Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Musharraf's Secularism is a Joke
http://www.mideastinsight.org/03_02/musharraf2.html ^

Posted on 09/12/2002 7:04:43 PM PDT by BlackIce

MEI: There has been considerable discussion regarding the possibility that the current war of terrorism will not be confined to targets within Afghanistan. Since Pakistan is a key partner of the United States in fighting terrorism, what are your views on the expansion of the war on terrorism globally to quite possibly include other Islamic states?

MUSHARRAF: We are against terrorism anywhere in the world. Still, we have not yet gone into detail in defining terrorism. We continue to say that terrorism, in all its forms and manifestations, needs to be addressed. Now that we say that, we need to take a very detailed and analytical look at what terrorism really is. And Pakistan will be there; it has given its support to fight terrorism to the world.

Afghanistan is our neighbor, and we have close bonds with Afghanistan. Therefore, it was an automatic response that we would get involved in whatever is happening in Afghanistan. But anywhere else in the world, one has to take a very close look, and afterward take steps.

We have not, as yet, really decided on our next steps. Regardless, Pakistan will remain a partner in fighting terrorism in all its forms and manifestations.

MEI: You have received some criticism from certain quarters about the manner in which you assumed power in Pakistan. In your view, why has the electoral process in Pakistan not produced a sustainable democratic system?

MUSHARRAF: I did not take power; I was actually handed over power. As to why there is no political structure of democracy in place in Pakistan, I think this is because the leaders themselves corrupted the democratic political system. Instead of consolidating this system in Pakistan, they corrupted the political structure. It is the political leaders themselves who are to blame.

MEI: You have recently announced that national and provincial elections will take place in October 2002. And yet, you have stated your intention to remain in office another five years. To what extent will Pakistan's elected officials be able to influence foreign and domestic policy-making?

Musharraf (right) with Afghanistan's Interim Leader Hamid Karzai. "We must facilitate an arrangement in Afghanistan that is acceptable to both Iran and Pakistan." Photo: Courtesy of Capt. Muhammad Shujaat Azeem. MUSHARRAF: We are going to have elections in October. And there will be an elected government with a prime minister as chief executive. Now, when I say that, I will remain the president. This is following the parliamentary form of government that has always been in place in Pakistan - except, obviously, that my being the president has to be under some kind of a constitutional arrangement, and we are looking into this. As for the future functioning of the new government, the prime minister will be the chief executive and will run the government through a Cabinet. Obviously, we would like to ensure that this political reform and restructuring is sustainable and is not reversed. And we would also like to ensure that national interest is always kept supreme.

MEI: Some have noted your respect for Turkish leader Mustafa Kemal Ataturk when you were a young boy growing up in Turkey. Are you interested in seeing Pakistan in the model of a secular Islamic state along the lines of Turkey?

MUSHARRAF: No, not at all. This is not a secular state. As I said, our forefathers, the founders of Pakistan, created Pakistan as an Islamic republic. So this is not a secular state, as opposed to Turkey. Certainly not. And I am not going to change that at all. When I praised Ataturk, it was for what he did for Turkey - he converted the "Sick Man of Europe" into modern Turkey. We cannot follow exactly what he did for Turkey here in Pakistan. Pakistan has its own environment. Therefore, we need to do something indigenous for Pakistan, and that is what we are doing. But I respect and admire Ataturk for what he did for Turkey.

MEI: You are on the verge of war with India over Kashmir. Could you shed some light on what the United States could do to help solve this problem between the two countries?

MUSHARRAF: Yes, there is tension and escalation now between India and Pakistan. And we have fought three wars over Afghanistan and a number of skirmishes over Kashmir. We need to resolve the Kashmir dispute. Otherwise this kind of confrontation will continue to happen in the future. I feel that the United States does have a role to play in mediating, or at least facilitating, a process of dialogue and then helping move things forward toward a resolution of the Kashmir dispute.

MEI: You have pledged to stop the infiltration of militants into Kashmir. But you have also said that you will offer political and moral support to Kashmiri groups. How do you reconcile these intentions?

Photo: Ron Sachs/CNP. MUSHARRAF: Very well. We have always lent political, diplomatic, and moral support to the indigenous freedom struggle that is going on in Indian-held Kashmir. I call what is happening in Kashmir "state terrorism." It is being carried out by the Indian government and forces. A U.N. Security Council resolution states that the solution to the Kashmir dispute should be in accordance with the wishes of the people of Kashmir who were guaranteed this in 1948. The people of Kashmir are asking for implementation of that U.N. resolution. Therefore, they cannot be called terrorists. But on the other side, the Indian forces are denying the implementation of the U.N. resolution. So, who is the terrorist?

We will always give moral, diplomatic, and political support to the people of Kashmir. Other than that, the movement there is totally indigenous. And we don't know how long it will carry on, because it is the people of Kashmir themselves who are involved.

MEI: Has the lifting of U.S. sanctions against Pakistan already begun to benefit the Pakistani people? What kind of assistance from the United States will have the greatest positive effect on Pakistan?

MUSHARRAF: We have highlighted our problems to the United States, and they are primarily economic. We sought the United States' support on the issue of debt relief, balance of payments, and market access. We got substantial debt relief through the Paris Club arrangement, in which an entire stock of debt was restructured for 30 years. We were also given considerable fiscal support, which was a big relief. We got $600 million, plus support in various other areas, which came to about $1 billion altogether. The European Union has given us total market access. But we are looking forward to some movement on this by the United States also.

MEI: What will you seek to convey to the U.S. administration and Congress in the coming months?

MUSHARRAF: First of all, I would like to convey that the association we have taken up with the United States should become a permanent one. The support that we have given in the fight against terrorism will be continued, and our association should be forward-looking. Pakistan's previous experiences with bilateral relationships, such as when the Soviets left, were not very good. This past impression needs to be corrected.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: india; musharraf; pakistan

1 posted on 09/12/2002 7:04:44 PM PDT by BlackIce
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: akash; swarthyguy; keri; AM2000; anu_shr; Dog Gone; belmont_mark; atc; tictoc; Annakin; Shermy; ...
From the man himself:

Are you interested in seeing Pakistan in the model of a secular Islamic state along the lines of Turkey?


MUSHARRAF: No, not at all. This is not a secular state. As I said, our forefathers, the founders of Pakistan, created Pakistan as an Islamic republic. So this is not a secular state, as opposed to Turkey. Certainly not. And I am not going to change that at all.
2 posted on 09/12/2002 7:08:24 PM PDT by BlackIce
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BlackIce
Musharraf's Secularism is a Joke

Pakistan has proudly and loudly claimed to be an Islamic nation since the days of General Zia. Musharraf has never, to my knowledge, said or done anything, to suggest a change in course. The title of your post is, therefore, misleading.

3 posted on 09/12/2002 7:11:59 PM PDT by AM2000
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AM2000
Remember how the Media was portraying Musharraf as the next Ataturk??

Well thats why my title says that.
4 posted on 09/12/2002 7:19:00 PM PDT by BlackIce
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: BlackIce
The media is stupid. Musharraf never said any such thing, nor has the Pakistani nation ever pretended to be anything but Islamic.
5 posted on 09/12/2002 7:20:16 PM PDT by AM2000
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: AM2000
Yeah thats true. Look I'm not disagreeing with what you said earlier, I'm just saying that THE MEDIA (as you said) labelling Musharraf as the next Ataturk is a joke cause the man himself says otherwise.
6 posted on 09/12/2002 7:25:52 PM PDT by BlackIce
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: BlackIce; swarthyguy
How come no one ever confronts this bast%&#$ about his Axis with the PRC? What, is it some sort of taboo topic? What a lame interviewer...(one of many...)
7 posted on 09/12/2002 7:35:45 PM PDT by GOP_1900AD
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AM2000
I haven't read the article yet, but the headline from the source is "PAKISTAN WILL REMAIN A PARTNER IN FIGHTING TERRORISM"

8 posted on 09/12/2002 7:49:26 PM PDT by Dog Gone
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Dog Gone
Damn man, I can't get any Poetic License?? :)
9 posted on 09/12/2002 8:04:03 PM PDT by BlackIce
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: BlackIce
That was a way more than poetic license, but I'm still glad you posted the interview. I was under the impression, at least, that Musharraf had some vision of moving toward a secular state eventually.

That's not the case. At best he's moving away from a radical islamic state.

10 posted on 09/12/2002 8:16:44 PM PDT by Dog Gone
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Dog Gone
The poor man is trying to survive. Do you really want him to fall on his sword in public? That would be ugly and unfortunate.
11 posted on 09/12/2002 8:18:35 PM PDT by Torie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Torie
I'm lowering my expectations of Musharraf. I wanted him to be Ataturk. I don't think he's going to be that.

I'll settle for useful dictator. For now.

12 posted on 09/12/2002 8:26:18 PM PDT by Dog Gone
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Dog Gone
The man would be dead in a week if he went down that road publically. He did shut down the Muslim fundie schools though.
13 posted on 09/12/2002 8:36:07 PM PDT by Torie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: BlackIce
Calling President Bush and Colin Powell. Hey, you guys, listen up. Here's WAZZUP!

Pakistani secularim is as real as a three dollar bill.
14 posted on 09/13/2002 8:51:14 AM PDT by swarthyguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Torie
Nothing's been shut down. They're ALL still operating.
15 posted on 09/13/2002 8:52:14 AM PDT by swarthyguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: swarthyguy
Not only are they all operating, but only about 4,000 out of the 15,000 - 40, 000 have even complied with the government's ordnance to register. (issued in June)

I'm trying to decide if Musharraf's public statement about Pakistan remaining an Islamic State is PR for the Madrassas, or the simple truth.

16 posted on 09/13/2002 9:23:34 AM PDT by keri
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: keri
The simple and plain truth.

A jihadi in a uniform, well groomed, with proper British English.

Just shaves, unlike arafat. But far more devious and dangerous.

I'm glad he'g giving these interviews.

Of course, Musharrafat's apologists will cite the pakistani street, speaking to the domestic audience, blah blah blah. So who's he lying to today; us or them.

Pakistan's islamicness is enshrined in the constitution.

"A person shall not be qualified for election as President unless he is a Muslim of not less than forty-five years of age and is qualified to be elected as member of the National Assembly."

The Constitution, Article 41(2)

17 posted on 09/13/2002 9:35:43 AM PDT by swarthyguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: swarthyguy
I got another Interview with Musharraf but the only thing is I cant find the link...yet. Its even better than this.
18 posted on 09/13/2002 10:42:54 AM PDT by BlackIce
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: BlackIce
Musharraf has no choice but to talk about Pakistan as an Islamic nation - secularism is poisonous to ordinary Pakistani as is socialism to Americans. From what I remember , he has been as secular as any Pakistani leader can become and survive. He is not some stupid Islamic Jehadi. His hatred of India has greater pathological roots than Islam ... he is a proud soldier whose army has been defeated by India twice when he was a junior officer and once when he himself led the army to the Kargil adventure. He wants revenge and will not rest till he gets it. Unfortunately for him..India is not exactly the Soviet union and has limitless number of people who can fight and run over his country. Terrorism is the best way to hurt India. That is the weapon of the weak and Musharraf knows that.
19 posted on 09/13/2002 10:13:09 PM PDT by anu_shr
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: swarthyguy
So who's he lying to today; us or them.

Us and them, I'd say. Credit the guy for being smart, unlike Arafat. Musharraf has probably done more for Pakistan's military than any other dictator the Pakis have ever had.

Point blank, I think the guy's a con. A darn good one.

20 posted on 09/14/2002 12:11:27 AM PDT by keri
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: keri
As much as i hate to say it, he's masterful.

Slicky, Tricky Mushy.

He's played Powell like a violin.
21 posted on 09/14/2002 10:08:20 AM PDT by swarthyguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: anu_shr
True
22 posted on 09/14/2002 10:16:35 AM PDT by BlackIce
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: keri; swarthyguy
Thats exactly right. Musharraf is playing games with the west.

I think that He sincerely wants all Islamic militancy to stop......if its directed against the West. What he wants is for the Jihadis to focus on India.

It dont work that way, because the In thing for the Jihadis is to attack the west and Christians. And since Pakistanis want to emulate the Arabs so badly, well thats what theyll focus on.
23 posted on 09/14/2002 10:19:21 AM PDT by BlackIce
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: swarthyguy
Thanks many times over for your posts. You know what's going on. It's in your blood.
24 posted on 09/14/2002 10:24:23 AM PDT by dennisw
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: anu_shr
India will not stand for his bull$hit for very much longer.
25 posted on 09/14/2002 12:42:02 PM PDT by Annakin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Annakin
Oh, yeah, India had the perfect shot in December 2001 to hit the Pakistanis.

She did not.

Again in May, again nothing.

India is too tied to the conventional, rational way of conducting business and places too much faith in the UN and the US.

Unabashed self interest is what Indians get their dhotis in a knot about.
26 posted on 09/15/2002 12:41:10 AM PDT by swarthyguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

Comment #27 Removed by Moderator

To: Annakin
I don't believe India will act against Pakistan. Unless directly attacked. Hindus tend to believe inaction is a also action and will wait for someone else to do their fighting. There is a brahminical disdain for getting hands dirty. Their is also a lack of killer instinct which has always prevented its leadership from pulverizing and finishing its enemies. Indian history is replete with Hindu rulers sparing muslim invadors who returned to fight another day and kill them. This unfortunately has not changed. Today Indian leadership is hiding behind nukes and hi-tech just to avoid fighting a war.
28 posted on 09/15/2002 11:29:26 AM PDT by anu_shr
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: anu_shr
It's called "Gandhi Syndrome."


29 posted on 09/15/2002 4:09:17 PM PDT by Annakin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Annakin
So tell me who i am.
30 posted on 09/15/2002 9:21:33 PM PDT by swarthyguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: swarthyguy
Umm...Gomer Pyle?
31 posted on 09/15/2002 11:41:59 PM PDT by Annakin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

Comment #32 Removed by Moderator

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson