Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

ZoneLabs: The Hot Stuff In Firewalls
BusinessWeek ^ | Alex Salkever

Posted on 07/06/2002 7:53:41 AM PDT by Reaganwuzthebest

Edited on 04/13/2004 2:16:32 AM PDT by Jim Robinson. [history]

Despite the tech doldrums, this computer-security outfit has just secured $24.3 million in new VC funding, and sales are exploding.

Can you give something away and still make money? That was the way of the early Web, and few companies that charted that course in those treacherous waters lived to tell the tale. Then there's ZoneLabs, which started out in 1997 handing out free downloads of an advanced personal firewall.


(Excerpt) Read more at businessweek.com ...


TOPICS: Front Page News; News/Current Events; Technical
KEYWORDS: firewalls; techindex
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-70 next last

1 posted on 07/06/2002 7:53:41 AM PDT by Reaganwuzthebest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
Been using ZoneAlarm firewall for almost two years, no problems, works great. And it's free.
2 posted on 07/06/2002 7:54:49 AM PDT by Reaganwuzthebest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
Good program. This guy is great. His spyware programs are small and effective also, and free.
3 posted on 07/06/2002 8:05:39 AM PDT by steve50
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: steve50
ZoneAlarm makes spyware protection too? I'm using Ad-aware which appears to work very well, and is free also.
4 posted on 07/06/2002 8:09:50 AM PDT by Reaganwuzthebest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
This is further evidence Microsoft has squandered an opportunity with Palladium. Palladium is spyware, and nobody can trust Micorosoft's firewall to protect against it. So if you are going to use Windows, you are obligated to get a firewall from a different vendor, preferably one without close ties to Microsoft, certainly one that has not bought in to Palladium. As a backstop, one could use open source firewall software to be certain there are no Palladium backdoors.
5 posted on 07/06/2002 8:13:00 AM PDT by eno_
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
He used to anyway. I run adware now also, no problems. I think Steve Gibson runs the outfit, called his version OptOut. It pulled about 80 spyfiles out of mine first time and never stopped a program from working. He writes small quality stuff.
6 posted on 07/06/2002 8:16:33 AM PDT by steve50
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
Been using ZoneAlarm firewall for almost two years, no problems, works great. And it's free.

Same story here. I first heard about it here on FR, maybe ZL should think about writing a check to JimRob. This story is nearly a advertisement.

I did upgrade to the 'Pro' version, seems like I paid $35. For me it was worth the money, I bounce my laptop through a bunch of domains, including work, home, hotel internet, etc. The Pro package totally eliminates all of the setup hassles. Plus, I had to disable the free version in the office, now the ZA Pro package just ignores the office.

Some on another thread enjoyed this link, Gibson Research. There's a lot of insight on why you need a firewall, online test to probe your firewall, and some interesting stories of online detective work from an oldtime internet pro.

BTW, if you have a cable modem or DSL and don't have a hardware or software firewall, you may as well let your computer have sex with Haitian males in a San Francisco bathhouse, while eating imported UK cow brains.

7 posted on 07/06/2002 8:19:23 AM PDT by TC Rider
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
Just bought Pest Patrol to add to my protection suite. I have a Netgear firewall router and Norton Internet Security already. Awesome product. Finds all kinds of Trojans and Ad/Spyware. Check it out.
8 posted on 07/06/2002 8:25:22 AM PDT by NerdDad
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: TC Rider
Am I correct that you only need a firewall if you have DSL or cable modem? A dude like me who hooks up on the phone line, I don't need one do I? And is that because my ISP is my buffer? parsy the non-techno freeper.
9 posted on 07/06/2002 8:28:01 AM PDT by parsifal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: TC Rider
BTW, if you have a cable modem or DSL and don't have a hardware or software firewall, you may as well let your computer have sex with Haitian males in a San Francisco bathhouse, while eating imported UK cow brains.

That can't be emphasized enough. If you've got broadband and you don't have some pretty serious firewall protection, your computer will get compromised. It's just a matter of how long it takes.

I use ZoneAlarm Pro and it's wonderful. The neat thing about ZA is that it is very easy to use, and also it has unique protection against "trojan horse" control programs. By default it doesn't let any program access the Internet, unless you tell ZA that it's OK for the program to do so. If the program changes at all--i.e., it's got a virus or trojan attached to it--ZA re-blocks it and asks you to approve it accessing the Internet, so you know something's up.

Using ZA on our two Windows computers (and I have a Linux box as well), behind our cable router, my wife and I feel fairly secure. Not hack-proof, by any means, but at least we feel moderately safe from the hordes of "3r33t scr1pt k1dd33z" running around out there.

}:-)4

10 posted on 07/06/2002 8:30:13 AM PDT by Moose4
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: TC Rider
BTW, if you have a cable modem or DSL and don't have a hardware or software firewall, you may as well let your computer have sex with Haitian males in a San Francisco bathhouse, while eating imported UK cow brains.

OK, you owe me a new keyboard, I think the monitor will be alright with some cleaning. Told some folks yesterday it was like walking out of their house and leaving the door open but I like yours much better. Permission to use?

You're right about the free advertising ZL is getting here. I read about Pest Patrol here a couple weeks ago. Downloaded the trial version and loved it. Ponied up for the full version on Thursday.

11 posted on 07/06/2002 8:32:22 AM PDT by NerdDad
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: nutmeg
bump
12 posted on 07/06/2002 8:33:50 AM PDT by nutmeg
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: parsifal
Parsy: There's three reasons phone line users don't need a firewall as much as broadband users:

1) You're not connected to the Internet 24/7, you're only on for a few minutes or hours at a time.

2) People aren't going to be as interested in trying to hack someone at the end of a 56k modem line as they are someone with a 1.5 Mbit cable/DSL hookup.

3) Most dialup ISPs assign you a different internet address--a set of four numbers like 24.88.200.124--each time you dial in. Cable/DSL people have IP addresses that stay static, or change infrequently, so they're easier to find and attack.

I'm not a networking/Internet guru, I know just enough to be dangerous to myself and innocent bystanders, so your mileage may vary. :)

}:-)4
13 posted on 07/06/2002 8:33:52 AM PDT by Moose4
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: parsifal
Am I correct that you only need a firewall if you have DSL or cable modem? A dude like me who hooks up on the phone line, I don't need one do I? And is that because my ISP is my buffer? parsy the non-techno freeper.

Nope. Anybody can download a trojan or catch a virus (especially if your kids use the computer). ZoneAlarm will alert you to their attempts to "phone home" so you can clean them up. So, use it even on dial-up connections - at worst, it can't hurt.

14 posted on 07/06/2002 8:35:03 AM PDT by balrog666
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
bump
15 posted on 07/06/2002 8:36:28 AM PDT by VOA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: parsifal
Oops, left off part of my first reply...I'd still use some kind of firewall even on a modem. I used to use Blackice Defender (decent product but not as good as ZA in my opinion) and I was surprised the amount of port scans I'd get even while using dialup. Better safe than sorry.

}:-)4
16 posted on 07/06/2002 8:38:17 AM PDT by Moose4
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: parsifal
Am I correct that you only need a firewall if you have DSL or cable modem? A dude like me who hooks up on the phone line, I don't need one do I? And is that because my ISP is my buffer?

The "buffer" you get from your ISP is that you get a different IP address everytime you dial up. That doesn't make you immune but it helps. The difference is that my cable modem only gets a new address every two weeks or if I power it off. If you spend as much time hooked up and reading FR as I do, you are still vulnerable. Hackers know that an ISP only has so many IP addresses to assign. They scan through them constantly looking for one that will let them in. It's easier for them to bang away at my cable modem than it is to find you on your dial up, but if they find you, they will try to get in.

All that said, you aren't as vulnerable as someone with an always on connection, but you can't have too much protection either. Zone Alarm and Pest Patrol costs $60. A good addition to your investment in virus protection which you should already have. Download the Pest Patrol freebee and let it scan your machine. If you find something you don't like, it's easier to convince yourself you need the software.

17 posted on 07/06/2002 8:43:58 AM PDT by NerdDad
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: parsifal
Am I correct that you only need a firewall if you have DSL or cable modem? A dude like me who hooks up on the phone line, I don't need one do I? And is that because my ISP is my buffer? parsy the non-techno freeper.

That may have been the case a year ago, but now I'd say go ahead and get the free version.

The hackers and script kiddies like broadband because the IP numbers rarely change, making it easy to get back in touch with their compromised hosts. They love the bandwidth, allowing them to do more damage to the targets of their real attack. The hackers want to use your computer as a foot soldier in a attack on a bigger target.

Some Zombies are programmed to 'phone home' to a newsgroup for new instructions. This would defeat any security gained by having new IP numbers on dialup.

Anyone using VPN (Virtual Private Networking) or tunneling over broadband to connect with the home office, without some kind of firewall, exposes their office network to the same dangers.

18 posted on 07/06/2002 8:45:06 AM PDT by TC Rider
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: TC Rider; NerdDad
You two to do nothing but scare ignorant people.

Hackers and ScriptKidz prey on vulnerabilities, most of which are present in SERVERS, not typical home systems. The average home user who keeps his Micro$oft system updated won't be vulnerable to an attack. His biggest vulnerability will still be email. Hackers don't sit around for hours trying to break "Joe Sixpack's" computer. They prey on known vulnerabilities in programs like Apache, BIND, IIS, SQL, and such.

Spend your time educating home users on the threat of emails rather than scaring them into useless firewalls. Millions of ports get probed everyday. It doesn't mean you're "under attack".

19 posted on 07/06/2002 9:24:28 AM PDT by triggerhappy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
Another ZoneAlarm testimonial:

I have a broadband connection. I have Norton Antivirus and McAffee VirusScan running simultaneously on my PC. Both programs are set to automatically update once a week through a scheduler application.

I suspected I had a problem; the cable modem communication indicator was flashing constantly, even when I supposedly had no application accessing the internet. I was unsure if this was a problem because it had done this from the very first day my connection was activated. I also noticed an overall slowdown of my PC (easy enough to do on my old timey Pentium I). On the advice of fellow FReepers, I decided to try installing ZoneAlarm.

The minute I activated ZoneAlarm it sniffed out four trojans that neither AV application had been able to detect.

ZoneAlarm keeps a log file of unauthorized access attempts made on your system. The first day I used ZoneAlarm, the log file grew to half a Meg in size. My PC was being attacked big time, and I never knew it.

Since installing ZoneAlarm, the unauthorized access attempts gradually subsided after a month or so.

Many thanks to the original FReeper who gave me a clue; I am grateful. To those of you who don't have ZoneAlarm, my advice is:

Install it now!

20 posted on 07/06/2002 9:34:45 AM PDT by BraveMan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: All
NetBus the original hacking tool was a Microsoft product. The greatest spammer is Microsoft. They've been busted selling Hotmail lists.
Now they introduce Paladium for our protection. That's gotta be the greatest marketing scam in history.
Look in your Windows for a directory named DRM. That means your computer belongs to Bill Gates. He's just letting you use.
21 posted on 07/06/2002 9:39:59 AM PDT by Rooster48
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Rooster48
Can Palladium run on Windows 98SE, or is it meant for XP? I intend to keep what I have as long as I can before upgrading.
22 posted on 07/06/2002 9:47:45 AM PDT by Reaganwuzthebest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

Comment #23 Removed by Moderator

To: triggerhappy
When you say firewall, are you referring to software or hardware? I'd agree a hardware firewall would be overkill.

The problem is that the default installation of MS OSes (like the Pro/Server versions of 2000/XP) comes with those services (HTTP/FTP/SMTP/???) turned on and running by default. The good news is that MS has recently indicatedthey would be locking these down by default.

Sure XP/2K might not be your typical home setup, but 95/98/ME had their own set of vunerabilities. The l33t k1dz will go for _any_ vunerability and the best way to cut out _most_ types of attacks is a firewall and ZA is an inexpensive solution.

Personally, I've gone the ZA & Linksys router combo and it works great.

24 posted on 07/06/2002 10:07:52 AM PDT by bobwoodard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: *tech_index
Index Bump
25 posted on 07/06/2002 10:17:07 AM PDT by Free the USA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

Comment #26 Removed by Moderator

To: Reaganwuzthebest
I use it.

Had the freebie for a few years and decided to buy the "Pro" version.

It's got a few more bells and whistles, doesn't cost much ($20?) and avoids the pop-up "buy me" ads.

27 posted on 07/06/2002 10:24:40 AM PDT by JimVT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: triggerhappy
You are correct that email and downloads are the main culprits for most people. However, I'm not most people. Everything I've said, except to answer Parsifal's question, has been about always on connections such as Cable and DSL. I get an email every morning from my hardware firewall listing 20 to 300 attempts to penetrate (scans) with trojans--every day. I don't want to scare ignorant people. I want to educate ignorant people. The average home user on a 56k modem is not vulnerable to the kinds of scans I see. But that does not mean they don't get scanned and it does not mean they do not get hacked. More importantly, as "Joe Sixpack" moves from his 56k modem to DSL or Cable, he must understand the dangers that come with always on connections.
I haven't said it on this thread yet, so I will. The best defense against having your computer penetrated by a virus or trojan is to not be connected to the Internet unless you need to be connected to the Internet. When a computer on my home network is not being used, I expect it to be turned off. When no one on the network needs to be on the Internet, the cable modem is on standby. When we are not at home, everything is turned off. Just because you have an always on connection does not mean that it should always be on. When it is on, you need a minimum of protection against virus and trojan invasion. Software such as Zone Alarm needs to be coupled with virus protection. Norton Internet Security contains both. I go for overkill. I have a hardware firewall and NIS. I also have Zone's Pest Patrol. I get at least one email daily that tells me my efforts are warranted.
Your mileage may vary.
28 posted on 07/06/2002 10:35:31 AM PDT by NerdDad
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: triggerhappy
You two to do nothing but scare ignorant people. Millions of ports get probed everyday. It doesn't mean you're "under attack".

I wonder why million of ports are getting probed every day? Could it be because of ignorant people who don't close their ports? Making their systems vulnerable to zombies that can then go out and probe another million ports.

Sometimes, ignorant people need to be scared, to get them off of their dead @sses and take some responsibility for their corner of the internet.

I agree that a port probe doesn't equal a DOS attack, but, it is an attack, none the less.

Slackers make my life difficult every day. Those ignorant souls that don't secure their email servers from relays, help fuel the mountain of spam my organization deals with every day. Those that don't secure their servers and desktops systems from zombies, just insure we'll have more Code Reds and DOS attacks.

29 posted on 07/06/2002 11:42:37 AM PDT by TC Rider
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
So! What is ZoneLab's url?the
30 posted on 07/06/2002 12:32:07 PM PDT by WaterDragon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WaterDragon
ZoneLabs
31 posted on 07/06/2002 12:34:44 PM PDT by Reaganwuzthebest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: parsifal
Cable and DSL guys MUST have a firewall. They are always on the Net (whether using the browser or not) as long as the computer is on. But really you should firewall too. You don't know how many intrusions there are until you stop them.
32 posted on 07/06/2002 12:37:53 PM PDT by Chemnitz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

Comment #33 Removed by Moderator

To: 4ourprogeny
What is your operating system?

I run Windoze 95 with lots of stuff , netcaptor, outlook(MS), Notetab lite,flyswat, Norton, etc. in 256M so I get starved for memory and lock up. When I do Cntrl, alt del first time Zonealarm always shows as the active guy, but I think that is in error. I just think I have an overloaded system. am working to change that!

34 posted on 07/06/2002 1:23:19 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
Here's the configuration that I like best:

Each of these applications has features that, when combined, make a great privacy suite.

1. Zone Alarm.

Use all of the firewall features. Disable the privacy features (cookie control & ad elimination). You can still turn on cookie blocking at the firewall for selected programs if you wish.

2. Internet Security 4.0

I'm really interested in Guard Dog, but McAfee has bundled all their programs into this one suite, so I get them all and just use what I want.

Guard Dog has an active privacy watcher that will prompt you when personal information, such as your name, address, phone number, account number, etc., go over the web. It will also prompt you when programs launch other programs or try to access the web. You can allow access once or always, or deny access once or always. Guard Dog will also block 3-rd party cookies (cookies from sites you haven't visited) and also delete cookies from un-bookmarked sites at the end of each browser session.

Don't use Guard Dog's ad blocking.

3. Ad Subtract

Intermute's Ad Subtract will block all pop-ups and banner ads, as well as block cookies, animations, music and images. It will also stop "referrers:" sites that open up other sites. You can customize what is blocked by site.

4. Other Bundled Software

With McAfee's Internet Security 4.0, you also get VirusScan 6.0, Firewall, Safe & Sound, QuickClean Lite, and Shredder. VirusScan did well in catching the recent klez virus, and updates its virus signature file automatically each week. The Firewall works well, but I thought it was performing slower than Zone Alarm when all the security features are turned on. Safe & Sound is a utility that will automatically back up selected files to another location. You can set it to back up to another drive or another directory, and set the interval anywhere from 30 minutes to real-time mirroring. QuickClean Lite is a garbage eliminator. Shredder is an enhanced DELETE program which overwrites deleted files many times with random values and scrambles the directory entries.

Combined Package

Many tools have similar features, but I really like how Guard Dog blocks indirect cookies and automatically deletes cookies from non-bookmarked sites at the end of each session. Other tools require you to manually select what to delete. Ad Subtract stops all the eyesores and extra clicks to close unwanted windows. VirusScan is as good as any other virus program, and is bundled with Guard Dog. The Firewall is as good as Zone Alarm, so you could use it instead if you wish.

-PJ

35 posted on 07/06/2002 1:24:21 PM PDT by Political Junkie Too
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #36 Removed by Moderator

To: Political Junkie Too
I have been happy with Norton, the virus checkers has stopped many riding in on E-Mail!
37 posted on 07/06/2002 1:36:10 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Guard Dog was the center-piece for me. Once I decided that I wanted that, I went with the rest of the package from McAfee.

-PJ

38 posted on 07/06/2002 1:40:36 PM PDT by Political Junkie Too
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: 4ourprogeny; Ernest_at_the_Beach
Ernest makes a very valid point. Running out of memory is the biggest culprit when your machine freezes for no reason. I jumped in when the prices were at the bottom and bumped my machine to 512M. Still, I find myself rebooting quite regularly. I work in IT when I'm not on FR. We tell all our users, "Don't call MIS until you've restarted your computer." Obviously, can't be sure without knowing what all is running, and seeing it happen, but it sounds more like memory starvation than a bug.
You would be surprised how many programs run in Windows without your knowledge. A look at Start|Run|MSCONFIG will give you an idea. Assuming you sorta know your way around your computer AND have a good backup, you can use MSCONFIG to turn off some of this stuff to free up a starved machine. But please, backup up your data and know what you're turning off.

39 posted on 07/06/2002 2:08:53 PM PDT by NerdDad
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: NerdDad
You would be surprised how many programs run in Windows without your knowledge.

This is true. In the past I always had Microsoft Messenger start up with Windows. Even when I would sign out, but leave the icon in the taskbar I noticed through ZoneAlarm messenger was still uploading. This of course is using memory even though the program was turned off. Now I completely shut it down; after I check my e-mail I exit the program.

Still I wondered, what information could have been getting uploaded to Microsoft? It's not that I'm paranoid or anything about it, but it just seemed strange.

40 posted on 07/06/2002 2:25:09 PM PDT by Reaganwuzthebest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

Comment #41 Removed by Moderator

To: 4ourprogeny
..it only shows 248.0 MB of RAM

It's all there. Just being used by Windows. Can't remember how much mine shows but it is a little less than the 512 I have. 98SE is better than the previous versions about giving back memory. But it's not always Windows' fault. Many apps running under Windows are horrible about leaking memory. We have one at work called MetaViewer that almost always requires a reboot after use. A tidbit many folks don't realize is that the Microsoft Office Shortcut Bar takes a meg of memory just to sit on your desktop. Insane.

42 posted on 07/06/2002 3:26:52 PM PDT by NerdDad
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
I finally figured it out. Went there and liked what I saw. Got Pest Control, but now it's exit button isn't ennabled and it tells me to use the finish button on the current logs tab. But that didn't work either. So it's sitting here, the Pest Control window, open and won't be closed. I wrote ZoneAlarm, but who knows when they'll write back? So, when I shut down, what happens?
43 posted on 07/06/2002 3:28:12 PM PDT by WaterDragon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
Freeper Techie question: I have Norton Internet security which contains a firewall can i also install zonelab firewall or that ad spy stuff without conflict? I am on DSL service which is kinda finicky on firewalls. Any help would be appreciated.
44 posted on 07/06/2002 3:38:41 PM PDT by lexington minuteman 1775
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: WaterDragon
I'm not familiar with the pest patrol program, but NerdDad said he got it, you might want to ping him.

The only thing I can think of is if the window won't close, try the ctrl/alt/delete keys to shut it. You also might want to reboot and try it again. If you still have problems with it, uninstall and then reinstall the program. Maybe you forgot to do something in the configuration setup.

45 posted on 07/06/2002 3:54:14 PM PDT by Reaganwuzthebest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: lexington minuteman 1775
I don't know the answer but I would suspect they are going to conflict!

I need to know the answer because I will be using norton Professional on my new machine when I get it going! Would prefer to stay with Zonelab for windows XP Pro.

46 posted on 07/06/2002 4:19:39 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: lexington minuteman 1775
Wish I could help you, I don't know, although I did find this link to ZoneAlarm help which discourages more than one firewall.
47 posted on 07/06/2002 4:32:54 PM PDT by Reaganwuzthebest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: Reaganwuzthebest
I run zone alarm on my server & esafe desktop on my laptop & workstations. It makes a great combo that nothing gets by. (But you must be somewhat computer literate to keep esafe set up properly)
48 posted on 07/06/2002 6:42:45 PM PDT by Ford Fairlane
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Chemnitz
Bump
49 posted on 07/06/2002 6:48:40 PM PDT by tet68
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: TC Rider
BTW, if you have a cable modem or DSL and don't have a hardware or software firewall, you may as well let your computer have sex with Haitian males in a San Francisco bathhouse, while eating imported UK cow brains.

That created, for me, the weirdest, most bazaar visual you could imagine. My computer would never do such a thing.

Of course, its protected by Zone Alarm as well.

50 posted on 07/06/2002 7:23:38 PM PDT by meyer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-70 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson