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Iranian Alert -- DAY 47 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 7.26.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 07/26/2003 1:06:52 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movment in Iran from being reported.

From jamming satellite broadcasts, to prohibiting news reporters from covering any demonstrations to shutting down all cell phones and even hiring foreign security to control the population, the regime is doing everything in its power to keep the popular movement from expressing its demand for an end of the regime.

These efforts by the regime, while successful in the short term, do not resolve the fundamental reasons why this regime is crumbling from within.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to join us here, post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: bushdoctrineunfold; iran; iranianalert; protests; studentmovement; warlist
To find all the links to all 47 threads since the protests started, go to:


1 posted on 07/26/2003 1:06:53 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- DAY 47 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 7.26.2003 | DoctorZIn

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

2 posted on 07/26/2003 1:07:30 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
I thought you should be aware of this. I wrote an editorial for Iran va Jahan last weekend entitled, Will CNN Never Learn.

I wrote the editorial based on an article that had been sent to me by an Iranian Student in Iran. Most of you are probably aware of the story, but it was about a young student “Hamid” who had, according to the Gooya.com report, provided video of the regime’s attack on the student dormitories.

Gooya.com reported that the Hamid had provided CNN with a copy of the footage. Hamid was subsequently arrested. It was reported that he had swallowed additional footage just moments before his arrest. He was then taken by the regime, to Evin prison where they performed surgery in the prison to retrieve the footage. Hamid later suffered infections and last Monday, died.

Sunday morning (before Hamid’s death) after hearing this story and out of concern for the health of this young man, I decided to take the Gooya.com report and circulate it to the English-speaking world. My hope was that if we could get media attention to his plight, the regime might make sure he received proper medical attention.

After drafting the editorial I called CNN, asking them to confirm or deny the Gooya.com report. I told them the article was written in Farsi. They said they had people who could translate it. I emailed them a link to the story (around 1PM PST). They confirmed that they received it.

I was told that the person responsible for making comments was at home for the weekend but that they were going to contact her at home and forward my email to her. They asked me by what time I needed to hear their response. I told them that I needed to hear from them before 10PM PST. I was told they would get back to me. They never did.

A few hours later the story was published on the website: Iran va Jahan. The story was then linked on a number of other sites. But after the death of Hamid I assumed interest in the story had faded. Then Thursday, I noticed a “Editor’s Note” under my editorial on Iran va Jahan.

Will CNN Never Learn?

Repeating their Iraqi mistakes in Iran.

7.20.2003

It appears CNN is once again in the business of burying news stories when their reports might embarrass their host country. If it were not for a student from Iran I might not have heard of this report. Fortunately the world of the Internet makes it increasingly difficult for stories to remain hidden from the public. The story I am referring to was published on gooya.com and while written in Persian is available on the net.

http://news.gooya.com/2003/07/18/1807-ff-01.php

I contacted CNN for a response but they chose not to.

Gooya.com is reporting that an Iranian student, Hamid, provided CNN with video of the attack on the student dormitories by the regime. The student was arrested by the regime and taken to the same prison, Evin where the Canadian/Iranian photojournalist Zahra Kazemi was tortured. Kazemi eventually died allegedly under the hands of the regime official Saeed Mortezavi, Tehran's Chief Prosecutor. The story of her murder has been international news for the past week.

But unlike Kazemi whose photos of the Evin prison remain in the hands of the regime, Hamid was successful in getting his footage to CNN. According to this report CNN is refusing to air the student’s footage, claiming it would endanger his life. But since they refused to air the footage the story has not received international attention and his life is now in grave danger.

It was reported that as the regime’s enforcers arrived to arrest him Hamid, he ate additional footage to keep it from the regime. They report that this young man was then taken to Evin prison where the same official responsible for the death of Kazemi ordered immediate surgery in the prison to retrieve the footage in his stomach. Since that time, due to infections caused by the surgery they were forced to move him to a hospital where it is reported he has four different infections.

Apparently CNN has not yet learned it lesson about protecting tortuous regimes. Just a few months ago CNN admitted that it sat on a variety of news stories in Iraq that would have exposed the nature of the Iraqi regime (New York Times, Editorial | April 11, 2003, Friday The News We Kept To Ourselves, by CNN producer Eason Jordan).

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FA0C16FD3C5F0C728DDDAD0894DB404482

In both cases they use the same excuse that they are protecting the lives of their sources of information.

In reality, the only thing keeping the regime from killing this brave Iranian is international awareness of his situation. The regime needs to maintain the illusion of respect for human rights to provide the Europeans and Japan with an excuse for further economic ties. If CNN were to broadcast this report and attribute it to him it would provide him with the notoriety needed to keep him from being one more unnamed student executed by the regime. It is time for CNN to stop protecting this regime in order to maintain its office in Tehran. When journalists sell out their ethics for rating it destroys the value of a free press to protect the innocent from corrupt governments.

I hope CNN will reconsider its position on this story. It may save a life and perhaps redeem the soul of that network.

Editor's Note - On July 24, 2003, Iran va Jahan received the following statement from CNN Public Relations with regards to the above story:

"A Statement From CNN...

It is entirely untrue that CNN declined to air a video tape purporting to show an attack by agents of the Iranian regime on students in their dormitory. CNN was never offered such a tape, does not know if such a tape exists, does not have an office in Iran and never has.

CNN Public Relations"

Since I had not heard from Iran va Jahan, I wrote them telling them that I was going to investigate the source of the Gooya.com report. I have not heard back from them yet.

I then wrote Gooya.com asking for help with the source of the report. I have not heard back from them either.

This morning I received an email from Iran that Gooya.com had published a correction to their report.

http://news.gooya.com/2003/07/18/1807-ff-01.php

The student who sent me this said, "At this link, Gooya got a letter from CNN, advising them to recorrect the news of Hamid. They recorrected the news but still insisting on existing of such tape and the fact that CNN has that video tape as well.”

The later today, my editorial on Iran va Jahan was removed and the following is in its place.

Will CNN Never Learn?

July 20, 2003

Iran va Jahan

..................

..................

"A Statement From CNN...

It is entirely untrue that CNN declined to air a video tape purporting to show an attack by agents of the Iranian regime on students in their dormitory. CNN was never offered such a tape, does not know if such a tape exists, does not have an office in Iran and never has.

Please remove this story and any links from your website.

Thank you.

CNN Public Relations

</B http://www.iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news_en.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=07&d=20&a=5

I am still trying to get to the bottom of this story, but felt that you should know what is going on. I don’t want to pursue a report that is false, but I also don’t want to participate in a cover up. I will keep you posted.

DoctorZIn

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

3 posted on 07/26/2003 1:26:15 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn; nuconvert; Texas_Dawg; McGavin999; Eala; freedom44; happygrl; risk; ewing; norton; ...
Jul. 25, 2003. 09:05 AM

Editorial: Get tough with Tehran



Pulling Canada's ambassador from Iran, as Prime Minister Jean Chretien has done, should be but the kickoff in a spirited campaign to draw global attention to the fatal injury suffered by a Canadian photojournalist in gravely suspicious circumstances in a Tehran prison.

Ottawa should also lobby for a United Nations probe of Zahra Kazemi's death, and press for the return of her remains.

Nor should we be put off by Tehran's allegation yesterday that Vancouver police "criminally" killed an Iranian earlier this month. Keyvan Tabesh was shot brandishing a machete at police.

Kazemi suffered a fatal blow to the head after she was arrested for taking pictures. Canadians want to know who authorized her arrest, how the injury occurred and whether anyone will be held to account.

Canada imports millions of dollars worth of luxury goods from Iran every year. We can get along with fewer Persian carpets, and less caviar and pistachio nuts, if Iran doesn't co-operate. And we don't have to continue hosting Iranian students here.

Kazemi's arrest and death was "horrible," as Chretien noted. And her speedy burial this week, thwarting a Canadian post-mortem, was contemptuous. Canadians are outraged, as are many Iranians. That anger must show.

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1059043000522&call_pageid=968256290204&col=968350116795
4 posted on 07/26/2003 2:41:06 AM PDT by F14 Pilot (If God brings you to it, He will bring you through it.)
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To: F14 Pilot
Good for you, Toronto Star
5 posted on 07/26/2003 4:46:45 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot
Good morning
thank you for the pings
6 posted on 07/26/2003 5:06:06 AM PDT by firewalk
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To: DoctorZIn
Thanks for the update.
I suppose one reason none of the media contacts I made responded, was because they did some checking also, and couldn't find anything to back it up. Thy have to be a lot more careful what they print than what we put on the thread, or even email out to others.Though if we're not a reliable source of news stories, we'll end up on their Spam list.
7 posted on 07/26/2003 5:08:17 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert; DoctorZIn
Many Persian language sources confirm this news but there is no doubt that no one can ignore this fact.
The regime is torturing its people in a wide range.
Hamid was an example of milions who were tortured by the regime officials.
You didnt see Ms. kazemi?
8 posted on 07/26/2003 6:46:26 AM PDT by F14 Pilot (If God brings you to it, He will bring you through it.)
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To: BeforeISleep; DoctorZIn; nuconvert; RaceBannon; Ronin; Valin; piasa; dixiechick2000; happygrl; ...
Canada to Iran: Follow our lead

Norma Greenaway, with files from Anne Dawson
The Ottawa Citizen

Saturday, July 26, 2003

Graham offers Tehran access to inquiry into RCMP shooting death of Iranian teen.......>>>>

The Chrétien government has sought to up the pressure on Tehran to find and punish those responsible for the death in detention of a Montreal photojournalist by offering Iranian officials access to the investigation of the police shooting of an Iranian teenager in British Columbia.

Foreign Affairs Minister Bill Graham made the offer yesterday in a diplomatic note to the Iranian Embassy in Ottawa. He was responding to Iran's attempts Thursday to draw a parallel between Zahra Kazemi's death in custody in Iran on July 10 and the fatal July 14 shooting by a Port Moody police officer of Keyvan Tabesh, an Iranian youth who was allegedly wielding a machete.

Though he rejected the analogy, Mr. Graham told reporters he would use the homicide inquiry and a planned coroner's inquest into Mr. Tabesh's death in B.C. to show Iran how democratic societies conduct such investigations. He urged Iran to follow its lead by giving Canadian officials access to an equally transparent investigation into how Ms. Kazemi died from a fractured skull.

"They raised the case of Mr. Tabesh," Mr. Graham said.

"They said the circumstances were an analogy. I'm saying if there is an analogy, then I expect the analogy to take place."

"And I expect us to have the reciprocal rights and privileges in Iran. In that case, for example, we would expect the same form of open, transparent investigation into the death of Mrs. Kazemi to take place with the opportunity of our officials to be present and represented as we will offer them the same representation in our society."

Mr. Graham returns to Ottawa today to meet Canada's ambassador to Iran to consider other measures to bring Iran to heel over the Kazemi inquiry and the government's continued efforts to have her remains returned to Canada. Trade and diplomatic sanctions are on the list.

The government recalled Ambassador Philip MacKinnon to protest Ms. Kazemi's burial Wednesday in Iran, contrary to the wishes expressed by her son in Montreal and the federal government.

Paul Martin, the front-runner to replace Jean Chrétien as prime minister, weighed in on the Kazemi affair for the first time yesterday by praising Mr. Graham, one of his leadership supporters, for recalling the ambassador and keeping the pressure on Iran.

"I believe that this is something that Canada must deal with in the strongest terms," Mr. Martin said.

"The actions that Bill Graham is taking are the right ones, and I would encourage him to do whatever he has to do in order to have the truth come out."

Mr. Graham said the need for an impartial inquiry is more apparent in light of new revelations that a senior Iranian official said he had been coerced into covering up the beating death of Ms. Kazemi by stating falsely she had died of a stroke.

"It's now clear there has been acceptance that the death occurred as a result of actions of authorities in the prison. That's beyond doubt now. It's just a question of ascertaining who those authorities are.

"And, of course, we've seen the recent reports the effect there was pressure put on certain Iranian authorities to provide a false declaration as to the cause of death. We are assuming that all of these matters will be the subject of an open inquiry in Iran, which we will have the opportunity to participate in."

Mr. Graham laid out the plans for the Tabesh inquiry, beginning with the current homicide investigation into the culpability of the police officer, now on leave, and going on to a public coroner's inquest into the circumstances of the death.

In the diplomatic note, the federal government offered to help Iranian officials go to B.C. and talk to investigators.

It also noted the remains of Mr. Tabesh had been returned to his family and buried in Vancouver, as per the family's request, a pointed shot at the refusal of Iranian authorities to heed the requests to return her body to Canada for burial.

Mr. Graham said he is hoping to persuade the pro-reformist Khatami government to put pressure on the judicial authorities responsible for conducting the inquiry. Reformists in Iran view many in the judiciary as conservative hardliners, and the Kazemi case has become a cause célèbre for both sides in the ongoing power struggle in Iran.

Javad Esmaeili, a veteran Iranian judge, was named yesterday to conduct independent inquiry. Mr. Graham said he that he will seek Mr. MacKinnon's input in evaluating that appointment during their weekend meetings.

http://canada.com/national/story.asp?id=CAAA47DD-4177-4558-AFF5-EA28C10A5F79
9 posted on 07/26/2003 7:04:15 AM PDT by F14 Pilot (If God brings you to it, He will bring you through it.)
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To: DoctorZIn; All
Dr. Zin - CNN is still ignoring the fact that US-based Iranian satellite broadcasts are being jammed on behest of the Iranian government by transmitters in Cuba. If it were CNN and their uplinks, the whole rest of the broadcast media world would be on the story like ants at a picnic. Since it's just you guys, it's conviently ignored.

Keep reminding the media that if they can silence your TV station, they can silence all broadcasters. Go to the owners / adsalespeople - bypass the editors / newsies.

10 posted on 07/26/2003 7:38:12 AM PDT by jriemer (We are a Republic not a Democracy)
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To: F14 Pilot
Yes, I have no doubt that the regime has tortured and killed it's people.
And this particular story may be entirely true, or it may be true up until the involvement of CNN. It's possible that was added to get the story more attention. I understand how that can happen and why. It's possible that a young reporter who indirectly works for CNN still has the video(s) in his possession.

It's important to try to stick to the facts if we're going to be emailing and phone calling the media regarding news we receive. We don't want to hurt our credibility. We want them to feel they can rely on stories we send as being true. Otherwise, they won't pay attention to what we say, and that defeats our purpose of trying to get the news out & the media involved in supporting the Iranian people in their struggle. When there's doubt, we have to say in our postings, that "this hasn't been verified," or "this is what is being said" or "this is what I heard", then we can work from there to get verification. Credibility is everything. Otherwise, we're just a rumor mill.
Make sense?
11 posted on 07/26/2003 7:52:26 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
Thank you for the ping.

And, I appreciate all of your digging on the CNN story.
12 posted on 07/26/2003 7:56:05 AM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife (Lurking since 2000.)
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To: nuconvert; DoctorZIn; AdmSmith; McGavin999; Eala; risk; RaceBannon; happygrl; Valin; piasa; ...
Call for European Union to break with Iran over journalist's death

Iran- 25 July 2003

Reporters Without Borders called on the European Union today to break off the "constructive dialogue" it has conducted with Iran since 1998 until officials responsible for the death of Canadian-Iranian photographer Zahra Kazemi earlier this month had been brought to trial.

It said it was "unthinkable" that such talks could continue while such a serious crime remained unpunished. It also called on the EU to back Canadian efforts to have Kazemi's body returned to Canada and for an international commission of enquiry to be set up.

The appeal to the EU was made in a letter to the current EU Commission president, Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi, to EU external relations commissioner Chris Patten and to Javier Solana, the EU high representative for common foreign and security policy.

After official attempts to cover up the cause of Kazemi's death, Iranian Vice-President Mohamed Ali Abtahi publicly admitted on 16 July that she had been "beaten." An autopsy and a government commission set up by President Mohammad Khatami was not able to provide full details and the origin of the skull fracture that caused her death remains a mystery.

For the past week, Iranian legal officials have strongly opposed further investigation. Kazemi was hastily buried on 22 July in the southern town of Chiraz, making a new autopsy by independent experts more difficult. Canada has repeatedly asked for the body to be repatriated.

The case file was handed over on 23 July to a military prosecutor by the hardline Teheran prosecutor Said Mortazavi, who some accuse of being directly responsible for Kazemi's death. He said errors may have been committed by the intelligence services or security forces but definitely not by his department.

The government commission of enquiry said Mortazavi had personally attended the interrogation of Kazemi shortly after she was arrested. With the military now in charge of the case, any trial will be held in secret without independent observers and without any guarantee of neutrality or impartiality.

Kazemi is thought to have been arrested on 23 July as she took photos of Evin prison, in northern Teheran. She was then reportedly beaten and died of her injuries on 11 July.

A total of 23 journalists are currently imprisoned in Iran, making it the biggest jail for journalists in the Middle East. Thirteen of them are believed to be held by Mortazavi's department and by the Guardians of the Revolution, in the same place where Kazemi was interrogated. They are not allowed visits from family or lawyers and are held in very bad conditions. Reporters Without Borders is very worried about their plight. Their families have written to President Khatami saying they have been physically and psychologically tortured.


http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=7640
*

http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=66
http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=7268
13 posted on 07/26/2003 8:27:30 AM PDT by F14 Pilot (If God brings you to it, He will bring you through it.)
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To: F14 Pilot; *Bush Doctrine Unfold; *war_list; W.O.T.; DoctorZIn; Eurotwit; freedom44; FairOpinion; ..
Thanks for the links!

Bush Doctrine Unfolds :

To find all articles tagged or indexed using Bush Doctrine Unfold , click below:
  click here >>> Bush Doctrine Unfold <<< click here  
(To view all FR Bump Lists, click here)



14 posted on 07/26/2003 8:52:50 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (Recall The Governer and then recall the rest of the Demon Rats!!!)
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To: DoctorZIn
I heard a quote from Otto Von Bismark that went something like:
...never believe anything until it has been officially denied at least twice...

I'd bet on CNN exercising cover up power.
This is not a good time for the big-time news agencies:
BBC, CNN, NYT are all skating on the edge.
15 posted on 07/26/2003 8:58:51 AM PDT by norton
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To: F14 Pilot
Ah, so the weak kneed Canadian government is depending on the weak kneed EU to do the right thing? Fat chance! Although with Burlisconi at the helm, they might be able to do something. The Journalists Without Borders are pretty funny in this whole thing too. They stood by while thousands were imprisoned and didn't say a single word. Now they are outraged. They should have been outraged years ago, they are responsible for the deaths of thousands who wanted nothing more than freedom and all the journalists had to do was their job. They didn't.
16 posted on 07/26/2003 9:27:41 AM PDT by McGavin999
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To: All
Regarding the story about CNN and the Iranian student Hamid.

I had hoped to provide you with a clear response to CNN, but since I have not yet heard from from Gooya.com and Iran Va Jahan I did not want to sit on the developments. I felt you deserved to hear what is going on

I have my suspicions as to what may be going on, but without more information. I cannot speak definitively. .

Our stories posted here are read widely, and our credibility is everything.

As soon as I have more information I will let you know.

DoctorZIn




17 posted on 07/26/2003 9:55:50 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
May 14, 2003

The Road to Victory Goes Through Tehran

To Win the War, the U.S. Must Topple Terrorism's Real Center: Iran
By Robert W. Tracinski

President Bush has declared the end of "major combat operations" in Iraq, but he has not declared victory in the War on Terrorism--and that's a good thing, because the largest and most important battle in that war still remains to be fought.

The road to victory goes through Tehran.

An end to the threat of Islamic terrorism requires, not just the toppling of one state sponsor of terrorism in Iraq, but the toppling of the regime that is the Middle East's most active promoter of terrorism--and the most virulent center of the ideology behind Islamic terrorism: the theocracy that rules Iran.

The most recent evidence for the urgent need to confront Iran is the simmering conflict in southern Iraq. Post-war Iraq has been touted by the administration as an attempt to create a free, peaceful, and prosperous society as a model to be followed by dissidents in neighboring countries like Iran. But Iran also wants to turn Iraq into a model--a model for American humiliation and the triumph of Islamic fanaticism.

The evidence of meticulous Iranian planning is everywhere. Note that Shiite demonstrators showed up just days after the fall of Baghdad carrying elaborate, professionally made banners proclaiming their theocratic agenda--with slogans printed in both Arabic and English, for the benefit of the Western media. This is not the work of poor, uneducated Iraqi peasants. It is the work of well-funded political operatives. Indeed, U.S. forces have already begun to capture Iranian agents in Iraq and believe that thousands more Iranian-backed fighters have flooded over the border in the past month.

A peaceful Iraq that respects the rights of its citizens--and allows the presence of U.S. troops or military bases--is a grave danger to Iran and to its co-conspirator in terrorism, Syria. So these two nations are trying to turn Iraq into "another Lebanon"--a quagmire of terrorist attacks and guerilla warfare. Their hope is that the United States will be so afraid of looking like a "bully" imposing an "occupation" that we will withdraw and abandon Iraq, letting Iran set up its own Khomeini-style regime there--in the same way that we abandoned Lebanon, allowing it to be colonized by Syria.

If we let this Iranian strategy work, we will have achieved "regime change" all right--we will have exchanged a fascist anti-American regime for a theocratic anti-American regime.

The nascent guerilla campaign in southern Iraq is a clear hostile act against the United States. Yet Iran is hoping that America will refuse to recognize this as an act of war. The mullahs hope we will once again put ourselves in the impossible situation of having to fight bands of guerillas among Iraq's civilian population, while refusing to confront the terror masters they serve.

What makes them think they can get away with it? Ultimately, Iran is counting on the administration's loudly proclaimed refusal to "impose our values" or our form of government on Iraq. But fighting for liberty is never an "imposition." No one has a right to violate the rights of others--and so it is no limitation on the "freedom" of Iraqi Shiites or Iranian agents if we deny their ambition to impose religious strictures by force.

The vow that we will not try to influence the new Iraq is a declaration of America's unilateral moral disarmament--our failure to fight for and protect the crucial values at stake in this war.

America needs to recognize that this war is inherently a conflict between two opposing value systems. Our enemies are driven by the theocratic philosophy shared, despite minor sectarian differences, by Osama bin Laden and by the mullahs who rule Iran. The destruction of the Iranian theocracy would do more than just eliminate the world's largest supporter of terrorism; it would do more than end a nuclear-weapons program that is far closer to completion than Iraq's ever was; it would do more than stop the Iranian-staged Shiite agitation in Iraq. The end of the Iranian regime would destroy the Middle East's laboratory of theocracy--the leading example and exporter of a system of religious dogma enforced by terror.

President Bush called the military victory in Iraq "the turning of the tide" in the War on Terrorism. That may be true, but the tide won't stay with us--or carry us to victory--until we are willing to take the war to Tehran and topple the most important material and ideological supporter of Islamic terrorism.

Robert Tracinski is the editorial director of the Ayn Rand Institute in Irvine, Calif. The Institute (www.aynrand.org/medialink) promotes the philosophy of Ayn Rand, author of Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead.

http://www.aynrand.org/medialink/roadtovictory.shtml

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
18 posted on 07/26/2003 10:03:02 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Two more journalists arrested in Iran

Saturday, July 26, 2003 - ©2003 IranMania.com

TEHRAN, July 26 (AFP) - Two more Iranian journalists have been arrested, press reports said Saturday.The two, both from the monthly Gozaresh (Report), were cartoonist Arash Noorchian and cover designer Mohammad-Amin Golbaft.

They were detained on unspecified charges after failing to post the judicial bail demanded by Tehran's prosecutor, reports said. Security forces raided the monthly's office on Wednesday, confiscating documents arresting the two journalists after searching the premises for some hours, according to the reports.

Abolghasem Golbaft, the monthly's director, was also sent to jail last month by the press court. A wave of recent arrests has targeted the reformist press since an outburst of virulent anti-regime protests in mid-June and July.

The latest arrests bring to 26 the number of journalists believed currently to be detained in prison in Iran.Since 2000, Iranian authorities have suspended the publication of nearly 100 papers, most from the pro-reform camp.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=17222&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

19 posted on 07/26/2003 10:09:08 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
'Bored' Youths Signal a Discreet Social Revolution

July 26, 2003
The Financial Times
Rafael Behr

Helicopters buzz over Tehran's residential areas looking for the illegal satellite dishes that many Iranians, sceptical of state-controlled media, stow on balconies, behind flowerpots and between washing lines.

Enforcement of the widely defied ban was stepped up following mainly student-led demonstrations that were reported in dissident newscasts, beamed into Iran by diaspora communities abroad. Although the protests petered out, the broadcasts were seized on by hardliners in the government as evidence that the domestic reform movement was playing into the hands of Washington hawks seeking regime change in Tehran.

But this has little resonance for those most attracted to foreign media - the young and bored. More than half of Iran's population is under 25 years old. Unemployment is 15 per cent and young Iranians bemoan their lack of prospects.

This generation has grown up knowing only the draconian social restrictions of post-revolutionary Iran. Curiosity about all things taboo is in evidence in every internet cafe where teenagers scour the web for material that, while often politically anodyne, is also usually licentious. Pornography and pop music downloads clutter the hard-drives of public computers. Instant messaging services are especially popular.

This leaves young Iranians free to cultivate tastes and relationships that are incompatible with revolutionary ideology and hidden from conservative clerics, traditionally minded parents and police helicopters. The result is a discreet social revolution. "We are already Americanised in our outlook," says one 16-year-old. "We also want regime change."

Changing attitudes are most apparent in Tehran. The city's northern suburbs have cruising grounds where young men and women exchange telephone numbers through car windows as they pass in gridlocked traffic, risking lashes or imprisonment for illicit sexual liaisons.

Drugs and alcohol, long available on the black market, are being used more widely and more openly. Inebriated youths are sometimes seen teetering through Tehran streets, a sight that would have been unthinkable five years ago.

The erosion of traditional values has far outpaced the rise of the political reformers, led by President Mohammed Khatami, whose election in 1997 and renewed mandate in 2001 first raised expectations of social transformation. The reformers are stuck fighting a rearguard action against the conservative clerical establishment, forcing a split in their support between those who want to pursue change through the existing institutions and those who want to abandon the political process altogether. But so far the growing contempt for the Islamic state's social controls has not tipped over into a mass mobilisation demanding political freedoms.

http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1058868184588
20 posted on 07/26/2003 10:13:12 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks for the ping. This powderkeg is gonna blow, sooner or later.
21 posted on 07/26/2003 10:38:51 AM PDT by BOBTHENAILER (Somehat)
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To: All
Traders with 'Rogue' States May Face Sanctions

July 25, 2003
The Financial Times
Guy Dinmore

US and foreign companies are coming under scrutiny for their dealings with states deemed by Washington to be sponsors of terrorism, particularly Iran and Syria, but officials say the Bush administration is hesitating before tightening economic sanctions.

Pressure for action is mounting from various quarters, including pension funds and some US state treasuries, as well as pro-Israeli lobby groups and a vocal contingent in Congress.

Brad Sherman, a California Democrat and member of the committee on international relations, asked at one recent hearing why the US was prepared to go to war with Iraq but was not more active in applying economic tools to Iran.

"It's as if we are more willing to risk the lives of our servicemen and women than we are to inconvenience the corporate sector," he said of what he called the Bush administration's "don't ask, don't tell" policy towards US firms trading with rogue states.

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, a Florida Republican and chair of the House sub-committee on the Middle East and Central Asia, is leading efforts to pass legislation that would tighten existing sanctions against Iran and Libya, and close loopholes that allow the foreign subsidiaries of US companies to do business with Iran.

The legislation would amend the 1996 Iran-Libya Sanctions Act (Ilsa) which empowers the president to punish non-US companies investing more than $20m in the energy sectors of the two countries. The European Union strongly opposed Ilsa and neither President George W. Bush nor his predecessor, Bill Clinton, has applied it.

The separate Syrian Accountability Act, also under consideration, would seek to check the growing business links between the US and Syria. Colin Powell, the secretary of state, used the act as a lever in his talks with Bashir Assad, the Syrian president, in May.

"Diplomacy has run its course with the Syrians and Iran," commented Yleem Poblete, staff director of the House sub-committee. "The sanctions regime will give our European allies a chance to join forces with the US short of military action."

More radically, Congressional staffers say there is also discussion of blacklisting foreign and US businesses involved with Iran with the intention of preventing them from securing US-funded contracts in Iraq.

Such a list was drawn up in the Pentagon this year but not implemented. US officials pointed out that Halliburton, headed by Dick Cheney before he became vice-president, has contracts with Iran through its foreign subsidiaries but was also awarded the main contract to run Iraq's oil fields.

As CEO of Halliburton, Mr Cheney lobbied the Clinton administration to ease sanctions on Libya and Iran. As vice-president, he led the National Energy Review which concluded in 2001 that the US should "level the playing field for US companies overseas" and recommended a comprehensive review of sanctions with consideration given to US "energy security".

The Bush administration is also resisting pressure to use Ilsa to punish foreign companies. Officials say they are comfortable at present with the co-operation of the European Union and Japan in applying joint pressure on Iran to open its nuclear programme to full international scrutiny.

Enforcing Ilsa, officials say, would lead to a damaging trade dispute over the legality of extra-territorial sanctions. Companies in the UK, Italy, Spain, Australia and Japan, all US allies in the war on Iraq, have interests in Iran's energy sector.

This week Mr Bush warned both Iran and Syria they would be held accountable for what he called their support of terrorists they harboured. Diplomatic relations and contacts with Syria continue, but the White House is still reviewing its policy towards Iran after breaking off direct talks in Geneva in May on the subject of Iraq.

"Will they enforce Ilsa? The answer is we don't know," said one executive of a European company with offices in Iran. "Things are racheting up, but it's difficult to know where they are going."

Roger Robinson, a former National Security Council official who heads Conflict Securities Advisory Group dealing with global risk assessment, says the worsening US-Iran relationship has heightened the perceived risk of doing business with states designated as sponsors of terrorism.

"We take note of a new security-minded consciousness among companies planning to enter Iran," he told the FT. "Relatively small amounts of equipment, technology and revenue flows can have an inordinately significant impact on share value and corporate reputation."

His company's database lists 400 publicly traded companies worldwide, including 35 major US corporations, that deal with "terrorist-sponsoring" countries, excluding Cuba. The US Treasury is one of his new clients.

Mr Robinson told the House subcommittee that it was primarily the "largest and most well-known companies in the world that have the risk appetite to conduct business with government sponsors of terrorism". Many of those firms are found in the retirement portfolios and mutual funds of millions of Americans, he added.

http://news.ft.com/servlet/ContentServer?pagename=FT.com/StoryFT/FullStory&c=StoryFT&cid=1058868181255&p=1012571727172
22 posted on 07/26/2003 11:01:18 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Three more journalists arrested in Iran

26.07.2003 17:00 UTC

Three more Iranian journalists have been arrested, press reports said Saturday. A wave of recent arrests has targeted the reformist press, since an outburst of virulent anti-regime protests in mid-June and July. The latest arrests bring to 27 the number of journalists believed currently to be detained in prison in Iran. Since 2000, Iranian authorities have suspended the publication of nearly 100 papers, most from the pro-reform camp.

http://www.dw-world.de/english/0,3367,4789_W_934404,00.html

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
23 posted on 07/26/2003 11:21:09 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Thanks for keeping us updated
24 posted on 07/26/2003 11:22:29 AM PDT by firewalk
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
This just in from a student in Iran...

"Doc, hi
I got home a few seconds ago.
I saw many check points again in Tehran.
Revolutionary guards were visible among Basidj militias.
They check all cars and arrest youths. "

Things are apparently still tense there. I wonder how long they can keep this up.

DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
25 posted on 07/26/2003 11:50:08 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
There's No Silencing Iran's Critics

July 26, 2003
National Post Canada
Peter Goodspeed

Debate suggests country ripe for revolution

When Zahra Kazemi, the Canadian photographer who was beaten to death by Iranian security officials, was buried in her hometown of Shiraz this week, she immediately became a martyr to a revolution that has yet to take place.

Internationally, her brutal murder was greeted with outrage, but in Iran, it has engendered a mixture of embarrassed disbelief and thuggish indifference.

That's because the country is already reeling. Twenty-four years after Iranians created a "government of God," the revolution that expelled the Shah in a fury of religious sentiment and anti-Western backlash is facing a huge crisis of legitimacy.

Iran is ripe for a new revolution, as debate swirls around the country over how much personal freedom can be allowed in the world's first Islamic theocracy.

A vicious political standoff between elected reformers and un-elected religious leaders who wield unlimited veto powers while controlling the state's security forces and the courts, has created an atmosphere of perpetual turmoil.

In recent weeks, thousands of political activists have been rounded up and packed into Iran's notorious prisons, where they are beaten and tortured.

Students and ordinary citizens took to the streets all over the country in protest. Parents of Iranian dissidents living abroad have been harassed. Children of reform-minded parliamentarians have been interrogated by religious militiamen and journalists have been arrested or had their newspapers closed.

For observers abroad, Tehran's apparent rush to obtain the capability to build nuclear weapons is creating unease, given Iran's reputation as a leading state sponsor of terrorism.

As a charter member of the "axis of evil," Iran touches every major security issue of interest to the United States, from weapons of mass destruction to terrorism, the Middle East peace process and the geopolitics of oil. Now, it looks as if it is about to become Washington's next major foreign policy crisis.

But Iran's domestic discontent could erupt at any moment.

As politicians and religious leaders argue over whether the Islamic clergy should have a monopoly on political power, ordinary people are becoming bolder in asserting their right to shape their country's future.

Articles are appearing in newspapers challenging the clergy's authority to have a final say in government and young people are defying tradition and strict Islamic social restrictions.

Western culture, in the form of banned books, music and movies, is creeping into a country that until recently relished its Islamic austerity.

Iranian teenagers talk of a raucous scene of fast-food joints, forbidden movies, furtive courtships and illicit parties. Socially restricted, disillusioned, full of anger and rebellion, they are desperately looking for relief.

Their discontent is a huge problem for the government, in a country where nearly two-thirds of the population is under 30 and more than half is under 21.

In the early days of Iran's revolution, foreign material was banned from movie theatres, foreign fashions were prohibited and bookstores were cleared of un-Islamic material.

There was even a brief attempt to prohibit the use of Western words in Farsi, banning them from public speeches, ads and books.

Women were ordered to cover up in chadors. Nail polish and cosmetics were banned, and those who showed too much of their hairline under their head scarves were publicly whipped.

The hajib, or dress code, is still mandatory for all girls and women over the age of nine in all public places.

Punishments range from verbal reprimands to 74 lashes with a whip to imprisonment for one month to a year.

Most forms of entertainment are severely restricted. Playing cards are banned, nightclubs are closed and religious vigilantes monitor personal behaviour.

Over the years, tens of thousands of Iranians have been arrested for "social corruption" and millions more have been warned about their behaviour.

On occasion, police in Tehran pull cars over to check if unmarried men and women are travelling together.

They also raid apartment buildings and use military helicopters to look for illegal television satellite dishes. They do not deter many middle-class families, who disguise their receivers as air conditioning units.

The religious conservatives insist they must defend Islamic cultural values, just as they defend Iran's borders.

But their regime, which came to power by smuggling in Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's sermons on audio tapes and videocassettes, now feels threatened by technology and cultural contraband.

When the 1979 revolution shattered 2,500 years of monarchy in Iran, it transformed the Islamic world, injecting it with the political philosophy of Ayatollah Khomeini, an austere mystic who had the stern moral inflexibility of a messenger of God.

He replaced the laws of men with clerical rule and his own interpretation of the laws of God.

His legacy has been an anti-Western, inward-looking state with a deep religious outlook and an isolationist's suspicion of international relations.

The concept of clerical rule has been the backbone of the Islamic Republic.

To criticize the Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Ayatollah Khomeini's successor, carries a maximum prison sentence of three years. If the criticism is regarded as an attack on the Islamic religion, it is punishable by death.

The Assembly of Experts, an elected body of senior Muslim theologians responsible for selecting the Supreme Leader, has ruled, "The word of the leader is final and it ends all disputes. This is a fundamental tenet of Islam."

As a result, Ayatollah Khamenei derives his authority not from the people, but from a concept known as Velayati Faqih (rule by an expert jurist), under which he is regarded as God's vice-regent on Earth.

When truth is absolute, there is no room for compromise. Accommodation of any sort is regarded as a betrayal of God.

As a result, Iran's politics stalemated.

When President Mohammad Khatami was swept in to power with 70% of the popular vote in the 1997 elections, he promised major political and social reforms.

The son of a leading ayatollah and a senior cleric himself, Mr. Khatami was once a close aide to Ayatollah Khomeini. In the early 1980s, he was credited with using his influence with Ayatollah Khomeini to save the game of chess, when extremists attempted to ban it on the grounds it was un-Islamic, even though it was invented by the ancient Persians.

Mr. Khatami has a reputation as a cultured, gentle man. He speaks English, German, Arabic and Farsi and wrote a book on philosophy that discusses the merits of Locke, Hobbes and Montesquieu. He insists democratic tolerance and pluralism have an Islamic core and the Prophet Muhammad's teachings rest on a need for dialogue and consent among the governed.

When he first ran for office, he received overwhelming support from young people and women as he talked of creating a "civil society" and striving to temper the revolutionary rhetoric.

Last year, Mr. Khatami proposed two bills designed to curb the mullahs' authority over the judiciary and the electoral process. He even threatened to resign if the bills were vetoed, saying they represented the minimum reforms he needed to carry out his role as President.

Since then, the Guardian Council, an unelected body that vets all legislation, has rejected both proposals, saying they run counter to Shariah law and the constitution.

With little to show for his reform efforts, Mr. Khatami's supporters are becoming increasingly critical of his performance and less tolerant of the religious leadership.

As the struggle over theology rages, it has swept up the rest of Iran in a political showdown over the amount of freedom of expression that will be tolerated.

Hardline clerics control the judiciary, the military, the police, the state broadcasting system, mosques and religious charities that dominate the economy. Despite constant public demands, they are unwilling to cede control of Iran's political agenda.

They regard calls for more public accountability and greater personal freedom as a direct assault on the foundations of the theocratic state Ayatollah Khomeini created.

And when they feel threatened, they do not hesitate to lash out violently at opponents, accusing them of being un-Islamic or influenced by Iran's enemies

The religious leaders have clashed constantly with the reform-dominated elected parliament. Theologians who oppose the clergy's growing role in politics have been jailed or placed under house arrest.

Journalists and political activists have also been swept up in repeated crackdowns.

Lately, the hardline religious conservatives have escalated their campaign of intimidation. Thugs have been used to break up reform rallies, new newspapers have been closed, journalists such as Ms. Kazemi have been beaten, jailed, tortured and killed.

There has also been a sharp increase in the number of public executions and floggings.

At one point early on in the struggle, General Rahim Safavi, the former head of the elite Revolutionary Guards, declared bluntly: "Heads need to be rolled, tongues need to be cut and pens need to be broken."

This sort of thinking resulted in the creation in 1998 of a hit squad from the Ministry of Intelligence that assassinated five dissident writers.

In December, 2000, after reform newspapers exposed their activities, a secret military court tried 18 former ministry officials for the murders; 15 of them were found guilty.

But all members of the death squad were later released, when the religious-controlled Supreme Court overturned their convictions.

Still, Iran's reformers persist in demanding change. Their newspapers continue to run editorials against stoning, publish stories on the return of prostitution and suicide rates of young people.

Above all, they constantly criticize Iran's political system and call for sweeping social, political and economic reforms.

pgoodspeed@nationalpost.com

http://www.nationalpost.com/world/story.html?id=74D9D941-EB94-4FE8-8FA0-754786682A04
26 posted on 07/26/2003 2:38:26 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Iran claims having arrested five over death of Canadian
journalist in Iran

World News
Jul 26, 2003

TEHRAN - Five people have been arrested in connection with the death in custody of Canadian journalist Zahra Kazemi, the public prosecutor's office announced, student news agency Isna reported.

The prosecutor's office issued a statement, quoted by Insa, which gave no details of the identities of those involved but stating they were being held in custody while the inquiry continues.

Relations between Ottawa and Tehran have been at a low ebb since the death of Iranian-born Kazemi.

She died in hospital on July 11 of a brain hemorrhage due to an unexplained blow on the head received while she was in custody in Tehran following her arrest for taking unauthorised photographs outside Evin prison.

Tehran's handling of the case, including refusing to repatriate her body to Canada, prompted a diplomatic incident which saw Ottawa recall its ambassador.

For the Canadians, there remains little doubt that Kazemi, 54, died following ill treatment during her time in detention.

On July 16, Iranian Vice President Mohammad Ali Abtahi announced that she "had died of a cerebral hemorrhage after being beaten".

But the report of a board of inquiry concluded that the hemorrhage was the result of a fracture of the skull, without saying how it was caused.

Ottawa demanded that those responsible be put on trial and Kazemi's body be repatriated to Canada, where she had lived for the past ten years. It announced it was recalling its ambassador after Kazemi was buried Tuesday in her home town of Shiraz, at the request of her mother, according to Tehran.

The Iranian foreign ministry on Saturday lodged a formal protest with the Canadian embassy over what Tehran calls the "murder" of a young Iranian near Vancouver.

Keyvan Tabesh, 18, was shot dead by a Canadian policeman on July 14 and Iran has demanded that his killer be brought to justice.

Police in Port Moody, just east of Vancouver, said Tabesh had been killed on July 14 after charging at a police officer with a machete following another incident in which he attacked a car.

Iran's foreign minister Kamal Kharazi on Friday dismissed Canada's account of the killing of Tabesh as "incomprehensible" and called for Ottawa to provide a "convincing explanation" of how he died.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1420.shtml


27 posted on 07/26/2003 2:41:29 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
It seems so many of these editorials and articles make it sound as though it's the reformers vs the mullahs. That the people want or would be satisfied with the reformers in power. They leave out the most important aspect to the "revolution".
I guess because Democracy is a dirty word.
28 posted on 07/26/2003 2:57:22 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert
The regime wants the world to see this crisis as the reformers vs hardliners. To do so "proves" they are a democracy, struggling between liberals and conservatives, something most people understand.

Most people do not understand that it is not a true democracy; the people cannot choose their candidates. Nor that most people do not support either the reformers of the harliners.

They want out of a theocratic government.
29 posted on 07/26/2003 3:18:20 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: F14 Pilot
"Many Persian language sources confirm this news but there is no doubt that no one can ignore this fact."

Can you come up with a list of those other news sources that can confirm this story? Also, whether they got their confirmation from another news source, an anonymous person, Hamid, etc.

If you can come up with this, there may be a way to put pressure on news over here to report it.
30 posted on 07/26/2003 5:56:41 PM PDT by mjaneangels@aolcom
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To: DoctorZIn
Exactly. But the people writing these articles and editorials should know better. I think most of them do. They just don't want to report that the Iranians want a true democratic government. They're misrepresenting to all their readers, what the real story is. More emails are necessary to correct and educate them, every time they write a piece that leaves out the "D" word.
31 posted on 07/26/2003 6:40:13 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
"Iran claims having arrested five over death of Canadian
journalist in Iran"

Good. Is one of them Mortezavi?
32 posted on 07/26/2003 6:54:43 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: All
Iran's Nuclear Spokesman Resign

July 26, 2003
Saudi Press Agency
SPA

Tehran -- The spokesman of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization has resigned, the news service Fars reported Saturday.

Khalil Mussavi told Fars he had resigned last Wednesday but refused to explain the reasons for his sudden decision. He did not say who would replace him as spokesman.

http://www.spa.gov.sa/html/archive_e.asp?srcfile=565199&NDay=26/07/2003&wcatg=0
33 posted on 07/26/2003 10:06:51 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Hmmmmmmm

Soon to be arrested?
34 posted on 07/26/2003 10:27:02 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: All
This Thread is Now Closed.

Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- DAY 48 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 7.27.2003 | DoctorZIn

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

35 posted on 07/27/2003 12:05:36 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: mjaneangels@aolcom; DoctorZIn; nuconvert
www.akunews.org.
http://news.gooya.com
www.nourizadeh.com
www.iran-emrooz.de
Here are a few of those websites which confirm it.
Moreover, Prosecutor Mortezavi declared that , The Islamic militants arrested a spy for western medias and he swallowed the footage he made.
This was broadcasted by State Run TV station in Tehran.
36 posted on 07/27/2003 12:33:52 AM PDT by F14 Pilot (If God brings you to it, He will bring you through it.)
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To: F14 Pilot
"Moreover, Prosecutor Mortezavi declared that , The Islamic militants arrested a spy for western medias and he swallowed the footage he made.
This was broadcasted by State Run TV station in Tehran."

This is very good information. It helps to confirm the story of Hamid. Now we need confirmation that Hamid met with someone from CNN, or someone posing as a reporter from CNN. It could have been someone from the Regime posing as a reporter from CNN. Did he tell someone he had met with a reporter? Did anyone go with him? Did he mail the video to someone?

37 posted on 07/27/2003 7:05:54 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert; DoctorZIn
To: mjaneangels@aolcom; DoctorZIn; nuconvert

www.akunews.org.
http://news.gooya.com
www.nourizadeh.com
www.iran-emrooz.de
Here are a few of those websites which confirm it.
Moreover, Prosecutor Mortezavi declared that , The Islamic militants arrested a spy for western medias and he swallowed the footage he made.
This was broadcasted by State Run TV station in Tehran.


36 posted on 07/27/2003 12:33 AM PDT by F14 Pilot (If God brings you to it, He will bring you through it.)
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To: F14 Pilot

"Moreover, Prosecutor Mortezavi declared that , The Islamic militants arrested a spy for western medias and he swallowed the footage he made.
This was broadcasted by State Run TV station in Tehran."

This is very good information. It helps to confirm the story of Hamid. Now we need confirmation that Hamid met with someone from CNN, or someone posing as a reporter from CNN. It could have been someone from the Regime posing as a reporter from CNN. Did he tell someone he had met with a reporter? Did anyone go with him? Did he mail the video to someone?



37 posted on 07/27/2003 7:05 AM PDT by nuconvert

------
Some Posts to gain info on that case
38 posted on 07/27/2003 7:24:14 AM PDT by F14 Pilot (If God brings you to it, He will bring you through it.)
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