Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Pocket Emergency Survival Kit
My pocket | FreedomFarmer

Posted on 03/06/2003 2:25:01 PM PST by FreedomFarmer

Could you survive on what is in your pockets, right now?

[Yeah, sure, credit card..cell phone...]

He He He. Don't bet your live on it.

Here is a very basic emergency survival kit. It is a starting point, not a magic lamp. It's function is to keep you alive until self-recovery or rescue. There are 54 items, including the container.

The contents are:

Buck Minibuck tool
10' copper-coated steel wire
6' 100lb. nylon cord
3 sq. ft. of heavy duty aluminum foil
10 waterproof matches
8 water purfication tablets (16.7% Tetraglycine Hydroperiodine)
Wire Saw with 2 finger rings
3" strip of 180 grit & 320 grit emery paper
5 assorted safety pins
5" long shrink wrap tube
Condom
Fishing kit
Sewing kit
Sponge
3' electrical black tape
Cotton lint
2 1/2" wide heavy rubber bands

Small metal container, i.e., Altoid, Sucrets, Ted Cash, etc.

The Buck minitool has the advantage of being quite small, with excellent quality plier jaws, wire cutter, scissors, and surgical sharp blade.

The 10' of wire has many uses, including antenna replacement, snares, attachment of expedient tools to shafts and handles, and general construction.

The heavy duty foil serves best as a pot to boil water for purification, lasting for 5-7 cycles. It can be used as a signal, light reflector, baking pan, solar still, or bits of it left as a trail marker.

The emery paper removes rust and corrosion, polishes, and sharpens; also used as a striking surface for the matches.

The shrink wrap tube can be used as an insulator, and when heated, shrinks to join items together. It is used as a straw to suck water from a seep or from below a surface.

The condom is capable of holding 2 gallons of water, elastic bandage, slingshot rubber, or trigger spring for a small animal trap.
The fishing kit, besides the obvious, provides line for surgical stitches, bird snares, and squirrel poles.

The sewing kit provides 25' of white thread, (white is strongest), sterile needles for surgical probes, fish gorges, etc. The needles are magnetized, so they can be used as a compass when suspended from a thread tied in the middle of the needle.

The sponge is disinfected, rinsed, and compressed under a weight to dry, reducing it's size. Used to absorb dew from vegetation, fish bait, etc., sponges were also popular with the Roman Legion. (Think Charmin)

The electrical tape is used to seal and water proof the container, and quite useful generally.

The rubberbands help hold the lid on, and keep the kit from easily falling out of shirt pockets. They provide triggers for snares, elastic for bandages, rubbers for slingshots, etc.

The fishing kit contains 25' of 12lb. monofilament line, assorted small hooks,wet flies and weights. I now use plastic coin holders, with the line coiled inside, along with hooks, a few wet flies, and lead foil from wine bottle necks. I use foam strike indicators for bobbers.

The sewing kit is simply made by wraping thread around a strip of shirt cardboard. I use a 3" wide strip, and notch the top and bottom where the thread rests. I then add 4 assorted sizes of sterilized and magnetized needles, and a cut down needle threader, fold cardboard around the kit like a book, and tape shut to seal.

The contents are housed in an any small container. I prefer metal, as the polished inside can be used as a signal mirror, and it can be used as a dish, cup, or cutting board.

My favorite container is a 2" X 3" metal box a Zippo lighter came in, which contains all the above contents. Any of these boxes fit inside a cigarette package with the bottom cut out(hint), and the whole thing weighs a mere 4 oz.

Cotton lint is a wonderful fire tinder, wound dresser, anti-rattle space filler, and filter. For example, a funnel of aluminum foil, with a lint filter in the bottom, will clarify water prior to chemical or boil purification.
You can recover nice clean cotton lint from your drier trap, and fill the odd corners of your kit. It weighs almost nothing.

In addition, I always carry the smallest Victorinox Swiss army knife, a penlight; a lighter; a handkerchief; and a lock-back knife in my pockets, and a container of water within reach.

A survival kit not carried is worthless, that is why this kit is so small and light weight. A larger kit, with first aid and ration supplies, can be kept within arms reach in each vehicle. Locally, we have had two separate occasions of a car going off the road into a culvert, and not being found for two days, even with active searches within hours of being overdue.

Whistles, flags, crys for help, and repeating patterns of three- the traditional call for help, are largely ignored in today's world. Relying on handfuls of good luck, or government ordered plastic sheeting and duct tape in an emergency is a poor choice.

Hopefully, in the few minutes it took to read this monograph, you gave some serious consideration to your actual survival. With this simple kit, one could build a lean-to for shelter, build a fire to roast game, cook fish, and purify water, set snares for rabbit, squirrel and deer and bank lines for fish, while searching for edible roots...but that might be a bit much, if you are actually in the interstate median with a flat tire.

Your survival might depend on what is in your pocket right now. Stay safe.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: banglist; camping; survival
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-85 next last
A funny thing happens to a culture on it's way to civilization. The Merchant and Service class, emulating perceived uperclass attributes, place their basic needs in the hands of an imported labor class, and eschew the very survival techniques and equipment they once mastered.

The very explorers and adventurers of all races that settled this land would be shocked to know how helpless their children have become.

1 posted on 03/06/2003 2:25:01 PM PST by FreedomFarmer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
54 Items? You've got a lot bigger pockets than I do. I think I'd get some funny looks at work if I strolled in with all that gear stuffed into my trousers.
2 posted on 03/06/2003 2:27:56 PM PST by dirtboy (The Pentagon thinks they can create TIA when they can't even keep track of their own contractors)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
The very explorers and adventurers of all races that settled this land would be shocked to know how helpless their children have become.

Especially if they could see what we are going to do to Saddam in a total duration of about 2-1/2 minutes.

3 posted on 03/06/2003 2:29:07 PM PST by E. Pluribus Unum
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Just don't try to carry that kit on an airline flight.
4 posted on 03/06/2003 2:32:55 PM PST by MineralMan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MineralMan
Just don't try to carry that kit on an airline flight.

Yes. How sad, and how stupid, is that?

5 posted on 03/06/2003 2:41:07 PM PST by eno_
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: MineralMan
Just don't try to carry that kit on an airline flight.

I do it all the time. Oh, you must mean one of those silly government run harrasment centers with a government subsidized jet ride afterwards. Thanks, I'll take my own crate anytime.

6 posted on 03/06/2003 2:42:00 PM PST by FreedomFarmer (Contains approx.30,000 servings per farm.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

Comment #7 Removed by Moderator

To: FreedomFarmer
This would be good for a neophyte but I wear my Leatherman Wave and could get by on much less than your list.
8 posted on 03/06/2003 2:44:08 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (RW&B)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Cotton lint

Got that one. Got the fishooks, too, although my plan with fish is to entice them within reach and hit them with a rock.

9 posted on 03/06/2003 2:44:42 PM PST by RightWhale (Theorems link concepts: Proofs establish links)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
3 sq. ft. of heavy duty aluminum foil

Perfect size for a hat.

10 posted on 03/06/2003 2:45:02 PM PST by CholeraJoe (Curtis Loew was the finest picker who ever played the Blues)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: E. Pluribus Unum
LOL!

It was a class of about 20 boys in your hometown, that didn't have a pocket knife between them, that got me thinking about this subject.

11 posted on 03/06/2003 2:45:03 PM PST by FreedomFarmer (Contains approx.30,000 servings per farm.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: UberAlles
Yes but a CONDOM? Why should we support the people that make those, even if it is for other purposes? How is the great American race supposed to floorish if we waste the seeds in a piece of rubbr?

Your Stalinist friends in the Soviet Union felt the same way about birth control (one size fits all diaphrams for ethnic Russians to try and arrest their birthrate decline), so you may think you're parodying conservatives - but you're actually just making a joke of yourself. Buh-bye, troll...

12 posted on 03/06/2003 2:45:30 PM PST by dirtboy (The Pentagon thinks they can create TIA when they can't even keep track of their own contractors)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Is that a Pocket Emergency Survival Kit....or are you just happy to see me?
13 posted on 03/06/2003 2:47:23 PM PST by Focault's Pendulum (I just bought the Maginot Line on E Bay.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Wire Saw with 2 finger rings

I've yet to find one of these that can actually survive more than ten cutting strokes. Either the rings distort, break off, or the wire "blade" breaks.

I have opted for a bodatious Swiss Army Knife with saw blades. Those small folding saws are even better.

14 posted on 03/06/2003 2:47:44 PM PST by GingisK
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Flurry
I like the wave, but not the price. I used Marvel Mystery Oil on mine to get it to open easier.
15 posted on 03/06/2003 2:48:36 PM PST by FreedomFarmer (Contains approx.30,000 servings per farm.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Amen. But half this stuff would get you hauled in for questioning if you took it to a local municipal court building or airport.

We are the Nanny State now. We no longer fend for ourselves, nor we allowed to do so.

16 posted on 03/06/2003 2:48:36 PM PST by PackerBoy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Are you a boy scout? I would have trouble carrying all that stuff -- but your idea is good.
17 posted on 03/06/2003 2:50:59 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
I keep a gym bag full of emergency survival gear.

I am glad this was posted because it reminds me to go through it and replace any items which might be getting old. It has actually been a couple of years since I looked at it. I have forgotten exactly what is in it but one thing is a Beretta model 70 with 200 rounds of .22 and a spare mag.

18 posted on 03/06/2003 2:51:30 PM PST by yarddog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PackerBoy
Nice list. But wait until you read the contents of my handbag- I believe I could save modern civilization wih the contents. And it only weighs about eight pounds.
19 posted on 03/06/2003 2:52:50 PM PST by frodolives (that's Auntie Frodo to you, pal.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: GingisK
The Milspec saw is too slow. I kinda like the W. German one, but it won't cut metal. Nobody makes a good one, anymore.
20 posted on 03/06/2003 2:53:29 PM PST by FreedomFarmer (Contains approx.30,000 servings per farm.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
I like the locking blades. Much safer than my old original leatherman. I hunt and fish and know how to trap. With or without my guns or compound bow or rods and reels.
21 posted on 03/06/2003 2:58:21 PM PST by Conspiracy Guy (RW&B)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: dirtboy
Jeezzzzz ... I am glad you quoted that deleted post. That has to be the stupidest troll attempt I have seen in a while, and that is saying something given the medicated lamebrain-trust that exists in the troll world these days.

As to the survival kit, all great advice, although it may be more of a 'fanny pack' kit than something for your pockets. Only thing I might add is one of those mylar blankets. They are good for making it thru a cold night, for getting out of the rain, and for signalling. Plus they are compact and weigh only a few ounces.
22 posted on 03/06/2003 2:59:27 PM PST by spodefly (This is my tag line. There are many like it, but this one is mine.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Might help to read up on how to make effective snares, too.
23 posted on 03/06/2003 3:00:08 PM PST by Eala
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
One condom?

There are a number of remarks I could make at this juncture but none of them befit a lady.

24 posted on 03/06/2003 3:11:40 PM PST by Capriole (Foi vainquera)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
The condom is capable of holding 2 gallons of water.

Well I learn something new every day, I didn't think this would be it.

25 posted on 03/06/2003 3:17:29 PM PST by OXENinFLA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Eala
Might help to read up on how to make effective snares, too.

Growing up on the res, it was kind of a boyhood ritual to weave grass loops to snare rabbits. Symbolic of how what sustains the rabbit can also trap him.

They always taste great when you catch them yourself.

26 posted on 03/06/2003 3:25:55 PM PST by FreedomFarmer (Contains approx.30,000 servings per farm.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
everything listed is good, but too many items for my practical everyday use. I can survive on what I carry all the time:
1 knife. Usually two knives. I always carry the Stiff K.I.S.S. It's mounted in its sheath sideways next to my belt buckle. Can draw it from any position that gets my hands in front of me at waist height. One handed draw and re-sheathing. Part serrated blade can make an instant job of cutting rope, webbing (like a seat belt), brush, opponents, etc. Also always keep a one hand opening clip folder in my rear pocket.
2 fire starter. I keep the magnesium/flint bar type on my keychain. Short piece of hacksaw blade taped to its side to make sure I am never seperated from a steel edge to shave the magnesium and make sparks.
<3>Gerber plier tool. It can be opened and closed (to the plier position) with one hand. Has everyhting nescessary for emergency tool use and it's very durable (Really. I was trapped between floors in an elevator at a stadium once when electricians working on the electric decided to disconnect the main power and then go to lunch. I was able to disassemble the door from inside and squeeze out between the floors).

