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Obituaries in the News..Col. Francis Gabreski
AP ^ | 2/1/02 | AP

Posted on 02/01/2002 5:17:57 PM PST by TomServo

NEW YORK (AP) - Retired Col. Francis "Gabby" Gabreski, who for many years was known as "America's Greatest Living Ace," died Thursday after suffering a heart attack at his home in Dix Hills, on Long Island. He was 83.

Gabreski, who recorded 37 1/2 kills as a fighter pilot in both World War II and the Korean War, joined the Army Air Corps in 1941. Throughout the war, Gabreski was credited with a record 31 kills in WWII. He added 6 1/2 more kills during the Korean War, his daughter said.

After WWII, Gabreski spent several years in flight testing and in command of fighter units before being assigned as commander of the 51st Fighter Wing. He helped develop tactics for jet fighters and shot down 6 1/2 MiG-15s between July 1951 and April 1952.

After his military career, he worked in the aviation industry and later served as president of the Long Island Rail Road.

Gabreski wrote about his military career in his autobiography, "Gabby, A Fighter Pilot's Life."

A member of the National Aviation Hall of Fame, an airport in Westhampton Beach on eastern Long Island bears his name.


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Another great Fighter and Patriot. Gone, but definitely not forgotten.
1 posted on 02/01/2002 5:17:57 PM PST by TomServo
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To: TomServo
For a pretty nice bio of Col. Gabreski, click here.
2 posted on 02/01/2002 5:22:08 PM PST by TomServo
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To: TomServo
Another great Fighter and Patriot. Gone, but definitely not forgotten.

Does anyone know if Col Robin Olds is still alive? I am pretty sure he was an ace in WW11, Korea and Vietnam.

3 posted on 02/01/2002 5:23:32 PM PST by Mark17
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To: TomServo
37.5 kills?

You sure about that?

(reminds me of a joke I heard once. Jeenie offers a guy some wishes, but whatever he get's his ex-wife get's double.. He wishes for a sports car, millions in cash and to be beaten half to death.)

4 posted on 02/01/2002 5:23:33 PM PST by Jhoffa_
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To: Mark17
Does anyone know if Col Robin Olds is still alive?

Do a google search for 'Robin Olds'. Several sources will pop up.

5 posted on 02/01/2002 5:30:37 PM PST by TomServo
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To: Jhoffa_
to be beaten half to death

LOL!!!!

6 posted on 02/01/2002 5:31:16 PM PST by TomServo
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To: TomServo
Godspeed, Colonel.

High Flight

Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
Sunward I've climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things
You have not dreamed of - wheeled and soared and swung
High in the sunlit silence. Hov'ring there
I've chased the shouting wind along, and flung
My eager craft through footless halls of air.
Up, up the long delirious, burning blue,
I've topped the windswept heights with easy grace
Where never lark, or even eagle flew -
And, while with silent lifting mind I've trod
The high unsurpassed sanctity of space,
Put out my hand and touched the face of God.

- John Gillespie Magee, jr.

7 posted on 02/01/2002 5:32:41 PM PST by Joe 6-pack
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To: Joe 6-pack
Thanks, Joe...
8 posted on 02/01/2002 5:36:12 PM PST by TomServo
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To: commiesout
get away from slivovitz thread!! now!!! also Malark and Grouch!
9 posted on 02/01/2002 5:40:24 PM PST by dennisw
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To: Mark17
I don't know about WWII or Korea, but I recall reading that he missed becoming an ace in Vietnam when the AIM-4s on his Phantom II failed on what would have been a sure Sidewinder kill.

He was a great tactician who, in one classic engagement, lured MiGs to attack Phantoms that were flying F-105 flight profiles. That was a very unpleasant and costly surprise for the MiGs.

10 posted on 02/01/2002 5:51:32 PM PST by cayuga
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To: TomServo
This is very sad. Gabreski has always been a hero of mine. The greatest pilot in the greatest airplane (P-47) of the Second World War. God Bless You, Sir. It was an honor to walk on the same planet as you.
11 posted on 02/01/2002 5:51:41 PM PST by Skooz
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To: All
This one really hurts. My heart is just broken over his death. When I was in the AF, he was still talked about and studied.
12 posted on 02/01/2002 6:01:16 PM PST by TomServo
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To: TomServo
By John L. Frisbee, Contributing Editor

Gabby

After a shaky start, he became one of the greatest fighter pilots this country has produced.

All of us, in uniform or not, can learn much from the career of Col. Francis S. "Gabby" Gabreski. He was, as most readers know, the leading US ace in the World War II European theater and is now the top living American ace, with 34.5 victories. He was not a born fighter pilot--if there is such a thing--but a man who reached the pinnacle of his profession by determination, dedication, and intelligence. His aggressive nature and competitive spirit were tempered by personal charm, good humor, and what Col. Hubert A. "Hub" Zemke noted as Gabreski's "natural exuberance."

Born of Polish immigrant parents in Oil City, Pa., he grew up bilingual, a fact that influenced the development of his Air Force career and probably saved his life many years later. While he worked his way through college at Notre Dame, he became interested in airplanes and used the few dollars he could spare for flying lessons. He did not excel. After his second year in college, he joined the Army Air Forces and squeaked through primary pilot training after being recommended for elimination by his instructor. Determination and faith in his ability got him through and, after graduation, to an assignment at Wheeler Field, Hawaii.

At Wheeler, Gabreski met Catherine Cochran, who later would become his wife. Their romance was interrupted on Dec. 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. As soon as the rubble could be cleared from the field, Gabby took off in an obsolete P-36 in pursuit of the departing enemy but too late to shoot or to be shot at by anyone other than trigger-happy Yanks on the ground.

Gabreski spent the next several months perfecting his flying. After several requests for a combat assignment were turned down, he tried another tack. Since he spoke fluent Polish, why not an assignment with one of the Polish squadrons flying with the RAF? After many delays, he was posted to the Polish-manned 315th Squadron at Northolt in the UK. The 315th was delighted to see him and gave him operational training in Spitfires, under combat conditions.

After some weeks with the Polish squadron, Gabreski was assigned to Zemke's 56th Fighter Group, flying P-47 Thunderbolts. The group was still in training, so Gabreski held an edge in operational experience when they entered combat in April 1943. Much to his disappointment, he flew several missions when no enemy airplanes were sighted, and by chance he was not on the board when the 56th did find targets. His frustration ended on August 24, 1943, when he scored his first victory. From that day on, victories came frequently, often by doubles and triples, until he led both the group and all AAF fighter pilots in the theater.

In his book, Gabby, A Fighter Pilot's Life, he describes the mission of Dec. 11, 1943, as the most exciting of his tour in Europe. Then a major, he was leading a squadron of P-47s on an escort mission. When they rendezvoused with the bombers, the B-17s were under attack by 40 Bf-110s. In the melee, Gabreski became separated from the rest of the squadron and found himself perilously alone at 30,000 feet, when he spotted three more Bf-110s below him. Diving to the attack, he shot down one of them.

By this time, Gabby's fuel was getting low and he was heading for home, when he was attacked by a single Bf-109 coming up from below. Clearly, this man was a hunter with serious intent. Not having enough fuel to mix it up with an aggressive enemy, Gabreski decided the best tactic was to run his pursuer out of ammunition. This would call for very precise timing and maneuvering. Twice, he eluded the -109 with steep climbing turns as it began to fire. The third time, his opponent got a hit that shot off one of Gabby's rudder pedals and creased his boot. The P-47 lost power due to a damaged turbocharger. Gabreski was about to bail out when he noted that his engine was producing enough power to keep him in the game. But there was no way he could survive unless he could reach a cloud bank below. The enemy pilot followed, but Gabby finally lost him and turned for the UK, hoping he had enough fuel to make it across the North Sea. He landed at Manston, on the English coast, just as his engine quit.

Several months later, after he completed 193 missions, the Air Force sent him home. While waiting to board the plane that would fly him to the US, Gabreski discovered that a mission was scheduled for that morning. He took his bags off the transport and wangled permission to "fly just one more." While strafing an enemy airfield, his prop hit a rise at the end of the field and he was forced to belly-in. He eluded the enemy for five days. During his run for freedom, he encountered a Polish-speaking forced laborer whom he persuaded to bring him food and water, but he finally was captured and was a POW at Stalag Luft I in Germany for eight months until the war ended.

After the war, Gabreski spent several years in flight testing and in command of fighter units before he succeeded in getting an assignment to Korea as commander of the 51st Fighter Wing. He played a major role in developing tactics for a new kind of war-a jet war-and shot down 6.5 MiG-15s between July 1951 and April 1952. He is one of only seven USAF pilots who were aces in both World War II and the Korean War. He ended a distinguished Air Force career as commander of several tactical and air defense wings before launching another successful career with the aviation industry and as president of the Long Island Rail Road.

No aspiring fighter pilot can become a 34.5-victory ace by reading about Gabby Gabreski's combat career, but his unflagging determination to reach the top of his profession is an inspiration for all.

Published July 1997. Some Valor articles have been amended for accuracy for presentation on this web site.Source

13 posted on 02/01/2002 6:08:07 PM PST by Tennessee_Bob
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To: TomServo

I thought a Missing Man formation might be appropriate.

14 posted on 02/01/2002 6:08:38 PM PST by Tennessee_Bob
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To: Tennessee_Bob
Thanks!...
15 posted on 02/01/2002 6:08:51 PM PST by TomServo
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To: TomServo
I did that search, and it did come up. I also thought you might be interested in seeing the Travis AFB Museum. I live only 5 miles from there, and retired as a USAF Msgt, in 1987.

http://aeroweb.brooklyn.cuny.edu/museums/ca/tafm.htm

16 posted on 02/01/2002 6:10:37 PM PST by Mark17
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To: TomServo
I would guess just about all of the WWII aces are either gone or close to it.

I heard a few months ago that the all time ace of aces, Erich Hartmann had died. I think his total was 352 although I think Gabreski actually shot down more per mission, (Hartmann flew over 1000 missions).

A few years ago I got to meet one of my boyhood heroes, General Robert L. Scott. He was not a disappointment! Still had that charisma and sense of humor which so many Southerners of his era have. I also heard a few months ago that he is still alive tho in his 90's.

17 posted on 02/01/2002 6:13:09 PM PST by yarddog
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To: Mark17
Thanks...and thanks for your Service to our Country.
18 posted on 02/01/2002 6:14:37 PM PST by TomServo
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To: Mark17
The United States had only two aces in Vietnam; Randy Cunningham and Steve Ritchie.
19 posted on 02/01/2002 6:14:59 PM PST by SMEDLEYBUTLER
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To: Tennessee_Bob
Beautiful. Thanks TB...
20 posted on 02/01/2002 6:15:23 PM PST by TomServo
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER
Randy Cunningham

A very bad dude to mix it up with..all missile Ace, if I remember correctly.

21 posted on 02/01/2002 6:17:37 PM PST by TomServo
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To: TomServo

Rest in Peace, Gabby.

22 posted on 02/01/2002 6:17:45 PM PST by SMEDLEYBUTLER
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To: cayuga
Ahhh, yes. Operation Bolo. Imagine the surprise felt by the MiG pilots...
23 posted on 02/01/2002 6:22:09 PM PST by hchutch
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To: dennisw
Don't panic, dude. We can fly even after 250 grams of grain alcohol.

At Maxwell, Gabby almost washed out again, this time for fainting at early morning parade when he badly hung over. He compounded the problem by not immediately explaining his reason for passing out. From the Army's point of view, a pilot who fainted for no apparent reason was an unacceptable risk, while one who fainted because he was hung over was merely a mild disciplinary issue. But before it got to expulsion, Gabreski coughed up the actual reason, and apart from some extra guard duty and other punishments, escaped further repercussions.
Good Man and Patriot. R.I.P.
24 posted on 02/01/2002 6:22:25 PM PST by CommiesOut
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER
The United States had only two aces in Vietnam; Randy Cunningham and Steve Ritchie.

I remember seeing an interview with Ritchie, but was this Cuningham the Navy guy who was a POW, and later a congressman?

25 posted on 02/01/2002 6:22:38 PM PST by Mark17
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To: Jhoffa_
Yep. It was standard to credit partial kills like .5 when two pilots jointly claimed one plane.
26 posted on 02/01/2002 6:24:54 PM PST by pfflier
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To: TomServo
All missile ace. And kill number five was a guy named Colonel Tomb. Tomb had shot down seventeen American planes before Cunningham took him down in an epic dogfight.

Cunningham's still around. Serving in Congress, IIRC.

27 posted on 02/01/2002 6:25:12 PM PST by hchutch
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER
I went to Junior College with a girl named Darla Ritchie who was miss teen USA or something like that. Her husband was a pilot at Eglin AFB.

I wonder if she is the wife of Steve Ritchie?

28 posted on 02/01/2002 6:26:36 PM PST by yarddog
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To: pfflier
OH!

Okay, thanks for clearing that up..

29 posted on 02/01/2002 6:26:41 PM PST by Jhoffa_
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To: TomServo
Speaking of WW2 aces, I suppose you all saw the indignity visited on Joe Foss a few days back....
30 posted on 02/01/2002 6:27:17 PM PST by Snickersnee
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To: Mark17
McCain was the POW.

Duke had to punch out, but our SAR guys recovered him.

31 posted on 02/01/2002 6:29:55 PM PST by hchutch
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To: Mark17
Does anyone know if Col Robin Olds is still alive? I am pretty sure he was an ace in WW11, Korea and Vietnam.

He was an ace in WWII and Vietnam. He 'flew a desk' during the Korean war.

32 posted on 02/01/2002 6:30:37 PM PST by Jen
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To: Snickersnee
I'm sorry, I must have missed that. Please advise.
33 posted on 02/01/2002 6:33:52 PM PST by Skooz
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER
The United States had only two aces in Vietnam; Randy Cunningham and Steve Ritchie.

Partly correct. They are the only two 'pilot' aces. The F-4 is a two-seater and the Weapons Systems Officers in the backseat are also given credit for kills. I interviewed WSO Chuck DeBellevue, the leading ace of Vietnam (with six kills - Ritchie and Cunningham have five each), for an article I wrote for my base's newspaper. I think there are three WSO aces, but not sure of that number.

34 posted on 02/01/2002 6:36:09 PM PST by Jen
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER
The United States had only two aces in Vietnam; Randy Cunningham and Steve Ritchie.

Not true!!! They were the pilots who achieved ace status. Their rear seaters (W. Driscoll and C. de Bellevue respectively) and another AF GIB named J. Feinstein (no relation) received credit also for the kills. Five aces total.

35 posted on 02/01/2002 6:37:20 PM PST by pfflier
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To: TomServo
bump
36 posted on 02/01/2002 6:44:44 PM PST by Red Jones
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To: all
Respected by His Enemies .. a fine epitath .. God Bless this Patriot and this country
37 posted on 02/01/2002 6:45:11 PM PST by NormsRevenge
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To: hchutch
Tomb had shot down seventeen American planes before Cunningham took him down in an epic dogfight.

I remember now! Saw it on the history channel. Ahhh...great show!

38 posted on 02/01/2002 6:46:16 PM PST by TomServo
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To: TomServo
History Channel rocks !!!
Its hard to fudge old war film .. they have some great stuff
39 posted on 02/01/2002 6:48:18 PM PST by NormsRevenge
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To: Tennessee_Bob
I thought a Missing Man formation might be appropriate.

Very much so. Thank you.

So few remain... Joe Foss, if you're reading this, you'll have to live to a hale and hearty 100. At least.

For God and Country, DD

40 posted on 02/01/2002 6:50:07 PM PST by Denver Ditdat
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To: Skooz
I'm sorry, I must have missed that. Please advise.

Right here. Sickening.

41 posted on 02/01/2002 6:59:15 PM PST by TomServo
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To: AFVetGal
He was an ace in WWII and Vietnam. He 'flew a desk' during the Korean war.

Well, you are right. I did a google search and saw for myself, but hey, I was only a senior NCO, air traffic controller, they never asked me my opinion about anything. One good thing, I retired before you did. (smile) By 1995, I was working in a level 2 open dorm setting, just trying to stay alive.

42 posted on 02/01/2002 7:11:33 PM PST by Mark17
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To: Mark17
air traffic controller

Something in common. You were GCA and I was GCI (tech, not controller). What a blast!!

43 posted on 02/01/2002 7:20:17 PM PST by TomServo
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To: TomServo
You were GCA and I was GCI (tech, not controller). What a blast!!

I never saw a GCA. They were pretty much a thing of the past when I entered the ATC field (1968) We had radar, but it was far more sophisticated than GCA, and today, it is even better. I spent 13 years in the tower, and only 3 in radar, and 4 years in Terps, which was the most fun I had my whole career.

44 posted on 02/01/2002 7:30:37 PM PST by Mark17
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To: TomServo
Something in common. You were GCA and I was GCI (tech, not controller). What a blast!!

And another thing, if I am not mistaken, you guys tried to run airplanes together, while we tried to keep them apart.

45 posted on 02/01/2002 7:31:55 PM PST by Mark17
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To: Mark17
Nice to meet another Air Force retiree! I was a public affairs specialist, then later a public affairs officer.
46 posted on 02/01/2002 7:34:13 PM PST by Jen
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER
Boy, that's a picture of a job well done.

Rest in Peace, Colonel!

47 posted on 02/01/2002 7:36:27 PM PST by The KG9 Kid
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To: AFVetGal; pfflier
The policy of giving WSO's equal credit for kills in Vietnam was made by General John T. Ryan and was a change to the Air Force's standing policy. I've never seen anything official that the Navy bestowed "ace" status upon their RIO, Driscoll, who was in the back for Cunninghams five kills. Had you interviewed Steve Ritchie, instead of de Bellevue, you'd have gotten a different story.

I met Ritchie and his wife at the museum on the former Lowery Air Force Base on 8 July 1997. He signed a copy of a Lou Drendel print for me so I'm certain of the date. I asked him what he thought about WSO's being given "ace" status and he said "That's bulls***!" I talked to him for a good half hour and that's the one quote that I can remember verbatim. A statement that emphatic sticks in your mind. To paraphrase the rest of our conversation he said that de Bellevue gave him vectors to the target and didn't do much more than that. He didn't fly the plane and he didn't shoot the missiles. Most aviation references to de Bellevue, Feinstein and Driscoll put the obligatory asterisk next to their names on the ace roster. The Air Force and de Bellevue may consider him an ace, but the guy who flew the plane doesn't.

48 posted on 02/01/2002 7:41:12 PM PST by SMEDLEYBUTLER
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER
Very sad day rest in peace Gabby

One of Gabby's "Jug" P47


49 posted on 02/01/2002 7:41:31 PM PST by tophat9000
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To: AFVetGal
Nice to meet another Air Force retiree! I was a public affairs specialist, then later a public affairs officer.

Roger that. I assume you must have made 0-6? One thing I wanted to mention. It seems with most retired officers, that many of them wish to be called by their rank. My uncle was a retired Army Major, and he sure did. Us enlisted pukes would verbally throttle anyone who calls us by our retired rank. I wonder why the difference?

50 posted on 02/01/2002 7:42:51 PM PST by Mark17
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