Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

A Glimpse of Hell Over the Horizon
The Sierra Times ^ | 20 June, 2002 | Tina Terry

Posted on 06/21/2002 5:06:37 AM PDT by brityank

A Glimpse of Hell Over the Horizon
Arizona Fire Report By Tina Terry
Sierra Times Ranch Hand
Published 06. 20. 02 at 23:52 Sierra Time

 

As I send this out, Show Low, Heber and Overgaard, Arizona - to the north of me, and not that far away, are burning out of control. Flames are leaping through the giant Ponderosa pines, destroying everything.

Thousands of wild animals are being killed, injured and being displaced. Thousands of people are evacuating, and hundreds, perhaps thousands, of homes are being destroyed. My family is preparing in case we need to evacuate from Payson.

And it's not even July yet. Three months of fire season to go here.

The federal government has so grossly mismanaged the national forests by permitting them to be overgrown and clogged with tinder that it's like we're sitting on a keg of gasoline - one that covers many hundreds of square miles.

Today one of our local firemen told me that the condition of the forests a hundred years ago was healthy - big trees didn't burn, and there were many many fewer trees per acre - fire thinned out the underbrush but didn't incinerate the total forest as it is doing today, and will probably do for weeks to come. The fires are burning so hot that they are burning everything, so hot that they are turning the ground to a glaze, through which water cannot penetrate - setting the stage for massive floods when we finally get rain. Right now we are praying for rain, but there's none in sight.

The way the forest was a hundred years ago was, the fireman explained, before the feds took over the national forests and "managed" them into the present state of tinder according to the insane enviro-Nazi policy of "We can't cut even one twig or let anything graze there." Dorks in D.C. making policy for forests they may never visit or understand. Moscow-on-the-Potomac policy - with the same disastrous results as the original Moscow produced when it micromanaged everything from the Kremlin.

Our solution, once these infernal fires have finally burned out - which may be weeks, months - is this:

Let all the governors of the Western states in which these federal goons ranging from incompetent dithering idiots to malicious sociopaths have created this horrific UNNATURAL situation band together and firmly declare to D.C. the following:

"You have mismanaged these federal lands, which lie within our state boundaries, so grossly and unethically that it has cost millions, maybe billions of dollars, destroyed human life and property and killed and displaced countless wildlife (where are PETA and their ilk while these poor animals are being slaughtered by these conflagrations caused by environmentalist insanity?)

"You have, by your insane policies, created a virtual Armageddon of unnatural havoc within our state borders. We shall therefore take over these lands and manage them ourselves by appointing local management to so do. To pay for this, we shall have our state residents refrain from sending their federal income taxes to Washington; these taxes will instead be placed in an escrow account, and will be used to repair the incalculable damage you have done to these lands within our borders, and to properly manage them so that they can be restored to health and to a safer condition.

"We'll hold local officials accountable for implementing sane policies. We won't redact their names if they are responsible for killing or injuring people, or for causing damage. We'll prosecute them if they do so.

"If there's anything left after doing this, we'll send the balance to D.C. so you can spend it on one of your countless other insane, bloated, administration-larded, unconstitutional programs - maybe the inept managing of our national borders..."

And just in case anyone has forgotten - remember Los Alamos, and the Forest Service's "controlled burn." These people cannot be trusted to act in our best interests. They are permitted to commit acts which, if committed in the private sector, would result in prosecution and jail time.

Please pray for us here in Arizona, and for all those in Colorado, who are suffering so mightily.

Pray for the poor critters, too. These innocents are suffering because of the inequities of humankind. It breaks my heart beyond description.

Tina Terry
Payson, Arizona

Editor's Note: Yesterday, the author of this article called the ranch office and asked, "Why is God doing this?" Well, Tina - there's your answer. God's not doing this. Government has done this, and we've got our work cut out for us. Terry Barton, the woman accused of starting the Colorado Fire, was released on bail yesterday. Just thought you folks would like to know that.

Yes, Tina: We'll keep you and others in our prayers.

© 2002 SierraTimes.com (unless otherwise noted)



TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Government; News/Current Events; US: Arizona; US: Colorado
KEYWORDS: enviralists; forestfires; gop; green; greens; landgrab; nationalforests; reuters; wildfire
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-55 next last

1 posted on 06/21/2002 5:06:37 AM PDT by brityank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: brityank
Ohhh you saw it also?
2 posted on 06/21/2002 5:10:18 AM PDT by J_Sheridan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: brityank
"The federal government has so grossly mismanaged the national forests by permitting them to be overgrown and clogged with tinder that it's like we're sitting on a keg of gasoline - one that covers many hundreds of square miles."

All of the mismanagement happened on President Clinton's watch! Under Clinton the government engaged in one of the biggest land grabs in U.S. History. The result was too much Federal land, and not enough employees to manage it all.

3 posted on 06/21/2002 5:14:23 AM PDT by Destructor
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: *landgrab; *Green; *Enviralists; farmfriend; marsh2; dixiechick2000; Mama_Bear; poet; ...
Today one of our local firemen told me that the condition of the forests a hundred years ago was healthy - big trees didn't burn, and there were many many fewer trees per acre - fire thinned out the underbrush but didn't incinerate the total forest as it is doing today, and will probably do for weeks to come. The fires are burning so hot that they are burning everything, so hot that they are turning the ground to a glaze, through which water cannot penetrate - setting the stage for massive floods when we finally get rain.

If anyone has any doubts as to why the idiotic watermelon policies of the Federal Government are so destructive, reread this.

Here is some more reading for deep background (click pic):

Fire in Sierra Nevada Forests The wildfires that have ravaged the West in recent years have focused national attention on the condition of our forests. Why are they so susceptible to severe fires? And how can we prevent catastrophe? In Forests on the Sierra Nevada, George Gruell examines these treasured woodlands through repeat photography: rephotographing sites depicted in historical photographs to compare past vegetation--its distribution and condition--to present. The paired black-and-white photographs document natural and human-wrought changes in the Sierran ecosystem during the past 150 years--from the varied and generally open-canopy habitats of early European-American settlement days to the dense, declining forests of today.

Gruell's comparisons show just how much damage that the misguided policies the ecoterrorists have wrought in the past few decades. The 'roadless initiatives' will create more conflagrations that they will use to keep human activities out of the forests and stuff us all into 'sustainable communities'.

4 posted on 06/21/2002 5:15:36 AM PDT by brityank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: brityank
With all due respect to the author's OneNoteSamba, the Rodeo fire is now declared arson.

The fire over near Heber was also arson.....someone got lost and started a signal fire!

Sadly, between those two and that Barton in Colorado, the tinhat vigilantes are mumbling about patrolling the forests on their own, with a walkytalky as their second weapon.

Real good time to vacation in Florida.

5 posted on 06/21/2002 5:19:13 AM PDT by KirklandJunction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: brityank
It's very hard to tell if it is government mismanagement of forests or part of the United Nations plan to run people out of areas and return the "resources" to the wild. No depth of corruption is above either entity.

Either way, the fed is getting what it wants, what happens to these inhabitants is of no consequence to them.

6 posted on 06/21/2002 5:22:34 AM PDT by MissAmericanPie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Destructor
No, not ALL of the mismanagement. Read your history. There was a President named Teddy Roosevelt.....then FDR.......
7 posted on 06/21/2002 5:24:02 AM PDT by KirklandJunction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: J_Sheridan
J_Sheridan member since June 21st, 2002

Ohhh you saw it also?

And this has to do with forest fires how?
If we don't get the Feral US Government under control, your friends in Argentina will have a lot less than they have now.
Welcome to Free Republic.

8 posted on 06/21/2002 5:26:56 AM PDT by brityank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: KirklandJunction
With all due respect to the author's OneNoteSamba, the Rodeo fire is now declared arson.

Most forest fires are arson, true? However, I am old enough to remember that back in the 50's and 60's, there were very few major conflagrations of the intensity and range that have occurred in the past decade. Closed forests are nothing but tinderboxes waiting for a spark, natural or man-made.

9 posted on 06/21/2002 5:32:01 AM PDT by brityank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: brityank
We shall therefore take over these lands and manage them ourselves by appointing local management to so do.

I don't forsee this ever happening. The reason: The fedgov will tell the states: We won't send you back 30% of the funds we steal from you to do your road repairs with and the states will kowtow, drop their pants, and smile. The states don't ever realize at this day in age that they, as creators of the federal government, dictate the rules!

Boonie Rat

MACV SOCOM, PhuBai/Hue '65-'66

10 posted on 06/21/2002 5:32:23 AM PDT by Boonie Rat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: brityank
More bad news:

1. Due to the last four/five years of below average rain, the average humidity of living Ponderosal Pine in n.e. Arizona is below ten percent. Consumer lumber in retail stores is around nineteen percent.

2. More wind today.

11 posted on 06/21/2002 5:34:06 AM PDT by KirklandJunction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: KirklandJunction; Destructor
While TR and others since have expanded the reach of the federal 'responsibility' for the national forests, it's only been in the last two decades that the watermelon orgs and UN policies for 'sustainable development' have enhanced the destruction of the environment.

Conservation is not a dirty word; environmentalism and their priests are.

12 posted on 06/21/2002 5:38:19 AM PDT by brityank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: brityank
Can't argue that a bit, but there's more.

More people, more media.

One of the reasons for this current Pinedale fire disaster is that decades ago Pinedale was two ranches. Period. Now they have tennis, golf, condos, boutiques, gas stations, miles and miles of paved roads to attract tourists, etc. Including a home of the Governor of Arizona, who was not born here, but does use state transportation for weekend trips from the state Capitol.

So many factors.

Strict immigration control should have started around 1490.

13 posted on 06/21/2002 5:42:39 AM PDT by KirklandJunction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: brityank
The Big Burn of 1910
14 posted on 06/21/2002 5:43:26 AM PDT by Ben Ficklin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: brityank
THis is such a damn shame! We just moved from Arizona 6 mos. ago and this area is such beautiful country. We used to camp in the area quite regularly before we had children. It's sad to know it's being scorched and that possibly better managment may have contained the flames.
15 posted on 06/21/2002 5:45:23 AM PDT by glory
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: KirklandJunction
You are right, it is terribly dry and rain has been sparse at best(except for 98 which seemed much more rainy to me than usual). I hate to say, but this fire will be even harder to contain than the Colorado fire because the conditions are so ripe for it.
16 posted on 06/21/2002 5:49:01 AM PDT by glory
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: brityank
LOL!

Yeah, run that by me again?

Remember who you are addressing your comments to.

Sure, I'm holding my breathe waiting for the truth, I might as well go down to the scuba shop first.

Point is, its a sore point.

501c has obligations, don't forget that posting non-offensive and non-vulgar messages that adhere to community standards can result in 501c status getting yanked. Yeah thats right, if you are tax exempt you have to let everybody in the golf house.

But don't worry.. and I don't... you know that as Arnold says: "I'll be back."

If you equate sweeping crap under the carpet with a clean house, your the fool not me!

17 posted on 06/21/2002 5:51:41 AM PDT by J_Sheridan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

Comment #18 Removed by Moderator

To: glory
Current plans are trying to stay alive and NOT in front of it, and "letting" it burn north across the Rim country, until it gets far enough north to run out of pine. Once it's in low brush area, pft! No fuel.

Hold on to those memories. It'll be a long while.

Remember the old Zane Grey cabin?