Not quite all the time, but usually when I'm in my rugged clothes (as opposed to sunday go to meeting clothes)
Rappelling/evacuation belt (I like the Wilderness instructor belt. It works well as a gun belt as well and looks nice for regular wear in place of your leather pants belt)
Rapelling/rescue line (usually 50 ft) 1/4 inch (or 8mm)
Mini figure 8 decender (SMC escape 8).
Extra long heavy duty laces in my boots (tourniquets, emergency prusik, etc.)

I admit it's not totally comprehensive, but it can provide the resources needed to cope with just about everything, and it's not something that's in the way or difficult to carry. I think I'll add the suggested emory paper to my wallet. I can see several uses for that, including polishing an aluminum or steel can or scrap to make a signal mirror.

27 posted on 03/06/2003 3:26:30 PM PST by templar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: yarddog
You ought to see my Abandon Ship bag, including the desalinator.
28 posted on 03/06/2003 3:27:35 PM PST by FreedomFarmer (Contains approx.30,000 servings per farm.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer; *bang_list; backhoe
click, click, click, Bang.
29 posted on 03/06/2003 3:38:01 PM PST by FreedomFarmer (Contains approx.30,000 servings per farm.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
The 2nd Amendment Sisters list this on on their ESCAPE company page.

Your Get-And-Go Bag

What it is, why you need it, and what to put in it.

<- Back to the "Tips And Ideas" page


You will need to be prepared for emergencies wherever you happen to be. So that you’ll have the basics to get you through nearly any short-term emergency, you should have what’s known as a bugout bag or 72-hour kit. This is a container of some sort that has items you might need if you had ONLY this container with you for 72 hours. This will be your lifeline if you ever have to abandon your home due to flood, fire, earthquake or other disaster. It will keep you safe and alive if you get stranded in your car. It can provide emergency help for others, and it can even be something to fall back on in those real-life, day-to-day little emergencies that happen to us all. You’ll want to supply your basic needs of food, water, shelter, hygiene, communication, and first aid in this handy kit.

You should be able to get everything you need in a medium to large daypack. Daypacks are nice because you can carry them easily on your back for long distances, but you could also use a backpack, a duffel bag, small suitcase, briefcase, or any other easily transportable container. Get something with wheels on it if you have a bad back, or simply don’t want to carry it (my bag, without the clothing, weighs about 13 pounds). The whole idea of a bugout bag is to keep it handy at all times, so you’ll want something portable. Mine generally stays in my car, because I’m nearly always within 200 feet of my vehicle. If I have to go into a shopping mall, large office building, or on some type of outing where my car is not with me, I take my bugout bag with me.

Why should you haul this stuff around with you? What if you’re at home, ready to go out on the town, and discover a button missing from the front of your shirt? Just walk over and retrieve the sewing kit from your bugout bag, without having to dig through the "junk drawer" for needle and thread. When you need a little cash for an emergency, you can tap this survival kit. If you work in an office building and a fire broke out, wouldn’t it be nice to have your flashlight and smoke hood with you? Let’s say you’re in a big shopping mall and a bomb goes off (sad to say, folks, it WILL eventually happen here in the USA). Would you like to have your supplies, especially first aid supplies, right there with you, or would you prefer to make a mad dash for your car (along with everyone else)?

I’ll tell you what is in my personal bugout bag, but remember that everyone’s needs are not the same, so you may have to make modifications. What is needed by a young single person may be vastly different from what’s needed by a family of five, or an elderly couple, so be sure to consider your own circumstances.

I like to pack things into what I call "modules". For example, all of my first-aid stuff is packed into one large zip-lock bag, my survival stuff in another, and so on. The plastic bags can be useful for many different things, so there is no waste.

