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Gun cleaning advice sought - What do you think of solvents?

Posted on 09/19/2002 3:08:18 PM PDT by SlickWillard

Venison season is just around the corner, and the local Walmart is stocking up on hunting supplies. All the gun cleaning kits have both oil [to be worked with a cloth], and solvents [to be worked with a wire metal brush]. My question: Is it possible that solvents, worked with a wire metal brush, could do more harm to your barrel than benign neglect? My guns are Mossbergs from the 590A1 series.

Thanks in advance for your opinions.


TOPICS: Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: banglist

1 posted on 09/19/2002 3:08:18 PM PDT by SlickWillard
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To: SlickWillard
Also, anyone know how I can bump this to the Bang List?
2 posted on 09/19/2002 3:10:07 PM PDT by SlickWillard
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To: SlickWillard
I never need to use solvents, mostly because I clean and lubricate my weapons immediately after firing and regularly between firings.

I'd say you can't do much better with plain old Break-Free CLP and regular lubrication and cleanings with only that.

3 posted on 09/19/2002 3:11:43 PM PDT by fogarty
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To: SlickWillard
The solvents work well with the cloth, and get the powder gunk out of there. The brass brush would aid in getting lead off the rifle lands, which the shotgun wouldn't have anyway.
4 posted on 09/19/2002 3:13:01 PM PDT by RightWhale
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To: SlickWillard
Since brass is softer than steel, you can safely use them on your shotgun bore. If all you're asking about is your Mossberg, I recommend Break-Free and a brass brush, followed by patches of the appropriate guage.

Removing copper fouling from a rifle bore is another matter. Since you didn't ask about it, I'll refrain from offering an opinion.

Regards,

L

5 posted on 09/19/2002 3:17:18 PM PDT by Lurker
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To: SlickWillard
You can use any nitrate based solvent to cleanse powder residue (it's also a good alibi if you get your hands "bagged" by the police after a shoot).

Acetone is an excellent solvent too, but make sure and oil all surfaces well after cleaning, then wipe off and lightly oil about 48 hrs later.

6 posted on 09/19/2002 3:19:52 PM PDT by greydog
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To: SlickWillard
Solvents? No way, check out MPro7, THE cleaning/lubricating fluid for guns, or your FA-18 Hornet. http://www.mp7.com
7 posted on 09/19/2002 3:21:32 PM PDT by Henchster
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To: SlickWillard
Is it possible that solvents, worked with a wire metal brush, could do more harm to your barrel than benign neglect?

As long as you are careful not to bang around in the bore with your cleaning rod, the answer is no. You won't harm your gun with the solvents.

8 posted on 09/19/2002 3:25:26 PM PDT by toddst
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To: SlickWillard
Nitrate based solvents ( like Hoppe's ) should be fine, as long as you don't let them sit for a long time on the metal--as soon as you're done cleaning out the powder with the solvent, make sure to run a dry cloth over the surfaces to get any solvent that remains.
9 posted on 09/19/2002 3:25:42 PM PDT by Tench_Coxe
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To: SlickWillard
There were certain portions of the gas system in the M249 which were subject to sever carbon and copper fouling...so much so that GI CLP and extensive copper brushing and elbow grease were marginally adequate. The little MRE bottles of Tabasco proved far more effective.

Later on in life I would experience similar problems with my .50AE Desert Eagle and solved them in a like manner. For less egregious problems than baked on copper and carbon, I've always found an dip in diesel coupled with a thorough drying and a light film of Hoppes (oil, not solvent) best for cleaning and general, between use storage. I've found various cleaning and lubricating practices work better for various methods/ lengths of storage and/ or climates.

10 posted on 09/19/2002 3:27:24 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack
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To: SlickWillard
My question: Is it possible that solvents, worked with a wire metal brush, could do more harm to your barrel than benign neglect?

