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Keyword: science

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  • Supermassive black hole found in tiny galaxy, wowing researchers

    08/14/2018 6:31:50 PM PDT · by ETL · 36 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Aug 14, 2018 | Chris Ciaccia
    A supermassive black hole has been found at the center of a tiny galaxy, a rare find. What makes the discovery even more unique is that it has been located in an ultracompact dwarf galaxy, stunning researchers. The findings, published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, note that the galaxy Fornax UCD3 is part of a set called ultracompact dwarfs (UCDs), a very rare set of galaxies. "We have discovered a supermassive black hole in the center of Fornax UCD3," said the study's lead author, Anton Afanasiev, in a statement. "The black hole mass is 3.5 million...
  • Perseid Meteor Shower 2018 Peaks Tonight! How to Watch Online

    08/12/2018 12:12:54 PM PDT · by ETL · 30 replies
    Space.com ^ | August 12, 2018 | Elizabeth Howell, Space.com Contributor
    The peak of the summer's best meteor shower – the Perseids– peaks overnight tonight (Aug. 12), but you'll need good weather to see it. Just in case your night sky cloudy or hazy, you can check out the annual meteor shower on webcasts online by Slooh, NASA and the Virtual Telescope Project. You can watch the Perseid meteor shower webcast here, courtesy of the astronomy broadcast service Slooh. The 6-hour webcast begins at 5 p.m. EDT (2100 GMT) and you can watch it directly on Slooh.com. During the broadcast, viewers can use the hashtag #Slooh on social media to share...
  • Alien Life, Seth Shostak and SETI

    08/09/2018 11:10:20 AM PDT · by jcpryor · 16 replies
    The Chris Pryor Show ^ | 08/09/2018 | Chris Pryor
    Seth Shostak from SETI.org joined the Chris Pryor Show. Seth discussed current scientific attempts to discover intelligent life and the mechanisms involved in this search. Seth has a fantastic radio show of his own, Big Picture Science and it can be found here https://seti.org/education-outreach/big-picture-science-overview
  • Look Up! You Might Be Able to See a Green Comet Tonight

    08/07/2018 12:09:27 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 41 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | Aug 7, 2018 | By Temi Adebowale
    Viewing the Incredible Hulk with the naked eye may be a little tricky. Because the comet got so close to the sun and broke up from solar heat, it's rapidly fading from view. Also, thunderstorms and clouds in various parts of the country may impede vision of the comet. However, experts don't rule out another eruption in the coming days, which could make the comet brighter in the night sky. Additionally, Paul Chodas, the manager for the Center for Near-Earth Object Studies at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, told Live Science the comet may be visible later in August ― around...
  • True Colors of Pluto and Its Largest Moon Charon

    08/07/2018 8:49:37 AM PDT · by ETL · 36 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Aug 2, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    Marking the anniversary of New Horizons’ historic flight through the Pluto system on July 14, 2015, NASA released high-resolution natural-color images of Pluto and Charon. These color images result from refined calibration of data gathered by New Horizons’ Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC).The processing creates images that would approximate the colors that the human eye would perceive, bringing them closer to ‘true color’ than the images released near the encounter.The image of Pluto was taken as New Horizons zipped toward the dwarf planet and its moons on July 14, 2015, from a range of 22,025 miles (35,445 km).The striking features...
  • The Reengineering of the Common Tomato

    08/04/2018 4:25:08 PM PDT · by vannrox · 58 replies
    metallicman ^ | June 2018 | editorial staff
    Did you know that the tomato is a fruit? It actually is, you know. It certainly does not taste like one today. Though, it really used to. Tomatoes used to be sweet and delicious. That is, until the 1920’s in the United States. What in the world was going on then? All that damned “Progressivism” and trying to change America into a utopia ruled by a benevolent wealthy class. Nonsense. Oh, yes. They implemented the Federal income tax, and they banned alcohol and did all kinds of things (like giving the right to vote to woman) to turn the world...
  • HD 26965b: Super-Earth Found Just 16 Light-Years Away

    08/02/2018 1:53:13 PM PDT · by ETL · 75 replies
    Sci News ^ | July 30, 2018 | Natali Anderson
    Designated HD 26965b, the newly-detected alien world has a mass of 8.47 Earth masses and is located a mere 16 light-years away.This planet revolves around the bright K-class dwarf star HD 26965 once every 42.4 days.The host star is approximately 6.9 billion years old, has a mass about 78% of the Sun’s and a radius 87% as large.“HD 26965 is the primary of a very widely separated triple system. The other two companions are an M4 dwarf and a white dwarf,” said University of Florida astronomer Bo Ma and co-authors.“This star is a very bright metal poor star with an...
  • New radio telescope picks up mysterious signal from space

    08/02/2018 8:05:24 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 75 replies
    CNET ^ | July 31, 2018 9:57 PM PDT | Eric Mack
    A new radio telescope in Canada is doing its job picking up mysterious signals from deep space known as "fast radio bursts" (FRBs). The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) in British Columbia detected the first-ever FRB at frequencies below 700 MHz on July 25, a signal named FRB 180725A. As you might guess, FRBs are milliseconds-long bursts of radio emissions that come from some unknown source across the universe. They're one of the newer cosmic mysteries around, having been first detected only about a decade ago. Possible explanations include bursts from magnetars, exploding black holes, and yes, highly advanced...
  • Who discovered Mars, anyway? A look back at the history of the Red Planet

    07/31/2018 2:41:41 PM PDT · by ETL · 30 replies
    Space.com ^ | July 27, 2018 | Meghan Bartels, Space.com Senior Writer
    Who discovered Mars? That's a trick question: Because the planet is visible to the naked eye, humans have been watching our rusty neighbor for thousands of years, and there's no way to track down the name of the long-dead observer who first noticed its reddish glow. But just because we'll never be able to give that sharp-eyed human a name doesn't mean there's nothing interesting to learn about the history of observing Mars. That said, they didn't know what Mars was — it was just a bright light that didn't behave in quite the same way as the other bright...
  • CRISPR creates new species with single giant chromosome

    08/01/2018 5:09:32 PM PDT · by aimhigh · 32 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | 08/01/2018 | Antonio Regalado
    For at least the last 10 million years every yeast cell of the sort used to make beer or bread has had 16 chromosomes. But now—thanks to CRISPR technology and some DNA tinkerers in China—there are living yeast with just one. Genome organizer: We humans have our genes arranged on 46 chromosomes, yeast use 16, and there’s even a fern plant with 1260 of them. That’s just the way it is. And no one is quite sure why. The big one: Do we really need so many chromosomes? That’s what Zhogjun Qin and colleagues at the Key Laboratory of Synthetic...
  • I will convince you of a fact-based God in less than 1,500 words

    08/01/2018 10:24:15 AM PDT · by John Conlin · 73 replies
    personal blog and YouTube video ^ | 8/1/2018 | John Conlin
    Of Course God exists The Conlin Challenge - I will convince you of a fact-based, as opposed to a faith-based God in less than 1,500 words So you believe in science, eh? Excellent, so do I. One aspect of this scientific thinking is a laissez-faire attitude towards results. A person who truly follows a scientific-way of thinking shouldn’t care one way or the other about a certain experiment; they simply attempt to map reality and by definition must follow the facts wherever they lead. True followers of science are therefore immune to allowing personal biases to infect their professional thinking....
  • An Important Question for the Secular World: Why?

    08/01/2018 9:41:23 AM PDT · by Salvation · 9 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 07-31-18 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    An Important Question for the Secular World: Why? Msgr. Charles Pope • July 31, 2018 • One of the more common misunderstandings of the modern age—we might even call it a delusion— is confusing explanation with meaning. Using the scientific method and other empirical techniques, we have been able to explain many of the processes and mechanics of the natural world.To give explanation, however, is not the same as to ascribe meaning. To answer how things work is not the same as to answer why they do. Showing, for example, the wonderful symbiotic relationships involved in photosynthesis and describing...
  • Mars Terraforming Not Possible Using Present-Day Technology

    07/30/2018 3:44:07 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 90 replies
    NASA ^ | 7/30/18 | Bill Steigerwald / Nancy Jones
    July 30, 2018 RELEASE 18-13 Mars Terraforming Not Possible Using Present-Day Technology Science fiction writers have long featured terraforming, the process of creating an Earth-like or habitable environment on another planet, in their stories. Scientists themselves have proposed terraforming to enable the long-term colonization of Mars. A solution common to both groups is to release carbon dioxide gas trapped in the Martian surface to thicken the atmosphere and act as a blanket to warm the planet. However, Mars does not retain enough carbon dioxide that could practically be put back into the atmosphere to warm Mars, according to a new...
  • Remaking “Sharing Human Technology with Plants” with HEXA

    07/29/2018 10:04:22 PM PDT · by vannrox · 44 replies
    Vincross ^ | Sept 17 | TianqiVincross Staff
    Many of you have heard about “Sharing Human Technology with Plants,” an installation project of a walking succulent plant (to be precise, an Echeveria ‘Hakuhou’) I started at the end of 2014. It somehow caught Bob Xu’s attention, who later became Vincross’ first investor. It’s no exaggeration to say that without “Sharing Human Technology with Plants,” we wouldn’t have been able to create HEXA so quickly. So, after having built HEXA, I’d always wanted to remake the project using HEXA as its base. The idea has been brushed aside for the lack of time until very recently.The original idea...
  • Business students more likely to have a brain parasite spread by cats

    07/29/2018 5:30:16 AM PDT · by vannrox · 29 replies
    newscientist ^ | 25JUL18 | Editorial staff
    An analysis of students in the US has found that those who have a certain type of brain parasite are more likely to be majoring in business studies. Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite carried by cats. It can infect people through contact with cat faeces, poorly cooked meat, or contaminated water, and as many as one-third of the world’s population may be infected. The parasite doesn’t make us feel sick, but it forms cysts in the brain where it can remain for the rest of a person’s life. Some studies have linked infection with the parasite to slower reaction...
  • NASA's New Planet Hunter Begins Its Search for Alien Worlds

    07/28/2018 12:10:06 PM PDT · by ETL · 17 replies
    Space.com ^ | July 28, 2018 | Meghan Bartels, Space.com Senior Writer
    NASA's newest planet-hunting telescope is officially at work. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), which is designed to hunt for alien worlds around stars not too far from the sun, began gathering science data Wednesday (July 25), members of the instrument team announced yesterday (July 27). TESS will send that initial data to Earth in August, with new observations arriving every 13.5 days after that, mission team members said in a statement. "I'm thrilled that our planet hunter is ready to start combing the backyard of our solar system for new worlds," Paul Hertz, director of NASA's Astrophysics division, said...
  • National Geographic Admits 'Starving Polar Bear' Was a Bit of a Fraud

    07/28/2018 7:38:09 AM PDT · by Zakeet · 32 replies
    Independent Sentinel ^ | July 27, 2018 | S. Noble
    Remember that video of an emaciated Baffin Island polar bear that went viral last December? It became the poster bear for climate change. National Geographic made a stunning admission - it was a bit bogus. The Statement: National Geographic went too far in drawing a definitive connection between climate change and a particular starving polar bear in the opening caption of our video about the animal. We said, "This is what climate change looks like." While science has established that there is a strong connection between melting sea ice and polar bears dying off, there is no way to know...
  • Space stations, dark rituals and chorizo: how social media saw the blood moon

    07/27/2018 10:13:00 PM PDT · by blueplum · 3 replies
    The Guardian UK ^ | 27 Jul 2018 | Patrick Lum
    (photos at link) Amateur skywatchers and photographers from around the world – as well as the stargazing professionals – have sacrificed sleep to share spectacular images of the blood moon on social media. NASA put up a handy explainer (even though North and Central America were left out of the shade), and streamed the eclipse’s progress from a variety of planetariums across the world. Other space experts also made their contributions, including from the international space station. Meanwhile, earth-based photographers shared incredible shots...
  • The Massive Mars Dust Storm Is Starting to Die Down

    07/27/2018 7:19:37 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    space.com ^ | Mike Wall
    The dust is finally beginning to clear on Mars, but it'll probably still be a while before NASA's sidelined Opportunity rover can phone home. A global dust storm has enshrouded Mars for more than a month, plunging the planet's surface into perpetual darkness. That's complicated life significantly for the solar-powered Opportunity, which has apparently put itself into a sort of hibernation; the rover hasn't contacted its controllers since June 10. Scientists studying the storm "say that, as of Monday, July 23, more dust is falling out than is being raised into the planet's thin air," agency officials added. "That means...
  • Former astronaut doubts that NASA or SpaceX will make it to Mars with their shiny new rockets

    06/20/2018 12:51:12 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 57 replies
    BGR ^ | June 19th, 2018 at 10:52 AM | Mike Wehner
    Chris Hadfield, who flew to the International Space Station as part of the Canadian Space Agency, told Business Insider that making it to Mars is going to take technology that has yet to be conceived. Put simply, he doesn’t believe the new rockets being worked on by NASA, SpaceX, or Blue Origin have much chance of fulfilling their stated goals. “Personally, I don’t think any of those three rockets is taking people to Mars,” Hadfield said regarding the SpaceX Big Falcon Rocket, Blue Origin’s New Glenn, and NASA’s Space Launch System being constructed by Boeing. “I don’t think those are...