For shelter, I have a heavy-duty all-weather space blanket and 50 feet of paracord. With these two items I can either fashion a small lean-to or simply wrap up in the blanket. I also have a tube tent for extra protection. The all-weather blanket is good summer and winter... in summer, face the shiny side away from you to reflect the sun’s heat, and in winter place the shiny side towards your body to reflect your body heat back (great for medical emergencies also). I have a complete change of clothes (I keep two pairs each of socks and underwear) in a large, sealed plastic bag. The purpose of the clothing is two-fold... first, I will always have something to put on if what I’m wearing becomes torn, soiled or wet. The other purpose is in case there were a chemical spill or attack. In order to be properly de-contaminated, all clothing you’re wearing must be removed and disposed of. If your change of clothing is in a sealed plastic bag, it won’t be contaminated and you’ll have something to wear besides a government-issued jumpsuit. For clothing choices, plan on dressing in layers. I even have a spare pair of shoes (I’ve found that what are called "boat shoes" are lightweight and don’t take up lots of room, but will do a fair job of protecting your feet).

For food, I have three packages of ramen noodles, three granola bars, three tea bags and three packets of sugar. Remember, this is a pack to get you through three days, not three weeks, and no one has ever starved to death in 3 days. If you’re diabetic or hypoglycemic, you may need different foods. I have an Esbit stove (also called a pocket stove) and Esbit fuel to heat tea, cook the ramen noodles, or even warm my hands. There’s a P-38 can opener in case I run across some canned food. I have a large metal sierra cup for drinking and/or cooking, and a spoon. There’s a one-liter bottle of water, and a SafeWater Anywhere water filter/canteen, so I can safely drink and use water from any puddle, creek, or pond. I’ve got a bottle of iodine tablets, too, just in case I have to use water from a cattle pond or similar germ factory, and a collapsible water bucket.

I have two packages of Lifeboat (wind and water proof) matches, as well as a StrikeForce firestarter and a bag of TinderQuik. The ability to start a fire can be vital, not only for cooking but to stay warm, to dry clothing, for signaling, and simply to buoy your spirits.

For hygiene, I have a large viscose rayon camp towel (I cut this, and use 1/3 for a washcloth and 2/3 for a drying towel), a bottle of NoRinse body wash, a bottle of PreventX hand sanitizer/first aid cream, toothbrush, dental floss, tampons, feminine hygiene pads, a few Q-tips in a baggie, comb, and a compact with camoflage paint (one can use the unbreakable mirror it contains for applying the camo creme, for hygiene, or for signaling). I took a Q-tip and rolled about 1/3 roll of toilet paper onto it, then stuffed it inside the now-empty cardboard tube. My U-Dig-It folding stainless steel trowel can be used for digging a "cat hole" (restroom), to dig a firepit, to clear a sleeping area of rocks and twigs, and even as an emergency tent stake for my all-weather blanket.

In the general purpose bag is about 10 yards of duct tape rolled onto a pencil. There’s also a small sewing kit, repair (large) needles, pair of leather work gloves, my SwissChamp Swiss Army knife, small flashlight and spare batteries for it, a handful of clothes clips (to hang wet clothes or to fasten the all-weather blanket), Fox 40 whistle, poncho, SaberCut saw, a bundle of long electrical ties, large trash bag, Survival Heat giant heat pad, hand warmers, spare pair of eyeglasses, SnowClaw snow shovel, insect repellant, a monocular, compass, and a roll of florescent pink tagging tape. I have good, current maps of my city, county and state (treated with MapSeal) in this bag, as well as a pocket-sized survival guide. I also have a deck of playing cards, but a paperback book or small game of some kind will help keep you and/or the kids occupied.

My first aid module consists of a SAM splint, a baggie full of QwikStrip bandaids, roll of waterproof adhesive tape, wide elastic (ace) bandage with velcro closures, EMT shears, a second small bottle of PreventX, two pairs of latex gloves, tube of lip balm, small dental kit, Zap dental anesthetic (there’s nothing worse than a toothache while you’re trying to stay alive), two combat bandages, ExitAir Bio escape hood, a bottle of potassium iodate (for radiation emergencies), three packets of oral rehydration salts, small bottle of sterile saline solution, a pair of fine-point tweezers, moleskin, and a small bottle of instant potato flakes (to control bleeding). I also have small bottles of Aleve and Pepto-Bismol tablets.

While I’m on first aid, I should tell you something that you need only carry around in your head... the fact that performing the Heimlich Maneuver on drowning victims can save lives! If you’ll perform the Heimlich before using mouth-to-mouth or CPR, you’ll drastically improve the victim’s odds of surviving.

The last module is for communications. I bought a small day planner-type book, and filled it with the names, addresses, and phone numbers of everyone I know, including folks like plumbers, electricians, car repair folks, and so on. I added phone numbers for the utility companies, city hall, poison control, and any other emergency services I could think of. I also wrote down every single credit card I have, along with the account number and the issuing company’s address and telephone number. It contains my bank account numbers, insurance policy numbers, and contact info for these people. This book does NOT contain my name, address, phone number, PIN numbers, or credit card expiration dates. I put in a recent, clear color photo of every member of my family, including the dog (don’t laugh... not only will it make you feel better to look at these photos while you’re under duress, it could be vital to finding a family member if they become lost or separated). It also contains two ink pens, solar-powered calculator, pencil, a small pad of paper, several dollars in quarters (for phone calls), and about $50 in small bills. There are spare keys for my home, vehicles, and business. The only other item in my communications module is a solar-powered AM/FM/shortwave radio. This will allow me to stay informed of current events, especially by shortwave (if local radio stations have been knocked off the air, I can still receive shortwave broadcasts from around the globe).

You may also want to include some kind of personal protection. When disaster strikes, it makes folks act in one of two ways... either they become especially helpful and giving, or they turn into thieves and looters who take advantage of the chaos. In a disaster, animals of all sorts may be frightened and running loose, and are likely to strike out in sheer panic. Whether your preference is for a handgun, stun gun, pepper spray, or maybe just a big stick, do consider having something on hand.

Don’t forget to customize your bag to fit your circumstances. A bag for each of your kids would contain somewhat different items. If you have pets, you’ll need supplies for them (bowl, leash, pet food, etc.). Special medical needs may have to be met (prescription medicines, walking cane, dentures, and so on). Remember, too, to go through this bag about every six months and make sure that everything is there, is intact and not expired, still fits, and is ready to use. And most importantly, make sure you know how to use everything in the bag... it’s no fun waiting until you’re in the middle of a disaster to read the directions!

30 posted on 03/06/2003 3:43:27 PM PST by Southack (Media bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: GingisK
The "SAS Saw" version is pretty good. It's not a wire, it is a linked chain like a small chainsaw chain. THey hold up fairly well.
31 posted on 03/06/2003 3:44:41 PM PST by Britton J Wingfield
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Chad Fairbanks
You might need smaller armadillos.
32 posted on 03/06/2003 3:46:36 PM PST by LurkerNoMore!
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Let's see- in my pockets right now are my keys (with several key rings that could be useful), some change and a a couple of dollar bills (useful for measuring small items, as they are exactly six inches long), my utility pocketknife (with short serated blade, opens with my thumb, and gets used constantly), and my "tool kit" knife (swiss army, with pliers, assorted other tools, and two *very* sharp blades). Since I know how to make cord from natural materials (I"m not very good at it, but i do know how), and the basics of how to build archery equipment from natural materials, I'd say that I'm pretty well equipped.
Never forget- a "survival knife" is whatever knife you have in your pocket when a survival situation happens.
33 posted on 03/06/2003 4:00:20 PM PST by TexasBarak
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
The condom is capable of holding 2 gallons

Maybe when I was younger....sigh

34 posted on 03/06/2003 4:03:23 PM PST by ErnBatavia ((Bumperootus!))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Interesting. The sarcastic screener at the airport may ask you: "Hey what do you have in your Pocket, A Refugee Shrimper and His Entire Family"? Ahhhhh LOL
35 posted on 03/06/2003 4:04:16 PM PST by Pagey (Hillary Rotten is a Smug , Holier-Than-Thou Socialist.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Southack
Interesting bag contents.

However, I think it is better to have several bags, with size and contants appropriate to the mode of carry. A car bag could have much more than the large one listed above. A personal carry bag that goes into the mall and the office probably could get by without the shovel, bottle of Potassium Iodate, and numerous other items.

The one in the car should have a rifle and ammo. A .30 cal for emergencies, and a .22LR (preferably supressed) for putting things on the dinner table.
36 posted on 03/06/2003 4:05:20 PM PST by Atlas Sneezed
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Growing up on the res, it was kind of a boyhood ritual to weave grass loops to snare rabbits.

Shoot, that's nothing. We used an abacus to count cards.

37 posted on 03/06/2003 4:09:56 PM PST by AppyPappy (Caesar si viveret, ad remum dareris.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
GREAT. THANKS.

Learned in Mainland China to carry backpack with us at all times. We never knew where we'd be nor for how long. And when Tienanmen came along . . .

I think at least a fanny pack should be part of getting dressed these days.
38 posted on 03/06/2003 4:11:45 PM PST by Quix
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Clemenza; PARodrig; rmlew; Yehuda; RaceBannon
survival ping
39 posted on 03/06/2003 4:16:53 PM PST by Cacique (Censored by Admin Moderator)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
bump for later review
40 posted on 03/06/2003 4:17:31 PM PST by chuknospam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FreedomFarmer
Also: FDA-Approved Potassium Iodide tablets for radiation exposure.
41 posted on 03/06/2003 4:18:05 PM PST by RipeforTruth
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: templar
Usually two knives. I always carry the Stiff K.I.S.S.

Just did a google search, no result. What kind of knife is this?

42 posted on 03/06/2003 4:18:18 PM PST by LibKill (Must...control...tag...line...of...death!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: AppyPappy
Shoot, that's nothing. We used an abacus to count cards.

LUXURY! We used to live in a shoebox in the center of an expressway!

43 posted on 03/06/2003 4:19:18 PM PST by el_chupacabra (AMDG)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: TexasBarak
Out of curiosity, I got out a dollr bill and measured it. It actually measures six and one eighth inches.
44 posted on 03/06/2003 4:20:51 PM PST by yarddog
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: el_chupacabra
LUXURY! We used to live in a shoebox in the center of an expressway!

Right.

I had to get up at ten o'clock at night, half an hour before I went to bed, drink a cup of sulphuric acid, work twenty-nine hours a day down at the mill and pay the mill owner for permission to come to work, and when we got home, our mother and father would kill us and dance on our graves singing Halleluja.

45 posted on 03/06/2003 4:31:31 PM PST by LibKill (Must...control...tag...line...of...death!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: LibKill
What kind of knife is this?

Columbia River Knife & Tool makes them. They are the ones that make the little folding KISS knives that people use for money clips. They're widely available at any knife shop or webbsite (I usually get mine locally at an ACE hardware). Gun shops have them if they carry a line of knives. It's just a very simple straight knife with no hilt, handle material, etc. Just a plain flat piece of carbon steel that is ground into an extremely useful knife. Tanto or drop point and part serrated or plain in either style. The handle can be wrapped with nylon cord or left plain. I leave it plain since it makes an excellent small pry bar that way, the really neat thing ablout them is the sheath. An abs plastic that can be configured for any carry position you desire; up, down, or sideways. Only about $25.00.

46 posted on 03/06/2003 4:55:57 PM PST by templar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: LibKill
Yeah, sounds like the way we grew up!
47 posted on 03/06/2003 4:56:23 PM PST by reformedliberal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: Beelzebubba
A .30 cal for emergencies, and a .22LR (preferably supressed) for putting things on the dinner table.

Aguilla ammunition makes a .22 RF round with a 60 gr lead bullet. Looks like a 22 short case with a full llength 223 (rn) bullet. Goes somewhat subsonic, and for accuracy needs a 1 in 9 twist barrel (available for the 10/22 but it takes a bit of looking). Really accurate with the right barrel, extreme penetration (shoots right throgh a redwood or cedar 4x4) and no supressor needed. they work semi auto actions as well.

48 posted on 03/06/2003 5:01:05 PM PST by templar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: templar
Thanks. Looks like a pretty good knife.

Here's their website. I found it after you gave me the maker's name.Columbia River Knife & Tool (Will open in window.)

49 posted on 03/06/2003 5:07:54 PM PST by LibKill (Must...control...tag...line...of...death!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: templar
Aguilla ammunition...extreme penetration (shoots right through a redwood or cedar 4x4) and no supressor needed.

Which brand is that? I know the neighbors would like something a lot quieter than stingers.

50 posted on 03/06/2003 5:35:03 PM PST by FreedomFarmer (Contains approx.30,000 servings per farm.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-85 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson