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Free Pocket Constitution available from CATO institute.
Cato Institute | 5/13/02 | P8riot

Posted on 05/13/2002 7:38:50 AM PDT by P8riot

Just found out from a friend that the CATO institute is offering a free pocket Constitution and Declaration of Independence (no shipping either). Great to have with you when you get into one of those heated arguments with left wing wackos. Here's the link. Do it if you want to. It'll probably get you on their mailing list though.


TOPICS: Announcements; Constitution/Conservatism
KEYWORDS: cato; constitution
In case anyone is interested.
1 posted on 05/13/2002 7:38:51 AM PDT by P8riot
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To: P8riot
Bump for later.
2 posted on 05/13/2002 7:43:18 AM PDT by Bikers4Bush
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To: P8riot
If you would like your mailbox JAM PACKED with junk mail solicitations for money from every cause under God's Great Sun, ask for this pocket Constitition.

Or, you could write your Congressman, who will send you one (and they already have your address).

3 posted on 05/13/2002 7:46:51 AM PDT by Vladiator
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To: P8riot
I have one here on my desk right now. It's a very nice little reference.
4 posted on 05/13/2002 7:46:51 AM PDT by riley1992
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To: P8riot
What parts do they leave out to make it pocket size?
5 posted on 05/13/2002 7:49:06 AM PDT by BikerNYC
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To: P8riot
I suggest the "Citizens Rule Book"

Whitten Printers, (602)-258-6406

It contains the Declaration of Independance, the Constitution and BOR, and a Handbook for jurors (info from the Fully Informed Jurors Association (FIJA).

There is a small cost for this pocket sized booklet.

Thanks for the post. Constitutional ignorance is widespread.

Regards

J.R.

6 posted on 05/13/2002 7:50:52 AM PDT by NMC EXP
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Comment #7 Removed by Moderator

To: BikerNYC
They only included the parts the government pays attention to anymore, so its just the size of a postage stamp.
8 posted on 05/13/2002 8:21:50 AM PDT by Wolfie
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To: P8riot
It'll probably get you on their mailing list though.

BTTT, but I'm on enough mailing lists as it is!
They say "free", but the cost is that you get inundated with solicitations.

9 posted on 05/13/2002 8:25:40 AM PDT by Constitution Day
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To: BikerNYC
It is remarkable how simple our system of limited government is supposed to be.

The entire Declaration of Independence and Constitution (with its ammendments) fits nicely, and at in very readable typeface, in a tiny book.

10 posted on 05/13/2002 8:34:49 AM PDT by krb
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To: BikerNYC
What parts do they leave out to make it pocket size?

My guess is they simply "revised" it to read:

We the Stockholders of the United States, in order to form a more perfect market, establish global profitablity, insure domestic subservience, provide for increased dividends, promote capital gains, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves, do ordain and establish this Mission Statement for the United States of America.

Etc. Etc. (The rest of us aren't supposed to see the fine print.)

11 posted on 05/13/2002 8:47:13 AM PDT by Willie Green
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To: P8riot
I bought a few hundred of both The Citizens's Rule Book and the Cato Constitution booklets to hand out in a 4th of July parade last year.

I decided not to use The Citizen's Rule Book and hence did not pass them out. I still have a big box of them. The reason I didn't like them was because I thought they were too political and not appropriate for my purposes. Although I agree with the politics in The Citizen's Rule Book, I thought they were too preachy and could be inflamitory. The Cato Books were just the facts, without commentary in a more professional looking package. It is 58 pages.

I also donated a bunch of the Cato Books to all the 5th graders at my daughter's school. (5th grade is where they learn about the Constitution.)

The Citizen's Rule book certainly has it's place. Sometimes you want a little propaganda in the mix, sometimes you don't.

12 posted on 05/13/2002 9:00:23 AM PDT by pjd
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To: P8riot
Free? I paid $5 for mine last year. I stuffed stockings with them.
13 posted on 05/13/2002 9:55:47 AM PDT by Britton J Wingfield
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To: P8riot

I get copies of the pocket Constitution like the one pictured above for 50 cents each from:

Betty Cordoba
Center for Teaching the Constitution
P.O. Box 5118
San Marcos, CA 92079

Tell Betty that Joe Brower sent ya.

I bought 150 of them at the beginning of the school year last September and gave them to the Marine Corps JROTC unit at the high school here in Venice, Florida. Every kid got one. By doing that, I've "broken the ice" with the Colonel in charge of the unit, and I'm already scheduled to come in as a "guest instructor" next year and expound on this, the greatest of all political documents ever written.

I'm going to buy a couple hundred more in the next few days so as to have a stock on hand for this coming 4th of July, where I will don my tricorn hat, colonial woodsman's vest, and canvas haversack, and carry these along the parade route, handing them out to anyone and everyone who wants one, along with some JPFO "Gran'pa Jack" booklets on the Bill of Rights. Just call me Johnny Appleseed -- you never know what will grow where. Should be a fun day!

I offer the above approaches in American "evangelism" for the consideration of any and all Freepers to try in their own communities. It's not at all difficult, and can be rather fun!


14 posted on 05/13/2002 1:58:33 PM PDT by Joe Brower
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Comment #15 Removed by Moderator

To: BikerNYC
Nothing is left out; it is the whole Constitution and the whole Declaration.

And for those of you freaking out about receiving solicitations as a consequence: if you want to support the mission of Cato, send money. If you don't, ask to be removed from their mailing list. Simple as that.

16 posted on 05/13/2002 5:08:42 PM PDT by austinTparty
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To: Willie Green
My guess is they simply "revised" it to read: We the Stockholders of the United States, in order to form a more perfect market, establish global profitablity, insure domestic subservience, provide for increased dividends, promote capital gains, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves, do ordain and establish this Mission Statement for the United States of America. Etc. Etc. (The rest of us aren't supposed to see the fine print.)

But, Willie, there's the rub: you cannot have political freedom without economic freedom, and you cannot have economic freedom without free markets. Capitalism and civil society are inseparable. The more government regulation you have of the markets, the more regulation period, and the less liberty we all have. Protectionism is creeping socialism. Read a little Adam Smith, a lot of Hayek and throw in a good dose of Milton Friedman to boot, and you will see that liberty cannot co-exist with central planning. Don't buy into the Leftist mythology.

17 posted on 05/13/2002 5:14:55 PM PDT by austinTparty
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To: Joe Brower
I'm going to buy a couple hundred more in the next few days so as to have a stock on hand for this coming 4th of July, where I will don my tricorn hat, colonial woodsman's vest, and canvas haversack, and carry these along the parade route, handing them out to anyone and everyone who wants one, along with some JPFO "Gran'pa Jack" booklets on the Bill of Rights. Just call me Johnny Appleseed -- you never know what will grow where. Should be a fun day!

One of the finest ideas I've seen in a while. Thanks, FRiend.

18 posted on 05/13/2002 5:15:37 PM PDT by FreedomFarmer
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To: BikerNYC
None, if this is the same one i got from them, it includes the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Amendments, and the preamble to the Bill of Rights.
19 posted on 05/13/2002 5:20:23 PM PDT by NovemberCharlie
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To: P8riot
At the CATO dinner the other night a leather-bound Constituion was brandished. I have several small copies, but they are all either too bulky, flimsy, or filled with extraneous material to serve as a suitable reference. Where can a well bound leather or vynl pocket sized Constitution be purchased? Anyone?
20 posted on 05/13/2002 5:21:57 PM PDT by ForOurFuture
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To: ForOurFuture
The one I mentioned feels like vinyl, and is about 3 1/2" by 5" In the back it says, "Additional copies of this booklet can be purchased for $1 each by calling 1-800-767-1241 (noon to 9:00 p.m. eastern time).
21 posted on 05/13/2002 6:11:55 PM PDT by NovemberCharlie
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To: austinTparty
you cannot have political freedom without economic freedom, and you cannot have economic freedom without free markets.

I agree. Unfortunately, much to its discredit, the Cato Institute places corporate liberty and freedom above the individual.

Read a little Adam Smith, a lot of Hayek and throw in a good dose of Milton Friedman to boot

I'm well versed in their works, read them long before you were born, sweetie. You should try reading Willie Green sometime:

Article I, Section 8.
The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises...

To regulate commerce with foreign nations, and among the several states, and with the Indian tribes;...

Our great nation was founded on principles of individual freedom, liberty and opportunity, NOT corporate freedom, liberty and opportunity. The excesses of unbridled, laissezz-faire Capitalism can be just as oppressive of individual freedom and opportunity as authoritarian Communism.


22 posted on 05/13/2002 6:25:16 PM PDT by Willie Green
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To: P8riot
I have four of them. Handy little volumes.
23 posted on 05/13/2002 6:29:04 PM PDT by StAthanasiustheGreat
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Comment #24 Removed by Moderator

Comment #25 Removed by Moderator

To: abner
Aren't y'all giving away the Pocket Constitution to everyone at your Flag Balloon events?
26 posted on 05/13/2002 10:12:41 PM PDT by LurkerNoMore!
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To: LurkerNoMore!
We are trying. We still are lacking most of the funding for the project.
27 posted on 05/14/2002 7:53:21 AM PDT by abner
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To: P8riot
Just found out from a friend that the CATO institute is offering a free pocket Constitution and Declaration of Independence (no shipping either).

I don't need Cato to send me anything. There are plenty of free copies of the Constitution on the Web -- thanks.

28 posted on 05/14/2002 9:18:44 AM PDT by FreeReign
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To: Willie Green
I argue with you now and then, generally over your corporate lay-off threads. This is my "I agree with you 1% of the time, but..." post.

Incorporation is a public grant. The elevation of the corporation over the individual is insidious and un-American.

Let me introduce you to my current hero, William Howard Taft. During the twisted days of 1911, when the progressives sought to turn the country over to the Corporation (J.P. Morgan in particular), Taft stood them down. Following the Standard Oil decision that year, the progressives declared the Sherman law inadequate to attend to the necessities of modern economics. They expaned upon the almost Marxist statement of Theodore Roosevelt from the year before at Osawaotime, KS,

Combinations in industry are the result of an imperative economic law which cannot be repealed by political legislation.
Taft understood where it was going:
Either we will have individualism or we will have combinations in restraint of trade going to that point where the people will demand that the power of men engaged in such corporations be transferred to the Government. And then we will have State Socialism.
Around that time, the New York Times followed with the insight that
Control of business by the Government would mean the control of Government by business.
It has become true in certain aspects, probably the worst, the ugliest and the most perverted of such abuse being in the tax code. Corporations have far more rights than individuals in taxation. It's dispicable.

I applaud your efforts to point this out here, especially in the face of Libertarian demagoguery on the magical powers of the "free market." There is and can be no such thing.

29 posted on 05/20/2002 8:36:00 PM PDT by nicollo
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To: nicollo
Thank-you very, very much!
I admit, I've become so accustomed to opposing the globalist mantra, I may come across as being somewhat demagogic myself.
It's refreshing to come across someone who obviously invests a considerable amount of thought and understanding in their posts.
We may not agree 100% on these issues, but I suspect it is higher than the 1% that you estimate.
30 posted on 05/20/2002 8:57:16 PM PDT by Willie Green
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To: Willie Green
Also from here, WG. Your posts have never not been appreciated.
31 posted on 05/20/2002 9:07:29 PM PDT by nicollo
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To: nicollo
Control of business by the Government would mean the control of Government by business.