19 posted on 06/21/2002 6:01:07 AM PDT by KirklandJunction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Ben Ficklin
BFL
20 posted on 06/21/2002 6:03:25 AM PDT by oyez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: J_Sheridan
You are incoherent.
21 posted on 06/21/2002 6:04:02 AM PDT by KirklandJunction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Destructor
The author of the article states:

"You (the federal government) have mismanaged these federal lands, which lie within our state boundaries,"

Then Destructor, you state:

"Under Clinton the government engaged in one of the biggest land grabs in U.S. History"

Article I, Section 8, Section 17, U.S. Constitution states:

"To exercise exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever,...over all places purchased by the consent of the legislature of the state..."

It seems to me the ultimate blame for federal "land grabs" and mismanagement of "federal lands" falls squarely on the shoulders of the citizens of the states that elected legislators who consented to the purchase of sovereign state land by our federal government.

22 posted on 06/21/2002 6:05:02 AM PDT by tahiti
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: J_Sheridan
What in the world are you railing about? Wake up on the wrong side of the bed this morning???
23 posted on 06/21/2002 6:06:25 AM PDT by shezza
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: shezza
Yeah, wrong side indeed.
The attendant didn't adjust the siderails.
24 posted on 06/21/2002 6:10:31 AM PDT by KirklandJunction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: KirklandJunction
To All:

Thank you my friends, I'm flattered, but PLEASE no more emails, celcall, wirephone, about 4x4 vigilante.

25 posted on 06/21/2002 6:12:57 AM PDT by KirklandJunction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: J_Sheridan; Admin Moderator
Bozo alert.
26 posted on 06/21/2002 6:14:25 AM PDT by dighton
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: J_Sheridan
Forget to take your meds today?
27 posted on 06/21/2002 6:31:52 AM PDT by BullDog108
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: dighton
He won't last a day!
28 posted on 06/21/2002 6:32:25 AM PDT by BullDog108
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Ben Ficklin
Thanks, Ben -- great site; I'll dig in deeper later.

"It was, we are going to make the forest environment safe for people. We are going to do our best to eliminate fire from the forest. Because fire isn't needed, so we will be better off if we just do our best to get rid of it."

"They didn't think it through," Arno said. "They didn't understand these beautiful wildland forests."

They did not know that in a forest, as in an heirloom clock, you cannot remove even one gear, he said. "Because you take that one gear out and funny thing is, the clock doesn't work anymore."

"Fire was the rejuvenating force in our forests, and we took it away," he said. "But the choice was not ours to make. Fire will return to this landscape."

The actions taken that have shut down forestry and logging, the 'Roadless Initiative', the 'Wildlands Projects', and the other watermelon actions placing nature over man have exacerbated the damage and range these wildfires cover.

29 posted on 06/21/2002 6:37:08 AM PDT by brityank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Ben Ficklin
It a harsh thing to say but fire has a cleasing effect. Mother Nature is a bitch.

As I understand it as settlers moved in to the South in the late 1700's and early 1800's the the forests were largely burned over, not like the hills of green we see to day. So it looks like the woods of the west are returning to their natural state.

30 posted on 06/21/2002 7:11:37 AM PDT by oyez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: brityank; KirklandJunction; Destructor; Boonie Rat; ccmay
While TR and others since have expanded the reach of the federal 'responsibility' for the national forests, it's only been in the last two decades that the watermelon orgs and UN policies for 'sustainable development' have enhanced the destruction of the environment.

TR inherited a problem. FDR brought us massive national programmes to fix it. Then it was a problem from the Program for America's Forests of the 1950s. Now it's a problem because of AlGore/Clinton/Babbit. All I hear on these threads is whining about Federal mismanagement. It's symptomatic of a systemic problem, intrinsic to socialism: the managing agent has no motive, means, or accountability to provide detailed, productive, and diverse methods of habitat management to the limits of technology. It's a product the public wants and a government monopoly can't seem to deliver. In fact, as government ownership fails, funding increases; witness the two billion dollars Babbit got from Clinton after the seven million acres they burned in 2000. Wait until they learn about the scope of their weed problem!

So why aren't we talking about doing something about it? A free market system is ready for trials, there is an implementation strategy. Free citizens should not be asking for permission to fix this mess; we should be taking the contract because the managing agent is blowing it. So, how do we organize that? Isn't anybody interested?

31 posted on 06/21/2002 7:17:25 AM PDT by Carry_Okie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: oyez
As I understand it as settlers moved in to the South in the late 1700's and early 1800's the the forests were largely burned over, not like the hills of green we see to day. So it looks like the woods of the west are returning to their natural state.

You don't understand it. What happens after a stand replacing fire is a blast of even aged juveniles and (here's the part most people don't get) WEEDS. The problem is, that aggressive exotics, once established, are PERMANENT. They completely alter the habitat. Consider knapweed (now infesting large areas of Montana and Idaho). The plant dries out the surface and dries up streams over summer. It puts out a pre-emergent that prevents natives from re-establishing. That loss of groundcover accelerates erosion over 130%. Those plants requiring regular regeneration can eventually go extinct. Each knapweed plant produces thousands of seeds that spread on the wind and remain viable for ten years. It is resistive to low doses of herbicides and those that are available (such as Transline) cost $500 a gallon. Exotics are very expensive to eradicate, often requiring efforts that extend across huge areas and detailed management for as much as a century. A fire creates an open growing medium for weed transmission and little vegetation in the way of wind propagation over large distances. There is no "recovery" as you "understand it."

32 posted on 06/21/2002 7:31:47 AM PDT by Carry_Okie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Carry_Okie
You may be curious of the works of Andrew J. Galambos.

Amazon.com, or www.tuspco.com/

33 posted on 06/21/2002 7:45:30 AM PDT by KirklandJunction
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: KirklandJunction
You may be curious of the works of Andrew J. Galambos.

Or perhaps the other way around. Thank you.

34 posted on 06/21/2002 7:58:03 AM PDT by Carry_Okie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Carry_Okie
So, how do we organize that? Isn't anybody interested?

I think the interest is there; the problem is we all have teaspoons -- 'they' have all the huge bucket-loaders.

Natural ecosystems are competitive. At any given point, some solutions are going to be more successful than others. The reason biodiversity is so important is that the conditions under which species compete are based upon selection under variable conditions. If the circumstances change, the strong may fail and the weak may suddenly prosper.
I don't think the strong have failed - yet - but the current actions of our elected officials in pandering to the false God of democracy is undermining this Republic and its precepts. Until we can revere those precepts, and reverse the Marxist socialism that is the mainstay of democracy, our teaspoons on the outside will only make us tired. We need to find a way to undermine the underpinnings that Agenda 21 is foisting across the land. JMHO.
35 posted on 06/21/2002 7:59:02 AM PDT by brityank
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: brityank
We need to find a way to undermine the underpinnings that Agenda 21 is foisting across the land.

That is what I am doing. To implement the system doesn't require any action by government at all.

36 posted on 06/21/2002 8:05:28 AM PDT by Carry_Okie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: J_Sheridan
Not sure what 501c you are talking about. If you are talking about Free Republic, we are not one.

Goodbye, again.

37 posted on 06/21/2002 8:35:57 AM PDT by Admin Moderator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

bump
38 posted on 06/21/2002 9:04:59 AM PDT by madfly
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Carry_Okie
Some of us learn something every day. Helpful link.

http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/plantsci/weeds/w842w.htm

Spotted knapweed is an aggressive, introduced weed species that rapidly invades pasture, rangeland and fallow land and causes a serious decline in forage and crop production. The weed is a prolific seed producer with 1000 or more seeds per plant. Seed remains viable in the soil five years or more, so infestations may occur a number of years after vegetative plants have been eliminated. Spotted knapweed has few natural enemies and is consumed by livestock only when other vegetation is unavailable. The plant releases a toxin that reduces growth of forage species. Areas heavily infested with spotted knapweed often must be reseeded once the plant is controlled. Historical records indicate that spotted knapweed was introduced from Eastern Europe into North America in the early 1900s as a contaminant in crop seed. It now infests several million acres of grazing land in the northwestern United States and Canada.

Ignore my sarcasm.

We have Kudzo, but it dosn't burn like a furnace.

39 posted on 06/21/2002 9:35:01 AM PDT by oyez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: brityank
bttt
40 posted on 06/21/2002 9:50:54 AM PDT by lodwick
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: lodwick
What to do about all this?

I think we need a Fire Division in our Military.

Instead of closing down a whole lot of bases, use them to maintain this Division.

A nation is no different than a city. Imagine if New York or Chicago had NO Fire Department!!!!!!

Well that's what our nation is lacking: a military unit trained to fight fires.

It's that simple.

41 posted on 06/21/2002 10:16:47 AM PDT by katya8
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: katya8
Well that's what our nation is lacking: a military unit trained to fight fires.

What our nation is lacking is Forest Service personel trained not to start fires.(;->)

42 posted on 06/21/2002 10:47:43 AM PDT by oyez
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: oyez
Hahahaha.....you're Sooo right, oyez...that too, would help...:-)
43 posted on 06/21/2002 10:58:57 AM PDT by katya8
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: katya8
I was thinking though (while frying soy beans in cinamon and sugar) that if half of a major wealthy city, say Washington DC, were to burn down....would people be talking about architects having used the wrong building materials or that the streets were too narrow......or would they be noisily outraged (justifyably so!!) and demanding that the city's A1 priority be the immediate creation of a Fire Department?????
44 posted on 06/21/2002 11:09:05 AM PDT by katya8
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: Admin Moderator
In a private email list I used to belong to, one of the posters was an incarcerated skitzo from England. He would make LONG nonsensical rants, but he made more sense than that guy you just ousted. The people on the list tolerated the English guy, because he was a kind soul. The one here today seems like he has more problems than just a little nuttiness. Thanks for the cleanup.
45 posted on 06/21/2002 1:52:04 PM PDT by JudyB1938
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: brityank
Stop the attacks by the wacko, extreme left-wing, enviro-nazis terrorist's on our Freedoms !!

Freedom Is Worth Fighting For !!

Molon Labe !!

46 posted on 06/21/2002 2:43:13 PM PDT by blackie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Destructor
All of the mismanagement happened on President Clinton's watch!

Except for the term "All", I agree 100% with your post - I'm afraid the BS of enviro-wacko thought started long before 'toon, though. I remember folks being scuttled by gov't EPA-like crap back in the 80's!

No, definitely not blaming my hero, R. Reagan, it's just that the enviro-idiots have been out of control for decades!! How old is "GreenPeace"?

Remember, too, these are the same folks who tell us we should eat more chicken, because to eat beef supports the cattle industry, and there are too many cows farting into the atmosphere, and this is hurting ozone levels. This sure sounds credible to me, especially since I am educated in REAL science - BVWAHAHAHAHAHA!

If we resurected the lumber industry and let them do their thing, this would all be solved! Who better to manage forests than those who could make money off proper management of same!!

47 posted on 06/21/2002 2:58:51 PM PDT by mil-vet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Carry_Okie
"So why aren't we talking about doing something about it?"

Because the other player in this game will use the guns before allowing the game to be lost.

And the "people" are now cowards.

48 posted on 06/21/2002 3:32:50 PM PDT by wcbtinman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: wcbtinman
And the "people" are now cowards.

Lazy gluttonous cowards.

49 posted on 06/21/2002 3:37:55 PM PDT by Carry_Okie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: brityank
The federal government has so grossly mismanaged the national forests by permitting them to be overgrown and clogged with tinder that it's like we're sitting on a keg of gasoline - one that covers many hundreds of square miles.

So good to see my tax dollars aren't being wasted.

50 posted on 06/21/2002 9:21:14 PM PDT by Valin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-55 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson