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Keyword: physics

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  • Richard Muller on why the flow of time is not an illusion

    02/11/2017 7:10:41 AM PST · by MtnClimber · 85 replies
    Physics Today ^ | 10 Feb, 2017 | Melinda Baldwin
    The physicist and author argues that cosmologists should take the concept of time more seriously and talks about becoming a “converted skeptic” on climate change. ....MULLER: The flow of time does not exist in the usual spacetime diagram of physics. Time is mysterious; in any relativistic coordinate system, it is linked to space. And yet time is different—and I mean much more than simply a sign in the metric. Time flows. Choose any coordinate system and you can stand still in space but not in time. That different behavior breaks the otherwise glorious spacetime symmetry. Moreover, there is a special...
  • Scientists Create A New Kind Of Matter: Time Crystals

    01/29/2017 8:28:33 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    popularmechanics.com ^ | Jan 28, 2017 | Sophie Weiner
    Now, two teams of researchers have figured out that crystals' repeating patterns can also exist through time. These "time crystals," detailed in a new paper in Physical Review Letter, are an entirely new kind of matter, one that can never reach equilibrium. To create the time crystals, researchers at University of Maryland hooked together 10 ytterbium atoms and hit them with two lasers multiple times to keep them out of equilibrium. Though the atoms did settle into a pattern, they could not reach equilibrium, meaning that the crystals perpetually remain in motion, though they don't contain any energy. Almost all...
  • Scientists have confirmed a brand new form of matter: time crystals

    01/29/2017 5:02:45 AM PST · by Mechanicos · 48 replies
    Science Alert ^ | 28 JAN 2017 | FIONA MACDONALD
    For months now, there's been speculation that researchers might have finally created time crystals - strange crystals that have an atomic structure that repeats not just in space, but in time, putting them in perpetual motion without energy. ... But time crystals have a structure that repeats in time, not just in space. And it keep oscillating in its ground state. ...
  • Princeton Physics Professor Discredits Anthropogenic Climate Change Theory

    12/23/2016 7:21:23 PM PST · by Coleus · 50 replies
    Princeton Physics Professor Discredits Anthropogenic Climate Change Theory  
  • Pilot Wave Theory and Quantum Realism (PBS video)

    12/01/2016 3:16:26 PM PST · by Reeses · 11 replies
    PBS Digital Studios ^ | Nov 30, 2016 | PBS Digital Studios
    There’s one interpretation of the meaning of quantum mechanics that manages to skip a lot of the unphysical weirdness of the mainstream interpretations: it's de Broglie-Bohm pilot wave theory. There are some pretty out-there explanations for the processes at work behind the incredibly successful mathematics of quantum mechanics - things are both waves and particles at the same time, the act of observation defines reality, cats are alive and dead, or even: the universe is constantly splitting into infinite alternate realities. The weird results of quantum experiments seem to demand weird explanations of the nature of reality. In this episode,...
  • Gravity may have chased light in the early universe

    11/28/2016 8:22:13 AM PST · by MtnClimber · 39 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 23 Nov, 2016 | Michael Brooks
    It’s supposed to be the most fundamental constant in physics, but the speed of light may not always have been the same. This twist on a controversial idea could overturn our standard cosmological wisdom. In 1998, Joao Magueijo at Imperial College London, proposed that the speed of light might vary, to solve what cosmologists call the horizon problem. This says that the universe reached a uniform temperature long before heat-carrying photons, which travel at the speed of light, had time to reach all corners of the universe. The standard way to explain this conundrum is an idea called inflation, which...
  • Variable, Not Constant: Speed Of Light Theory Challenging Einstein’s Physics Can Now Be Tested

    11/27/2016 11:30:21 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 56 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 27 November 2016, 1:16 am EST | Dianne Depra
    Researchers suggesting that the speed of light varies have come up with a numerical prediction that will allow their theory to be tested. Many theories in physics are built upon the idea that the speed of light is at a constant rate, but Joăo Magueijo and Niayesh Afshordi think otherwise. In a paper published in the journal Physical Review D, they detailed the creation of an exact figure on the spectral index, a model that can be used to determine if their theory is valid or not. All structures in the universe today were created when fluctuations occurred in the...
  • Why quantum mechanics might need an overhaul

    11/26/2016 6:19:48 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 61 replies
    Science News ^ | November 4, 2016 | Tom Siegfried
    Why quantum mechanics might need an overhaul by Tom Siegfried 3:37pm, November 4, 2016 Nobel laureate Steven Weinberg says current debates suggest need for new approach to comprehend reality SAN ANTONIO ? Quantum mechanics is science’s equivalent of political polarization. Voters either take sides and argue with each other endlessly, or stay home and accept politics as it is. Physicists either just accept quantum mechanics and do their calculations, or take sides in the never-ending debate over what quantum mechanics is actually saying about reality. Steven Weinberg used to be happy with quantum mechanics as it is and didn’t worry...
  • Even physicists are 'afraid' of mathematics

    11/13/2016 7:25:21 AM PST · by LouieFisk · 72 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | November 11, 2016 | University of Exeter
    Physicists avoid highly mathematical work despite being trained in advanced mathematics, new research suggests. The study, published in the New Journal of Physics, shows that physicists pay less attention to theories that are crammed with mathematical details.
  • Five Independent Signs Of New Physics In The Universe

    11/06/2016 8:17:45 AM PST · by MtnClimber · 23 replies
    Forbes ^ | 4 Nov, 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    Since the Large Hadron Collider at CERN turned on, it’s brought with it an incredible slew of results. Large numbers of rare, exotic and unstable particles have been created, and their decays have been measured to unprecedented precision. The Higgs boson has been created and observed to have a mass of 126 GeV/c2, branching and decaying in exactly the ratios the Standard Model predicts. As it now stands, we’ve detected every particle and antiparticle predicted by the most successful particle physics theory of all time. Unless we get hit by a big physics surprise, the LHC will become renowned for...
  • Microsoft thinks time crystals may be viable after all... Movement without energy?

    09/12/2016 5:02:41 PM PDT · by dayglored · 53 replies
    The Register ^ | Sep 12, 2016 | Katyanna Quach
    Microsoft researchers have teamed up with physicists from the University of California, Santa Barbara, to show how time crystals might be possible. First proposed by Nobel-prize winning theoretical physicist Frank Wilczek, time crystals are hypothetical systems that spontaneously break time-translational symmetry (TTS) – a fundamental symmetry in physics. In plain language, they exhibit tiny movements without using energy. Crystals have a rigid arrangement of atoms that break translational symmetry. Their structure is not symmetrical in space, unlike a sphere, which looks the same from all directions. Time crystals break the symmetry of space and time. Wilczek considered a group of...
  • In 1975, a Cat Co-Authored a Physics Paper

    09/05/2016 6:29:55 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 14 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | 30, Aug, 2016 | Eric Grundhauser
    When one reads a physics paper in an esteemed journal, one does not generally wonder if it was written by a cat. But such was the case for an article in the 1970s credited to co-author F.D.C. Willard—the Cat Who Published. Jack H. Hetherington was a professor of physics at Michigan State University in 1975, when he finished what would become an influential and often-cited physics paper. The academic writing, entitled, Two-, Three-, and Four-Atom Exchange Effects in bcc 3He, was an in-depth exploration of atomic behavior at different temperatures. It would have flown over the heads of most lay...
  • This device turns neon plasma into natural patterns

    08/23/2016 8:11:24 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 10 replies
    PBS ^ | 8-23-2016 | Leigh Anne Tiffany
    From zebra stripes to a honeycomb lattice, nature features breathtaking patterns. Now, physicists based in China have found a way to recreate these natural motifs in 3-D — using just a little electricity. Their new device discharges plasma — air and argon gas charged with electricity — or the same stuff found in neon lights. Using different voltages, the researchers were able to create various 3-D shapes in the plasma. “To experts, this work could advance the development of plasma physics,” co-inventor Lifang Dong of Hebei University told the NewsHour. “But to non-experts, it could explain a whole range of...
  • Scientists on verge of discovering new fifth force that will change how we see the universe

    08/16/2016 6:53:07 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 26 replies
    National Post ^ | Aug. 16, 2016 | John-Michael Schneider
    Since the mid-1970s, modern physics has rested on the knowledge of four fundamental forces of nature: gravity, electromagnetism, the strong nuclear force, and the weak nuclear force. Now scientists are on the verge of discovering a fifth force of nature, which could change the field of physics forever. According to a recent paper published by University of California physicists in the peer-reviewed journal Physical Review Letters, what physicists thought was a new particle of matter could be a new force altogether.
  • 5th force of nature possibly discovered, US physicists say

    08/16/2016 5:45:02 AM PDT · by Bloody Sam Roberts · 68 replies
    RT America ^ | Unknown
    Scientists are ecstatic over the fact that they may have just discovered the fifth fundamental force of nature. The possible discovery of a previously-unknown subatomic particle looks set to finally bring the elusive dark matter into the mix. The discovery centers on a new type of boson that possesses characteristics previously unseen in particles. Furthermore, its existence casts doubt upon whether the known ‘sector’ of matter and particles exists alongside a ‘dark’ sector – both interacting with each other via another, unseen force.“If true, it's revolutionary,” said Jonathan Feng, professor of physics & astronomy at the University of California, Irvine,...
  • Black hole made in the lab shows signs of quantum entanglement

    08/15/2016 8:54:32 PM PDT · by brucedickinson · 42 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 8-15-2016 | Rebecca Boyle
    Steinhauer created a sonic black hole using a quantum state of supercold fluid called a Bose-Einstein condensate. The fluid flows through a tube in which lasers constrain the flow at two different energy levels, creating a kind of waterfall. Atoms reach supersonic speeds when they spill over its edge. This serves as the model event horizon. To measure Hawking radiation, he pinged the fluid with a short laser pulse. This created a sound particle known as a phonon, along with a partner particle, near the horizon – just as Hawking suggested happens near a real black hole. He then took...
  • Just a burp: Intriguing hints of physics particle evaporate

    08/06/2016 7:23:04 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Aug 6, 2016 5:31 PM EDT | Seth Borenstein
    Eight months after raising hopes that they may have found an intriguing new particle that cannot be explained by the existing main physics theory, disappointed scientists are saying: Never mind. It was just a statistical burp, not a breakthrough, researchers reported Friday. […] Early unconfirmed readings of a new particle in December by physicists at the center, called CERN, set the physics world abuzz. Scientists there had discovered the Higgs boson or “God particle” in 2012, and two new readings from the Large Hadron Collider made it seem as though they may had found a revolutionary new particle. …
  • Cats seem to grasp the laws of physics

    06/14/2016 2:05:53 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 56 replies
    phys.org ^ | 06/14/2016
    Previous work conducted by the Japanese team established that cats predict the presence of invisible objects based on what they hear. In the present study, the researchers wanted to find out if cats use a causal rule to infer if a container holds an object, based on whether it is shaken along with a sound or not. The team also wanted to establish if cats expect an object to fall out or not, once the container is turned over. Thirty domestic cats were videotaped while an experimenter shook a container. In some cases this action went along with a rattling...
  • Is Particle Physics About to Crack Wide Open?

    This is by far the most exciting thing that has happened in particle physics over the last three decades. If this hint of new physics is confirmed—something that could happen within just a few weeks, or possibly even within days—it is difficult to state the importance of such a discovery. It would be bigger than the detection of the Higgs boson, which was just confirmation of what was already known.
  • World Famous Scientist: God Created the Universe

    06/09/2016 9:32:50 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 94 replies
    Intellectual Takeout ^ | June 8, 2016 | Jon Miltimore
    World Famous Scientist: God Created the Universe ‘The final resolution could be that God is a mathematician.’ Michio Kaku has made a name for himself as a world-leading theoretical physicist unafraid to speak his mind.Kaku, the Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics at the City College of New York, has published more than 70 articles in physics journals on topics such as supersymmetry, superstring theory, supergravity, and hadronic physics.His latest claim is likely to make waves in the world of science.“I have concluded that we are in a world made by rules created by an intelligence”, Kaku says...
  • Doubling down on Schrödinger's cat

    05/29/2016 10:00:37 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 23 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | May 26, 2016 | Provided by: Yale University
    Yale physicists have given Schrödinger's cat a second box to play in. Credit: Michael S. Helfenbein/Yale University ====================================================================================================================== Yale physicists have given Schrödinger's famous cat a second box to play in, and the result may help further the quest for reliable quantum computing. Schrödinger's cat is a well-known paradox that applies the concept of superposition in quantum physics to objects encountered in everyday life. The idea is that a cat is placed in a sealed box with a radioactive source and a poison that will be triggered if an atom of the radioactive substance decays. Quantum physics suggests that the...
  • Why Stephen Hawking Actually Believes In God

    05/27/2016 8:56:34 PM PDT · by amessenger4god · 44 replies
    Unsealed.org ^ | 5/27/2016 | Gary
    Stephen Hawking, smarter and wiser than many of his colleagues, admits the obvious - that the probability of our universe supporting life is infinitesimally small.  His anything-but-God workaround is simply to propose a near infinite number of universes to solve the problem - if the probability of biological life coming into existence in our universe via purely natural mechanisms is next to nil (which it is) than throw a few septillion parallel universes into the mix and eventually one or two might generate life.  Out of those literally countless universes we just happen to be lucky enough to have been...
  • Schrödinger's cat lives and dies in two boxes at once

    05/27/2016 11:17:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 39 replies
    Physics World ^ | May 27, 2016 | Staff
    Schrödinger's cat now has a second box to play in, thanks to an international team of physicists that has created a two-mode "Schrödinger's cat state" for the first time. The experiment brings together two purely quantum properties, in that the "cat" (i.e. the photons) is simultaneously "alive and dead" (in a superposition of states) while also in two locations at once (the two boxes are entangled with one another).
  • What Is The Strongest Force In The Universe?

    04/27/2016 7:17:25 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 78 replies
    Forbes ^ | 26 Apr, 2016 | Ethan Siegel
    When it comes to the fundamental laws of nature, we can break everything down into four forces that are at the core of everything in the Universe: The strong nuclear force: the force responsible for holding atomic nuclei and individual protons and neutrons together. The electromagnetic force: the force that attracts and repels charged particles, binds atoms together into molecules and life, and causes electric current, among other things. The weak nuclear force: the force responsible for some types of radioactive decay and the transmutation of heavy, unstable fundamental particles into lighter ones. And gravity: the force that bind the...
  • Engineers develop micro-sized, liquid-metal particles for heat-free soldering

    04/25/2016 10:53:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    phys.org ^ | April 25, 2016 | Provided by: Iowa State University
    The vial contains liquid-metal particles suspended in ethanol. The particles were used to demonstrate heat-free soldering. Credit: Christopher Gannon/Iowa State University =========================================================================================================== Martin Thuo likes to look for new, affordable and clean ways to put science and technology to work in the world. His lab is dedicated to an idea called frugal innovation: "How do you do very high-level science or engineering with very little?" said Thuo, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Iowa State University and an associate of the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory. "How can you solve a problem with the least amount...
  • Even Engineers Are Completely Baffled By This New Magnet Technology