That's deep. And it is real good to see you back and freeping.

32 posted on 05/26/2002 6:48:25 AM PDT by Huck
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To: Huck; AustinTparty; Willie Green
Here's another one from Taft for y'all to consider:

It has been said, and it is a common platform expression, that it is well to prefer the man above the dollar, as if the preservation of property rights has some other purpose than the assistance to and the uplifting of human rights. Private property was not established in order to gratify love of some material wealth or capital. It was established as an instrumentality in the progress of civilization and the uplifting of man, and it is equality of opportunity that private property promotes by assuring to man the result of his own labor, thrift, and self-restraint. When, therefore, the demagogue mounts the platform and announces that he prefers the man above the dollar, he ought to be interrogated as to what he means thereby -- whether he is in favor of abolishing the right of the institution of private property and of taking away from the poor man the opportunity to become wealthy by the use of the abilities that God has given him, the cultivation of the virtues with which practice of self-restraint and the exercise of moral courage will fortify him.

Now I am far from saying that the development of business, the discovery of new and effective methods of using captial, have not produced problems which call for additional action by the Government to prevent the abuses of the concentration of wealth and the combination of captial. Moreover, in order to tempt investment, we have doubltess in times past permitted the State to pledge to individuals privilege more permanent and of wider scope than the public demanded, and we have permitted the establishment of corporations and the acquisition of power through the corrupting use of money in politics, so as at times to give to a few dangerous control in legislation and government; but during the past ten years much progress against such abuses has been made in this regard. Statutes have been passed... to restrain a misuse of the privileges conferred by charter...

William Howard Taft, Jan. 12, 1912

Keyword in that last one, Willie G: "charter", i.e., incorporation... a "privilege" not a right.

33 posted on 05/27/2002 2:30:33 PM PDT by nicollo
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To: P8riot
I'm already on their mailing list, so no worries. Thanks for the link.
34 posted on 05/27/2002 2:35:44 PM PDT by Tijeras_Slim
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To: nicollo
When, therefore, the demagogue mounts the platform and announces that he prefers the man above the dollar, he ought to be interrogated as to what he means thereby

Sounds like Mencken. If memory serves, Mencken admired Taft. You have certainly whet my appetite to learn more about the man. What will I do until your book comes out?

35 posted on 05/27/2002 6:14:59 PM PDT by Huck
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To: Huck
Glad to know that H.L. agrees with me. You'll just have to sit tight until my publisher gets it together. I dumped my 200,000 words (40,000 in footnotes!) on them a few weeks ago, and now it's a waiting game. Looks like early 2003. Believe me, I don't know what to do until then, either...

Meanwhile, here's another Taft classic. Facing down T.R.'s populist agitations, in which he declared for "direct democracy" in order to overcome problems he said were on level with those faced by Lincoln in 1861 (!), Taft said,

Votes are not bread, constitutional amendments are not work, referendums do not pay rent or furnish houses, recalls do not furnish clothing, initiatives do not supply employment or relieve inequalities of condition or of opportunity. We still ought to have set before us the definite plans to bring on complete equality of opportunity, and to abolish hardship and evil for humanity. We listen for them in vain.
...and this:
A popular government is a government by the people -- that is, by a majority of the people, who under the law are given the right to exercise the electoral franchise, and constitutional limitations are imposed to prevent the misuse of the power of the majority, so that the individual or the minority may not suffer injustice through the action of the majority... Thus it is easily seen that under the Progressive programme the whole machinery that has been so carefully built up by the old statesmen of this country and England, to save to the individual and to the minority freedom, equality before the law, the right of property and the right to pursue happiness, is to be taken apart and thrown into a junk heap.
Be well, Huck!

Oh,Twain loved Taft, too.

36 posted on 05/27/2002 7:54:05 PM PDT by nicollo
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To: nicollo
Sounds like the wimps in Atlas Shrugged.
37 posted on 05/28/2002 5:49:21 PM PDT by P8riot
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To: P8riot
What would your hero say?
38 posted on 05/28/2002 7:29:02 PM PDT by nicollo
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To: nicollo
Who is John Galt?
39 posted on 05/29/2002 6:04:33 PM PDT by P8riot
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To: P8riot
That's a cop-out -- which is fine by me, unless, of course, you're just joyriding irony, toying with libertarian secret codes...

Now give me either a better answer to my question or a better criticism of our earlier posts (your no. 37).

Or are you just a "wimp"?

40 posted on 05/30/2002 3:13:22 PM PDT by nicollo
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To: Joe Brower
I'm going to buy a couple hundred more in the next few days so as to have a stock on hand for this coming 4th of July, where I will don my tricorn hat, colonial woodsman's vest, and canvas haversack, and carry these along the parade route, handing them out to anyone and everyone who wants one...

A BTT for the best idea I've heard in a long time!

I have one - fits in your pocket and it's the most subversive document the world has ever seen. I last used it to show an unbelieving young woman that yes, dear, women did in fact have the vote before 1960. She was serious, and a soon-to-be graduate of a nearby university whose name will not be mentioned but which was named after a very important guy who was our first president. No, not Marx.

41 posted on 05/30/2002 3:26:30 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: nicollo
I wasn't criticizing your post. Just the subject of your post. I didn't think that I was being that vague.
42 posted on 05/30/2002 5:34:55 PM PDT by P8riot
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To: P8riot
You are very welcome criticize a post, especially the "subject" of a post, Lol!.
Yes, I was telling you not to be vague.

Now, get to it.

43 posted on 05/30/2002 7:18:54 PM PDT by nicollo
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To: Huck; AustinTparty; Willie Green; x; P8riot
Another thread reminded me of this one from Taft in 1912. He said it just before leaving office:
I have succeeded in securing the adoption of a new set of rules for equity proceedings in the United States courts. I hope to be able to secure new rules to govern proceedings at common law and if I succeed in my efforts in that direction I shall have accomplished more for so-called social justice than all the hollering and hysteria of the professional reformers could achieve in a thousand years.
x, I thought you'd have fun with some of these quotations.
P8riot, I promise I'll go away now... !
44 posted on 05/31/2002 9:13:28 AM PDT by nicollo
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To: nicollo
if I succeed in my efforts in that direction I shall have accomplished more for so-called social justice than all the hollering and hysteria of the professional reformers could achieve in a thousand years.

Like the other Taft quote, this one is quite Menckenesge in tone. "Hollering and hysteria of the professional reformers"? Sounds like the old sage to me.

45 posted on 05/31/2002 9:39:12 AM PDT by Huck
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To: Huck
You're gonna force me into Mencken. I DON'T HAVE TIME, dammit! My FR ventures are my only down time, and now you're gonna add to my desparately long reading list.

Ok, I give in. Where should I start?

I wonder what Mencken's take was on the Taft administration? He would have been in his thirties. A quick websearch says he was writing for the Balt. Herald Tribune until 1906, and then the Sun . The Tribune was pro-Taft. The Sun , I dunno.

He was probably of the progressive set. Maybe that's why he turned cynical. He seems to me to have the contempt of a former believer.

Back to the Library of Congress I go... Thanks, Huck.

46 posted on 05/31/2002 11:35:09 AM PDT by nicollo
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To: nicollo
Mencken, as far as I can tell, was simply convinced that most of humanity's problems were unsolvable, and attempts at solving them were folly. At worst, they were gross attacks on human dignity, at best, they were terrificly funny. You, nicollo, must find some time for Mencken, just for his writing style and humor alone.

Go to the library, and find a collection that contains "On Being an American" and "Sahara of the Bozart." I have to run. More later.

47 posted on 05/31/2002 12:05:13 PM PDT by Huck
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