Keyword: physics

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  • Happy Birthday, LHC: Here's to 10 Years of Atom Smashing at the Large Hadron Collider

    09/13/2018 8:41:04 AM PDT · by ETL · 14 replies
    Space.com ^ | Sept 11, 2018 | Don Lincoln, Senior Scientist, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory; Adjunct Professor of Physics,
    Ten years ago, the world's largest scientific instrument was turned on and the start of a research dynasty began. On Sept. 10, 2008, a beam of protons was shot for the first time around the entire 16.5-mile-long (27 kilometers) ring of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the world's largest and highest energy atom smasher ever constructed. Located at the CERN laboratory, just outside Geneva, Switzerland, the LHC was constructed to smash highly energetic beams of protons together at near the speed of light. The stated goal was to create and discover the Higgs boson, the last missing piece of...
  • Everything Worth Knowing About ... Entanglement

    08/18/2018 9:28:36 PM PDT · by blam · 16 replies
    Discover Magazine ^ | 8-18-2018 | Devin Powell
    Up until last year, mathematician Peter Bierhorst had hoped the physicists he works with would fail. It was nothing personal. He just found their worldview a little disturbing. Like most physicists, his co-workers believe that our universe’s particles can influence each other using a sort of telepathy. Called “entanglement,” this connection allows two particles separated by vast distances to behave as a single entity. Both instantly react to something that happens to one of them. If you find this very weird and counterintuitive, you’re not alone. “I find this very weird and counterintuitive,” says Bierhorst, a postdoc at the National...
  • A Major Physics Experiment Just Detected a Particle That Shouldn't Exist

    06/04/2018 7:12:49 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 90 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | June 1, 2018 04:49pm ET | By Rafi Letzter, Staff Writer
    Scientists have produced the firmest evidence yet of so-called sterile neutrinos, mysterious particles that pass through matter without interacting with it at all. The first hints these elusive particles turned up decades ago. But after years of dedicated searches, scientists have been unable to find any other evidence for them, with many experiments contradicting those old results. These new results now leave scientists with two robust experiments that seem to demonstrate the existence of sterile neutrinos, even as other experiments continue to suggest sterile neutrinos don't exist at all. That means there's something strange happening in the universe that is...
  • Mysterious neutrino surplus hints at the existence of new particles

    06/03/2018 1:08:06 PM PDT · by ETL · 52 replies
    ScienceNews.org ^ | June 1, 2018 | Emily Conover
    Pip-squeak particles called neutrinos are dishing out more than scientists had bargained for.A particle detector has spotted a puzzling abundance of the lightweight subatomic particles and their antimatter partners, antineutrinos, physicists report May 30 at arXiv.org. The finding mirrors a neutrino excess found more than two decades ago. And that match has researchers wondering if a new type of particle called a sterile neutrino — one even more shadowy than the famously elusive ordinary neutrinos — might be at large.Such a particle, if it exists, would transform the foundations of particle physics and could help solve cosmic puzzles like the...
  • Feynman the joker

    05/12/2018 10:00:36 AM PDT · by MtnClimber · 35 replies
    Physics Today ^ | 11 May, 2018 | Melinda Baldwin
    Richard Phillips Feynman, who was born 100 years ago today, made his mark with contributions to particle physics, superfluidity, and quantum electrodynamics—the last of which won him the 1965 Nobel Prize. That honor alone would have been enough to guarantee him a place in the history of science...... Yet Feynman’s posthumous reputation rests not just on his aptitude for physics but also on his playful personality. He’s known for pulling pranks at Los Alamos, trying his hand at a variety of quirky hobbies, and taking road trips in a Dodge Tradesman Maxivan...... When Feynman pointed out the security gap at...
  • Does the Universe Care About Stephen Hawking?

    Famed scientist Stephen Hawking died earlier this week at the age of 76. He is largely regarded as one of the most important physicists in history. Of course, the tributes came pouring in. While most commemorated his genius and determination to transcend the debilitating effects of ALS, others attempted more nuanced commentary. Like USA Today which took Hawking’s death as opportunity to remind us of the physicist’s view that “Heaven is a fairy story.” Hawking, who died at 76, spoke candidly in a 2011 Guardian interview about what he believes happens when people die. He told the Guardian that while...
  • Lack of evidence put Hawking’s Nobel hopes in black hole

    03/15/2018 5:21:09 AM PDT · by C19fan · 38 replies
    AP ^ | March 14, 2018 | Seth Borenstein
    Stephen Hawking won accolades from his peers for having one of the most brilliant minds in science, but he never got a Nobel Prize because no one has yet proven his ideas. The Nobel committee looks for proof, not big ideas. Hawking was a deep thinker — a theorist — and his musings about black holes and cosmology have yet to get the lockdown evidence that accompanies the physics prizes, his fellow scientists said.
  • Mathematicians work to expand their new pictorial mathematical language into other areas

    03/02/2018 3:52:26 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 24 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 2/6/18
    Mathematicians work to expand their new pictorial mathematical language into other areas February 6, 2018, Harvard University An illustration of the project is pictured in Lyman Building at Harvard University. Credit: Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer A picture is worth 1,000 words, the saying goes, but a group of Harvard-based scientists is hoping that it may also be worth the same number of equations. Pictorial laws appear to unify ideas from disparate, interdisciplinary fields of knowledge, linking them beautifully like elements of a da Vinci painting. The group is working to expand the pictorial mathematical language first outlined last year by...
  • He Became A Celebrity For Putting Science Before God. Now Lawrence Krauss Faces Allegations [tr]

    02/23/2018 6:02:37 AM PST · by C19fan · 25 replies
    BuzzFeed ^ | February 22, 2018 | Peter Aldhous, Azeen Ghorayshi, and Virginia Hughes
    When Melody Hensley first met Lawrence Krauss, she was a 29-year-old makeup artist at a department store, and he was one of her intellectual idols. She ran an atheist website in her spare time and had just started volunteering for the Center for Inquiry (CFI), a nonprofit group committed to promoting science and reason above faith. She was hoping to build a career in the burgeoning “skeptics” movement, and Krauss was one of its brightest luminaries. At a CFI event in November 2006, Krauss asked Hensley for her card, and later, as she was leaving, asked her if she was...
  • Scientists building world's most-powerful 'SUPER LASERS' that can RIP holes in space

    01/24/2018 8:44:59 PM PST · by Ciaphas Cain · 53 replies
    Daily Star ^ | 24 January 2018 | Anthony Blair
    Boffins in Shanghai, China, have been designing the world's most powerful laser. The team has already made history with its earlier invention, the Shanghai Superintense Ultrafast Laser Facility have already set records. The machine is small enough to fit on a tabletop, and contains a disc, the width of a frisbee, which is made of titanium-topped sapphires.(Snip)This year physicist Ruxin Li and his team are planning on building a laser that will pack a mind-boggling 100 petawatt burst. Called the Station of Extreme Light, the team hopes the laser will be able to tear a hole in the fabric of...
  • Light’s weird dual nature weathers trip to space and back

    10/29/2017 4:12:12 PM PDT · by ETL · 21 replies
    ScienceNews.com ^ | October 25, 2017 | Emily Conover
    'Delayed-choice' test, a first with spacefaring photons, affirms light can behave like a wave or a particle. Light is two-faced: Sometimes it behaves like a wave, sometimes like a particle. Now, scientists have shown that light’s shifty disposition persists even after trekking thousands of kilometers into space and back again, researchers report October 25 in Science Advances.Depending on how light is measured, it can either be particle-like, lighting up a camera pixel, for example, or wavelike, interfering with other waves like ripples on the surface of water. It’s one of the many oddities of quantum mechanics. Before light is measured,...
  • LBNF/DUNE to create 2,000 jobs in SD (Also 2,000 in Illinois, physics research)

    10/26/2017 5:52:13 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    The Black Hills Pioneer ^ | October 26, 2017 | Al Van Zee
    LEAD — Construction on the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), which will house the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), is underway. Groundbreaking ceremonies took place July 21. Tuesday, the Sanford Underground Research Facility and Fermilab held a joint informational meeting to brief local residents on what to expect from construction activities and from the economic impact of the project in the months ahead. Giving the presentation were Sanford Underground Research Facility Executive Director Mike Headley and LBNF Project Manager Josh Wilhite. The presentation began with the major features that will make the DUNE research being done at the LBNF a...
  • Einstein proof: Nobel winners find ripples in the universe

    10/03/2017 4:03:34 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 30 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 3, 2017 5:14 PM EDT | Seth Borenstein and Jim Heintz
    For decades astronomers tried to prove Albert Einstein right by doing what Einstein thought was impossible: detecting the faint ripples in the universe called gravitational waves. They failed repeatedly until two years ago when they finally spotted one. Then another. And another. And another. Three American scientists — including one who initially flunked out of MIT — won the Nobel Prize in physics Tuesday that launched a whole new way to observe the cosmos. Sweden’s Royal Academy of Sciences cited the combination of highly advanced theory and ingenious equipment design in awarding Rainer Weiss of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology...
  • We’re About to Cross The ‘Quantum Supremacy’ Limit in Computing

    09/02/2017 4:48:55 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Gears of Biz ^ | September 3, 2017 | Helen Clark
    The 4th International Conference on Quantum Technologies held in Moscow last month was supposed to put the spotlight on Google, who were preparing to give a lecture on a 49-qubit quantum computer they have in the works. A morning talk presented by Harvard University’s Mikhail Lukin, however, upstaged that evening’s event with a small announcement of his own – his team of American and Russian researchers had successfully tested a 51-qubit device, setting a landmark in the race for quantum supremacy. Quantum computers are considered to be part of the next generation in revolutionary technology; devices that make use of...
  • Sound Pulses Exceed Speed of Light

    09/02/2017 12:06:20 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 39 replies
    Live Science ^ | January 12, 2007 | Charles Q. Choi
    A group of high school and college teachers and students has transmitted sound pulses faster than light travels—at least according to one understanding of the speed of light. The results conform to Einstein's theory of relativity, so don't expect this research to lead to sound-propelled spaceships that fly faster than light. Still, the work could help spur research that boosts the speed of electrical and other signals higher than before. The standard metric for the speed of light is that of light traveling in vacuum. This constant, known as c, is roughly 186,000 miles per second, or roughly one million...
  • Confirmed: Electrons Flowing Like Liquid in Graphene Are Insanely Superconductive

    08/23/2017 12:13:26 AM PDT · by Enchante · 43 replies
    Science Alert ^ | August 23, 2017 | Fiona MacDonald
    Electrons have been caught flowing through graphene like a liquid, reaching limits physicists thought were fundamentally impossible. This type of conductance is known as 'superballistic' flow, and this new experiment suggests it could revolutionise the way we conduct electricity. If that's not crazy enough, the super-fast flows actually occur as a result of electrons bouncing off each other, something that high school physics tells us should slow conductivity down.
  • Measuring The Speed Of Quantum Tunneling

    07/31/2017 8:20:26 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 9 replies
    Forbes ^ | 30 Jul, 2017 | Chad Orzel
    I've been wrapped up in writing a new book, so I didn't notice this right when it was published, but a couple of weeks ago there was a paper in Physical Review Letters titled Experimental Evidence for Quantum Tunneling Time that's worth a mention here. This is, as the title suggests, an investigation of one of the signature weird effects of quantum physics, namely the phenomenon of "tunneling" where a particle encountering a barrier can end up on the other side even though it doesn't have enough energy to get there by normal means. This was followed a few days...
  • The strange topology that is reshaping physics

    07/20/2017 7:04:36 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 16 replies
    Nature ^ | 18 Jul, 2017 | Davide Castelvecchi
    Topological effects might be hiding inside perfectly ordinary materials, waiting to reveal bizarre new particles or bolster quantum computing. Charles Kane never thought he would be cavorting with topologists. “I don't think like a mathematician,” admits Kane, a theoretical physicist who has tended to focus on tangible problems about solid materials. He is not alone. Physicists have typically paid little attention to topology — the mathematical study of shapes and their arrangement in space. But now Kane and other physicists are flocking to the field. In the past decade, they have found that topology provides unique insight into the physics...
  • Lawbreaking Particles May Point to a Previously Unknown Force in the Universe

    07/18/2017 7:46:52 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 38 replies
    Scientific American ^ | 17 Jul, 2017 | Jesse Dunietz
    Scientists aren’t yet certain that electrons and their relatives are violating the Standard Model of particle physics, but the evidence is mounting. For decades physicists have sought signs of misbehaving particles—evidence of subtle cracks in the “Standard Model” of particle physics, the dominant theory describing the most fundamental building blocks of our universe. Although the Standard Model has proved strikingly accurate, scientists have long known some adjustments will be needed. Now, as a recent review paper in Nature documents, experimenters have started seeing suggestions of particles flouting the theory—but they’re not quite the violations theorists were looking for. The evidence...
  • First ever Earth-orbit teleportation completed

    07/11/2017 7:12:10 PM PDT · by Ciaphas Cain · 49 replies
    Sky News ^ | July 11, 2017
    Scientists have completed the first teleportation of an object from Earth to a satellite orbiting more than 300 miles away. Alas, those of you expecting Scotty to beam them up soon will be sorely disappointed - the object teleported was merely a single photon. While the experiment doesn't bring us any closer to teleporting matter, it is a huge leap forward for quantum physics. The team of Chinese researchers behind the successful teleportation came together from a number of disciplines and included quantum physicists as well as rocket scientists. In 2016, they launched a satellite called Micius, named after Chinese...