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Gushing reviews of the Chevy Volt
cars.com ^ | 4/7/12

Posted on 04/15/2012 9:04:00 PM PDT by DallasBiff

"My husband (JDHCalif) wrote a lengthy review and I wanted to add my 2 cents. We are actually now getting nearly 130mpg per day because his company installed an electrical outlet in his office parking area.

The car costs about $2 to fully charge at PG&E rates and each full charge takes the car about 45 miles. Even though we drive 130 mile+ daily commutes we are burning almost no gas...not insignificant in CA where gas is now $4.63 per gallon. The Volt is proving to be more than twice as economical as our Prius...and it drives so much better - even the regen brakes feel better. We are going to sell the Prius and get another fully loaded Volt for me (which net/net costs less than a comparably loaded new Prius)

(Excerpt) Read more at cars.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: chevy; gm; obama; volt
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To: Idaho_Cowboy

Call AAA? /:))


51 posted on 04/16/2012 1:25:35 AM PDT by jennings2004 (President Hayes, Mount Rushmore, telephone, Dear Leader...what a mix!)
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To: DallasBiff

On the public dole?


52 posted on 04/16/2012 2:16:05 AM PDT by monocle
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To: gunsequalfreedom

The new BMW 320 ed here in the UK market does a combined 68.9 MPG along with 0-60 in sub 8 seconds and 143mph top end, although UK gallons are a little larger than US ones, it’s still impressive.

I’m surprised diesels aren’t more popular in the US.

http://www.bmw.co.uk/bmwuk/pricesandspecifications_technical_specs/0,,1156_181265620__bs-Mw%3D%3D%40bb-RjMw%40bm-WjNBSg%3D%3D,00.html?tab=technicalSpec&isPGA=


53 posted on 04/16/2012 2:41:25 AM PDT by Caulkhead
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To: Secret Agent Man
If you overinflate your tires by about 30-35%, you can significantly improve mileage as you will reduce rolling resistance.

Just don't be surprised when your tires go bald in the center of the tread.

54 posted on 04/16/2012 2:56:16 AM PDT by Fresh Wind ('People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook.' Richard M. Nixon)
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To: Caulkhead
I’m surprised diesels aren’t more popular in the US

People remember the auto-destruct diesels that GM built back in the 80s, and they think that diesel cars still smell like a city bus.

55 posted on 04/16/2012 3:03:33 AM PDT by Fresh Wind ('People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook.' Richard M. Nixon)
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To: DallasBiff

“..and each full charge takes the car about 45 miles.”

Bullshit.
My company bought one to tear apart to ensure GM wasn’t further violating our patents and IP.

We’d drive it around and when we plugged it in, the dashboard read, “9 hours until recharge”. That was a 110 volt outlet. The 240v station was a little less than half of that.


56 posted on 04/16/2012 3:26:34 AM PDT by SJSAMPLE
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To: DallasBiff
If “gushing” is the term, it's more like the commode backing up. This reads like a propaganda piece from the White House telling the gullible they can pickup a turd by the clean end.
57 posted on 04/16/2012 4:14:52 AM PDT by MasterGunner01 (11)
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To: Secret Agent Man; ThunderSleeps
If you overinflate your tires by about 30-35%, you can significantly improve mileage as you will reduce rolling resistance, tire life, steering response and increase your stopping distance.
58 posted on 04/16/2012 5:00:46 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: gunsequalfreedom
If you want a fast car and about 42 mpg, this is it. Fun and fast.

Nice car, that Audi. I can fit my 6'2", 220-lb. self into it with relative ease (the seats slide *way* back. I just wish it was offered with a manual transmission, as it is in Europe.

59 posted on 04/16/2012 5:03:31 AM PDT by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
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To: Secret Agent Man

Debunking a Mileage Myth: Can You Really “Pump Up” Your Fuel Economy?
http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/news/4199963

The door placard on the Honda recommends 32 psi in all four tires. The sidewall says the maximum pressure for the tires is 50 psi. So for the trip to Arizona, we inflated the tires to 45 psi. We figured 5 psi under that maximum inflation pressure would reduce drag enough to boost our mileage by some measurable amount. Before reaching Phoenix’s West Valley, we were able to travel 394.1 miles, then filled up in Glendale with 9.34 gallons and recorded 42.19 mpg. That’s the best mileage we’ve recorded so far in this car.

Two days later, we dropped the pressure back down to the recommended 32 psi and pointed the Fit’s nose home toward L.A. This time, over the exact same route, at the same speeds, the Fit went 411.3 miles. At the Chevron station in Santa Monica, our Fit drank 9.76 gallons, translating into 42.14 mpg—nearly the exact same mileage.


60 posted on 04/16/2012 5:04:36 AM PDT by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: DallasBiff

I was leaving Knoxville on I 40, crusing about 70 in the middle lane when something flashed by on my right. It swerved to the left ahead of me and was pulling away. I saw the label...... it was a Volt . I tried to close but at 82, my computer controlled diesel mushes out.

The last I saw, it was heading on into the mountains toward Asheville. The Volt had Tennessee commercial tags, unusual for an automobile. The driver running in excess of 80 and heading into the mountains with a car having a 40 mile range showed confidence that I deemed not prudent


61 posted on 04/16/2012 5:09:54 AM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. +12 ..... Crucifixion is coming)
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To: Fresh Wind
People remember the auto-destruct diesels that GM built back in the 80s, and they think that diesel cars still smell like a city bus.

I think most American drivers now associate diesel with the German marques, but don't ponder the issue much beyond the prices they see posted at the filling stations.

There's one guy I see almost every week, pumping E85 into a late-'90s vintage Honda Accord. He doesn't know or care that his car wasn't built to take the stuff - it's just the cheapest fuel he can find.

I did see premium unleaded priced higher than diesel recently. That may have been the first time in over a decade I'd noticed that.

62 posted on 04/16/2012 5:19:49 AM PDT by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
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To: Revel

Anyone with a golf cart knows that the battery deteriorate much quicker when used in reality instead of the fake reviews.


63 posted on 04/16/2012 5:23:41 AM PDT by iopscusa (El Vaquero. (SC Lowcountry Cowboy))
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To: Charles Martel

It’s probably not so much the higher pump price of diesel fuel that bothers people, it’s the nagging fear of not being able to find a station that has it and getting stuck.

I’d worry much more about getting stuck with something like a Leaf.


64 posted on 04/16/2012 5:28:52 AM PDT by Fresh Wind ('People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook.' Richard M. Nixon)
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To: DallasBiff

For less than $16,000, we just bought a 2012 Nissan Versa. We’re averaging 45mpg city, about 40mpg highway (odd switcheroo). No gubmint subsidies went into the designing or marketing of our car. I absolutely guarantee that maintenance will be considerably less compared to the Volt. And I doubt if our car’s efficiency will seriously decline during Michigan’s long, cold winter months, which the Volt’s surely does.


65 posted on 04/16/2012 5:34:54 AM PDT by grellis (I am Jill's overwhelming sense of disgust.)
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To: DallasBiff

Notice (in the header)there is no mention of how long it took to charge the little piece of poop.


66 posted on 04/16/2012 7:36:01 AM PDT by DH (Once the tainted finger of government touches anything the rot begins)
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To: Pikachu_Dad
[They get] about 22.5 miles per dollar....

...I get about 40 miles for every $7.50 or 20 miles for every $3.70...

I can't tell if you're arguing for or against the Volt. By your math they're getting 22.5 miles per dollar while you're only getting 5.4.

67 posted on 04/16/2012 7:49:54 AM PDT by Yardstick
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To: Charles Martel
There's one guy I see almost every week, pumping E85 into a late-'90s vintage Honda Accord.

Wow. I can't believe that the car made it past week 2 doing that. One would think that all the rubber in the fuel system would be long gone unless the dude took the time to replace all of it with something that can handle the corrosive nature of Ethanol. I have read of a guy with a 90's vintage Cavalier that he retrofitted so that he could use the cheaper E85. It is doable.

68 posted on 04/16/2012 8:49:45 AM PDT by Lazlo in PA (Now living in a newly minted Red State.)
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To: Myrddin
I'm pretty sure the connection to Fry's power socket was done without permission. The slug even left the weatherproof cover open as he slinked away in his plug-in. Thief.

I've got a hunch that someone out there has started a listing of unattended, hot AC outlet locations. Sort of like the "wardriving" WiFi lists.

Back around 2004 or so, two of those glorifed golf cart type plug-in electric "urban cars" began appearing in my office building's garage. The drivers would arrive very early and park in the spaces by the wall outlets. After a month or so, the weird little cars were no longer seen.

One day I mentioned it in passing to one of the building maintenance guys, who informed me that the management had noticed it too and they killed the power to those outlets. It wasn't so much the electricity cost (a drop in the bucket, in those circumstances) as it was the fact that the drivers didn't ask permission or offer to pay. So, no more electricity for them.

69 posted on 04/16/2012 8:49:50 AM PDT by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
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To: Lazlo in PA
Wow. I can't believe that the car made it past week 2 doing that.

It is possible that the owner made the necessary fuel system mods; a '90s Accord would be easy enough to figure out. I'm not sure about the engine control computer, though - maybe there's a tuner out there that can reprogram the injector pulses to approximate E85 settings.

To look at the car, though, you wouldn't think the guy was putting any money into it.

70 posted on 04/16/2012 9:05:09 AM PDT by Charles Martel (Endeavor to persevere...)
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To: antiRepublicrat

That is not how I understand the Volt. It has a gasoline engine also after the battery dies, so you may still need tune ups and oil changes.


71 posted on 04/16/2012 9:43:50 AM PDT by entropy12 (I believe in American exceptional-ism.)
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To: antiRepublicrat

I am not familiar with Nissan Leaf. If it is a pure electric, with no gasoline backup, then of course you are right...mechanically it is a simpler design.


72 posted on 04/16/2012 9:47:54 AM PDT by entropy12 (I believe in American exceptional-ism.)
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To: Caulkhead
I’m surprised diesels aren’t more popular in the US.

Until recently I think we had a phobia against diesels due to government dislike of the fuel. But, they are catching on in the passenger car market due to power and mpg.

We also have GM to blame for some apprehension about diesel. It's conversion of a 350 ci gasoline engine to diesel that blew up at 30,000 miles left a bad impression in some people's minds. GM, by the way, does not stand for Good Merchandise.

My next car will be a turbo diesel.

73 posted on 04/16/2012 10:59:13 AM PDT by gunsequalfreedom (Conservative is not a label of convenience. It is a guide to your actions.)
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To: entropy12
I have a friend who purchased a Leaf and the special fancy charger system for his home. The car arrived a week before the charger. After driving a bit, the car was sitting in the driveway with insufficient power to go anywhere. Absent the charger, he tried the 110 VAC charger cable. It blew the breaker in the garage that normally serves his washing machine. He was a very unhappy new Leaf owner with an expensive paperweight in the driveway. He hasn't had any complaints since getting the new charger. He did have thoughts of installing a solar electric system, but I'm not sure that is a winning proposition.
74 posted on 04/16/2012 11:58:49 AM PDT by Myrddin
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To: Charles Martel
It's a drop in the bucket for an occasional thief. Not so if lots of vampires appear on your sockets. Getting a policy in place to keep exterior sockets powered off is something you need to do now to discourage the thieves. Adding keyed access for authorized users e.g. gardening contractors is a possibility. A sign stating that electricity thieves will be towed is another solution. If you're charging without an authorized placard on the dashboard...away you go.
75 posted on 04/16/2012 12:04:01 PM PDT by Myrddin
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To: I still care

Please elaborate on the battery replacement. What is causing the failures?


76 posted on 04/16/2012 12:34:35 PM PDT by Clay Moore (The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of a fool to the left. Ecclesiastes 10:2)
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To: DallasBiff

Did you run them over?


77 posted on 04/16/2012 3:00:19 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Money cannot buy happiness, but it's more comfortable to cry in a Mercedes than on a bicycle.)
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To: chris37

Maybe the deductible for the battery is $1500.


78 posted on 04/16/2012 4:01:28 PM PDT by US_MilitaryRules (Unnngh! To many PDS people!)
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To: entropy12
That is not how I understand the Volt. It has a gasoline engine also after the battery dies, so you may still need tune ups and oil changes.

Thus my negative comment about hybrids.

79 posted on 04/16/2012 9:00:16 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: Myrddin

For me, a night’s charge at home for the Leaf would easily take care of my commute and any regular errands I run in town. I like the idea in a pure economic sense. I ran the numbers about six months ago, and it came to 99 mpg equivalent at my electricity cost and the price gas was at that point. It would be even better now. All of that driving is city, so regenerative braking and lack of idling in traffic would give me a big boost beyond that. Add maintenance savings cost and giving up the time to do it, and it’s looking pretty tempting.

But that’s specifically for my case. Your Mileage May Vary — literally. It could be a complete non-starter for you.


80 posted on 04/16/2012 9:02:34 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: DallasBiff

Why would I spend $41k on a Volt when I could spend (just by way of example—this isn’t mine) 6k for 27 mpg and bank the difference?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Ford-Thunderbird-SPORT-1988-FORD-THUNDERBIRD-SPORT-/261003326286?pt=US_Cars_Trucks&hash=item3cc502b34e


81 posted on 04/16/2012 9:23:12 PM PDT by Windcatcher (Obama is a COMMUNIST and the MSM is his armband-wearing propaganda machine.)
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To: gunsequalfreedom
My next car will be a turbo diesel.

I've ridden in the Volkswagen/Audi (same thing) TDi diesels, 2.0 and 2.5, and they are very sweet. This isn't your dad's old no-rev smoker. A VW Golf with that 2.0 six-speed is pretty quick and gets 30/40 mpg. Too bad the US still hates diesels, because you can get a GTD version of that engine in Germany with more power and lots more torque.

For small commuters, I really feel gipped over here. Over there you can get a VW Polo diesel 1.2 (75 hp) that gets 50/70 mpg. With diesel costing less than gas over there, why bother with electrics?

82 posted on 04/16/2012 9:25:20 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat
My current commute is 7 miles to work. Places I like to shop are almost 20 miles out. A visit home to Pocatello....925 miles. Non-starter. My Kawasaki Versys yields 53 MPG. It is perfectly suited to any commuting tasks. I fire up the F150 4x4 on rainy days.

At home in Pocatello, the city is small enough that I could get around with a Leaf. That falls apart if I want to go to the bookstore. The nearest bookstore is 53 miles north in Idaho Falls. Freeway speeds are 75 MPH. My favorite place to visit Spring -> Fall is Yellowstone National Park. 154 miles to the west entrance. The one-way distance from the west entrance to Old Faithful is 30 miles. Non-starter distances. Winter temperatures and snow add a new dimension to the Leaf. The battery capacity is severely impacted by cold temperatures. Having to run the heater and a cold battery are a recipe for an early dirt nap.

83 posted on 04/16/2012 11:12:35 PM PDT by Myrddin
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To: Kickass Conservative; Clay Moore

I’ll check it out and get back to you.


84 posted on 04/17/2012 12:02:18 AM PDT by I still care (I miss my friends, bagels, and the NYC skyline - but not the taxes. I love the South.)
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To: Myrddin
Having to run the heater and a cold battery are a recipe for an early dirt nap.

I have to give Nissan credit, unlike others that just publish big numbers, they also published lower scenario numbers. I believe the range in the worst scenario was cut to around 60 miles. In really cold climates you can get a battery heater option. Yes it uses power to heat the battery, but that gets out more than is used.

But for me on a 100+ degree day running the AC it would still do what I need. It could handle probably 90% of my driving habits, and I have a van for the rest.

85 posted on 04/17/2012 5:38:58 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat
Mid Spring to mid Fall is air conditioner season in eastern Idaho. I wait until 8:30 PM to mow the lawn in July. The oppressive heat is backing off and there is direct sunlight until 9:13 PM. You need air conditioning in the car during the day. That's why my hybrid (2008 Mercury Mariner) never gets better than about 26 MPG combined average over all seasons.

The plug-in car is going to have appeal to a narrow range of customers. It simply doesn't fit my needs...and I'm not willing to hack back my choices to fit within its limits.

86 posted on 04/17/2012 9:25:45 AM PDT by Myrddin
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