    03/31/2016 10:29:32 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 119 replies
    damn.com ^ | 03-31-2016 | Staff
    When you think of magnets you probably imagine being a kid in class playing with them for the first time, figuring out that forces we can’t see have the ability to manipulate physical objects. We can make things affected by the magnetic waves, but not until recently have we been able to “program” them. A highly innovative company from Alabama have introduced to the world “Polymagnets,” and they’re incredible. They’re guaranteed to be one of the coolest things you see today!
  • Astrophysicists detect ultra-fast winds near supermassive black hole

    03/24/2016 12:44:16 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    phys.org ^ | March 21, 2016 | Provided by: York University
    Artist's illustration of turbulent winds of gas swirling around a black hole. Some of the gas is spiraling inward, but some is being blown away. Credit: NASA, and M. Weiss (Chandra X -ray Center) ============================================================================================================================================== New research led by astrophysicists at York University has revealed the fastest winds ever seen at ultraviolet wavelengths near a supermassive black hole. "We're talking wind speeds of 20 per cent the speed of light, which is more than 200 million kilometres an hour. That's equivalent to a category 77 hurricane," says Jesse Rogerson, who led the research as part of his PhD thesis in...
  • Classical physics in a spin

    03/10/2016 1:57:14 PM PST · by molewhacka · 18 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | March 10, 2016 | Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics
    Simple "spin models" used to explain magnetism can precisely reproduce any possible phenomenon in classical, non-quantum physics, according to scientists at the MPQ and UCL. This is the first time such simple 'universal models' have been found to exist, showing that something analogous occurs in physics. The study, published this week Science, builds on pioneering work from the '80s which is at the interface between theoretical computer science and physics. Extremely simple computers are universal: they can in principle compute anything that can be computed. Spin systems are a very simplified, stripped-down model of the interactions between particles making up...
  • Are the Constants of Physics Constant?

    03/09/2016 6:07:00 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 56 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 7 Mar, 2016 | Venkat Srinivasan
    When Max Born addressed the South Indian Science Association in November 1935, it was a time of great uncertainty in his life. The Nazi Party had already suspended the renowned quantum mechanics physicist's position at the University of Gottingen in 1933. He had been invited to teach at Cambridge, but it was temporary. Then, the Party terminated his tenure at Gottingen in the summer of 1935. Born took up an offer to work with C. V. Raman and his students for six months at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore. While there, he found that his family had lost...
  • US physicists discover new elementary particle

    03/03/2016 2:49:21 AM PST · by kitchen · 24 replies
    newKerala.com ^ | 03--03-2016
    New York, March 3 : A team of US researchers has detected a new form of elementary particle called the "four-flavoured" tetraquark that can affect scientists' understanding of "quark matter" -- the hot, dense material that existed moments after the Big Bang and may still exist in the super-dense interior of neutron stars. For most of the history of quarks, it's seemed that all particles were made of either a quark and an antiquark or three quarks, "This new particle is unique -- a strange, charged beauty. It's the birth of a new paradigm. Particles made of four quarks --...
  • The number that fascinates physicists above all others

    02/20/2016 2:09:29 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 67 replies
    Cosmos Magazine ^ | Paul Davies
    "God is a pure mathematician!" declared British astronomer Sir James Jeans. The physical Universe does seem to be organised around elegant mathematical relationships. And one number above all others has exercised an enduring fascination for physicists: 137.03599913. Let me explain. When scientists measure any quantity they must specify the units being used. The speed of light, for example, is either 186,000 or 300,000 depending on whether it is expressed as miles per second or kilometres per second. Likewise your weight might be 150 or 68 according to whether you are measuring in pounds or kilograms. Without knowing the units being...
  • Announcement Thursday on Einstein's gravitational waves

    02/09/2016 12:29:36 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 6 replies
    phys.org ^ | February 8, 2016 | AFP
    Scientists are set to make a major announcement Thursday on efforts to pinpoint the existence of gravitational waves, or ripples of space and time that transport energy across the universe. The waves themselves have never before been directly measured, though Albert Einstein said a century ago they were out there, according to his theory of general relativity. They are believed to form around massive objects like black holes and neutron stars, warping space and time. If gravitational waves have been spotted, it would mark one of the biggest scientific discoveries of our time, filling in a major gap in our...
  • How Physics Lost Its Fizz: Physics is now just recycling once-exciting ideas

    01/21/2016 12:52:39 PM PST · by Trumpinator · 57 replies
    blogs.scientificamerican.com ^ | January 18, 2016 | John Horgan
    How Physics Lost Its Fizz Physics, which decades ago seemed capable of answering the deepest mysteries of existence, is now just recycling once-exciting ideas By John Horgan on January 18, 2016 For a lapsed Catholic like me, physics represented a kind of scientific theology, an empirical, rational way of probing the mysteries of existence. Physicists were discerning resonances between the smallest and largest scales of reality and spinning out astonishing conjectures about our universe and even other universes. ...snip... Physicists' fantasies about parallel and virtual realms are not just stale. Increasingly, they strike me as escapist and even irresponsible, because...
  • Quantum Weirdness Now a Matter of Time

    01/19/2016 5:20:28 PM PST · by Reeses · 37 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | January 19, 2016 | George Musser
    Bizarre quantum bonds connect distinct moments in time, suggesting that quantum links - not space-time - constitute the fundamental structure of the universe. ... A field is a highly entangled system. Different parts of it are mutually correlated: A random fluctuation of the field in one place will be matched by a random fluctuation in another. ("Parts" here refers both to regions of space and to spans of time.) Even a perfect vacuum, which is defined as the absence of particles, will still have quantum fields. And these fields are always vibrating. Space looks empty because the vibrations cancel each...
  • Why String Theory Is Not Science

    12/24/2015 6:40:17 AM PST · by C19fan · 44 replies
    Forbes ^ | December 23, 2015 | Ethan Siegel
    There are a lot of different ways to define science, but perhaps one that everyone can agree on is that it’s a process by which: 1.knowledge about the natural world or a particular phenomenon is gathered, 2.a testable hypothesis is put forth concerning a natural, physical explanation for that phenomenon, 3.that hypothesis is then tested and either validated or falsified, 4.and an overarching framework — or scientific theory — is constructed to explain the hypothesis and that makes predictions about other phenomena, 5.which is then tested further, and either validated, in which case new phenomena to test are sought (back...
  • Physicists figure out how to retrieve information from a black hole

    12/23/2015 1:17:47 PM PST · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    sciencemag.org ^ | 23 December 2015 3:15 pm | By Adrian Cho
    Black holes earn their name because their gravity is so strong not even light can escape from them. Oddly, though, physicists have come up with a bit of theoretical sleight of hand to retrieve a speck of information that's been dropped into a black hole. The calculation touches on one of the biggest mysteries in physics: how all of the information trapped in a black hole leaks out as the black hole "evaporates." Many theorists think that must happen, but they don't know how. Unfortunately for them, the new scheme may do more to underscore the difficulty of the larger...
  • Black holes can grow to 50 billion times the mass of the Sun... and then stop

    12/21/2015 1:15:25 PM PST · by Red Badger · 32 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | December 21, 2015 12:30 GMT | By Matt Atherton
    Black holes can only grow if they have a gas disc to feed on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center/Flickr ======================================================================================================== Black holes can only grow to 50 billion times the mass of the Sun, before they lose their only source of 'food' and stop growing. Scientists discovered that black holes have a size limit, as when it gets so big, the gas which feeds the great void loses its energy, and falls into the unknown. A researcher from the University of Leicester analysed the disc of gas which surrounds supermassive black holes at the centre of galaxies. He found that...
  • Potential New Particle Shows Up at the LHC, Thrilling and Confounding Physicists

    12/20/2015 12:36:01 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 28 replies
    Scientific American ^ | December 16, 2015 | Clara Moskowitz
    The gigantic accelerator in Europe has produced hints of an exotic particle that defies the known laws of physics. A little wiggle on a graph, representing just a handful of particles, has set the world of physics abuzz. Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland, the largest particle accelerator on Earth, reported yesterday that their machine might have produced a brand new particle not included in the established laws of particle physics known as the Standard Model. Their results, based on the data collected from April to November after the LHC began colliding protons at nearly twice the...
  • What Are Quantum Gravity's Alternatives To String Theory?

