Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Professor shares secrets for top grades
Washington Times ^ | February 21, 2003 | Lou Marano, UPI

Posted on 02/22/2003 2:06:20 AM PST by Cincinatus' Wife

Edited on 07/12/2004 4:01:04 PM PDT by Jim Robinson. [history]

WASHINGTON, Feb. 21 (UPI) -- Students arrive at colleges and universities with hardly any idea of what's expected of them and are shocked to find that they lack the writing and study skills to get top grades, a Canadian professor said.


(Excerpt) Read more at washtimes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: education; highereducation; learningskills
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-74 next last

1 posted on 02/22/2003 2:06:20 AM PST by Cincinatus' Wife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
...because the students were unprepared for higher learning, and I was tired of remedial instruction...

There is a load of truth in that statetment. I am finding that we are spending most of our time at the community college teaching students the things they should have learned while in high school. Generally, they are arriving to college without the slightest notion of what proper study skills are and they can not write a complete sentence to save their lives.

The word "higher" in higher education has increasingly been reduced to less than higher; to the lowering of standards, to grade inflation, and lower expectations. They have all conspired to the narrowing of what we mean by education and education: getting a degree; getting a piece of paper as opposed to getting an education. And as far as the entitlements students expect (I guess they get this notion from K-12) I had a student who was getting a "D+" in class. Near the end of the course he wanted to know what he could do to get 'extra credit to bring his grade up'. EXTRA CREDIT?!?! During the semester he turned in 1 page papers with text paraphrased off the internet (which I failed him on), all of his work was late by at least a day, and he showed up to class late almost daily.

He thought he was owed another chance (which would lead to pleas for yet another and another and we would pass this kid to the next instructor). Well I don't play that game of making someones kid someone else's problem.

2 posted on 02/22/2003 3:51:06 AM PST by visagoth (If you think education is expensive - try ignorance)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: visagoth
There are millions of stories that will back this up. Public school instruction started to decay about 40 years ago. For starters, Schools of Education need to go.
3 posted on 02/22/2003 4:10:42 AM PST by Cincinatus' Wife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
A functionally illiterate generation cannot lead. It will serve. Government education cannot be reformed. It is a hopeless mess. Not enough people care and it would take a massive mobilization of citizens to reform the system. At the same time, America is allowing millions of uneducated illegal aliens to flood into the country. That is simply adding to the pool of ignorance.
4 posted on 02/22/2003 4:13:23 AM PST by NoControllingLegalAuthority
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
For starters, Schools of Education need to go.

Oh my gosh, I cannot begin to tell you of the "gimicks" that my teacher friends substitute for knowledge.

They know all these tricks but nothing about content, and as a result, have nothing of interest to convey to their students.

ARRRRRRRGHH

5 posted on 02/22/2003 4:29:59 AM PST by happygrl
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: NoControllingLegalAuthority
Bernie Gaidosch is fighting Socialism. The Ruling Elite (TRE) want large masses of rightless and easily manipulable people to be cogs in the one world order and to get themselves deeply into debt.
6 posted on 02/22/2003 4:34:20 AM PST by Jason_b
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
My experience is that about 10% of any college level class you teach will flunk out, and you can spot the ones that will fail within the first week. Consequently, you bend over backwards trying to motivate those marginal students that are barely going to earn a C. Inevitability those students that get D's or worse are going to complain to the Dean that your teaching skills are below par.

I had one that didn't show up for most of the lectures, didn't do any of the homework, and then nearly hyperventilated during the midterm exam. He complained to the dean that my lectures were worthless. I responded to the dean, " how would he know that my lectures were worthless since he was never there." The dean responded, "don't worry about it he flunked all my classes too."

I learned after that and kept roll, sort of a CYA strategy. It is a shame to have to take roll call in a senior level engineering course, I equate it to treating the students like children in grade school. You got do what you got to do. That class was audited by ABET as a result of the complaint. I survived.

What is suprising is that a student can make it all the way to the senior level without basic math and writing skills. It catches up to them and they have wasted three years of their lives. It takes a large number of teachers passing on without merit, to get a student to this point. In the long run they harm the student and the education process, just to avoid conflict.

Anyone old enough to remember when a high school diploma was worth something can relate. Today a high school diploma is a joke, they are worthless. The same thing is happening to higher education.

