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No Joke: Poland is our best friend in Europe
The Weekly Standard ^ | 02/03/03 | Matthew Kaminski

Posted on 01/24/2003 9:50:55 PM PST by Pokey78

Brussels

WHEN EUROPE THREW a big party in Copenhagen in December, Poland nearly spoiled the fun. Unhappy with the membership terms offered by the European Union, the Poles held out for a few extra billion euros, knowing full well the "historic" enlargement jamboree couldn't take place without the biggest of the Central European candidates. The E.U. caved and put up extra cash, securing the claim to have "reunified Europe" and "buried Yalta." Polish prime minister Leszek Miller, a veteran of one of his country's last Communist governments, thanked native son Pope John Paul II for getting Poland into "Europe."

The theatrics in Copenhagen may be a foretaste of things to come in the expanded Europe. Not since Britain joined in 1973 has the old guard in Paris, Berlin, and Brussels been so uneasy about a new member. Leave aside Poland's stagnant economy, its dangerous populists, and its corruption scandals. Poland is a pain because its heart isn't in Europe but across the Atlantic.

It's a deeply worrying prospect for the euro-nationalists. The E.U.'s constitutional convention, now underway in Brussels, aims to strengthen the common foreign policy after Europe's failure to stand up to America on Iraq, Kyoto, and the international criminal court. On January 14, France and Germany (a.k.a. Old Europe) backed the creation of the post of European president, in part to give the E.U. a stronger voice, and a week later Paris sided with Germany's pacifistic stance on war with Iraq. A European military force will be up and running this year. And while many different camps have a say in the often tedious debate over Europe's future, most are still tempted to define Europe against America, as in de Gaulle's day, and to see their values or interests as divergent.

The coming expansion of the E.U. to 25 countries and 445 million people (up from 15 countries and 378 million people today) might just make Europe better able to stand up to America in world affairs. But there's a hitch. Poland, the most important of the incoming members, with its 40 million people and strategic location on the E.U.'s future eastern frontier, is Washington's closest ally on the Continent. During the drawn-out negotiations over membership, French president Jacques Chirac pointedly warned Polish foreign minister Bronislaw Geremek that Poland better not be the "American Trojan horse in Europe" or Paris might veto its accession (as de Gaulle once did Britain's). Some in the Brussels press corps casually refer to Poland as a "Fifth Column."

Maybe they're right. Only a few weeks after Copenhagen, Warsaw bought 48 F-16 fighters from Lockheed Martin for $3.8 billion, snubbing two European offers. "As a thank-you present for entry into Europe, what a success!" said a scandalized Serge Dassault, whose French concern, Dassault Aviation, lost out. For three days, his newspaper, the Paris daily Le Figaro, ran letters from readers calling the Poles ingrates and bad Europeans.

The pique in Paris, however, was mostly for show. The French, like the Poles, had known all along that the biggest military tender ever in the former Warsaw Pact would go to a U.S. concern. (Congress gave Poland a favorable loan to cover the purchase, and Lockheed Martin threw in more goodies, including about $10 billion of "offset" investments, than either of the European concerns could muster.) While the jets will help Poland take a bigger role in NATO and any other U.S.-led coalition--the Poles, unlike the Germans, say they're ready to serve in Iraq--the planes were meant to send a clear signal. "With Europe, you have to talk and be on good terms," says Tomasz Lis, anchor of Poland's most-watched evening news show, Fakty. "But the relationship with America is sacred."

Polish president Aleksander Kwasniewski didn't seem to care about French feelings. A former sports minister in the Communist era and a savvy politician, Kwasniewski knows polls show the Poles to be among the most pro-American of nations. They're still grateful to Washington for getting Poland into NATO--and ambivalent about the economic costs of joining the E.U. After the jet sale, Kwasniewski went to Washington for the second time in six months. At their White House meeting, President Bush said, "I have got no better friend in Europe today."

From the Polish perspective, the attraction needs no explanation. France and Britain failed Poland in 1939, and again at Yalta (while many Poles rationalize American complicity in the division of Europe, saying Stalin manipulated a frail FDR). Ten million Polish Americans strengthen the bond. The national mythology touts self-sacrifice on behalf of the West against a Barbaric East, going back to the defense of Vienna against the Turks, the Polish army's victory against the Bolsheviks in 1920, and the Polish air force's role in the defense of London in World War II. Less than a year after communism fell, on the eve of the first Gulf War, Polish special forces spirited six U.S. operatives out of Iraq (a story later made into a hit Polish film). Poland's special forces unit, GROM, a standout in an outmoded military, was also deployed in Haiti in 1994.

This eagerness to prove themselves good allies no doubt helped the Poles' cause at NATO and served their narrow national interest. But it also serves America. Through NATO and in many other ways, the United States is a European power. The Europeans aren't the easiest allies; but in the Balkans and Afghanistan, they run the peacekeeping operations. And in a wider Europe, Poland will have potentially broad influence. Inside NATO, the Poles are staunch defenders of the alliance and generally support military engagements abroad. And they sit on a still fragile frontier. Their eastern neighbors include Ukraine, which allegedly sells radar systems to Saddam Hussein, and Belarus, whose president is Europe's last dictator and another Saddam pal. The Poles can be a westward bridge and a good example for these and other former Soviet countries toward which the E.U. has no coherent policy.

AND THERE'S A BETTER REASON to welcome not only the Poles but the other East Europeans into the E.U. For half a century, building Europe was about burying World War II and nudging France and Germany to get along. The current crop of Western European leaders don't have the war to guide them: Gerhard Schröder, ousting Helmut Kohl in 1998, said Germany needed to free itself from its past. Germany's foreign minister Joschka Fischer and the E.U.'s foreign policy chief Javier Solana spent their youth protesting against America rather than feeling grateful for its role in ending the war and rebuilding Europe.

The incoming members had markedly different formative years. Soviet tyranny ended only a dozen years ago. These countries know it wasn't Germany or France that brought down the Soviet empire or that championed their entry into NATO and the E.U. A decade ago, the Europeans stood by as the Balkans descended into war, less than an hour's flight from Vienna. The Balkans aren't that different from Bulgaria or Poland. The Bosnian war remains a useful reminder that Brussels, Paris, and even London haven't yet proven themselves mature enough to look after their messy continent without U.S. help.

So the debate over a divergence in "values" between Europe and America sounds baffling from Warsaw. There, America's "values" aren't rejected. The E.U. may hold the ticket to First World living standards, but America's "moralistic" foreign policy has more appeal to Poles than European realpolitik. And of the 10 incoming E.U. members, only Poland--the most pro-American of the lot--has any strategic weight. Its support for NATO and for U.S. intervention against "rogue regimes," as well as its skepticism about a common European foreign policy and the E.U.'s military ambitions, will have an impact.

Far from widening the trans-Atlantic gulf, the enlargement of the E.U. should change the tenor and substance of relations for the better--as long as the United States retains its leadership role in NATO, and the newcomers master the rules of the E.U.'s sometimes bizarre political game. To succeed in doing this after its accession to the E.U. in 2004, Warsaw will need savvy diplomacy. The link with the United States can help. American diplomats and visiting congressmen, for their part, hope Poland, once inside the E.U., can assist in resolving nasty trade disputes.

For now, the biggest question mark is whether Poland can get its domestic house in order. The recession is hurting. An early post-Communist dose of "shock therapy" sparked an economic boom in the 1990s, but reform has stalled. The farmers are hungry for subsidies that Brussels doesn't want to give. Fringe parties are growing more popular. Poland needs to be a success story to matter in Europe. At the moment, the most encouraging sign is an ambiguous one: No country has provoked so much grumbling in Brussels since Margaret Thatcher lived at 10 Downing Street.

Matthew Kaminski is an editorial page writer for the Wall Street Journal Europe.


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Germany; News/Current Events; Russia; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: europeanunion; france; germany; nato; poland; russia; unitedkingdom
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1 posted on 01/24/2003 9:50:56 PM PST by Pokey78
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To: Pokey78
Thanks for posting this article.

I think that FReepers with any interest in traveling to Europe should avoid "Old Europe" and spend their tourist dollars in Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, and Czechoslovakia, all of which have proven to be better friends of America than the rest of Europe.

Of course, Britain is an island, and a good ally.

And for Orianna Falacci and Beurlesconi's sake I'll include Italy on the "friend" list.

OK, Spain, too. Their Prime minister is a conservative and has supported Dubya.

The rest have no honor and no sense of their own civilization.

2 posted on 01/24/2003 10:04:46 PM PST by happygrl
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To: Pokey78
good policy article... something I have never thought of... I wonder what Germany would think if we moved our bases to Poland. You think all that cash would get the Poles economy moving..?? Hey I am all for dumping those ingrates!!!
3 posted on 01/24/2003 10:06:33 PM PST by Walkingfeather
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To: Pokey78
Great article, and very true about the Polish-American bond as well.

A side story about our relationship with them: I'm from Milwaukee, which has quite a few Poles - many with immediate family back in Poland. I have an aunt who was the first generation of her family to be born in America in the early 60's. She wrote her grandparents numerous letters, and each time she would plead for them to come to America any way that they could. They always said no. Finally, in the early 90's, both grandparents were convinced to visit.

On the drive back to Milwaukee from O'Hare, they stopped to grab a few things at a large supermarket. The grandparents went in to the store, and their jaws dropped. They immediately asked, "Can anyone buy this food?" which was soon followed by "Without any stamps, or rations?" After they heard the answer, they started to cry. I think it was at that point they finally realized the power of freedom.
4 posted on 01/24/2003 10:11:50 PM PST by July 4th
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To: Pokey78
Poles are the coolest.
5 posted on 01/24/2003 10:19:31 PM PST by Dec31,1999
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To: Pokey78
Poland knows better than to rely on the French, who didn't do a damn thing to help Poland in her hour of need even after the French declared war on Nazi Germany.
6 posted on 01/24/2003 10:23:02 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: July 4th
I was married to a Cuban woman whose 50 year old uncle made his first visit here from Havana. He had the same reaction when he went into a supermarket. He was about 95 pounds and he had tears in his eyes. He couldn't believe all of the food we had available here to us.

It made me realize how much we take for granted here. When he talked about Cuba - he whisperered as if someone was going to report him....
7 posted on 01/24/2003 10:25:53 PM PST by M. Peach (Eschew obsfucation)
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To: Pokey78; July 4th
Thanks for posting this article. It's truly nice to know we have such good friends in "New Europe". BTW. I think the term "Old Europe" is gonna stick. It'll be known as a "Rummyism".

July 4th, that was a lovely story. My father-in-law is a first generation American born Czech. However, I think when his mother came here, she brought the whole family. We can't have an informal gathering with just her kids and their families without renting a hall!

8 posted on 01/24/2003 10:36:18 PM PST by dixiechick2000 (Thank you, Poland!)
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To: Pokey78
Half-Polish American bump and N'STROWIE to you!
9 posted on 01/24/2003 10:41:06 PM PST by Clemenza (East side, West side, all around the town. Tripping the light fantastic on the sidewalks of New York)
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To: Cacique
Ping!
10 posted on 01/24/2003 10:42:30 PM PST by Clemenza (East side, West side, all around the town. Tripping the light fantastic on the sidewalks of New York)
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To: Walkingfeather
I wonder what Germany would think if we moved our bases to Poland.

The German Greens would be delighted, Poland and the Czechs would be delighted (give them some bases too) and it will scare the hell out of the Russians.

Maybe we could get a naval base on the Baltic while we are at it.

11 posted on 01/24/2003 10:48:04 PM PST by Mike Darancette
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To: Pokey78
The Germans, French, and other "old Europeans" have enjoyed a "leadership" monopoly due to the cold war's artificial east-west division. They were the only game in town for the U.S. in our war against the Soviets. Even Britain, historically our closest European ally, has benefitted by being the only game in town, i.e. the least anti-American Europeans. These countries may have been anti-capitalist, i.e. socialists, and secretly hated most of what American's stood for, but they needed us, and we needed them.

With the fall of the U.S.S.R., I think these countries felt less liberated from a Soviet treat, but more from a dependence on the U.S. they despised. Dependency never breeds loyalty. It always makes the dependent resent their provider. I think "old" Europe feels liberated from the U.S., and most Europeans can't wait to tell the U.S. to "go to hell".

Except, when nasty things like Kosovo occur. They realize that the haven't the fortitude and national disposition to defend themselves (after all, what if the war occurred during their six week holiday season; whoever would fight it??). So, the old Europeans will bluster and try to prick the U.S. in every way they can, but in the end, they won't cut the cord. Maybe in a few more years...

So, the development of a newly freed, independent group of European nation states is truely interesting. I think the U.S. must do all it can to help them develop capitalist institutions, and a traditional rule of law (i.e. don't let the American bar anywhere near them).

EVERY time these Eastern European countries come to us as friends, standing on their own feet, we should reward the relationship in spades.

Who knows: Maybe an capital-based economic miracle in those countries can remind our country (i.e. USA) what it means to be truely free (and end the class-warfare rhetoric forever).

Good luck, my Polish, Chek, and other "new" European friends!

Oh, and by all means, move our bases to any European country who feels we're partners rather than occupiers. Let the Germans go back to their radical leftist past (i.e. Hitler's "National SOCIALISTs" were not "right wing", they were just less left wing than the Communists). We'll kick their a** again if need be.

The same applies to our bases in Korea. Move our guys to Taiwan, and out of Korea. Let them enjoy their "reunification" with their "mother" country in the North. The South Koreans can all adopt comrade Kim's new weight watching routine (i.e. eating grass), for all I care. I've been to Korea, made some nice friends there, and would go back to help them in a second, IF the current generation didn't hate American's so much. Let 'em go... We have friends in this world; we don't need to reward and protect those who hate us.

FReegards, SFS

12 posted on 01/24/2003 10:55:10 PM PST by Steel and Fire and Stone
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To: Steel and Fire and Stone
"Chek" = "Czech".. sorry, I had the finest public school education..
13 posted on 01/24/2003 10:56:22 PM PST by Steel and Fire and Stone
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To: July 4th; M. Peach
I often think of how lucky we are to have our grocery stores.
14 posted on 01/24/2003 11:03:03 PM PST by Slyfox
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To: Steel and Fire and Stone
Really appreciate your post.
15 posted on 01/24/2003 11:27:04 PM PST by MeekMom (( a fellow skier))
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To: Slyfox
I often think of how lucky we are to have our grocery stores.

Never mind the stores, what about the farmers?

It certainly is a blessing to be liberated from all want and starvation, even for poor people. However, we seem to have gone overboard in the other direction. How astonishing it must be for someone from India or Zimbabwe or Haiti to read about Americans so fat they are having stomach operations to lose weight.

-ccm

16 posted on 01/24/2003 11:31:11 PM PST by ccmay
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To: Dec31,1999; Pokey78
Poles are the coolest.

My dad's RAF fighter wing had Polish squadrons attached during WWII. He had the utmost respect for their fearlessness. They were so brave and hated the Nazis so much that they would sometimes atttempt to collide with a German plane if their guns jammed. I remember telling a Polish joke to him as a young boy, and being reprimanded for insulting his favorite comrades.

-ccm

17 posted on 01/24/2003 11:36:22 PM PST by ccmay
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To: Pokey78
"For now, the biggest question mark is whether Poland can get its domestic house in order."

America loves to Polish joke with derission because they make good targets, gentle (for the most part) and forebearing (often characterized here as "dumb"). Poland is only the best friend for the moment in which it is willing to do whatever Uncle Sam wants.

The statement above is a case in point. Poland has needs, we are dangling carrots. How many other countries have had to get any domestic house in order to qualify for the millions we drop in laps. Did Iraq? Did Foxey Mexico? Russia? India? etc. etc.

If it is true that the meek will inherit the earth this is one group of people who qualify by nature. Only God can protect them because they have had no other champion for many centuries and they love the U.S. too much.
18 posted on 01/25/2003 12:03:17 AM PST by Spirited
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To: Pokey78
Poland is a welcome addition in this fight.
19 posted on 01/25/2003 12:04:25 AM PST by sheik yerbouty
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To: sheik yerbouty
Do Broni!
20 posted on 01/25/2003 12:26:52 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: Spirited
America loves to Polish joke with derission because they make good targets

From the Polish point of view, its a whole lot better being on the recieving end of mindless jokes in America then it is being on the recieving end of a tyrants sword in Europe. As far as needing a champion, you seem to forget that one of Polands Nobleman sacrificed his wealth and his life being a champion for our country in its time of need. Look up Casimir Pulaski, the 'Father of the American Cavalry'. We Poles can wait for you to 'catch on'.

21 posted on 01/25/2003 12:46:09 AM PST by justa-hairyape
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To: justa-hairyape
Don't forget Kosciuszko. And thanks to King Jan Sobieski, Europe isn't Muslim, and thanks to Sikorski, Europe isn't Bolshevik.
22 posted on 01/25/2003 12:49:28 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: Pokey78
The Poles have a VERY long history of fighting for freedom in Europe, America and other countries around the globe.

As far as I am concerned, they are a very welcome group of friends.
23 posted on 01/25/2003 1:03:32 AM PST by txzman (Jer 23:29)
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To: txzman
And on a slightly humurous note, you can actually thank a Pole for that great tasting creation, the Bagel.

"...The first bagel rolled into the world in 1699 when a baker wanted to pay tribute to Jan Sobieski, the King of Poland. King Jan had just saved the people of Austria from an onslaught of Turkish invaders. The King was a great horseman, and the baker decided to shape the yeast dough into an uneven circle, resembling a stirrup. The Austrian word for "stirrup" is beugel.

So there it is. It all makes sense now. Not only is the bagel a wonderfully delicious "stirrup" of fresh baked dough, it is also an icon of freedom. King Jan's courage and strength speak volumes, and the hand rolled bagel is a noble way to capture that spirit.....enjoy your hand rolled bagel at Bagel Guys.

24 posted on 01/25/2003 1:34:53 AM PST by justa-hairyape
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To: justa-hairyape
No Polish blood in me, but from years of living and working with Poles,you're the best.Pretty girls, good cooks and Dyngis day makes St Patricks day look like a Morman wake.
25 posted on 01/25/2003 1:36:41 AM PST by singletrack
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To: Pokey78
Pokey--Thanks for posting this--I'm verklempt...


PROUD TO BE POLISH BUMP

A great thread...

26 posted on 01/25/2003 1:38:48 AM PST by lorrainer (Tom Daschle is a dupa !!)
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To: happygrl
Don't forget the Bosnian Muslims and the Kosovo Liberation Army.

Good allies to have in the war on terrorism, too.
27 posted on 01/25/2003 1:53:15 AM PST by Ichabod Walrus
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To: txzman
The Poles have a VERY long history of fighting for freedom in Europe, America and other countries around the globe.

This goes WAY back to the revolutionary days.

Thaddeus Kosciuszko

His statue is in Washington DC, in front of the White House.

The Poles are our friends.

28 posted on 01/25/2003 6:43:20 AM PST by Paradox
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To: ccmay
They helped the nazis identify all the Jews in Poland better than any other country. 90% of the Jews in Poland were killed in the holocaust. That's a higher percentage than any other European country.
29 posted on 01/25/2003 7:45:25 AM PST by College Repub (http://www.collegehumor.com)
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To: Spirited; justa-hairyape
America loves to Polish joke with derission because they make good targets, gentle (for the most part) and forebearing (often characterized here as "dumb").

Polish jokes exist because there were vast numbers of Polish immigrants who arrived here in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Most of them spoke not a word of English, and stupid, ignorant nativists assumed this was because the Poles were stupid or ignorant.

Polish jokes are practically unknown in Europe, and a source of mystery to Europeans who associate Poland with Chopin, Madame Curie, gutsy Lech Walensa, lovely old cities like Krakow, and brave, doomed cavalry charges against the Nazi tanks.

Even in this country you don't hear Polish jokes all that often any more. My school-aged kids have never heard one.

-ccm

30 posted on 01/25/2003 9:53:26 AM PST by ccmay
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To: College Repub
There were Nazi collaborators in all countries that were invaded by Germany in Europe. It doesn't give special notice to the Poles. The Vichy government in France did the same thing.
31 posted on 01/25/2003 9:57:54 AM PST by Pyro7480 (+ Vive Jesus! (Live Jesus!) +)
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To: Pokey78; Paradox
If I remember correctly, there are squares in Warsaw named after George Washington and Woodrow Wilson, and they were trying to name another after Ronald Reagan, but I don't remember if that went through.
32 posted on 01/25/2003 9:59:37 AM PST by Pyro7480 (+ Vive Jesus! (Live Jesus!) +)
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To: College Repub
They helped the nazis identify all the Jews in Poland better than any other country.

That is to the everlasting shame of those individuals who collaborated. It detracts nothing from the majestic history of Poland, nor from their friendship and support for America at our own times of need, in the Revolution and now.

Don't forget that they also had one of the largest, least-assimilated, and most conspicuously traditional Jewish populations going into the war, and that they were occupied longer than any other country during the war. And as I mentioned, great numbers of them fought side by side with us, especially in the Royal Air Force.

-ccm

33 posted on 01/25/2003 10:06:10 AM PST by ccmay
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To: ccmay
How astonishing it must be for someone from India or Zimbabwe or Haiti to read about Americans so fat they are having stomach operations to lose weight.

Well, all I can say is that it is very nice to have the choice.

We feed the world, don't forget.

34 posted on 01/25/2003 11:26:21 AM PST by Slyfox
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To: justa-hairyape
From the Polish point of view, its a whole lot better being on the recieving end of mindless jokes in America then it is being on the recieving end of a tyrants sword in Europe.

I think the Polish joke died as a genre when Archie Bunker left the airwaves and was replaced by Lech Walesa and Karol Wojtyla. Men who stood against the might of the Soviet empire armed only with a flag, a slogan, and their faith aren't good humor material, they're heroes.

35 posted on 01/25/2003 11:34:34 AM PST by Campion
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To: College Repub
90% of the Jews in Poland were killed in the holocaust.

Along with a whole lot of Polish Christians.

36 posted on 01/25/2003 11:38:18 AM PST by Campion
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To: Campion
The Poles are with us.

The French and the Germans are not.

37 posted on 01/25/2003 11:53:22 AM PST by rbmillerjr
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To: Campion
Sorry the holocaust there cannot only be applied to Jews. They holocausted hoardes of Ukranians but no one mentions that.
The Germans so mistreated the Poles that the horrifying occupation of the Russians pales by comparison and Still the Jews are the only ones about whom it is PC to speak.

Who is going to cry out for the German or Dutch Christians who were "offed"? Most of those spoke out to try to save the Jews but the Jews have almost nothing to say about them.
38 posted on 01/25/2003 12:04:13 PM PST by Spirited
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Comment #39 Removed by Moderator

To: txzman
The Poles have a VERY long history of fighting for freedom in Europe

Lifting the siege of Vienna is one notable moment.

40 posted on 01/25/2003 12:22:34 PM PST by RightWhale
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To: Paradox
In my hometown, Kosciuszko Square is a triangle---honest!
41 posted on 01/25/2003 12:23:24 PM PST by PeteyBoy
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To: College Repub
"They helped the nazis identify all the Jews in Poland better than any other country. 90% of the Jews in Poland were killed in the holocaust."

That is post-war rhetoric written by Jews. Many of the Jews who were identified were done by their own fellow Jews. That was the case in the area of my family.

My own spouse is a descendantt of Judah and we have spent enough to get Russian Jews back to Israel so don't give me the old anti-semetic line. It is tired and very like what I hear from the Jesse Jackson/Al Sharpton group wresting privilege out of someone elses' pain. It is time to stand up and insist on truth not whining for or trading for privileged treatment.

Please take revisionist history surmised by those who were not there with grains of salt.
42 posted on 01/25/2003 12:26:13 PM PST by Spirited
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To: Spirited
When did I ever say anything about demanding privileged treatment or call anyone anti-semetic? I merely replied to a post that was talking about how brave the poles were in fighting the nazis with some facts that suggest otherwise.
43 posted on 01/25/2003 1:01:17 PM PST by College Repub (http://www.collegehumor.com)
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To: ccmay
Wasn't Copernicus Polish?
44 posted on 01/25/2003 1:02:44 PM PST by uncbuck (Send lawyers, guns and money.)
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To: Spirited
Actually, Hitlers plans for extermination also included the Poles. His plan called for the elimination of the Polish people by 1975. Not only that, Hitlers first visible racism occurred when he saw the slavic Poles living in Austria. That was documented in the book Hitler and Stalin. Obviously Hitler was an idiot. Little did he know that the King of Poland had saved Austria from the Turks a few centuries before. But then again, Old Europe has a history of stabbing New Europe in the back. Germanies invasion of Poland in 1939 took the Poles by complete surprise. You see the Old Europian country Germany had just signed a treaty. And when the Russians invaded Poland from the east about 2 weeks later, the Poles at first thought the Russians had come to help them fight the Germans. Stabbed in the back twice in two weeks by Old Europe. Never trust an Old Europian signature or for that matter their new champion, Saddam Hussien's.
45 posted on 01/25/2003 1:17:12 PM PST by justa-hairyape
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To: Pokey78
They are welcome in the Union on this side of the pond whenever they like.

Anyone know the steps to statehood they would have to take?
The Constituion isn't very clear on this other than that its up to Congress.
46 posted on 01/25/2003 1:17:59 PM PST by uncbuck (Send lawyers, guns and money.)
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To: Campion
When I was a young lad, the best Polish jokes I heard were told to me by my 100 % Polish relatives. I think the Polish have a great sense of humor, too.
47 posted on 01/25/2003 1:26:15 PM PST by justa-hairyape
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To: happygrl
Interesting. The Eastern block knows how to take orders and fall in line. It is a story of uniformity in both cases.
48 posted on 01/25/2003 1:27:49 PM PST by Austin Willard Wright
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To: Pokey78
Tak! Dzenkuje Bardzo!
49 posted on 01/25/2003 3:57:34 PM PST by Snake65
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To: Dec31,1999
yep. THey'd be even cooler though if they were protestant:)
50 posted on 01/25/2003 4:04:28 PM PST by mamelukesabre
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