    12/19/2015 7:19:11 AM PST · by C19fan · 19 replies
    Fortune ^ | December 17, 2015 | Ethan Slegel
    The Universe we know and love — with Einstein’s General Relativity as our theory of gravity and quantum field theories of the other three forces — has a problem that we don’t often talk about: it’s incomplete, and we know it. Einstein’s theory on its own is just fine, describing how matter-and-energy relate to the curvature of space-and-time. Quantum field theories on their own are fine as well, describing how particles interact and experience forces. Normally, the quantum field theory calculations are done in flat space, where spacetime isn’t curved. We can do them in the curved space described by...
  • A Fight for the Soul of Science (physicists, philosophers debate boundaries of science)

    12/17/2015 10:01:58 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 28 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 12/16/15 | Natalie Wolchover
    A Fight for the Soul of Science String theory, the multiverse and other ideas of modern physics are potentially untestable. At a historic meeting in Munich, scientists and philosophers asked: should we trust them anyway? Laetitia Vancon for Quanta MagazinePhysicists George Ellis (center) and Joe Silk (right) at Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich on Dec. 7. By: Natalie WolchoverDecember 16, 2015 Comments (17) Share this: facebooktwitterredditmail PDF Print Physicists typically think they “need philosophers and historians of science like birds need ornithologists,” the Nobel laureate David Gross told a roomful of philosophers, historians and physicists last week in Munich, Germany,...
  • Black holes have a size limit of 50 billion suns

    12/10/2015 8:44:24 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 27 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 10 Dec, 2015 | Joshua Sokol,
    Even gluttons can't eat forever. When black holes at the hearts of galaxies swell to 50 billion times the mass of our sun, they may lose the discs of gas they use as cosmic feedlots. Most galaxies host a supermassive black hole at their centre. Around this is a region of space where gas settles into an orbiting disc. The gas can lose energy and fall inwards, feeding the black hole. But these discs are known to be unstable and prone to crumbling into stars. Theoretically, a black hole could grow so big that it swallows up the stable part...
  • Death Star: NASA engineer reveals Empire could have re-purposed asteroid to create ultimate weapon

    12/10/2015 8:18:22 PM PST · by rickmichaels · 21 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | December 11, 2015 | Cheyenne MacDonald
    A NASA engineer has proposed a method to efficiently build a Death Star, and it's not the way the Empire would have done it. Instead of constructing the massive weapon from nothing, by shooting materials out from a planet, an asteroid could be used to provide all of the essential building blocks. The Empire is doing things the hard way; using an asteroid to build a Death Star would require much less work, as metals and organic compounds would already be there.
  • Spacecraft Launches to Test the Hunt for Ripples in the Fabric of Spacetime

    12/03/2015 5:00:08 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    universetoday.com ^ | on December 3, 2015 | Nancy Atkinson
    The European Space Agency successfully launched the LISA Pathfinder, a spacecraft designed to demonstrate technology for observing gravitational waves in space. The launch took place at Europe’s spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana on a Vega rocket, at 4:04 GMT on December 3, (10:04 pm EST Dec 2), 2015. Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of spacetime, which were predicted by Albert Einstein in his General Theory of Relativity. So far, because they are extremely tiny and incredibly faint, gravitational waves have proved to be elusive. The technology needed to detect them is highly sensitive and therefore has been difficult...
  • Lift-off for Lisa Pathfinder! Mission to detect Einstein's gravitational waves successfully [tr]

    12/03/2015 6:10:56 AM PST · by C19fan · 4 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 3, 2015 | Richard Gray
    A Vega rocket carrying the European Space Agency's Lisa Pathfinder has finally blasted into orbit after being delayed by a 'technical issue'. The rocket, with the probe mounted on top, lifted off earlier today in Kourou, French Guiana, to begin its mission to hunt for gravitational waves in space. Gravitational waves are ripples in the fabric of space-time, predicted a century ago by Albert Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, but until now have proved elusive. The rocket had been expected to launch on 2 December - exactly 100 years since Einstein published his theory - but 'technical issues' delayed it...
  • 'Material universe' yields surprising new particle

    11/25/2015 12:22:07 PM PST · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 25, 2015 | Provided by: Princeton University
    These tungsten ditelluride crystals behave as insulators for current applied in some directions and as conductors for current applied in other directions. The researchers found that this behavior is due to a newly theorized particle, the type-II Weyl fermion. Credit: Wudi Wang and N. Phuan Ong, Princeton University --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- An international team of researchers has predicted the existence of a new type of particle called the type-II Weyl fermion in metallic materials. When subjected to a magnetic field, the materials containing the particle act as insulators for current applied in some directions and as conductors for current applied in other...
  • The Most Mind-Bending Fact I Learned in Physics

    11/19/2015 10:56:52 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 64 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | 11/2015 | Tom Hartsfield
    Physics is built out of philosophically fascinating ideas. Or, at least, ideas that fascinate us as physicists. We are often moved to reverentially proclaim the beauty of various concepts and theories. Sometimes this beauty makes sense to other people (we're made of star stuff) and other times it's opaque (Frobenius manifolds in psuedo-Euclidean spaces). I have my own personal favorite idea. It arises from the philosophically fantastic (but mathematically moderate) workings of Einstein's relativity theory. The theory of special relativity holds that time and space are not separate entities, each operating on its own; rather they are intimately and inextricably...
  • How To Go To Space (made simple) -- 3min YouTube video

    11/12/2015 1:53:00 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 6 replies
    YouTube ^ | 11/10/15
    Click Here
  • What If Everyone JUMPED At Once?

    10/29/2015 1:43:27 PM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 40 replies
    YouTube ^ | Aug 18, 2012 | Vsauce
    What If Everyone JUMPED At Once? Geek & Sundry
  • A particle purely made of nuclear force [Gluons]

    10/15/2015 1:38:34 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 24 replies
    phys.org ^ | October 13, 2015 | Provided by: Vienna University of Technology
    Nucleons consist (left) of quarks (matter particles) and gluons (force particles). A glueball (right) is made up purely of gluons. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have calculated that the meson f0(1710) could be a very special particle – the long-sought-after glueball, a particle composed of pure force. For decades, scientists have been looking for so-called "glueballs". Now it seems they have been found at last. A glueball is an exotic particle, made up entirely of gluons – the "sticky" particles that keep nuclear particles together. Glueballs are unstable and can only be detected indirectly, by analysing their decay. This...
  • Two physicists earn Nobel Prize for discovering neutrino's chameleon-like powers

    10/06/2015 5:24:45 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 7 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 10/06/2015 | Amina Khan
    The 2015 Nobel Prize in physics has gone to two scientists for discovering the quirky, shape-shifting behavior of neutrinos — tiny ghostlike particles that fill the universe, traveling close to the speed of light. Takaaki Kajita of the Super-Kamiokande experiment at the University of Tokyo and Arthur B. McDonald of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory at Queen’s University in Canada were awarded the physics Nobel on Tuesday for their discovery that neutrinos oscillate — and thus, that they must have mass. Small as these particles are, the scientists' insight — that neutrinos are chameleon-like particles, switching identities in an instant —...