling over the paradoxes of quantum theory. Now a few of them are trying to reinvent it. If the truth be told, few physicists have ever really felt comfortable with quantum theory. Having lived with it now for more than a century, they have managed to forge a good working relationship; physicists now routinely use the mathematics of quantum behaviour to make stunningly accurate calculations about molecular structure, high-energy particle collisions, semiconductor behaviour, spectral emissions and much more. But the interactions tend to be strictly formal. As soon as researchers try to get behind the...
  • Scientists manage to study the physics that connect the classical [to] the quantum world

    09/09/2013 4:10:37 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 9/9/13
    Scientists manage to study the physics that connect the classical the quantum world 10 hours ago Enlarge Principle of the experiment: In the beginning the atom cloud is prepared in an almost perfectly ordered quantum state (symbolized by gray atoms). Over time, this quantum order is lost and disorder spreads through the system with a certain well-defined velocity (symbolized by the mixture of red and gray atoms). This disorder can be associated with the emergence of a temperature. The initial quantum properties are lost only through interactions between the atoms, without any influence from the outside world. How does a...
  • Minute Physics [on youtube]

    09/05/2013 8:53:22 PM PDT · by FlJoePa · 9 replies
    youtube.com ^ | 9-4-13 | minute physics
    Smart people and lots of great 1 minute videos
  • Is naturalness already hidden within the Standard Model?

    09/04/2013 9:47:05 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 5 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 9/2/13 | Jon Butterworth
    Maybe the Standard Model is even more wonderful than it appears. Maybe we really don't need supersymmetry. Plus, other difficult topics, ouzo and a big Greek weddingIn a somewhat bizarre end-of-the-summer interlude, I just spent two nights and a day in Corfu at a Summer Institute on particle physics. Originally I intended to stay longer, but embarrassingly I agreed to give a lecture here months ago and then forgot. I also didn't realise at the time that it coincided with the end of the school holidays... a tricky time when one of your children is starting a new school and...
  • Theoretical physics: The origins of space and time

    08/28/2013 3:33:35 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 50 replies
    Nature ^ | 8/28/13 | Zeeya Merali
    Many researchers believe that physics will not be complete until it can explain not just the behaviour of space and time, but where these entities come from.“Imagine waking up one day and realizing that you actually live inside a computer game,” says Mark Van Raamsdonk, describing what sounds like a pitch for a science-fiction film. But for Van Raamsdonk, a physicist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, this scenario is a way to think about reality. If it is true, he says, “everything around us — the whole three-dimensional physical world — is an illusion born from...
  • Ball lightning captured in the lab

    08/22/2013 8:20:43 PM PDT · by neverdem · 19 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 21 August 2013 | James Urquhart
    US researchers have developed a new way to create glowing orbs of plasma similar to ball lightning in the lab, allowing them to study their chemical and physical properties. The work could help scientists unravel the mysteries of this very rare natural phenomenon.Ball lightning has been known for millennia, but its rarity and short lived nature – typically lasting between 1 and 10 seconds – has prevented it from being studied and understood. In recent years, however, lab experiments that mimic ball lightning have been developed.One method involves a glowing discharge produced above an aqueous electrolyte solution. However, high...
  • Mystery of Earth's radiation belts solved

    07/25/2013 5:59:47 PM PDT · by neverdem · 43 replies
    Nature News ^ | 25 July 2013 | Ron Cowen
    Van Allen belts accelerate their own particles rather than just trapping them. The two concentric rings of high-speed particles that encircle the Earth are finally giving up the secrets of their origin — 55 years after their discovery. Two NASA probes have found evidence that the Van Allen belts, as the rings are known, are responsible for accelerating the particles, rather than collecting energetic particles that originated elsewhere. Space scientists think that their latest findings1 could also account for the even more energetic belts circling Saturn and Jupiter, as well as high-energy radiation associated with worlds beyond the Solar System...
  • Faster Than the Speed of Light?

    07/23/2013 8:17:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    The New York Times ^ | July 22, 2013 | Danny Hakim
    HOUSTON — Beyond the security gate at the Johnson Space Center’s 1960s-era campus here, inside a two-story glass and concrete building with winding corridors, there is a floating laboratory. Harold G. White, a physicist and advanced propulsion engineer at NASA, beckoned toward a table full of equipment there on a recent afternoon: a laser, a camera, some small mirrors, a ring made of ceramic capacitors and a few other objects. He and other NASA engineers have been designing and redesigning these instruments, with the goal of using them to slightly warp the trajectory of a photon, changing the distance it...
  • Not Everything Is Due To Bias, Including All-Male Physics Departments

    07/21/2013 2:39:23 PM PDT · by neverdem · 31 replies
    Science 2.0 ^ | July 19th 2013 | News Staff
    If a physics department has no women, does that mean there is hiring discrimination? Only if your job in sociology is to find discrimination. Simple statistics shows that is not true or there would be claims of discrimination in psychology, where lots of departments have no men. Yet when it comes to gender equality advocates, physics is always mentioned and psychology never is. A new analysis by the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Statistical Research Center debunks the claim that the existence of all-male departments is evidence of hiring bias. Labor statistics have backed that up; not only are women...
  • Are Neutrinos Their Own Antiparticles?

    07/20/2013 4:35:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 14 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 16 July 2013 | Edwin Cartlidge
    Enlarge Image Shining example. The GERDA experiment at the Gran Sasso lab in Italy has all but ruled out earlier claims for neutrinoless double-beta decay. Credit: The University of Tübingen A long-standing controversy among particle physicists looks to be settled—in the less exciting way—thanks to new data from an ultrasensitive particle detector deep underground. Physicists operating the GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) 1400 meters down in Italy's Gran Sasso National Laboratory say that they see no signs of a hypothesized type of nuclear decay called neutrinoless double-beta decay that, were it conclusively observed, would almost certainly merit a Nobel Prize....
  • Can Quantum Mechanics Produce a Universe from Nothing?

    07/18/2013 10:36:09 AM PDT · by kimtom · 170 replies
    www.apologeticspress.org ^ | 2/1/2013 | Jeff Miller, Ph.D.
    According to the First Law of Thermodynamics, nothing in the Universe (i.e., matter or energy) can pop into existence from nothing (see Miller, 2013). All of the scientific evidence points to that conclusion. So, the Universe could not have popped into existence before the alleged “big bang” (an event which we do not endorse). Therefore, God must have created the Universe. One of the popular rebuttals by the atheistic community is that quantum mechanics could have created the Universe. In 1905, Albert Einstein proposed the idea of mass-energy equivalence, resulting in the famous equation, E = mc2 (1905). We now...
  • 'Cold Fusion' Rebirth? New Evidence For Existence Of Controversial Energy Source

    03/23/2009 12:42:14 PM PDT · by FlameThrower · 36 replies · 1,770+ views
    Science Daily ^ | Mar. 23, 2009 | American Chemical Society
    ScienceDaily (Mar. 23, 2009) — Researchers are reporting compelling new scientific evidence for the existence of low-energy nuclear reactions (LENR), the process once called "cold fusion" that may promise a new source of energy.
  • Researchers perform first direct measurement of Van der Waals force

    07/11/2013 11:51:55 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Jul 08, 2013 | Bob Yirka
    Enlarge Mapping out the van der Waals interaction between two atoms. (a) In the experiment of Béguin et al. two atoms are trapped in the foci of two laser beams separated by a distance R. (b) Depending on R, the excitation laser field can couple the ground state |gg of the atomic pair to states containing one atom in the Rydberg state (|gr and |rg, respectively), or to a state with both atoms populating the Rydberg state |rr. The energy of the latter state is strongly shifted because of the van der Waals interaction UvdW between the atoms (see...
  • A sound idea to redefine temperature

    07/11/2013 9:04:34 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 11 July 2013 | Daniel Johnson
    UK scientists want to redefine temperature using the Boltzmann constant, changing the way in which it has been calculated for over 50 years. The group, working at the UK’s National Physical Laboratory, published a study today that could make it possible to measure temperature much more accurately in the future.The current definition of temperature relies upon the triple point of water – the state at which water can be ice, liquid and vapour in equilibrium – but this makes accurate measurements of extreme temperatures difficult. The team say that the solution is to link the standard unit of temperature,...
  • Precise atomic clock may redefine time - Device lays the groundwork for a new second.

    07/09/2013 4:40:57 PM PDT · by neverdem · 17 replies
    Nature News ^ | 09 July 2013 | Philip Ball
    The international definition of a second of time could be heading for a change, thanks to researchers who have demonstrated that an advanced type of ‘atomic clock’ has the degree of precision and stability needed to provide a new standard. Jérôme Lodewyck of the Paris Observatory and his colleagues have shown that two so-called optical lattice clocks (OLCs) can remain as perfectly in step as experimental precision can establish1. They say that this test of consistency is essential if OLCs are to be used to redefine the second, which is currently defined according to a different type of atomic clock....
  • 'Corkscrew' light could turbocharge the Internet

    06/29/2013 3:18:24 PM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies
    Nature News ^ | 27 June 2013 | Maggie McKee
    Different-shaped beams could increase fibre-optic capacity, easing Internet congestion. Twisty beams of light could boost the traffic-carrying capacity of the Internet, effectively adding new levels to the information superhighway, suggests research published today in Science1. Internet traffic is growing exponentially and researchers have sought ways to squeeze ever more information into the fibre-optic cables that carry it. One successful method used over the last 20 years essentially added more traffic lanes, using different colours, or wavelengths, for different signals2. But to compensate for the added lanes, each one had to be made narrower. So, just as in a real highway,...
  • Two-photon microscopy: New research may help drastically reduce cost of powerful microscope...

    06/29/2013 12:04:25 PM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Apr 21, 2013 | NA
    Two-photon microscopy: New research may help drastically reduce cost of powerful microscope technique Enlarge The same section of a mouse brain imaged with a femtosecond laser (above) and a much weaker laser but the new dye (below). (Phys.org) —A dye-based imaging technique known as two-photon microscopy can produce pictures of active neural structures in much finer detail than functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, but it requires powerful and expensive lasers. Now, a research team at the University of Pennsylvania has developed a new kind of dye that could reduce the cost of the technique by several orders of magnitude....
  • Relativity behind mercury's liquidity

    06/24/2013 12:56:35 AM PDT · by neverdem · 16 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 21 June 2013 | Laura Howes
    The effects of relativity can be seen in everyday phenomena © ShutterstockWhy is mercury a liquid at room temperature? If you ask that question in a school classroom you will probably be told that relativity affects the orbitals of heavy metals, contracting them and changing how they bond. However, the first evidence that this explanation is correct has only just been published.An international team led by Peter Schwerdtfeger of Massey University Auckland in New Zealand used quantum mechanics to make calculations of the heat capacity of the metal either including or excluding relativistic effects. They showed that if they...
  • Video: Close Call in the Corona

    06/09/2013 11:10:06 AM PDT · by neverdem · 11 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 6 June 2013 | Sid Perkins
    Credit: Video courtesy of Cooper Downs Deep inside the sun's atmosphere, temperatures reach millions of degrees—so hot that even the best-shielded spacecraft can't go there (even at night). But natural objects that pass exceptionally close to the sun do provide scientists opportunities to directly probe the solar corona. Enter sun-grazing comets, such as comet Lovejoy, which whizzed within 140,000 kilometers of the sun's surface in mid-December 2011 (as seen in the first 20 seconds of the video). When a comet is far from the sun, its tail acts like a weather vane in the solar wind (the torrent of...
  • Temporal cloak erases data from history

    06/09/2013 1:05:34 AM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    Nature News ^ | 05 June 2013 | Zeeya Merali
    Technique that hides rapid data streams could provide ultra-secure communications. If you’ve ever wanted to edit an event from your history, then help may soon be at hand. Electrical engineers have used lasers to create a cloak that can hide communications in a 'time hole', so that it seems as if they were never sent. The method, published today in Nature1, is the first that can cloak data streams sent at the rapid rates typically seen in telecommunications systems. It opens the door to ultra-secure transmission schemes, and may also provide a way to better shield information from noise corruption....
  • New Physics Complications Lend Support to Multiverse Hypothesis

    06/03/2013 5:18:54 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    Scientific American ^ | June 1, 2013 | Natalie Wolchover and Simons Science News
    The spectacular discovery of the Higgs boson in July 2012 confirmed a nearly 50-year-old theory of how elementary particles acquire mass, which enables them to form big structures such as galaxies and humans. “The fact that it was seen more or less where we expected to find it is a triumph for experiment, it’s a triumph for theory, and it’s an indication that physics works,” Arkani-Hamed told the crowd. However, in order for the Higgs boson to make sense with the mass (or equivalent energy) it was determined to have, the LHC needed to find a swarm of other particles,...
  • The Vast and the Tiny (John Derbyshire)

    05/31/2013 11:54:04 AM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    American Spectator ^ | May 2013 | John Derbyshire
    On galaxies and bosons, stars and quarks. In physics, truth does not always equal beauty. The Milky Way: An Insider’s Guide By William H. Waller (Princeton University Press, 296 pages, $29.95) A Palette of Particles By Jeremy Bernstein (Belknap Press of Harvard University, 224 pages, $18.95) THE BRITISH PHILOSOPHER J.L. Austin coined the handy phrase “medium-sized dry goods” to describe the world of everyday phenomena that the human nervous system is best suited to cope with, phenomena ranging in size from a grain of dust to a landscape. Within that range our senses and cognition are at home. All our...
  • Theorists weigh in on where to hunt dark matter

    05/26/2013 6:21:28 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 22, 2013 | Lori Ann White
    Enlarge Left panel: Air molecules whiz around at a variety of speeds, and some are very fast. When they collide with both heavy and light elements - for example, xenon (purple) and silicon (orange) - these fast moving particles have enough momentum to affect both nuclei. Right panel: Dark matter particles are moving more slowly and are less able to affect the heavy xenon nucleus. As a result, detectors made from lighter materials like silicon may prove to be more effective at picking up signals of dark matter. Credit: Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (Phys.org) —Now that it looks...