7 posted on 02/22/2003 4:43:19 AM PST by SSN558
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
http://www.profsecrets.net/index.html hope it works....now, where do i go for my "cut"?
8 posted on 02/22/2003 4:48:21 AM PST by 1john2 3and4
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
"...recommends a private school, despite their expense, because test-taking skills and essay writing are almost always taught there. "

Soemthing rubs me the wrong way with this approach. It's not an issue of public or private schools,...and I favor private schools from higher criterion of excellence,....but the isues being discussed are closer to literacy, illeteracy, and any student simply giving a damn.

I don't attribute the diference in ability to 'test-taking skills'. I find the test scores are remarkably higher if one simply knows and has learnt the subject.

9 posted on 02/22/2003 4:56:55 AM PST by Cvengr
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cvengr
Soemthing=Something
10 posted on 02/22/2003 4:57:22 AM PST by Cvengr
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
1. Some people are allowed into college and they should not be there.

2. Reading and writing are not essential in a visual media culture. The non reader and writer of today is tomorrows useful serf.

3. Corruption is probably as prevalent in academia as in the rest of society. The college reflects the rest of society.

11 posted on 02/22/2003 5:04:51 AM PST by AEMILIUS PAULUS (Further, the statement assumed)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
Students arrive at colleges and universities with hardly any idea of what's expected of them and are shocked to find that they lack the writing and study skills to get top grades, a Canadian professor said.

In liberal (most of them) American universities all you need to be prepared for is Womyn's studies, African studies, and "Peace" protests.

12 posted on 02/22/2003 5:07:31 AM PST by Moonman62
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AEMILIUS PAULUS
To your list I would add that which you imply,
4. Only a few need to know, and they will do the work that makes money, the rest can ride on their sholders.
13 posted on 02/22/2003 5:19:45 AM PST by KC_for_Freedom
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
In states like Ohio, there are mandated proficiency tests at certain grade levels. The jobs of teachers and administrators often hinge on the scores. The result? The curriculum teaches for the test. Property values in my area often are decided by these test scores.
14 posted on 02/22/2003 5:52:05 AM PST by buccaneer81 (Plus de fromage, s'il vous plait...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: visagoth; SSN558
Have you had much experience with home-schooled students at the college level ? I ask because my son, who was homeschooled from the 8th grade, is now in Community College and seems to be handling his courses well (Dean's List, 3.95 GPA) -- Although we are what could be called "relaxed" homeschoolers (no strict schedule, you can do "school" wherever/whenever you're comfortable, and we worked until mastery with minimal emphasis on tests), we did focus on strengthening basic skills, esp. grammar & writing (even diagramming sentences) and he actually enjoyed going on to advanced math. I am not overly surprised that he is doing well academically, but I was a little worried about his keeping to a schedule and staying oraganized. Any thoughts ?
15 posted on 02/22/2003 6:21:01 AM PST by twyn1 (God Bless America !)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
bumpfor those of us still in college
16 posted on 02/22/2003 6:39:40 AM PST by Live free or die
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
Gaidosch said students could acquire academic skills from his manuals in two weeks.

I seriously doubt this. Looking back at my high school education, I am very grateful for the strong emphasis on writing and the number of required English classes. Writing is an acquired skill, and will go rusty if not practiced frequently. Here are my suggestions:

1) a thorough knowledge of grammar-- It may be boring, but it is essential. (amd I fully acknowledge that I continue to make a few errors here.)

2) a love of reading--You cannot write well, if you don't read. Habits that discourage reading, like listening to some kinds of music and watching too much television, should be discouraged.

3) regular writing assignments in school--and graded by the kind of teachers I had. Nothing like red all over a paper to highlight errors.

The above may not produce a Shakespeare, but should provide most college students with the basic writing skills they will need in the future.

17 posted on 02/22/2003 6:41:48 AM PST by independentmind
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SSN558
We need a combination of home school and school. We need to stop blaming teachers and schools, but put the blame on parents who do not know how to prepare kids for school.

We taught our boys phonics back in the 60's before they started to school. Now their children are doing the same. All our grandkids are good students, and just one example illustrates. Wesley, in first grade, could read before kindergarten, and now has been tested and reads with comprehension on the fourth grade level. Teacher said he could probably handle higher grades since the fourth grade was very easy for him.

During the summer months their mother, each day, gives each child 10 vocabulary words and 5 to 10 math problems. The two older boys were having so much fun that the 2 year old wanted to "play too".

I could tell similar stories about the other kids, but the reason for this reply is to advise that we need courses in school on parenting so that new parents can prepare their kids for school, instead of letting the TV raise them.

WE cannot wait until the school years, much less high school.
18 posted on 02/22/2003 6:44:01 AM PST by bobg (Bob G.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
I think we all (parents, schools, colleges) fail so miserably at teaching our children and students "how to learn". I have always thought a required course or series of courses specificially designed to teach these learning skill would be quite beneficial. But then, what the hell do I know...
19 posted on 02/22/2003 6:46:57 AM PST by error99 ("I believe stupidity should hurt."...used by permission from null and void all copyrights apply...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: error99
I work for a community college (non-teaching) and its a lot of things.....students not prepared, teachers who rather teach far-left ideas than subject matter, excess of admininstration..etc

Our school system is a mess..and probably wont get better until some drastic changes are made

Some things I like to see change are:

- End of compulsory education: You can't make a kid learn if it doesn't want to be there. Society ends up dealing w kids who already do not want to go to school (prison)....this really wouldnt change for the worse (maybe for the better) the current situation. It sure would save money that would normally be wasted on disruptive kids who shouldnt be in school anyway

- Eliminate administration and non-teaching jobs: Some schools and districts have more than 50% of their employees in non-teaching positions. There should be no more than 25%. Also, make administrators more liable for poor schools and poor education (not teachers, not parents, not janitors).....seems we rarely point to bad administration for our poor schools

- Stop "Political Correctness": Kids need to learn to read and write...not "Heather has two mommies"...."Gay is OK"..and other liberal pablum. No special treatment for non-white, non-anglo kids who refuse to behave, refuse to pay attention, and obstruct classes. Set the same standards for everyone
20 posted on 02/22/2003 7:01:50 AM PST by UCFRoadWarrior (I Wonder What Susan Sarandon Looks Like In A Burqa?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: visagoth
I am finding that we are spending most of our time at the community college teaching students the things they should have learned while in high school...

My impression is that the work that used to be done in high schools has now been kicked up to the community college level. The latter have essentially been turned into the high schools of today.

I think that's a shame. It deprives community colleges of the opportunity to fulfill the roles for which they were originally intended, and it lets high schools get away with being little more than adolescent day-care centers.

Somehow, this needs to stop.

21 posted on 02/22/2003 7:04:11 AM PST by The Other Harry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: independentmind
Well, judging from of the students my daughter has met, a few hiints might help some of them at least PASS the classes they are in:

1. ATTEND CLASS!
2. Listen to the lecture and take notes.
3. READ THE MATERIAL!
4. Exchange notes with others, and review together before exams.
5. Anticipate possible essay exam questions.

Many of the sstudents my daughter meets don't even follow these basic steps. They are wasting their time (and their parents' money).

22 posted on 02/22/2003 7:04:26 AM PST by Miss Marple
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: visagoth
He thought he was owed another chance (which would lead to pleas for yet another and another and we would pass this kid to the next instructor). Well I don't play that game of making someone's kid someone else's problem.

More power to you, btw. You are doing that kid a favor. You are perhaps the first *good* instructor he's ever had.

23 posted on 02/22/2003 7:09:15 AM PST by The Other Harry
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: AEMILIUS PAULUS
In the "university" here 60% of the students are in remedial programs. It's much cheaper if they'd go to the local community college and I don't know why they don't do that. Too many univerisities are just handing out diplomas if a student stays in long enough.
24 posted on 02/22/2003 7:12:51 AM PST by FITZ
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: FITZ
I think it is called "dumbing down." Many groups could not make it so they lowered standards. Kinda like the IQ test consistently come out low. Blame the test. Enjoy. It will be fun having a doctor with an IQ of 85.
25 posted on 02/22/2003 7:16:27 AM PST by AEMILIUS PAULUS (Further, the statement assumed)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: SSN558
"I learned after that and kept roll, sort of a CYA strategy."

I am a university instructor, as well, and I do the same. I want to know who is attending and who is blowing the class off, and I intend to have proper records should they prove necessary.

26 posted on 02/22/2003 7:22:49 AM PST by Irene Adler
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
"Public school instruction started to decay about 40 years ago. For starters, Schools of Education need to go."

You have this right, both assertions.

27 posted on 02/22/2003 7:24:47 AM PST by Irene Adler
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: FITZ
Too many univerisities are just handing out diplomas if a student stays in long enough.

Don't you suppose a root cause of this are a leftwing dominated educrat establishment who won't hire anyone who actually knows the material as instructors (with possible exceptions for engineering and technical courses where you can't b***s*** your way through)? Isn't it past time the Republican dominated state legislatures who control the purse strings start demanding diversity in political leanings of state-funded faculties?

28 posted on 02/22/2003 7:30:26 AM PST by Vigilanteman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Irene Adler
I teach senior level classes in college and I never thought about taking roll before (most people do this as a type of participation grade -- I didn't think about the CYA aspect), but I think the next term that I teach I will start. Thanks!
29 posted on 02/22/2003 7:37:41 AM PST by tamu
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: independentmind
Teachers in England now mark papers in green ink. Red is too upsetting.
30 posted on 02/22/2003 7:38:19 AM PST by ladylib
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: bobg
I agree with you about home school and school in combination. Thats my practice in my home.

My daughter goes to school and then studies at home with me as well. My son will also.

In our state you have to be a credentialed teacher to teach at home, and I have my degrees, but not in teaching. The compromise was to send the kids to school, but to take total control of the education at home and make sure the education is first rate.

She is only 7, and my son is 3, but I use the television as an instructional tool, along with books and the extensive library my wife and I have obtained over the years.

I go to extreme lengths to tell them that passing school is the lowest common denominator, and a lot more is expected of her. Self education is just as important as regular education, and it is stressed in my home.

I also have to spend a lot of time de-programming the social topics they teach in school. I had to take 30 minutes to tell her that Martin Luther King was an important figure in American history, but not the ONLY figure in our history that did something.

The tendency of the schools is to teach curriculum that fits the SOL ( standards of learning) and to disregard all other topics. A lot falls in the cracks.

31 posted on 02/22/2003 7:39:19 AM PST by judicial meanz ( socialism- its a mental disorder, not a political view.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: judicial meanz
I agree with you about home school and school in combination. Thats my practice in my home.

Homeschool doesn't have to be an either/or decision, people should teach their children even if they send them out for school ---even family trips are a very good way to teach children things they can't get from school, they learn map-reading, geography and can learn a lot of science and history depending on places you take them. Going to public school can be a learning experience, you often have to deprogram but that can make for a child who learns to see through the bull and is less gullible.

32 posted on 02/22/2003 7:45:38 AM PST by FITZ
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: FITZ
Absolutely. Especially in a state where its almost illegal to homeschool.

I can teach college or university but I cant homeschool my kids under current law in this state, so I had to compromise. Go figure!

33 posted on 02/22/2003 7:50:12 AM PST by judicial meanz ( socialism- its a mental disorder, not a political view.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: twyn1
We homeschooled both of our children from 7th grade. Our Daughter is a junior now at the University of Tenn. studying Spanish and world business. She honed her study skills by associating with serious students in her classes.(there are always some students who are actually there to get a good education) They form study groups and study together at night. This has enabled her to get very good grades since she started in a local community college. I wouldn't say we were particularly hard on our kids at home as far as school; but we did make sure they both understood grammer and correct writing techniques by assigning many essays on topics ranging from history to politics of the day. (thus killing two birds with one stone) It is also imperative that they study Algebra 1&2 plus Geometry which really teaches them how to think more tha anything else. Of course some good Critical Thinking courses come in handy too.
34 posted on 02/22/2003 7:51:45 AM PST by Desparado
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Vigilanteman
Remediation -- UTEP students are placed in remediation as a result of:

(1) failure to pass one or more sections of the Texas Academic Skills Program (TASP), the state-mandated test in mathematics, reading, and writing, or (2) failure to pass one or more UTEP course placement tests. Although TASP results have not been used as an admissions instrument, failure to pass one or all portions of the TASP results in students' being placed in legally required remediation in failed areas. Many UTEP entering students fail to attain acceptable scores on the TASP test, particularly in mathematics.

Entering students must also take University placement examinations in reading, writing, and mathematics and are placed in remediation if their scores are low. Test results lead to fully 60 percent of entering UTEP freshmen taking remedial courses in mathematics, courses that do not count in their degree plans. While fewer students need remediation in reading and writing, a 1997 UTEP study documented the difficulty UTEP students have if they take non-remedial content courses while they still need remediation in reading.

In the 1994-96 UTEP SACS Self Study, it was recognized that there were major problems with the University's approach to remediation, including the large number of students involved, their poor success rates, especially in mathematics, and a lack of cohesion in the administration of remedial programs. In 1996, the accreditation visiting team from the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) agreed with this finding and recommended that "The University must examine its developmental and remedial programs to ensure a coherent, efficient approach."

In response to the SACS recommendation, UTEP's Provost formed a Remediation Task Force in 1996, chaired by the Dean of the College of Engineering. After evaluation of the report and findings, the Provost, in cooperation with the Vice President for Student Affairs, recommended that UTEP establish a single operating unit that would oversee all remedial programs. Since a significant fraction of UTEP's entering students are in some remedial status, the Provost also recommended that the new unit offer programs for all entering students. This recommendation has been accepted, and its fundamental concepts will guide the reorganization of services for entering students in fall 1998. There is now clear direction to take a more holistic view of these programs and to create what will appear to students as a single coherent program.

http://www.utep.edu/cierp/plan/sect5d.htm

This is an example of a "university" with no admissions standards, it demands state (taxpayer) money for these programs but meanwhile there is a perfectly good community college in the same town where these remedial students could go. Of course that means less taxpayer money for the "university". Now that Texas is facing a budget deficity and looking at some cutbacks, the "university" is screaming bloody murder. They want their money.
35 posted on 02/22/2003 7:51:57 AM PST by FITZ
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
I managed to get a Bachelor's and Mater's degree in nuring, and graduated in the top 10% of my Law class. My recommendations would be:

1) Take a few hours to read Stunk & White's, "The Elements of Style", as well as the style manuel you professor recommends;

2) Focus primarily on passing the graded tests, rather than the mountains of ungraded homework your professor never reads;

3) Attempt to reproduce your professor's lecture outline, using your lecture notes. Use the textbooks when needed, but mostly to more fully understand the lecture content; and

4) Avoid study groups, unless you're one of the dumber students. Otherwise, you end up wasting your precious time tutoring those who won't study.

36 posted on 02/22/2003 8:03:44 AM PST by keats5
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
Bump
37 posted on 02/22/2003 8:04:12 AM PST by Richard Kimball
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
Okay, somebody that has the power really needs to see this and realize its the truth in the U.S. as well. The only reason I am able to write at all is because I took Advanced Placement english classes (both of them) and passed before I got to college. Teachers that don't teach AP don't have to focus on anything at all other than the "FCAT writing" aka florida writes part deux. These essays have NOTHING TO DO with reality, as I thought I knew what a real essay was before I took APs, but in reality I was clueless.


The kids in highschool now not taking advanced courses are simply screwed. They do not know a thing. As a bonus to myself, I decided I would take a history course up here to refresh my knowledge, and a lot of the college kids don't even know how to write an essay using quotes and citations. It's really sad the state that public education puts the kids in.
38 posted on 02/22/2003 8:06:40 AM PST by anobjectivist (The natural rights of people are more basic than those currently considered)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Miss Marple
1. ATTEND CLASS! 2. Listen to the lecture and take notes. 3. READ THE MATERIAL! 4. Exchange notes with others, and review together before exams. 5. Anticipate possible essay exam questions.

I am LOL at this because at first I couldn't believe that I actually have to tell my students to do these things... this semester I spent an entire lecture on these and other basic study skills... and this is for an upper-level course. The students do seem to be doing better, but time will tell.

39 posted on 02/22/2003 8:11:14 AM PST by alley cat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: visagoth
Near the end of the course he wanted to know what he could do to get 'extra credit to bring his grade up'. EXTRA CREDIT?!?! During the semester he turned in 1 page papers with text paraphrased off the internet (which I failed him on), all of his work was late by at least a day, and he showed up to class late almost daily.

He thought he was owed another chance (which would lead to pleas for yet another and another and we would pass this kid to the next instructor).

You're doing the right thing there ... that kid is in for a WORLD of hurt when he hits the professional world.

40 posted on 02/22/2003 8:23:54 AM PST by Centurion2000 (Take charge of your destiny, or someone else will)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: alley cat
Its amazing, isnt it!

After I graduated with my brand new Ph.D, I taught as an adjunct for about a year, in lower level classes.

You and the others who teach now are giving me a ton of reasons why I am so glad I resigned and didnt go back. I admire your ability to put up with it, because I couldnt do it.

Another good point to add....the tons of leftist freaks who teach college (because they are so wierd no one else will have them) always have the time to indoctrinate your kids into radical causes under the guise of teaching them.
41 posted on 02/22/2003 8:24:02 AM PST by judicial meanz ( socialism- its a mental disorder, not a political view.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
The whole education system is broken. My father was a college professor for 15+ years. He was considered overly strict because he expected students to neatly print their names, the course number and section, and the semester at the top of each paper they turned in. The students found this requirement overly difficult.

At the same time, I took a computer programming class where the professor proclaimed the first class that she didn't know how to write code in this language so we'd be learning together. Great, I was spending hundreds of dollars for this?

Years ago, while looking through my grandmother's fifth grade reader I discovered something quite telling. My grandmother, born in 1901, was reading Shakespeare in fifth grade. Only the senior college-bound students studied Shakespeare in my high school.

The whole education system is broken. One book may help some college students. However, for real success in higher education, we need to completely revamp the entire system.

42 posted on 02/22/2003 8:24:52 AM PST by FourPeas
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: alley cat
"Listen to the lecture and take notes"

I found that taking notes was a real hinderance, just listen and pay attention.

Of course the difference might be that my dad taught me to have a memory from the time I was born. When I was 2 1/2 or 3 he started taking me on construction jobs and when we got home he would quiz me on what different workers were doing and constantly hammered me with "pay attention to what is going on around you, you might need to know it some day".

I don't want to hear something more than once. By the 3rd grade the teachers figured this out and after about an hour in class they would find something else for me to do in the school.

Of course things were a little different when I went to school, I graduated from college in the 1950s.
43 posted on 02/22/2003 8:31:05 AM PST by dalereed
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Moonman62
In liberal (most of them) American universities all you need to be prepared for is Womyn's studies, African studies, and "Peace" protests.

Our daughter is receiving top scores on her AP exams and scored in the 98th percentile on her PSAT. As such, not a day goes by that we aren't getting "consider our college in your applications" letters and e-mails. What has amazed me is that even the schools that purport to be the best put the emphasis on areas that only a liberal could love.

For example, an e-mail from MIT states something to the effect of "we're not just for geeks." Wesleyan takes the cake though... the photos in their brochure were designed purely to emphasize "diversity." The first photo was a black woman dressed in full African regalia teaching a white woman to dance a tribal dance. Other full-page photos included a woman who looked more lesbian than K. D. Lang. They all emphasize their programs/majors in African-American studies and other ethnic-related educational programs. Don't kids major in anything actually useful or productive any more?

44 posted on 02/22/2003 8:31:12 AM PST by Spyder (Just another day in Paradise)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: SSN558
I've experienced similar situations...especially with Title Four/Welfare to Work cases.

The worse part was, I had a gal who had 45% attendance, turned in one of six assignments (three class sessions late and not typed), and scored 41% on the sole exam I administer. She complained to the Dean and I was told that because she is state funded, we must make "accomodations for her".

I submitted a garde sheet showing attendance, assignments, and exam scores and wrote, "Final Garde: "A"...see Dean for explanation"

Obviously, I'm a loose cannon.

45 posted on 02/22/2003 8:46:18 AM PST by NMFXSTC
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: SSN558
ADDENDUM: From then on, not only did I take attendnace, I had a sign in sheet each student would sign at each class session!
46 posted on 02/22/2003 8:47:51 AM PST by NMFXSTC
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Cincinatus' Wife
What a great article. Unfortunately, his article will fall upon deaf ears amongst those who have the power to do something. (parents and administrators)

I homeschooled for about 1 1/2 yrs to get out of the horrid district we were in..I had to quit because of health problems. (*we don't get substitutes!*) After watching my kids LEARN..I now know how little "report cards" actually tell. It is SO EXCITING to watch the process of children learning. :)

47 posted on 02/22/2003 8:54:21 AM PST by Freedom2specul8 (Please pray for our troops....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: NMFXSTC
LOL That's pretty funny~!
48 posted on 02/22/2003 8:55:31 AM PST by Freedom2specul8 (Please pray for our troops....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: FITZ
And the kicker is that this alleged university demands the autonomy to give "international" (read, "Juarez") students in-state tuition rates. Nothing like subsidizing a foreign student's education to warm the taxpayer's heart. Meanwhile, the American student from Oklahoma pays through the nose to attend what is known to many here as the University of North Chihuahua.
49 posted on 02/22/2003 9:05:30 AM PST by gueroloco
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: Spyder
Have you checked out any of the threads on FreeRepublic recommending conservative colleges?
50 posted on 02/22/2003 9:11:41 AM PST by Moonman62
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-74 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson