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Iranian Alert -- August 12, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 8.12.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 08/12/2003 12:07:26 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movment in Iran from being reported.

From jamming satellite broadcasts, to prohibiting news reporters from covering any demonstrations to shutting down all cell phones and even hiring foreign security to control the population, the regime is doing everything in its power to keep the popular movement from expressing its demand for an end of the regime.

These efforts by the regime, while successful in the short term, do not resolve the fundamental reasons why this regime is crumbling from within.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to join us here, post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iran; iranianalert; protests; studentmovement
To find all the links to all 64 threads since the protests started, go to:


1 posted on 08/12/2003 12:07:27 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- August 12, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 8.12.2003 | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

2 posted on 08/12/2003 12:08:35 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Saudi Says Iran Drags Feet Returning Al Qaeda Leaders

August 12, 2003
The Washington Post
John Mintz

As many as 15 al Qaeda leaders and operatives are currently in Iran, but Tehran is dragging its feet in responding to requests from Arab governments to repatriate the accused terrorists for interrogation and trial, a senior Saudi official said yesterday.

Among the al Qaeda members being held in what Iranian officials describe as "safe houses" are Saad bin Laden, who was being groomed to succeed his father, Osama bin Laden, as al Qaeda's leader, and Saif Adel, an Egyptian described by U.S. officials as the terrorist network's security chief, said the Saudi counterterrorism official who asked not to be identified.

"Iran has been giving us the runaround" about the al Qaeda personnel in that country, and for months Iranian officials denied knowing their identities, the Saudi official said.

Yesterday's briefing for reporters was part of a wide-ranging attempt by Riyadh to demonstrate that it is working closely with Washington on counterterrorist initiatives, including attempts to win concessions from Tehran. Saudi officials have ratcheted up their public relations efforts in the weeks since a congressional report on the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks suggested that Saudi figures have helped finance worldwide terrorism -- an assertion that the Saudi government strongly denies.

The Saudi official pointed out that in recent days FBI agents in Riyadh have been given full access to Ali al Ghamdi, al Qaeda's leader in Saudi Arabia, who was arrested in June and has been accused of planning the May 12 suicide bombings that killed 34 people, including nine Americans. "It's another sign of our cooperation," the Saudi official said. In past years, U.S. investigators complained bitterly that Saudi officials had barred them from interviewing terrorism suspects jailed in the desert kingdom.

The Saudi official said that in addition to Saad bin Laden and Adel, other al Qaeda members in Iran include Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, the terrorist network's spokesman whose Kuwaiti citizenship was revoked by that government, and Abu Musab Zarqawi, a Jordanian and prominent terrorist operative who hid in Baghdad last year after being wounded in the war in Afghanistan.

The younger bin Laden, who is 23 or 24, is one of the oldest of Osama bin Laden's many children. He lived with his father for five years in Sudan until they were expelled by the government there, and moved al Qaeda's headquarters to Afghanistan. Western intelligence officials have said for almost a year that Saad was in Iran, and there have been periodic reports that the Iranians had deported him.

From Iran, Adel helped coordinate the synchronized attack on three residential compounds in Riyadh in May, according to U.S. and allied intelligence officials. The possibility that Adel could have planned the attacks while under the control of Iran has angered Riyadh and Washington.

The Saudi official yesterday echoed questions raised by U.S. officials about whether the al Qaeda members are being treated as captives or guests by Iranian officials. "That's the million-dollar question," he said. "They're in a place where Iranians are totally in control. . . . But are they engaging in [terrorist] missions? We don't know."

The real question is which Iranian officials control them. Iranian intelligence officials and leaders of the radical Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps have struck periodic alliances with al Qaeda over the years, while reformist Iranian officials have publicly denounced the idea of providing safe haven for bin Laden's fighters.

Saudi officials are trying to persuade Tehran to hand over the seven or eight Saudis among the al Qaeda members in Iran, the official said. The Egyptian and Algerian governments are also demanding that their citizens be turned over, he said. Kuwait has said it does not want Ghaith.

The U.S. government has no diplomatic relations with Iran, but has made clear to Tehran through intermediaries that it wants them extradited here or to other friendly nations. "We've made our concerns very clear to Iran that they should be turned over," State Department spokesman Philip T. Reeker said last week.

The Saudi official said a 10-person al Qaeda cell captured in Riyadh yesterday after a shootout with police is tied to a London-based Saudi dissident who opposes the royal family, Saad al Faqih. Few allegations have surfaced tying him to terrorism in the past, and he could not be reached for comment yesterday.

Meanwhile, Riyadh has concluded that Omar Bayoumi, a Saudi who befriended and aided two of the Sept. 11 hijackers in California in 2000 has no tie to terrorists, the official said. Bayoumi, a former accountant for the Saudi aviation ministry, has been interviewed three times by the FBI in recent days. The report on the Sept. 11 attacks by Congress's intelligence committees recommended that Bayoumi's role be investigated further.

The officials also noted that the Saudis extradited to the United States three members of a group of Muslim activists recently indicted in Northern Virginia for taking part in a conspiracy to support "violent jihad" by members of a Kashmiri movement designated by the U.S. government as a terrorist organization. The Saudis spent months helping to develop the case with Washington, he said.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news_en.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=08&d=12&a=2
3 posted on 08/12/2003 12:11:47 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Saudi Says Iran Drags Feet Returning Al Qaeda Leaders

August 12, 2003
The Washington Post
John Mintz

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/962437/posts?page=3#3

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
4 posted on 08/12/2003 12:12:54 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Iran to try some Al Qaeda suspects
IRIB NEWS
2003/08/11 Tehran, Aug 11 - Iran will try those Al Qaeda suspects whose nationality remain unclear as well as those who are rejected by their country of origin, a senior Foreign Ministry official said here Monday.

"If the nationality of some individuals are not known and no country accepts them, as the Information Minister has said, we will take action ourselves," Foreign Ministry Spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi told reporters at a weekly news briefing.

Iran's Information Minister Ali Younesi said on Saturday that Tehran will put some of the Al Qaeda operatives in Iranian custody on trial instead of allegedly swapping them with senior elements of terrorist opposition Mujahedin Khalq Organization.

Other Al Qaeda members to stand trial in the Islamic Republic are those who are found to have committed crimes in Iran, Asefi said.

"If it is established that some individuals among them have committed crimes in Iran, we will try them according to the country's laws and international commitments," he said.

Asefi refused to name any of those held by Tehran on the suspicion of being linked to Al Qaeda which Washington accuses of masterminding Sept 11, 2001 terror attacks on American landmarks.

"I am not in a position to announce who are among these individuals, but this is a security matter, the publication of which in the media is not expedient," he said.

Asked to confirm whether Kuwaiti-born Al Qaeda Spokesman Sulaiman Abu Gaith was in Iran, Asefi said, "This is an invented story which is appealing to certain media, especially in Arab countries.

"The discussions (in Arab and Western media about Al Qaeda) do not correspond with the condition of those held in Iran," he added.

Asefi also rejected press reports that Iran sought concessions from certain countries in exchange for extraditing Al Qaeda prisoners.

"This is a false news, invented outside (Iran) about Al Qaeda."We are serious in our fight against terrorism and we have turned back many of these individuals or returned them to their own countries," the Foreign Ministry Spokesman added.

Asefi turned the table on Western governments for being 'not committed to their responsibilities' and for 'supporting terrorist groups and the Zionist regime which is the symbol of state terrorism".

5 posted on 08/12/2003 12:17:39 AM PDT by Pro-Bush (Circumstances rule destiny)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
ISRAEL, IRAN, AND U.S. HAVE SECRET CONTACTS

2003-08-12
Source:RadioFreeEurope

ISRAEL, IRAN, AND U.S. HAVE SECRET CONTACTS.
The public displays of mutual hostility between the governments of Israel, Iran, and the U.S. make it very difficult for any of the governments to engage in normal and open relations, regardless of any shared concerns or interests. This situation results in a lack of transparency in their relationships and necessitates secret contacts -- with at times embarrassing results, as illustrated by three recent cases.

Israel and Iran have been negotiating an exchange of prisoners since May, as reported in the 7 August edition of the Tel Aviv Russian-language daily newspaper "Novosti Nedeli." The contacts initially were an outgrowth of Tehran-Washington discussions begun in Geneva in July. According to the report, the interlocutors were a former U.S. official named Frank Andersen and a former Islamic Revolution Guards Corps officer identified as "Mohammad Khatami." Former government personnel were used in order to ensure the deniability of these official contacts. Tehran expressed a willingness to extradite Al-Qaeda's Sayf al-Adel (see above) in exchange for Mujahedin Khalq Organization leaders, but Washington rejected this offer.

Tehran then tried to get custody of the MKO personnel by involving the Israelis, "Novosti Nedeli" reported. In a meeting with an Israeli intermediary identified as "Amnon Zikhroni," Khatami said that, in exchange for MKO personnel, Iran would deport al-Adel, ensure the release of captured Israeli reserve officer Elhanan Tenenbaum, return the remains of Israeli soldiers captured by Lebanese Hizballah, and seek information on captured Israeli pilot Ron Arad. Washington again rejected the deal, according to "Novosti Nedeli," but the Iranian side insisted that the so-called "Jewish lobby" pressure the White House.

The case of Palestinian, Lebanese, Syrian, Jordanian, and Iranian prisoners in Israel was added to in subsequent discussions. According to "Novosti Nedeli," some Israelis would like to have the U.S. release convicted Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard in exchange for al-Adel. These discussions reportedly are continuing, but Pollard's release is not open for discussion.

In another recent case, two officials from the Pentagon working for Undersecretary of Defense for Policy Douglas Feith held "several" meetings with notorious Iran-Contra figure Manuchehr Ghorbanifar, "Newsday" reported on 8 August, citing anonymous "administration officials." Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld confirmed later the same day that the meetings had occurred, but he said they took place more than one year ago, were part of an effort to gather information on Iran, and they had gone nowhere, Knight-Ridder reported.

The White House had not authorized the meetings, and it was only by chance that it, the State Department, and the CIA learned about them, "Newsday" reported. Rumsfeld said that information on the meetings was shared with other government agencies. According to "Newsday's" sources, the "ultimate policy objective of Feith and a group of neo-conservative civilians inside the Pentagon is regime change in Iran." Administration policy, however, is one of engagement over issues such a nonproliferation and the Al-Qaeda extraditions.

An anonymous "senior U.S. official" told Knight-Ridder that Ghorbanifar wanted to be paid for introducing the U.S. officials to Iranian moderates. Michael Ledeen of the American Enterprise Institute opened the Ghorbanifar channel, "Newsday" reported, citing a former CIA officer who learned this from current intelligence officers. Neither Ledeen nor Ghorbanifar would comment, according to "Newsday."

Israeli officials introduced Ghorbanifar to Ledeen -- who was a consultant to the National Security Council -- in the mid-1980s. Ghorbanifar claimed at the time to know Iranian moderates. This eventually would become the arms-for-hostages scandal (see Theodore Draper, "A Very Thin Line: The Iran-Contra Affairs," [New York: Hill and Wang, 1991]; see also Michael Ledeen, "Perilous Statecraft," [Scribners, 1988]).

Late on 8 August, an anonymous "senior defense official" said that another meeting with Ghorbanifar took place in Paris in June, and this one resulted from "an unplanned, unscheduled encounter," "The Washington Post" reported on 9 August.

In a different matter, Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Assefi said on 7 August that President Khatami has not written a letter to any U.S. official, Fars News Agency reported. Assefi added that Iran has transparent relations with other countries and it does not need to establish secret relations with any country and, in the case of the U.S., "Over many long years, official channels have existed for regulating relations between the two countries and Iran has conveyed its views to the opposite side through these official and legal venues."

Assefi was reacting to a 6 August report in the Saudi Arabian "Al Watan" newspaper which stated that Khatami had written a letter to U.S. Secretary of State Powell calling for the continuation of the secret and official Iran-U.S. talks that are reported to have taken place in Geneva. (Bill Samii)

http://www.nitv.tv/main.htm

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

6 posted on 08/12/2003 1:14:55 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn; dixiechick2000; Valin; McGavin999; nuconvert; piasa; risk; RaceBannon; AdmSmith; ...
Rise of Iraq's Shiites could pose threat to Iran's clerical rulers

By Nicholas Birch | Special to The Christian Science Monitor

TEHRAN, IRAN – Well before the first bomb dropped on Baghdad, Western analysts worried that liberation from Saddam Hussein's Sunni-based tyranny could push Iraq's Shiite majority into the arms of Iranian theocrats.
In the chaos that followed, such concern has seemed justified. Protesters in Shiite districts of Baghdad brandish posters of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, founder of Iran's theocracy. In Iraq's holy city of Najaf, thousands flock to hear the speeches of Moqtada al-Sadr, a virulently anti-American advocate of clerical rule.

But an extraordinary outburst this week from Ayatollah Khomeini's grandson shows that the renaissance of Iraq's Shiites is a double-edged weapon that potentially is every bit as dangerous for Iranian rulers' grasp on power as it is for Washington.

Speaking to journalists in Najaf Tuesday, Seyyed Hussein Khomeini said that "Iranians insist on freedom, but they are not sure where it will come from. If it comes from inside, they will welcome it, but if it was necessary for it to come from abroad, especially from the United States, people will accept it."

While his name carries great weight for Iranians, Mr. Khomeini has little standing in the Shiite hierarchy. But his comments echo the discontent many Iranians feel about heavy-handed clerical rule.

Faced with US warnings not to meddle in Iraq's affairs, Iran has limited itself to barbed declarations that no one has the right to interfere in another country's affairs. "Tehran has no intention of trying to impose its political model on Iraq," says Amir Mohebbian, a columnist for the ultra-conservative daily Resalat. "All clerics, whether political or apolitical, share our goals and objectives."

But other Iranian observers say there is plenty of evidence that many in Iran would like Iraq to adopt clerical rule. The outspoken support of senior ayatollahs in the Shiite's sacred city of Qom, Iran, they say, has gone a long way toward legitimizing Najaf-based Mr. Sadr.

The rationale behind such behavior is clear, argues Seyyed Mostafa Mohaghegh Damad, expert on Islamic law at Tehran University. "The revival of politically independent seminaries in Najaf will have a spillover effect on Iran. It could create a breathing space for those wishing to conform to the age-old precepts of Shiite tradition - the pious, apolitical links between senior ayatollahs and their followers."

Mesmerized by the push for change of Iran's reformist government, the West has tended to underestimate clerical opposition to the Iranian regime. One London-based clerical opposition group estimates that of approximately 5,000 ayatollahs in Iran, only 80 wholeheartedly support it.

While Ruhollah Khomeini was alive, doubts about his doctrine of clerical rule were tempered by his clerical credentials. The same is not true of his successor Ali Khamenei, only a middle-ranking cleric when he was appointed supreme leader in 1989. "Senior clerics treat his theological pronouncements with disdain," says Nadeem Kazmi, of the London-based Al-Khoei Foundation, a charity with close links to the apolitical Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani in Najaf.

But what Ayatollah Khamenei lacks in credentials, he has made up for in surveillance, such as increased attempts to bring Qom's independent seminaries under state control. Nobody knows how many dissenting clerics have been executed by special clerical courts, although some sources put the figure at 60 since 1989.

"If Qom remains under the same kind of oppressive atmosphere, everyone will come to Najaf," Seyyed Hussein Khomeini said on Tuesday.

In a recent book on Iran's ruling elite, German Iranian scholar Wilfried Buchta goes further. "A Shia grand ayatollah from outside the Iranian system of power..., could issue fatwas [legal judgments] on religious-social matters that run counter to Khamenei's political line," he writes. "If this should happen, it could bring the whole system to the verge of breakdown."

Following a series of high-level clerical defections in recent years, some Iranian analysts see signs that dissatisfaction in Iran has spread to traditionally pro-regime clerics. But most Iranians doubt the clerics will transform passive opposition into active revolt. "If we're going to depend on them, we have a long wait on our hands," says Davoud Hermidas Bavand, law professor at the Supreme National Defense University in Tehran. The political editor of reformist daily Etemad, Rouzbeh Mirebrahimi, agrees. "Even if Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani stood up in Najaf and criticized the Iranian regime, which he won't, nobody would listen to him."

But this is north Tehran, where students brandish copies of Nietzsche and whisper "God is dead" behind closed doors. While their more secular reform movement seems deadlocked, more traditionally minded Iranians may be willing to listen to clerics in Iraq who advocate separation of mosque and state.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0808/p06s01-wome.html
7 posted on 08/12/2003 1:19:06 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: All
from the August 08, 2003 edition

Rise of Iraq's Shiites could pose threat to Iran's clerical rulers

By Nicholas Birch | Special to The Christian Science Monitor

TEHRAN, IRAN - Well before the first bomb dropped on Baghdad, Western analysts worried that liberation from Saddam Hussein's Sunni-based tyranny could push Iraq's Shiite majority into the arms of Iranian theocrats.

In the chaos that followed, such concern has seemed justified. Protesters in Shiite districts of Baghdad brandish posters of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, founder of Iran's theocracy. In Iraq's holy city of Najaf, thousands flock to hear the speeches of Moqtada al-Sadr, a virulently anti-American advocate of clerical rule.

But an extraordinary outburst this week from Ayatollah Khomeini's grandson shows that the renaissance of Iraq's Shiites is a double-edged weapon that potentially is every bit as dangerous for Iranian rulers' grasp on power as it is for Washington.

Speaking to journalists in Najaf Tuesday, Seyyed Hussein Khomeini said that "Iranians insist on freedom, but they are not sure where it will come from. If it comes from inside, they will welcome it, but if it was necessary for it to come from abroad, especially from the United States, people will accept it."

While his name carries great weight for Iranians, Mr. Khomeini has little standing in the Shiite hierarchy. But his comments echo the discontent many Iranians feel about heavy-handed clerical rule.

Faced with US warnings not to meddle in Iraq's affairs, Iran has limited itself to barbed declarations that no one has the right to interfere in another country's affairs. "Tehran has no intention of trying to impose its political model on Iraq," says Amir Mohebbian, a columnist for the ultra-conservative daily Resalat. "All clerics, whether political or apolitical, share our goals and objectives."

But other Iranian observers say there is plenty of evidence that many in Iran would like Iraq to adopt clerical rule. The outspoken support of senior ayatollahs in the Shiite's sacred city of Qom, Iran, they say, has gone a long way toward legitimizing Najaf-based Mr. Sadr.

The rationale behind such behavior is clear, argues Seyyed Mostafa Mohaghegh Damad, expert on Islamic law at Tehran University. "The revival of politically independent seminaries in Najaf will have a spillover effect on Iran. It could create a breathing space for those wishing to conform to the age-old precepts of Shiite tradition - the pious, apolitical links between senior ayatollahs and their followers."

Mesmerized by the push for change of Iran's reformist government, the West has tended to underestimate clerical opposition to the Iranian regime. One London-based clerical opposition group estimates that of approximately 5,000 ayatollahs in Iran, only 80 wholeheartedly support it.

While Ruhollah Khomeini was alive, doubts about his doctrine of clerical rule were tempered by his clerical credentials. The same is not true of his successor Ali Khamenei, only a middle-ranking cleric when he was appointed supreme leader in 1989. "Senior clerics treat his theological pronouncements with disdain," says Nadeem Kazmi, of the London-based Al-Khoei Foundation, a charity with close links to the apolitical Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani in Najaf.

But what Ayatollah Khamenei lacks in credentials, he has made up for in surveillance, such as increased attempts to bring Qom's independent seminaries under state control. Nobody knows how many dissenting clerics have been executed by special clerical courts, although some sources put the figure at 60 since 1989.

"If Qom remains under the same kind of oppressive atmosphere, everyone will come to Najaf," Seyyed Hussein Khomeini said on Tuesday.

In a recent book on Iran's ruling elite, German Iranian scholar Wilfried Buchta goes further. "A Shia grand ayatollah from outside the Iranian system of power..., could issue fatwas [legal judgments] on religious-social matters that run counter to Khamenei's political line," he writes. "If this should happen, it could bring the whole system to the verge of breakdown."

Following a series of high-level clerical defections in recent years, some Iranian analysts see signs that dissatisfaction in Iran has spread to traditionally pro-regime clerics. But most Iranians doubt the clerics will transform passive opposition into active revolt. "If we're going to depend on them, we have a long wait on our hands," says Davoud Hermidas Bavand, law professor at the Supreme National Defense University in Tehran. The political editor of reformist daily Etemad, Rouzbeh Mirebrahimi, agrees. "Even if Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani stood up in Najaf and criticized the Iranian regime, which he won't, nobody would listen to him."

But this is north Tehran, where students brandish copies of Nietzsche and whisper "God is dead" behind closed doors. While their more secular reform movement seems deadlocked, more traditionally minded Iranians may be willing to listen to clerics in Iraq who advocate separation of mosque and state.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0808/p06s01-wome.htm
8 posted on 08/12/2003 1:24:07 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
Thanks for the ping
9 posted on 08/12/2003 5:52:56 AM PDT by firewalk
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Iraq "chaos" will only end with foreign forces' departure: Iran

Mon Aug 11, 7:37 AM ET Add Mideast - AFP to My Yahoo!

TEHRAN (AFP) - The "chaos" in Iraq (news - web sites) will only end with the departure of foreign forces from the country, Iran's foreign ministry spokesman warned.

"We do not support any acts which endanger the life of the innocent, but we think that the presence of foreign forces and the way they behave towards the Iraqis are the principal cause of insecurity in Iraq", Hamid-Reza Asefi said in his weekly press conference.

"So for calm to return, it is necessary for the foreign forces to leave Iraq and to agree to give the future of this country to the Iraqis as soon as possible," Asefi said Monday. "Only under these conditions, can we hope for the end of chaos in Iraq."

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=1514&e=14&u=/afp/20030811/wl_mideast_afp/iran_iraq_us_unrest_030811113753

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”



10 posted on 08/12/2003 6:55:40 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Islamic regime to adopt policy of "Burned Land" in case of US attack

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Aug 12, 2003

The Islamic republic regime seems to have adopted an "expected" policy in case of a US invasion of Iran. This policy which is called "Burned Land" intends to destroy anything, such as cities, Industrial and military installations and agricultural fields before the arrival of the invasion forces.

Such policy has been used by other countries during the last centuries and especially by Russia during the French and German invasions of 19th and 20th centuries.

Based on a report, issued on Aug. 11th by IRNA, the Head of the Islamic Revolution's Guards Corps Major General Yahya Rahim Safavi, has stated that Iran has drawn up a new defensive strategy to confront probable American invasion.

Safavi has stated "Since America has superiority over us in terms of (military) equipment, We have shifted from defending the borders to putting up a defense over surface and this means no land is left to allow Americans to set their foot on

The Islamic republic regime's leaders have always confirmed their dis-respect of Iran's National Interests when it comes to the survival of their illegitimate regime and bankrupt ideology.

Rouh-Ollah Khomeini, the founder of the theocratic system, was believing of Iran as just a platform to be used in order to create a vaste Islamic system and everyone remember his infamous comment when he came back from exil back in 1979.

To a reporter asking what was his feeling following putting feet on his Motherland's soil, after 15 years of exil, he responded: "Nothing!".

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1702.shtml

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
11 posted on 08/12/2003 7:01:02 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: All
U.S. Wants Access to Al Qaeda Suspects in Iran

August 12, 2003
Reuters
Reuters.com

CANBERRA -- The United States said on Tuesday it wants access to high-level members of al Qaeda who have been detained in Iran so it can interrogate them on any future attacks Osama bin Laden's network could be planning.

Iran publicly acknowledged for the first time last month that it was holding some senior al Qaeda figures and said it planned to extradite some of them to "friendly countries."

"Some we believe are quite high-level. We would like to get access to them and interrogate them to try and head off whatever plans they have in the works," U.S. Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage told reporters in Canberra.

"Much of the al Qaeda leadership is dead or in hiding. The ability to conduct terrorism is more difficult, but having said that they are still out there...the battle goes on," he said.

Iran's government spokesman Abdollah Ramazanzadeh has said al Qaeda members could only be handed over to countries with which Iran had extradition agreements.

He said Iran did not have such an agreement with the United States, which blames al Qaeda for the September 11, 2001, suicide attacks on New York and Washington.

Ramazanzadeh has declined to reveal the identity of the al Qaeda members in Iran's custody for "security reasons." He said that arrested members of al Qaeda who had committed crimes in Iran would be prosecuted by Iranian courts.

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=3261881
12 posted on 08/12/2003 7:02:13 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Based on a report, issued on Aug. 11th by IRNA, the Head of the Islamic Revolution's Guards Corps Major General Yahya Rahim Safavi, has stated that Iran has drawn up a new defensive strategy to confront probable American invasion.

Safavi has stated "Since America has superiority over us in terms of (military) equipment, We have shifted from defending the borders to putting up a defense over surface and this means no land is left to allow Americans to set their foot on

If General Safavi is listening, I have a much better defense plan for him and his mullah friends if we invade, to wit: Tuck your head between your legs and kiss your a$$ good bye.

Then again, I really don't think an American invasion is necessary. Why? Their theocracy is imploding bit by bit every day.

5.56mm

13 posted on 08/12/2003 7:33:41 AM PDT by M Kehoe
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To: DoctorZIn
Foreign investments secure in Iran, says Karroubi

Tabriz, Aug 12, IRNA -- Majlis Speaker Hojjatoleslam Mehdi Karroubi here Tuesday assured foreign investors their investment in Iran would be safeguarded.

He made the remark at the opening ceremony of a two-day international seminar on foreign investment in this province's capital, Tabriz, located northwest of the capital.

Acknowledging the importance of security that will guarantee to investors the return of their capital and earnings, he called on concerned officials to exert their utmost to defend foreign investment in this country in order to encourage investors to participate in national development.

The speaker also voiced the readiness of the Iranian Parliament to help solve the country's economic problems, particularly in the matter of securing foreign investment. 1424/LS/210 End

http://www.irna.ir/en/tnews/030812143425.etn02.shtml

Comment: The will have problem in raising 17 bn USD!
14 posted on 08/12/2003 9:56:09 AM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: AdmSmith
They need the $ or they will collapse.

Fortunately, investors have to be aware that his promises to safeguard their investments is dependent on their being in power.

I wouldn't want to invest there right now.

Watch their economy, I believe it will be an important element in the collapse of the regime.
15 posted on 08/12/2003 11:06:01 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: All
Kurdish Party Says It Captures Iraqi Islamists Near Iranian Border

August 12, 2003
Reuters
Reuters.com

BAGHDAD -- An Iraqi Kurdish group said on Tuesday its Peshmerga fighters had captured several members of Ansar al-Islam, a shadowy group reported to have links with al Qaeda, near the border with Iran.

"We captured a number of them yesterday (Monday) and we shall do our investigations to know who are those people and what is their plan," Adel Murad, a spokesman for the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK), told Reuters in Baghdad.

Murad said Kurdish fighters rounded up 50 people who had entered north of Iraq through borders with Iran coming from Afghanistan.

"I do not know if all of them are from Ansar al-Islam or the majority of them or some of them. Our security forces captured them on the borders with Iran," Murad said.

Ansar al-Islam has been identified as one of several groups suspected of carrying out a car bomb attack against the Jordanian embassy in Baghdad last week which killed 17 people.

Murad said that before the U.S.-led war to topple Saddam Hussein the PUK raided headquarters of the group and killed and captured a number of militants.

"Now we think the group returned to the area to resume their terrorist acts in Kurdistan and to participate in terrorist operations inside Iraq," he said.

"We will capture them and send them to trial."

The PUK has clashed repeatedly in recent years with Ansar al-Islam and says its members have trained in al Qaeda camps in Afghanistan.

Independent observers have not confirmed the Ansar's link with al Qaeda and bin Laden.

http://reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=worldNews&storyID=3262698
16 posted on 08/12/2003 12:02:38 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Atomic Experts Reach Iran for Nuclear Sites Inspections

August 12, 2003
AFP
Hindustan Times

Inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have arrived in Iran to conduct routine inspections of nuclear sites there, a spokesman for the UN agency said on Tuesday.

Four experts arrived in Iran on Tuesday to inspect the country's nuclear programme, in particular its enrichment programme which might enable it to develop nuclear weapons.

Water, air and soil samples will be taken back to Vienna to see if any traces of radioactive isotopes liable for use in an atomic bomb are present.

The results of the mission, which ends on Thursday, will be published in a report by IAEA secretary general Mohammed ElBaradei on September 8.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_337298,00050004.htm
17 posted on 08/12/2003 12:03:41 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: All
Khatami Admits Democratic Reforms Have Failed

August 12, 2003
The Associated Press
Dow Jones Newswires

TEHRAN -- Iran's president Tuesday admitted his program of democratic reforms has largely failed but said he hasn't broken his promise to voters to promote democracy and freedoms, the official Islamic Republic News Agency reported.

"Lately, speaking for me has become difficult because I feel many of the ideas and programs I sincerely offered and the people voted for have not materialized, " IRNA quoted Khatami as saying.

He added: "I remain committed to the promise I made to the nation, although doubts may have surfaced, because of the existing problems, that their servant ( Khatami) has broken his promise."

Last month, Khatami said he would resign if Iranians - dissatisfied over his failure to deliver promised reforms - want him to go.

Khatami made the remarks Tuesday amid continuing attempts by ruling hard-line clerics to undermine his reform agenda and deepening public discontent over the country's slow pace toward democratic change.

"Perhaps part of the population, especially the youth, who want quick realization of their demands, have become disappointed," he told the National Congress of Non-Government Youth Organizations in Tehran.

In June, thousands of Iranians held a week of nightly protests, railing not only against their usual targets - Iran's unelected hard-liners who control key institutions - but also against Khatami for his failure to introduce greater political, social and economic freedoms.

But Khatami said he still had some hopes for success.

"A ray of hope still exists. Considering the circumstances (in the country) I believe there is no way other than continuing the path we have begun. With patience and wisdom, hopefully we will succeed," IRNA quoted him as saying.

Khatami's hopes for a compromise with hard-liners have been thwarted in recent weeks after the hard-line Guardian Council, which vets all parliamentary legislation, rejected two key reform bills presented by the president.

Those bills would have given greater powers to Khatami to stop constitutional violations by his hard-line opponents and barred the Guardian Council from arbitrary disqualification of candidates in legislative and presidential elections.

Khatami has repeatedly complained that he has been powerless to stop hard- liners violating the constitution and acting against voted reforms and hoped the bills would give him the necessary instruments to push for reforms.

The president has said the closure of more than 90 pro-democracy publications over the past three years, the arrest of dozens of prominent intellectuals and writers and closed trials without jury were open violations of the constitution, but hard-liners have ignored his warnings.

Separately, a woman activist Tuesday held a sit-in in front of Iran's most notorious prison to protest the death of an Iranian-Canadian photojournalist while in police custody and "lack of security" for prisoners.

Azam Taleqani said her three-hour sit-in in front of Evin Prison in northern Tehran was a "symbolic" gesture of protest against trampling of freedoms and the rights of prisoners by the hard-line ruling Islamic establishment in Iran.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news_en.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=08&d=12&a=6

18 posted on 08/12/2003 12:05:22 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Khatami Admits Democratic Reforms Have Failed

August 12, 2003
The Associated Press
Dow Jones Newswires

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/962437/posts?page=18#18

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
19 posted on 08/12/2003 12:06:04 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: All
Woman Risks Iran's Wrath to Protest Canadian's Death

August 12, 2003
Toronto Star
Ali Akbar Dareini

TEHRAN - A woman activist held a three-hour sit-in outside Iran's most notorious prison today to protest the July death of a Canadian photojournalist while in police custody and "lack of security" for prisoners.

Azam Taleqani said her sit-in at Evin Prison in northern Tehran was a "symbolic" gesture of protest against the trampling of freedoms and the rights of prisoners by the hardline ruling Islamic establishment in Iran.

"I held a sit-in to protest the death in prison of Zahra Kazemi and the judiciary's failure to inform the public about who was behind the crime," Taleqani told The Associated Press in a telephone interview.

Taleqani said she was approached by prison officers, curious to know the reason for her sit-in. The officers asked her to leave, without forcing her.

Kazemi, 54, died July 10, nearly three weeks after she was detained for taking photographs outside a Tehran prison during student-led protests.

Iranian Vice-President Mohammad Ali Abtahi said Kazemi had been murdered. Earlier, a presidential committee that investigated Kazemi's death shied away from calling the death intentional, saying she died of a "fractured skull, brain hemorrhage and its consequences resulting from a hard object hitting the head or the head hitting a hard object."

A judicial inquiry into the death led to the detention of five Intelligence Ministry agents, two of whom were released earlier this month on bail.

Canada withdrew its ambassador after Kazemi was buried in her birthplace, the southern Iranian city of Shiraz, against the wishes of Canadian authorities and her son, who lives in Montreal.

"The mysterious death of Kazemi creates greater concerns about the safety of prisoners. How can we be sure that political prisoners don't meet the fate of Kazemi in jail?" asked Taleqani, who is close to the outlawed Freedom Movement of Iran. She said she is also concerned about prisoners held in solitary confinement for months without trial.

The Freedom Movement — which opposes the clerics ruling Iran — rejects violence and seeks peaceful but profound democratic changes.

Taleqani is the daughter of the late Ayatollah Mahmoud Taleqani, a highly respected liberal cleric in the early years after the 1979 Islamic Revolution that toppled pro-U.S. Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi.

Kazemi's death has become a new point of contention between Iran's elected reformers — who support President Mohammad Khatami's program of democracy and social freedoms — and unelected hardline conservatives, who stubbornly resist them.

Hardliners have closed down more than 90 pro-democracy publications and jailed several dozen writers and political activists in the last three years, almost all of them without trial or in closed trials without a jury.

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?GXHC_gx_session_id_=1a284655ea620662&pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1060684975073&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968705899037
20 posted on 08/12/2003 12:06:58 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Woman Risks Iran's Wrath to Protest Canadian's Death

August 12, 2003
Toronto Star
Ali Akbar Dareini

TEHRAN - A woman activist held a three-hour sit-in outside Iran's most notorious prison today to protest the July death of a Canadian photojournalist while in police custody and "lack of security" for prisoners....

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/962437/posts?page=20#20

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
21 posted on 08/12/2003 12:08:06 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: All
EU wants Iran to ensure transparency in nuclear programme

World News
Aug 12, 2003

Brussels - European Commission, the executive arm of the EU, wants Iran to fulfill her obligations as a member of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) by taking steps to adhere to the relevant international instruments, such as the IAEA Additional Protocol, ensuring adequate transparency of Iran's nuclear programme.

In response to a question addressed to him by Portuguese member of the European Parliament (MEP), Paulo Casaca, on Iran's nuclear program, the foreign policy wizard of the European Commission, Chris Patten said; "We recognize Iran's right as a party to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to develop nuclear energy for peaceful purposes but strongly support that Iran must be fully transparent and in compliance with this treaty (NPT)".

Expressing his concern over what he described as Iran's failure to fulfill some of her obligations under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) safeguards agreement, EU commissioner Patten said the European Commission, welcomed the June 2003 report of Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), but recognizes the right of Iran to develop nuclear energy for peaceful purposes.

The EU has repeatedly stated that the issue of weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) constitutes one of the major areas of concern in its relations with Iran. While recognizing Iran's right as a party to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to develop nuclear energy for peaceful purposes, the European Commission strongly supports the view of the EU that Iran must be fully transparent and in compliance with this treaty, Patten underlined.

In response to another question sent by the MEP, the EU Commissioner Chris Patten said, The Commission would hesitate to refer to the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) as `the democratic opposition' to the regime in Tehran.

EU believes that more intense economic relations with Iran can be developed only if satisfactory progress is reached in the four areas of concern, namely human rights, terrorism, non-proliferation and the Middle East Peace Process.

The European Council of minister had been expressing concern over the development of the Iranian Nuclear programme and over the proliferation risks. The Council time and again reiterated its expectation that Iran show full transparency and co-operate fully with IAEA and meet its requests, in particular those referred to in the last Board of Governors meeting.

An urgent and unconditional acceptance, signature and implementation of an IAEA Additional Protocol on safeguards is of the utmost importance as it would be considered by the international community as a sign of the Iranian commitment in the field of non-proliferation an official at the EU headquarter opined.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1705.shtml
22 posted on 08/12/2003 12:11:31 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: All
Iran step up arrests of activists

By Dan De Luce
Aug 12, 2003

Iran's hardline clergy has begun arresting and interrogating journalists, students and political activists in a new attempt to intimidate opposition before next year's parliamentary elections.

In the most extensive wave of detentions in recent years, plainclothes security agents have detained hundreds of student activists as well as journalists and reformist commentators.

"This is not a new process," Reza Yousefian, an MP in the reformist movement, told the Guardian. "But it has accelerated. They want to prepare themselves for the next round of parliamentary elections.

"Newspapers and students are the two engines of reform and they have been damaged and disrupted in some way by these arrests."

The most recent detentions include the arrest of Abolghasem Golbaf, the editor in chief of the political monthly Gozaresh.

Ever since the election of reformist Mohammad Khatami as president six years ago, conservative militants acting through the judiciary and shadowy security services appear to have waged a campaign of repression to undermine the reformist movement.

A number of President Khatami's allies have been imprisoned, a senior adviser was murdered three years ago and dozens of newspapers have been shut down.

Reformist activists say the pro-democracy demonstrations which erupted in June have provided a fresh opportunity for the conservative clergy to go after the most strident voices demanding reform of the country's theocracy.

The minister of science, research and technology, Mostafa Moin, submitted his resignation last week amid speculation that he had objected to political interference at universities and had come under pressure to punish student activists after the June demonstrations.

Upon release, many students and other activists are less ready to speak their minds and some journalists choose to stay away from "sensitive" topics. After being freed on bail, dozens of journalists and activists operate under the cloud of a pending trial.

But despite the imprisonment of more than 20 journalists in recent months, the news media and dissident voices are growing increasingly defiant as they test the limits of the system.

Details of psychological torture are emerging and a flurry of open letters to the powerful supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, have castigated "authoritarian methods".

In a 32-page letter published last month, Abbas Abdi, a reformist held in solitary confinement, described how the authorities put inmates under extraordinary pressure to extract confessions.

A former student radical who helped to seize the US embassy in 1979, Mr Abdi was imprisoned and accused of plotting with foreign powers after his firm published a poll last year showing more than 70% of Iranians favoured restoring relations with the US.

The death in custody last month of a Canadian photojournalist of Iranian descent, Zahra Kazemi, shocked the country. Revelations that she died of a blow to the head and that authorities might have tried to hush up details of her case have underlined the reformists' long-held concerns that hardliners are operating parallel security services and unregistered detention centres outside legal authority.

Many voters, disappointed with the pace of reform, are expected to boycott elections next February, allowing the conservatives to win back control of parliament.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1706.shtml
23 posted on 08/12/2003 12:12:23 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Iran step up arrests of activists

By Dan De Luce
Aug 12, 2003

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/962437/posts?page=23#23

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
24 posted on 08/12/2003 12:13:20 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn; F14 Pilot
"Burned Land"

Scorched Earth...it seems I've heard of this policy somewhere before.

Azam Taleqani is a brave woman. I pray for her safety.

Thanks for your posts!

25 posted on 08/12/2003 12:52:58 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 (Two fish are in a tank. One says to the other ---"I'll man the guns, You drive")
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To: DoctorZIn
This is very bad news, Doctor.

"Iran's hardline clergy has begun arresting and interrogating journalists, students and political activists in a new attempt to intimidate opposition before next year's parliamentary elections."

This vicious cycle is starting all over again.
Announcing the release of a few, and arresting dozens more.

"Many voters, disappointed with the pace of reform, are expected to boycott elections next February, allowing the conservatives to win back control of parliament."

They CAN NOT allow this to happen. They made this mistake before. It does them no good.
26 posted on 08/12/2003 2:59:56 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: All
Iran's Leader Says Reforms Have Stalled

ALI AKBAR DAREINI
Associated Press

TEHRAN, Iran - Iran's president admitted Tuesday that his program of democratic reforms has largely failed, but said he will not break his promise to voters to promote democracy and freedoms.

Iranian President Mohammad Khatami made the remarks amid continuing attempts by ruling hard-line clerics to undermine his reform agenda and deepening public discontent over the country's slow pace toward democratic change.

"Lately, speaking for me has become difficult because I feel many of the ideas and programs I sincerely offered and the people voted for have not materialized," the official Islamic Republic News Agency quoted Khatami as saying.

Last month, Khatami said he would resign if Iranians - dissatisfied over his failure to deliver promised reforms - want him to.

"Perhaps part of the population, especially the youth, who want quick realization of their demands, have become disappointed," he was quoted as telling the National Congress of Non-Government Youth Organizations in Tehran.

In June, thousands of Iranians held a week of nightly protests, railing not only against their usual targets - Iran's unelected hard-liners who control key institutions - but also against Khatami for failing to introduce greater political, social and economic freedoms.

Khatami, however, said he still had some hopes for success.

"A ray of hope still exists. Considering the circumstances (in the country) I believe there is no way other than continuing the path we have begun. With patience and wisdom, hopefully we will succeed," IRNA quoted him as saying.

Khatami's hopes for a compromise with hard-liners have been thwarted in recent weeks after the Guardian Council, which vets all parliamentary legislation, rejected two key reform bills presented by the president.

Those bills would have given greater powers to Khatami to stop constitutional violations by his hard-line opponents and would have barred the Guardian Council from arbitrarily disqualifying candidates in legislative and presidential elections.

The soft-spoken president has said the closure of more than 90 pro-democracy publications in the past three years, the arrests of dozens of prominent intellectuals and writers and the holding of closed trials without jury violated the constitution. Hard-liners have ignored his warnings.

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/6517154.htm
27 posted on 08/12/2003 4:40:13 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Iran's Leader Says Reforms Have Stalled

ALI AKBAR DAREINI
Associated Press

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/962437/posts?page=27#27

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
28 posted on 08/12/2003 4:44:43 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: All
Saudi Official Says Key Al Qaeda Figures in Iran

Tue August 12, 2003 04:59 PM ET
By Tabassum Zakaria

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Several key al Qaeda members, including the security chief and Osama bin Laden's son, are in Iran, which has not responded to a request by Saudi Arabia to hand over any of its citizens among them, a senior Saudi official said on Tuesday.

He said those in Iran included: Saad bin Laden, an older son of the Saudi-born al Qaeda leader; Egyptian Saif al-Adel, believed to be the network's security chief; Kuwait-born Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, al Qaeda's spokesman; and Jordanian Abu Musab Zarqawi, who has suspected al Qaeda ties and is accused of plotting the murder of a U.S. diplomat in Amman last year.

"We are very much confident, actually, that those names are there as well as others," the Saudi official told a small group of reporters on condition of anonymity.

"We are aware that there are at least another 10 or 12 major Qaeda fish ... as well as many others who could be supporters," he said, without identifying the others. "We know they are in safe houses under Iranian control."

Iran had "total control" over the al Qaeda members in the sense that "they won't be able to pack and leave let's say without Iranians knowing about it," the official said.

"We don't know if they can still engage in terrorist activities," he added.

Al Qaeda, led by the Saudi-born Osama bin Laden, has been blamed for the Sept. 11, 2001, hijacked plane attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon that killed about 3,000 people.

STILL AWAITING A RESPONSE

Saudi Arabia has asked Iran to hand over Saudi nationals among that group but has not received a response.

The last time the issue was raised on a senior level was during Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal's visit to Iran in June when he met with Iran's President, Mohammad Khatami, Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi, and other officials, the Saudi official said. "And we have yet to hear back from them," he said.

Before Prince Saud's visit, Saudi Arabia sent a team to Iran to help identify any Saudis among the al Qaeda members, but they were not given access to them, the Saudi official said.

He would not comment on whether the United States knew the identities of the al Qaeda members in Iran, but said that there was information-sharing between Saudi and U.S. authorities.

"If they don't know exactly who every Tom, Dick and Harry who is there, we have a good idea," the Saudi official said.

Iran said last month it was holding several key members of al Qaeda who had fled from Afghanistan and Pakistan, but denied U.S. accusations that it has been harboring them, saying it has arrested and deported more than 500 suspects in the past year. It refused to name those it is holding.

Earlier this week, Iran said it planned to try any al Qaeda members it cannot extradite. "If their citizenship is not clear and no country will accept them, then ... they will be tried in Iran," Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza Asefi said on Monday.

Saudi officials had been "optimistic" about a resolution to the issue around the time of Prince Saud's visit to Iran, "but we are losing our patience," the Saudi official said.

"We feel that we would be willing to wait up to a point to be honest with you and then we have to see where do we go then," the official said. "We would want this issue to be solved."

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?storyID=3266439
29 posted on 08/12/2003 4:46:13 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Saudi Official Says Key Al Qaeda Figures in Iran

Tue August 12, 2003 04:59 PM ET
By Tabassum Zakaria

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/962437/posts?page=29#29

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
30 posted on 08/12/2003 4:51:42 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
It is interesting to me that all of this news from Iran is rather muted in the media. Either they are missing it, or they are willfully suppressing it.

My bet is for the latter.

31 posted on 08/12/2003 5:00:22 PM PDT by Miss Marple
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To: Miss Marple
Sometimes I wonder if the fact that the Iranian people are largely pro-Bush and pro-USA has something to do with their lack of interest in covering the story.
32 posted on 08/12/2003 5:13:51 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Wonder no more.
33 posted on 08/12/2003 7:54:33 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert
"They CAN NOT allow this to happen. They made this mistake before. It does them no good."

Maybe they ought to go vote in February afterall, and write in W next to President.

That ought to send a message.

34 posted on 08/12/2003 8:16:58 PM PDT by mjaneangels@aolcom
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To: DoctorZIn
Who is this ALI AKBAR DAREINI, Associated Press?

Awfully pro Khatami, isn't he?

"...I feel many of the ideas and programs I sincerely offered and the people voted for have not materialized," the official Islamic Republic News Agency quoted Khatami as saying.

Big DUH, and he's full of crap.
35 posted on 08/12/2003 9:07:35 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
A Grandson?s Remarks Hint at Unrest in Iran and Iraq
12 August Nicolas Birch Eurasia News

A Grandson?s Remarks Hint at Unrest in Iran and Iraq Nicolas Birch: 8/11/03 Eurasia News The image of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, founder of Iran?s theocracy, looks down from posters in Shia districts of Baghdad. Iran, officially neutral in the US-led invasion of Iraq, has bristled when American President George W. Bush has warned it against interfering in Iraq?s post-invasion chaos. But an August 5 statement by Khomeini?s 45-year-old grandson, Sayyid Hussein Khomeini, shows how that chaos can have Iran?s ruling clerics on the defensive.

"Iranians insist on freedom, but they are not sure where it will come from," Khomeini told journalists in Najaf August 5. "If it comes from inside, they will welcome it, but if it was necessary for it to come from abroad, especially from the United States, people will accept it." These startling remarks quickly circulated around the world?s newswires, deepening awareness that Iran?s ruling clerics are facing unprecedented challenges to their legitimacy.Khomeini, by vaulting himself into the global spotlight, may have been positioning himself as a champion of Iran?s millions of disaffected youth. If he taps Iraqis? yearnings for freedom as well, Khomeini could contribute to turbulence in both countries.

A little over a year ago, Iran?s fundamentalist strain seemed to be growing inexorably stronger. The clerics who retain final authority in the government are still pressing to capitalize on reform-minded voters? impatience with President Mohammed Khatami and his allies. But they are being careful about making overtures to Iraq. The country has responded to Bush administration scolding by saying that "no one has the right to interfere in another country?s affairs." Amir Mohebbian, a columnist for the hard-line daily Resalat, professes that Tehran?s policymakers have "no intention" of forcing their "political model" on Iraq. Khomeini?s remarks may suggest that the model in question faces too much friction at home to be exportable.

Some observers dispute this, noting that senior ayatollahs in Qom have backed a young cleric in the holy Iraqi city of Najaf and that Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has been known to work closely with Iraqi-born members of the Iran-backed Supreme Council for Islamic Revolution in Iraq. A Khamenei representative accompanied that group?s leader, Ayatollah Bakr al-Hakim, when he returned to Iraq in May. Seyed Mostafa Mohaghegh Damad, an expert on Islamic law at Tehran University, argues that Iranian fundamentalist rulers see attractive prospects for a "clone theocracy" in Iraq. He sees liberation from Saddam as a chance for "those wishing to conform to the age-old precepts of Shia tradition ? the pious, apolitical links between senior ayatollahs and their followers." But these links would not necessarily entail political devotion. Indeed, shortly after al-Hakim arrived in Iraq, Iranian press said he professed himself "a religious clergyman" rather than a politician.

It is not clear how Iranian fundamentalists can deploy client Iraqis like Hakim, who have at times made conciliatory gestures toward the Bush administration. Western observers who have fixated on Khatami?s failure to push broad reforms through the power structure may overestimate the fear that the ruling clerics command in Iran.One London-based clerical opposition group estimates that of approximately 5,000 ayatollahs in Iran, only 80 wholeheartedly support the regime. And of 14 exalted "Grand Ayatollahs" inside Iran, many ayatollahs now question the marriage of governing power with religious purity. And the younger Khomeini?s remarks about freedom indicate that the clerics? muted ideology corresponds to a muted authority.

Some Iranian analysts see signs that dissatisfaction in Iran is beginning to spread to traditionally pro-regime clerics. They point to remarks in May 2002 by Ayatollah Ebrahim Amini, deputy head of the conservative Assembly of Experts. "The regime cannot maintain itself in power by force," he told a crowd in Qom then. "Society is on the verge of an explosion." More than a year later, these remarks by an official of a group that can appoint or remove the Supreme Leader cannot easily be discounted as alarmist.

One phenomenon that the young Khomeini?s remarks highlighted was the contrast in reputation between his grandfather and the current Supreme Leader. The older Khomeini, for all his vitriol, had a reputation as a peerless scholar. Khamenei does not. "Senior clerics treat his theological pronouncements with disdain," says Nadeem Kazmi, spokesman for the London-based Imam Al-Khoei Benevolent Foundation, a charity with close links to a revered but apolitical ayatollah based in Najaf. Critics say that Khamenei has compensated for his lack of credentials with efforts to stifle dissent among clerics. An indeterminate number of dissenting clerics ? perhaps as many as 60 ? have been executed on the orders of special clerical courts since 1989.

In this context, the young Khomeini?s remarks about the United States looking like an acceptable agent for liberation may block any inroads clerics might have hoped to forge into Iraq. Some doubt whether Shia in general can incite Iranians who have lived with a generation?s worth of disappointment under the clerics. "Young people are far more interested in Cyrus the Great and all that nationalist claptrap" than in Shia, says Ali Ansari, who teaches Middle Eastern history at the University of Durham. Sayyid Hussein Khomeini?s ideas may tap those young Iranians? anxiety for a new political model. That could foster instability in Iran and Iraq.

Editor: Nicolas Birch specializes in Turkey, Iran and the Middle East.


http://www.iranexpert.com/2003/unrestiniraniraq12august.htm
36 posted on 08/12/2003 10:13:47 PM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: All
This thread is now closed.

Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- August 13, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 8.13.2003 | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

37 posted on 08/13/2003 12:03:15 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: AdmSmith
"Young people are far more interested in Cyrus the Great and all that nationalist claptrap" than in Shia, says Ali Ansari, who teaches Middle Eastern history at the University of Durham."

"..nationalist claptrap"...now there's a revealing phrase from the Middle Eastern history teacher
38 posted on 08/13/2003 5:18:57 AM PDT by nuconvert
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