There is no such thing as "benign" neglect.
Clean your firearms immediately after use.
The crud that collects attracts moisture (humidity) leading to the formation of acids. Over time, if "neglected", these will eat away at the bore causing severe pitting. This may be of less concern with shotguns than rifles or handguns, but it is good practice nonetheless for ALL firearms. Keep them well maintained at all times, and safely stored when not in use.

11 posted on 09/19/2002 3:29:15 PM PDT by Willie Green
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To: Henchster
"... No way, check out MPro7, THE cleaning/lubricating fluid for guns, or your FA-18 Hornet. http://www.mp7.com"

WARNING: MPro7 cleaning solution will cause irreversable damage to some plastics used in modern firearms!

I've also seen it soften the paint on other types of finished firearms.

MPro7 cleaning solution should only be used on all-metal gun parts, though the MPro7 lubricating solution looks to be just common silicone in a bottle.

My suggestion for cleaning shotgun barrels is Simple Green.

12 posted on 09/19/2002 3:32:24 PM PDT by The KG9 Kid
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To: SlickWillard
If you don't mind mixing your own, search the web for "Ed's Red" - a formula for homemade gun solvent. I use it by the gallon.
13 posted on 09/19/2002 3:35:21 PM PDT by spqrzilla9
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To: SlickWillard
If you want even more encouragement about cleaning, along with a few "once a year" opinions, go over to www.thefiringline.com and use the search function to find shotgun cleaning info.

If you shoot a lot of lead slugs instead of normal birdshot or buckshot you may want to get a special lead solvent as well.
14 posted on 09/19/2002 3:37:04 PM PDT by MossbergPump
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To: spqrzilla9
"... If you don't mind mixing your own, search the web for "Ed's Red" - a formula for homemade gun solvent. I use it by the gallon."

Indeed. Ed's Red is the best of the best, and it's an ancient Chinese secret.

15 posted on 09/19/2002 3:37:16 PM PDT by The KG9 Kid
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To: Joe 6-pack
Sweet's 7.62 is really good for copper build up.
16 posted on 09/19/2002 3:37:50 PM PDT by Dead Dog
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To: fogarty
I'd say you can't do much better with plain old Break-Free CLP and regular lubrication and cleanings with only that.

Break-Free is awesome stuff.
17 posted on 09/19/2002 3:41:39 PM PDT by July 4th
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To: spqrzilla9
Instructions for making your own 'Ed's Red' solution:

''Ed's Red'' Bore Cleaner... Home-Mix Really Works!

18 posted on 09/19/2002 3:43:11 PM PDT by The KG9 Kid
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To: SlickWillard
Where will you be hunting? If you have to ask these questions, I don't want to be in the same county when you're carrying. Can you name the components of a modern smokeless firearm cartridge?
19 posted on 09/19/2002 4:28:03 PM PDT by BulletBrasDotNet
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To: SlickWillard
Dawn dish washing soap in as hot as water you can. Then clean it with gun oil after. I use this when I clean my Black Powder rifle. Then I dry it and then use gun oil after.
20 posted on 09/19/2002 4:32:51 PM PDT by crz
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To: SlickWillard
I use a compound called "SweetShooter". This stuff is better than anything I have found so far. As for oil...IT never touches any of my guns. Yup I wasn't stuttering...NO OIL. This compound has ‘tecrolan’ in it, which molecularly bonds to the metal. I use only steel brushes both outside and in the bore, but only if you use a ‘tecrolan’ product. It great, no fouling period cause there is no oil and a tecrolan treated gun is super easy to clean. I get mine at the local gun shows and they do a brisk business. They have a ‘tecrolan’ cream which I use on the slides only, never had a problem.
21 posted on 09/19/2002 4:54:28 PM PDT by PushinTin
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To: Willie Green
Hear hear!

Every firearm you own should ALWAYS have a light coating of lubricant - mine being good old CLP.

22 posted on 09/19/2002 5:25:13 PM PDT by fogarty
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To: SlickWillard
Have been using a product called Clenzoil.com on my AKs/ARs. After first cleaning with Hoppes' and removing ALL residue, apply thin layer of Clenzoil and let weapon set for several days. It seems to soak in-yet builds an invisible film. Next time you clean the weapon, it seems to clean up easier/faster. This is especially noticeable with AKs as I use WOLF or BARNAUL.
23 posted on 09/19/2002 5:45:15 PM PDT by donozark
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To: SlickWillard
What do you think of solvents?

Solvents should be legalized. Anyone who disagrees with me is a jack booted thug. There is no proven physical harm associated with inhaling solvents. The War on Solvents is an abysmal failure and should be assigned to the scapheap of failed ideologies. What occurs between a consenting adult and his solvent of choice is his own business. If you disagree with me, I will spit on you!!!

24 posted on 09/19/2002 5:50:21 PM PDT by johniegrad
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To: SlickWillard
This is a recomended cleaning procedure for older military guns. Some of this may apply to cleaning guns in general.

------------------------------------------------------------

Maintenance Cleaning

If you follow these directions, you will never have to worry about ammunition being corrosive or non-corrosive. It seems that the forums are bombarded with questions about ammo being corrosive or non-corrosive. I think this because many people think you have to go to elaborate extremes to clean their rifles after using corrosive ammo. This is because many folks advocate the use of ammonia mixed with boiling water and the pouring of this water down bores. Other folks advocate long sessions of scrubbing their bores following the ammonia and hot water ritual.
I have seen very exotic recipes for cleaning after corrosive ammo that including mixing concoctions or the use the of electrolytic devices. Friends, let's keep this simple. We can start by understanding what corrosive ammo is and what that means for clean up after the range.

Corrosive ammo is corrosive because of the presence of corrosive salts in the primers used and/or the powder. When the cartridge is fired these salts are deposited in the bore and around the bolt face. Left untreated, these salts will interact with moisture in the air and corrode the metal surfaces they are on. The goal after firing this ammo is to neutralize the salts and remove the powder residue and metal fouling. To do this you will need Three products – Windex with Ammonia-D Gun Scrubber and Sweet's 7.62. You will not need to boil up hot water or concoct exotic recipes. You don't even need to remove the rifle from the stock if you are careful.

Pointing the muzzle down towards the floor over an old pan, squirt a liberal amount of Windex into the chamber and bore while slowly turning the rifle. Allow it to drip out of the muzzle.

Place the rifle back on your bench ( or kitchen table ) and run a Windex soaked patch through for about 20 strokes that has been wrapped around an old bore brush. Note that this replaces the necessity of using a bore brush before cleaning with solvents.

Spray some Gun Scrubber down the bore from the chamber. Using a chamber brush, clean the chamber thoroughly. Dry patch and run a patch through for about 40 strokes liberally soaked with Sweet's 7.62. Dry patch and inspect the bore. If it still appears dirty repeat the process.

When you are satisfied that the bore is clean enough, run a final patch through to lightly coat the bore with gun oil. Clean your bolt parts by liberally spraying with the Windex and wipe dry. Then spray the inside of the with Gun Scrubber
Using a cloth, dab a little Sweet's 7.62 on the bolt face and wipe aggressively. Use a wooden matchstick or round toothpick to get into the groove surrounding the bolt face and up under the extractor. Spray with Gun Scrubber. Use a Q-tip to clean the inside of the bolt face.
Wipe the bolt parts down with a light coat of gun oil and reassemble and you are done!
Occasionally you might want to remove the barreled receiver from the stock to clean the magazine assembly.

If you stick to this cleaning process you never have to worry about what kind of ammo you use. It's quick and easy and does an excellent job. Using the boiling water method seems to leave a great deal of moisture in and around the receiver that invites corrosion a few days later.

25 posted on 09/19/2002 6:02:54 PM PDT by CWRWinger
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To: *bang_list

Click on the pistol to display the latest FreeRepublic 'bang_list' posts.


26 posted on 10/08/2002 9:41:24 AM PDT by Joe Brower
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