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Iranian Alert -- August 28, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 8.28.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 08/28/2003 12:01:42 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movment in Iran from being reported.

From jamming satellite broadcasts, to prohibiting news reporters from covering any demonstrations to shutting down all cell phones and even hiring foreign security to control the population, the regime is doing everything in its power to keep the popular movement from expressing its demand for an end of the regime.

These efforts by the regime, while successful in the short term, do not resolve the fundamental reasons why this regime is crumbling from within.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to join us here, post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iran; iranianalert; protests; studentmovement; studentprotest
Discover all the news since the protests began on June 10th, go to:


1 posted on 08/28/2003 12:01:43 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread

Live Thread Ping List | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”


2 posted on 08/28/2003 12:03:01 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; Eala; piasa; Valin; nuconvert; Texas_Dawg; kattracks; RaceBannon; seamole; ..
Iran says ready to talk on IAEA checks

28.08.2003 - 07:30
By Linda Sieg

TOKYO (Reuters) - Iran has told Japan it is ready to start negotiations with the United Nations' atomic watchdog on snap inspections of its
nuclear programme, a move that could help clear the way for Tokyo to clinch a deal on a $2 billion (1.3 billion pounds) contract to develop a
giant oil field.

Resource-poor Japan has been juggling its desire to clinch the contract to develop the Azadegan oil field with pressure from the United
States -- its main security ally -- to back off because of concerns that Tehran is developing nuclear weapons.

Iran says its programme is for peaceful purposes only.

Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi told Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi that Tehran wanted to broaden cooperation with the U.N.'s
International Atomic Energy Agency and begin talks on signing an Additional Protocol, allowing snap inspections of nuclear sites, a Japanese
Foreign Ministry official said on Thursday.

Iran had said on Tuesday it was ready to sign the IAEA's Additional Protocol but wanted clarification on "the preservation of its sovereignty"
under the enhanced inspection programme, a reservation analysts said could delay final agreement.

Speaking to reporters after his meeting with Koizumi, Kharrazi declined to discuss details of talks on the contract to develop Azadegan,
one of the world's largest untapped oil fields.

A Japanese-backed consortium missed a June 30 deadline and lost exclusive rights to the deal.

"Japan and Iran have been discussing this for a long time and those talks are continuing," Kharrazi said.

"We produce and sell energy. If Japan invests in Iran, that will help it secure stable energy supplies," Kharrazi added.

Japan's trade minister, Takeo Hiranuma, said earlier this week that progress had been made in the talks, but officials have offered no
timetable for when a deal might be finalised.

The Japanese Foreign Ministry official said Azadegan had not come up in Kharrazi's talks with Koizumi.

The Japanese consortium includes the government-backed Japan Petroleum Exploration (JAPEX) and INPEX as well as trading house
Tomen Corp.

DOUBTS AND TIMING

Fears that Tehran wants nuclear weapons were stoked by a new IAEA report that showed Iran had repeatedly failed to inform the U.N.
nuclear watchdog of its atomic activities, Western diplomats in Vienna, where the agency is based, said on Wednesday.

Japan, though, has never been comfortable with Washington's inclusion of Iran -- Tokyo's third largest oil supplier -- as part of an "axis of
evil" with Iraq and communist North Korea.

Japanese Foreign Minister Yoriko Kawaguchi reiterated on Wednesday that Tokyo viewed the oil deal and the nuclear concerns as
separate matters, and some diplomatic experts said that ultimately Tokyo was likely to finalise the contract.

The timing, however, could well be affected by progress toward Tehran's signing the Additional Protocol.

"There is a public presentation issue with regard to how it chimes with the nuclear problem and that obviously has a bearing on when this
(the oil deal) can be done," a Western diplomat said.

"I think Japan will go ahead and take the contract, but the way it will be done is to spread over a period of time, and fudged in various
ways," he said.

http://www.swisspolitics.org/en/news/index.php?section=int&page=news_inhalt&news_id=4174286
3 posted on 08/28/2003 12:23:14 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: All
Meeting people`s demands guarantees strong voter turnout: Khatami

Tehran, Aug 27, IRNA -- President Mohammad Khatami here on Wednesday
said people`s demands must be supported to guarantee their strong
participation in the upcoming Majlis elections.
Khatami, addressing a meeting of university lecturers, said the
people`s participation in the political arena would help thwart the
threats against the country, stressing that the officials must try not
to frustrate people`s hope in the affairs of the country.
"The prudent people of Iran still persist on their supreme
aspirations that were manifested in the Islamic Revolution, and want a
guarantee for supporting their demands and respecting their votes. And
they will make no mistake in that regard," he said.
Khatami further stressed that the Iranian people will march toward
the ideals of the Revolution while considering the priorities [of the
country], adding that Iranians will always stress moderation and will
avoid extremism in their struggle toward that end.

http://www.irna.ir/#2003_08_2712_06_085
4 posted on 08/28/2003 12:25:48 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; Eala; AdmSmith; dixiechick2000; nuconvert; onyx; Pro-Bush; Valin; Tamsey; ...
Khatami vows gov`t will spare no effort in serving people

Tehran, IRNA -- President Mohammad Khatami here on Wednesday
stressed that the government will spare no effort in serving the
people.
Khatami, addressing the weekly cabinet meeting, underscored the
need to continue the path of the martyrs of the Islamic Revolution by
struggling to defend the values of the system, to protect Iran`s
territorial integrity and to serve the people.
He recalled the gap between the people and the state before the
Islamic Revolution of 1979, stressing that the Revolution had filled
the gap to bring the government and the people closer to each other.
Khatami added that Iran belongs to the Iranian nation and that
the Islamic Republic drives its mandate from the people.
"There is no doubt that whatever we have is from the Iranian
nation, and the government has done its best to serve the people and
is determined to continue this," he said.
"Still, the officials must adapt their mentality to people`s
demands, and it is not appropriate to raise our own mentality in the
name of the people."

http://www.irna.ir
5 posted on 08/28/2003 12:27:52 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
BTTT
6 posted on 08/28/2003 1:06:56 AM PDT by onyx (Name an honest democrat? I can't either!)
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To: onyx; DoctorZIn; nuconvert; Valin; McGavin999; AdmSmith; seamole
Iran Ready to Start Talks on Snap Nuke Inspections

LONDON (Reuters) - Iran's Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi said on Thursday the Islamic Republic was ready to start talks on allowing snap U.N. inspections of its nuclear sites which Washington says are used to develop weapons.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=586&ncid=586&e=1&u=/nm/20030828/wl_nm/nuclear_iran_dc
7 posted on 08/28/2003 2:40:27 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; nuconvert; seamole; Valin; McGavin999; AdmSmith; dixiechick2000; onyx; SpookBrat; ...
Ottawa scolds Iran for secrecy

Controversial Tehran prosecutor refuses to release Kazemi report

Michael Friscolanti
National Post
Thursday, August 28, 2003

Canada's Foreign Affairs Minister yesterday scolded Iran for refusing to disclose key details about the murder of Zahra Kazemi, saying he is "profoundly disappointed" with the country's continuing secrecy over the case.

Bill Graham's stern rebuke came after what turned out to be a fruitless meeting at the Canadian Embassy in Iran between consular officials and Tehran's chief prosecutor -- the man many believe personally delivered the beating that ultimately killed the Montreal photojournalist.

For a tense and often confrontational 90 minutes, Gilles Poirier, the embassy's chargé d'affaires, sat across from General Saeed Mortazavi, pressuring him to release the official report into Ms. Kazemi's death.

Gen. Mortazavi's adamant refusal came as little surprise to observers, many of whom suspect he has extremely personal motives to hide the truth.

"Although Canada has made repeated requests, the Iranian government has yet to provide us with the investigative report on Ms. Kazemi's death," Mr. Graham said in a statement yesterday. "This is not the co-operation and transparency that Canada has insisted on and that I have been promised."

Mr. Graham, who was in Denver for a NORAD-related meeting, said the government will continue to push Iran.

"The matter isn't over," his statement read. "Canada will continue to use every opportunity to see that justice is done for Ms. Kazemi and that the wishes of her family to have her remains returned to Canada are respected."

During yesterday's meeting, Mr. Poirier asked the prosecutor for information about two female intelligence agents who have been charged in connection with the case. He also asked if Judge Javad Esmaeili, who is conducting an inquiry into the murder, has completed his probe.

Gen. Mortazavi was largely evasive. He indicated the report could be completed sometime in September, but provided few other details.

"He didn't give any information," said France Bureau, a spokeswoman for Mr. Graham. "He didn't confirm anything."

Reports have suggested Gen. Mortazavi, known as "the butcher of the press," was present during the assault that plunged Ms. Kazemi into a coma and eventually led to her death.

Mr. Poirier, however, did not question Gen. Mortazavi about his alleged personal involvement in the beating -- highlighting the dubious situation in which the Canadian government finds itself: It is desperate to know what happened to the 54-year-old freelance journalist, but one of its primary sources of information is a man many have linked to her death.

Ms. Kazemi, an Iranian ex-patriot and Canadian citizen, was arrested on June 23 for snapping pictures of Tehran's Evin prison.

After a violent 77-hour interrogation by several levels of the Iranian government, she was transported to hospital with a brain hemorrhage. She died on July 10 and was later buried -- against the wishes of her family -- in her hometown of Shiraz.

Iranian officials initially denied any responsibility for her death, insisting she suffered a stroke. They later confirmed she was killed.

Ms. Kazemi's murder, which triggered international outrage, has strained relations between Tehran and Ottawa. Canada recalled its ambassador in protest.

The case has also exposed the escalating rift between Iran's hardline conservative judiciary and its elected reformists -- a battle that has intensified with allegations of cover-up.

On Monday, Gen. Mortazavi's office said two women at the reformist-controlled Intelligence Ministry were to stand trial for the Ms. Kazemi's murder.

Yesterday, several reformist MPs insisted the women were being sacrificed as scapegoats to protect officials in the judiciary. One, Mohsen Armin, did not outright accuse Gen. Mortazavi of being involved, but he did point out the chief prosecutor questioned Ms. Kazemi for more than four hours after her arrest.

Reformist legislator Naser Qavami told The Associated Press yesterday a top Intelligence Ministry official advised a closed meeting of the Iranian parliament a judiciary official working in the prison had beaten Ms. Kazemi, leading to her death.

The legislator said ministry officials also accused the judiciary of moving prison officers who witnessed the beating to different positions and pressuring them not to say what they saw.

During the closed parliament session, the officials also accused the judiciary of tampering with prison records and forcing Intelligence agents to accept responsibility for the murder.

Hamid Mojtahedi, a Toronto-based lawyer who met with Gen. Mortazavi this week, said such accusations are not surprising.

"Mortazavi himself is implicated in all of these issues and he is trying very hard to push it under the table and hide the facts," said Mr. Mojtahedi, of the human rights group Lawyers Without Borders.

Mr. Mojtahedi said Gen. Mortazavi even threatened to arrest him. "His exact words were: 'If you really are interested to know how our legal system works, I can give you a close look at it by locking you up,' " Mr. Mojtahedi said.

Observers described yesterday's developments as unprecedented, but they doubt the reformists would go so far as actually release what they claim to be the truth behind the beating. Such a disclosure would crumble the entire regime, they said, forcing Iran to reveal what really happened to hundreds of other people who have been secretly murdered in the country.

"If such a thing happened, it would be one of the biggest, incredible things that could happen," said Aryo Pirouznia of the Dallas-based Student Movement Coordination Committee for Democracy in Iran, a group aiming to replace the current Islamic regime. "If such a report is released, then, my God, it's going to create a Pandora's box. The whole system would come undone."

Marlys Edwardh, a Toronto-based lawyer who represents Ms. Kazemi's only son, Stephan Hachemi, said she is also amazed by the events in Iran over the past day.

http://canada.com/national/story.asp?id=20E7E047-2412-424A-9CD8-BF47A8CC7FEF
8 posted on 08/28/2003 6:31:13 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: All
Iran to Start UN Talks Over Checks at Nuclear Sites (Update2)

Aug. 28 (Bloomberg) -- Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharazi said his government will begin talks with United Nations' officials over allowing UN inspectors to make spot checks on Iran's nuclear facilities.

http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000101&sid=aUcmu0hb9fDc&refer=japan
9 posted on 08/28/2003 6:32:47 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: All
Mind Over Mullah

There has been a sudden surge in debates across the world on whether or not Islam is compatible with democracy. Like it or not, there is no consensus yet on this issue. Indeed, the very concept of democracy is still hotly contested, with systems as varied as Turkey, the United States of America, Israel and South Africa each calling themselves democracies.

http://www.iranian.ws/news/publish/article_345.shtml
10 posted on 08/28/2003 7:16:35 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; Eala; piasa; Valin; nuconvert; Texas_Dawg; kattracks; RaceBannon; seamole; ..
Iranian Said Held in Belgium for Buenos Aires Bomb

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (Reuters) - Police in Brussels arrested on Wednesday a second Iranian official facing extradition to Argentina for his alleged role in a 1994 Jewish center bombing that killed 85 people, an Interpol official in Argentina said.
"His name is Saied Baghban. He is among those Judge (Juan Jose) Galeano issued international arrest warrants for on Aug. 13. He is being held in Brussels and he had worked as a diplomatic courier," Inspector Alfredo San Martin of the Interpol office in Buenos Aires told Reuters.

Former Ambassador Hadi Soleimanpour, another of the eight Iranian officials facing extradition, has been in British custody since last Thursday. He was Iran's ambassador in Buenos Aires when the AMIA Jewish community center was attacked.

The United States and Israel have long suspected Iran of being behind the attack, while Tehran has repeatedly denied involvement.

Iran cut economic and cultural ties with Argentina following the diplomat's arrest, and Iranian President Mohammad Khatami said Iran would take "strong action" on the matter.


http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?storyID=3344782
11 posted on 08/28/2003 7:18:51 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; Eala; piasa; Valin; nuconvert; Texas_Dawg; kattracks; RaceBannon; seamole; ..
Iran 'asked France for nuke parts'

VIENNA, Aug 27 (AFP) - Iran tried to buy nuclear equipment that can be used for both civilian or military purposes from several countries including France, according to an official French report obtained by AFP.
The report says Iran's shopping list included equipment used to reprocess plutonium, a substance which is used to build atomic weapons.

"The list of Iranian purchasing attempts in the French nuclear industry and dual goods manufacturers clearly points to the development of large capacities in terms of reprocessing and spent fuel manipulation."

The French government presented the report at a meeting in South Korea in May of the Nuclear Supplier's Group (NSG), a group of 40 countries that seeks to curb nuclear weapons proliferation.

Iran insists that its controversial nuclear programme is strictly for civilian purposes but has been accused by the United States of using it as a cover to develop nuclear weapons.

The UN's nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency, said in a report circulated to its board of governors Tuesday that it was concerned about several aspects of Iran's atomic programme.

The French report said Tehran tried to buy 10 high-density radiation shielding windows from a French manufacturer in late 2000.

In 2002 an Iranian company based in the United Arab Emirates tried to buy 28 remote manipulators, half of which had the capacity to produce material with radioactive levels "above the NSG threshold", from another French supplier.

These could notably be used to reprocess and manipulate plutonium, the report said.

It added that Iran also tried to purchase documents in France on generators and tubes for flash radiography used in nuclear testsing.

A diplomat told AFP Wednesday that it was known Iran has for some time been trying clandestinely to buy nuclear equipment abroad.

The NSG, whose members include France, Britain, the United States, Russia and Germany, was founded in 1974 with the aim of preventing the export of technology that can be used to develop nuclear arms.

http://www.expatica.com/france.asp?pad=278,313,&item_id=33762
12 posted on 08/28/2003 7:20:08 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
Thanks for this post, and I cannot say that I am surprised that the Iranians sought out the French.
13 posted on 08/28/2003 7:25:04 AM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife ("Life isn't fair. It's fairer than death, is all.")
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To: F14 Pilot
"Gen. Mortazavi was largely evasive. He indicated the report could be completed sometime in September, but provided few other details.
"He didn't give any information," said France Bureau, a spokeswoman for Mr. Graham. "He didn't confirm anything."

As I said yesterday, if this meeting takes place, there won't be any revelations.

("Hamid Mojtahedi, a Toronto-based lawyer who met with Gen. Mortazavi this week,...")
"Mortazavi himself is implicated in all of these issues and he is trying very hard to push it under the table and hide the facts," said Mr. Mojtahedi, of the human rights group Lawyers Without Borders.
Mr. Mojtahedi said Gen. Mortazavi even threatened to arrest him. "His exact words were: 'If you really are interested to know how our legal system works, I can give you a close look at it by locking you up,.. "

This guy is really out of control, and the Regime needs to get rid of him before elections in Feb. I think there's a chance they might. Now, firing squad, hanging, stoning, or just plain old torture...?
14 posted on 08/28/2003 7:27:15 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
Why Iran Protects Al-Qaeda

August 28, 2003
The Daily Star
Nawaf Obaid

Cooperation between international intelligence agencies has proven one of the most effective tools in thwarting terrorist attacks. That is why Iran’s refusal to grant access to over a dozen senior Saudi-born Al-Qaeda suspects is disturbing.

On Monday, press reports, citing Iran’s ambassador in Riyadh, suggested that Iran had handed over to Saudi Arabia a number of Al-Qaeda members. However, the individuals, like the 16 Saudis Iran turned over last year, are merely foot soldiers. What the Saudis want are the ringleaders of one of the last functioning Al-Qaeda cells with regional command and control powers.

Intelligence officials also believe that members of this group know the identities of dozens of Al-Qaeda operatives dispersed in Saudi Arabia, Europe and the United States. That is why Saudi officials are keen to interrogate the suspects. In the last few months, however, Iran has hindered this effort.

To be more precise, radical Iranian clerics have hindered these efforts.

Iran’s moderate president, Mohammad Khatami, has promised to hand over the Saudi Al-Qaeda suspects. However, Saudi security officials were twice rebuffed when arriving to pick them up.

In the most recent attempt, Prince Mohammad bin Nayef, the assistant minister of interior for security affairs (the highest civilian administrator of the Saudi Arabian General Security Service), was told he would not be allowed to see the prisoners. A senior general in the Saudi General Intelligence Presidency who oversees coordination with Iran’s Intelligence Ministry was furious. According to him: “(supreme leader Ayatollah Ali) Khamenei’s people are holding up the extradition because they fear they’ll be implicated.”
This episode highlights the strength of Khamenei and the radical clerics who follow him. Khamenei controls several powerful state security organs, including Iran’s Revolutionary Guards and the newly created Foreign Intelligence Service. Both report directly to Khamenei’s Office of the Supreme Leader, entirely bypassing Khatami’s government. In the past few years, American, Saudi and other regional intelligence services have compiled a detailed dossier on the extremists within these institutions and their connections to international terrorism.

The 1996 Khobar bombing in Saudi Arabia serves as an example. Ali Fallahian, the former Iranian intelligence minister who is believed to have orchestrated the attack, now serves as a top adviser to Khamenei. General Ahmad Sharifi, the “case officer” who oversaw the group that carried out the bombing, is an adviser to the Revolutionary Guards military operations chief. And Ibrahim al-Mughassil, the Saudi Shiite who organized the operation from Saudi Arabia’s Eastern Province, has found refuge in Iran with his two main accomplices.
Since the demise of the Taleban, Iran has become a sanctuary for Al-Qaeda, making it the only place in the world where both Shiite and Sunni terrorists have found haven. US, Saudi and Pakistani intelligence officials have concluded that the radical wing of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards has harbored numerous top Al-Qaeda operatives, of which the three most dangerous are Said al-Adel (Osama bin Laden’s chief of global operations), Saad bin Laden (Osama’s son and a regional Al-Qaeda leader) and a third man who is yet to be identified. With help from Revolutionary Guards radicals, the so-called “Tehran trio” masterminded the recent suicide bombings in Riyadh that killed 34 and injured over 200.

Since the bombing, Saudi intelligence officers have uncovered much information about Al-Qaeda’s operations within the kingdom and the group’s connections to Iran. One of the leaders of the cell that carried out the attacks, Ali Fagasi al-Ghamdi, has been talking to Saudi agents since he turned himself in last June. Ghamdi identified the Tehran trio as the masterminds of the bombing and Turki al-Dandani as the main leader of his cell (a cousin of Dandani is the unidentified third of the trio). Dandani was killed in the northern Saudi province of Jouf while attempting to flee to Iraq. Saudi intelligence officials believe he was heading to Iran, to reunite with his comrades.

Ghamdi has provided an inside view of the structure and operations of the Al-Qaeda cells, of which eight to 10 are now believed to be operating in Saudi Arabia. Supposedly, Ghamdi and Dandani were sent to establish a new cell because Al-Qaeda’s ranks had thinned and it lacked the manpower to carry out attacks in the kingdom. But since Al-Qaeda cells are purposely kept isolated from each other, only those who recruited and dispatched the operatives know their identities and plans. Perhaps dozens of militants can be traced back to the Tehran trio, and this explains why Saudi authorities are extremely anxious to interrogate them.

Unfortunately, Iranian “custody” of these individuals puts them effectively under the protection of the extremists. This may for a time shield Revolutionary Guards officers with blood on their hands, but in the long run an alliance between Iranian officials and Al-Qaeda cannot hold. International pressure and domestic anger will eventually break the bond, especially if another terrorist attack can be attributed to the actions or inaction of Iranian officials. In that case, they may meet the same fate as the last group of radicals who made common cause with Al-Qaeda, the repressive Taleban thugs in Afghanistan.

Nawaf Obaid is a Saudi oil and security analyst. He is the author of a forthcoming book, Saudi Arabia Since 9/11. He wrote this commentary for THE DAILY STAR.

http://www.dailystar.com.lb/opinion/28_08_03_b.asp
15 posted on 08/28/2003 7:30:38 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Why Iran Protects Al-Qaeda

August 28, 2003
The Daily Star
Nawaf Obaid

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/971810/posts?page=15#15

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
16 posted on 08/28/2003 7:32:11 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: F14 Pilot
I hope someone gets their hands on this report and leaks it to the western press. Of course, as corrupt as the press is, they might not ever reveal what's in it. Maybe they'll be able to find an honest journalist.......hmmmm......
17 posted on 08/28/2003 7:32:27 AM PDT by McGavin999
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To: DoctorZIn
Nuclear Evidence in Iran Forces Proliferation Questions

August 28, 2003
The Christian Science Monitor
Peter Grier and Faye Bowers

WASHINGTON – International inspectors haven't proved that Iran has a secret nuclear weapons program - but they're getting close.

In one of the most troubling disclosures yet about Tehran's atomic intentions, a new International Atomic Energy Association report says that an IAEA team recently found traces of two types of highly enriched uranium at an Iranian facility.

Iran has denied producing weapons-grade fissile material. Particles of any such uranium must have been on the equipment in question when purchased, said Iranian officials.

But analysts outside the IAEA said such an explanation strains credulity, especially given that Iran delayed inspectors' access to two other uranium sites. At the least, they say, Tehran has a lot of explaining to do. "Iran needs to provide a lot more information very quickly," says David Albright, an expert on nuclear proliferation at the Institute for Science and International Security.

Disclosure of the new IAEA findings comes at a sensitive time for the international community. The next meeting of the IAEA's board of governors is scheduled for Sept. 8, and many expect that the US will push for the board to find Iran in violation of the Non-Proliferation Treaty.

A chain of referrals

The IAEA would then refer the matter to the UN Security Council, which could vote for economic sanctions against Iran.

"In terms of next steps, the US has been putting pressure on the IAEA," says Paul Kerr, a research analyst at the Arms Control Association.

To this point the US has been content to let the IAEA take the lead in the world's efforts to investigate Iran's suspected nuclear-weapons program.

A litmus test of international action

In some ways US officials see the situation as a test not just of Iran but of the rest of the world's intentions. Russia, Japan, Germany, France, and other nations have long complained about the US predilection for unilateral action in global affairs. Now they're being presented, step by step, with evidence that Iran is cheating on its international agreements.

Thus the US attitude about the IAEA's and UN's role is, to an extent, to ask "what are you all going to do about this?"

"It's a really big test because if these institutions don't prevent Iran from going nuclear, what do they have to complain about the US taking actions on its own?" says Brenda Shaffer, an expert on Iran and Central Asia at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government.

The fact that IAEA inspectors found evidence of possible clandestine work at the Natanz uranium enrichment plant is a good indication that Tehran is further down the road toward obtaining nuclear weapons than many analysts and intelligence agencies had predicted.

Environmental samples taken by the IAEA at the facility between March and June 2003 "indicate the possible presence in Iran of high enriched uranium, material that is not on its inventory of declared nuclear material," says the restricted-distribution report, a copy of which was obtained by the Monitor.

The key ingredient for nuclear nukes

Uranium enrichment is a purification process which creates either fuel for civilian reactors or the fissile core of nuclear weapons. Bomb-grade material must be more highly enriched than its civilian counterpart. Iran says that its nuclear infrastructure is intended to support power-generating reactors. Most of the rest of the world suspects that this is just a cover story, and that Iran really has a multitrack effort under way to obtain a nuclear arsenal.

Report arouses other suspicions

Some analysts found another part of the IAEA report almost as worrisome as its disclosure about finding trace elements of weapons material.

Iran has admitted doing work on enrichment centrifuges at a second site, known as the Kalaye Electric Co., according to Mr. Albright of ISIS.

The existence of this facility was revealed by an Iranian resistance group, and, until recently, Tehran rebuffed IAEA efforts to enter what it first called a watch factory.

Inspectors found fresh paint and other signs of hurried refurbishment upon their visit. Environmental samples taken at Kalaye have yet to be conclusively analyzed, according to the IAEA report.

Given the context of what the IAEA has discovered it's "legitimate to worry that the [Kalaye] refurbishment is to hide past uranium-enrichment activities," says Albright.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0828/p02s01-usfp.html
18 posted on 08/28/2003 7:36:04 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Nuclear Evidence in Iran Forces Proliferation Questions

August 28, 2003
The Christian Science Monitor
Peter Grier and Faye Bowers

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/971810/posts?page=18#18

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
19 posted on 08/28/2003 7:37:14 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Another from Debka. I can't confirm its accuracy but it is being widely published. -- DoctorZin

Russia Sells Iran AVLIS System for Advanced Uranium Enrichment

August 28, 2003
DEBKAfile
DEBKAfile Exclusive Report

The Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency – IAEA – put out a disturbing report this week confirming earlier DEBKAfile revelations that traces of uranium enrichment activity were found in samples at Natanz nuclear facility in Iran, 290 km south of Tehran, evidence that Iran was in the process of building a nuclear arsenal.

Agency officials admit that Tehran is in clear non-compliance with its nuclear safeguard obligations and may even have laid itself open to a complaint to the UN Security Council and the threat of sanctions.

In issue Number 120, published on August 8, DEBKA-Net-Weekly’s military sources reported exclusively that in the second week of July Russia secretly delivered the components of the AVLIS (atomic vapor laser isotope separator) system aboard unmarked military transports.

This accelerated and environmentally clean process of uranium enrichment was first developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California, for the US Department of Energy in the 1970s. In 1998, the Iranians were reported working on their own AVLIS. The version supplied by Russian is apparently based on more advanced technology. While the US energy department suspended AVLIS development in 1998, the Russians appear to have stepped up production, counting on an expanding future exports to governments bent on acquiring nuclear weapons, such as Saddam Hussein’s Iraq, Iran, Libya, Syria, North Korea, India and Pakistan.

The Russian components came with Russian technicians for assembling the apparatus and teaching Iranian nuclear technicians how to use it.

According to the information obtained by DEBKA-Net-Weekly , AVLIS has been installed at two of Iran’s uranium enrichment facilities, Natanz and Moallen Kalayeh. The latter is Iran’s most secluded subterranean nuclear plant, buried under the Albroz Mountains 40 km north of Tehran. In its tall tunnels, Iran carries out its most secret tests.

Moallen Kalayeh used to be a small rural village. Today it is a closed township populated by hundreds of scientists and technicians. It is also one of the most heavily protected places in the country. The Iranians are putting the new equipment to work at top speed at the peak of their effort to build up a stock of enriched uranium sufficient for a nuclear device before September 8, when the Nuclear Atomic Energy Agency’s board convenes in Vienna to discuss the Iran report.

Tehran has also been racing against the clock to forestall decisions at the six-nation talks on North Korea’s nuclear program that began in Beijing August 27, before they impede Iran’s related progress towards a nuclear weapon. Attending the talks are the US, the two Koreas, Japan, Russia and China, the host.

According to our Moscow sources, Russian military circles as certain that without that AVLIS would not have been consigned to Iran without the okay of President Vladimir Putin. He would have seen the delivery as a means of getting round his promise to President George W. Bush not to send Iran spent nuclear rods to fuel the Bushehr nuclear reactor and a way of compensating Iran for this letdown.

http://www.debka.com/article.php?aid=549
20 posted on 08/28/2003 7:42:01 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Norwegian Companies Interested in Investing in Iran

Tehran Times - By Mehr News Agency
Aug 28, 2003

TEHRAN – Visiting speaker of Norway's Parliament Yurgen Kosmo said the Norwegian enterprises advocate investment in Iran's industries.

Kosmo told the Mehr News Agency that he would seek to explore the avenues for facilitating the investment of Norwegian companies in Iran.

Kosmo also said that he would discuss Middle East developments as well as the issue of human rights in his meetings with Iranian leaders.

Norway wants to be informed about Iran's viewpoints regarding the issues of the Middle East as well as the Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, the speaker said.

He said Tehran and Oslo both advocate peace and stability in the world, stressing that Norway attaches great significance to its debates with Iran in that connection.

Kosmo said he was interested in meeting with the members of Majlis Article 90 Commission to become familiar with the procedures of lodging complaints with that commission so as to have a real picture of the status of human rights in Iran.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1993.shtml

21 posted on 08/28/2003 7:43:58 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Press freedom campaigner rearrested

AFP - World News (via Iranmania)
Aug 28, 2003

TEHRAN - Leading Iranian press freedom campaigner Issa Saharkhiz, detained last month on charges of publishing anti-regime propaganda, was rearrested Wednesday, the student news agency ISNA reported.

Saharkhiz, co-director of the Center for the Protection of Journalists, was taken away by judiciary officials and could be remanded in custody on the same charges, the center told ISNA.

He was originally arrested in mid-July during a crackdown on reformist journalists and accused of "spreading propaganda against the regime" over an article calling for the overhaul of the Islamic regime.

He was later released on bail. The Center for the Protection of Journalists co-organized an August 8 journalists' strike demanding the sacking of Tehran chief prosecutor Said Mortazavi, who as head of the country's press court, oversaw the closure of scores of pro-reform titles in the past few years.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1994.shtml
22 posted on 08/28/2003 7:45:56 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Who Do You Believe? The Mullahs or Your Own Eyes?

August 28, 2003
The Wall Street Journal
Review & Outlook

One test of whether the world is serious about stopping the spread of nuclear weapons is if it is willing to believe evidence when it sees it. We are about to find out if the United Nations and Europe believe what their own eyes see in Iran.

U.N. weapons inspectors have been playing a game of cat-and-mouse with Iran for months, and this week they disclosed that they've found traces of highly enriched uranium. The uranium particles were found in samples taken at Iran's Natanz facility, and U.N. officials say they are sufficiently enriched to be used in a nuclear weapon.

Iran acknowledged that weapons-grade uranium was discovered, but it claims the traces come from used imports that were contaminated before they arrived in Iran. Sure, the imports did it. The U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) is keeping mum but seems to want to give Tehran the benefit of the doubt. This is not reassuring for the cause of nuclear nonproliferation.

Everything we know about Iran's nuclear ambitions suggests that the mullahs in Tehran are still hiding their true capabilities and intentions. Iran has allowed the IAEA to inspect its sites but has refused access to key areas. As proliferation expert Henry Sokolski noted on these pages recently, Iran's nearly completed "peaceful" light-water reactor would be capable of generating weapons-grade plutonium for 50 bombs after a year of operation. IAEA Director-General Mohamed El Baradei saw for himself in February the advanced stage of the Natanz reactor, where hundreds of centrifuges to enrich uranium were on display.

The urgent question is whether the IAEA is now going to do anything about this. The Bush Administration has been pushing it to pass a resolution next month that would find Iran in "noncompliance" with the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. This would result in Iran's violations being reported to the U.N. Security Council, for debate and presumably for action.

The problem is that many IAEA officials, Russia and other governments on its 36-member nation board are keen to avoid any confrontation with Iran. U.S. Undersecretary of State John Bolton was in Moscow Tuesday lobbying Russian officials to sanction Iran, but usually reliable sources tell us Russia won't back off its aid to the country.

Tehran's mullahs are also smarter than Saddam Hussein. Instead of resisting inspections, they have recently changed their attitude in the hope of co-opting the IAEA and Europeans to believe whatever they hear. In an August 19 letter to the IAEA, Iran acknowledged that it had conducted "uranium conversion experiments" in the early 1990s that it should have reported but didn't. Iran is "taking corrective action," the letter said. Tehran's ambassador to the IAEA has also suggested that his country is willing to consider signing a NPT protocol that would allow surprise inspections.

Given Iran's record and ambitions, the only safe strategy here is don't trust but verify. Evidence of enriched uranium is a clear violation of the NPT, and if the treaty means anything the world can't allow it to go unsanctioned. The world made that mistake in North Korea a decade ago, and that country now has two rogue nuclear programs instead of one. The IAEA should understand that if it doesn't act to stop Iran from getting the bomb, someone else will have to.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=08&d=28&a=6
23 posted on 08/28/2003 8:14:48 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Who Do You Believe? The Mullahs or Your Own Eyes?

August 28, 2003
The Wall Street Journal
Review & Outlook

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/971810/posts?page=23#23

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
24 posted on 08/28/2003 8:16:10 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Given Iran's record and ambitions, the only safe strategy here is don't trust but verify. Evidence of enriched uranium is a clear violation of the NPT, and if the treaty means anything the world can't allow it to go unsanctioned. The world made that mistake in North Korea a decade ago, and that country now has two rogue nuclear programs instead of one. The IAEA should understand that if it doesn't act to stop Iran from getting the bomb, someone else will have to.

That is why Iran should be dealt with, before N. Korea.

25 posted on 08/28/2003 8:21:09 AM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife ("Life isn't fair. It's fairer than death, is all.")
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To: DoctorZIn; Pan_Yans Wife; nuconvert; McGavin999; Valin; AdmSmith; seamole
Graham will ask UN to look into Kazemi death

Canadian Press

OTTAWA — Foreign Affairs Minister Bill Graham will ask the UN Human Rights Commission to look into the beating death of a Montreal journalist in Iran.

"It's important that we have independent reporting and monitoring," he said in a teleconference Thursday from Denver, where he's attending a meeting regarding Norad.

He said he's unhappy with the way the Iranian government has handled the investigation into the death of photographer Zahra Kazemi, a Canadian with Iranian citizenship who died after interrogation in Iranian custody.

Canadian officials haven't been given a copy of the official Iranian report on the death.

"We have been promised that report, but we've yet to see it," the minister said.

Canada will keep the pressure on Iran, he added.

"We continue to consider our options."

He said Canada wants to see the issue dealt with in an open trial.

Graham said a meeting Wednesday between Canadian diplomats and Prosecutor General Saeed Mortazavi produced little information.

The minister said Mortazavi himself may be "potentially implicated in the case."

Asked about the reported arrest of two Iranian women in connection with the death, Graham said the development is encouraging because it may lead to more information.

"The end game is to get to those responsible."

http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/1062083130953_111/?hub=TopStories
26 posted on 08/28/2003 8:39:12 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: nuconvert
Re#14
Why not, the regime needs him to keep opponents away.
27 posted on 08/28/2003 8:49:11 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
State's Reeker Says Iran Must Satisfy IAEA's Nuclear Concerns

August 28, 2003
US Department of States
Washington File

The United States says no country should engage in nuclear cooperation with Iran until Iran has fully answered the questions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) about its nuclear programs and fully addressed the concerns of the international community.

Warns Russia and others against cooperating with Iran

The United States says no country should engage in nuclear cooperation with Iran until Iran has fully answered the questions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) about its nuclear programs and fully addressed the concerns of the international community.

Speaking at the August 27 State Department press briefing, State Department Deputy Spokesman Philip Reeker said that Iran's nuclear ambitions "present a serious challenge to the entire international community, and specifically to the International Atomic Energy Agency and the international nuclear nonproliferation regime, which is based on the Nonproliferation Treaty."

Reeker was asked about press reports that Russia had agreed to send nuclear fuel to Iran's Bushehr reactor. In response, the spokesman said that no country, including Russia, should cooperate with Iran "until Iran satisfies the IAEA's questions and fully addresses the concerns of the international community, including full, immediate, unconditional implementation of the additional protocol, to the Nonproliferation Treaty."

He added that the United States is reviewing the IAEA's report on the matter and is looking forward to discussing it at a September 8 meeting of the IAEA Board of Governors in Vienna.

Following is an excerpt from the August 27 State Department briefing:

(begin excerpt)

QUESTION: Can we talk a little bit about Iran?

MR. REEKER: Sure.

QUESTION: Given that this new IAEA report is out there now, there was a -- there have been reports out of Moscow today that the Iranians are prepared to sign an agreement with the Russians, and that the Russians are -- you know that, to send waste back to Russia -- and that this would clear the way for the Russians soon to provide fuel for Bushehr. Is that -- what do you think about that?

Do you think that -- especially since Under Secretary Bolton has just been in Moscow -- is that your understanding of the way things go -- are going? Are you concerned?

Do you still believe that the Russians are going to send that fuel soon to Bushehr?

MR. REEKER: A number of those questions are obviously things you need to ask the Russians. I am not going to try to speak for them or characterize them. Let's just --

QUESTION: But Bolton was just there.

MR. REEKER: Let's just, yeah, let's start with that, since Bolton was just there.

We talked a bit about that yesterday. Under Secretary Bolton, in fact, yesterday, Tuesday, was in Paris, where he met with French Deputy Secretary General for Political and Security Affairs Stanislas Lefevre de Laboulaye to discuss a wide range of nonproliferation issues that included discussions in advance of the September 8th meeting of the Board of Governors of the IAEA that will take place in Geneva. That will address concerns -- sorry. Pardon me, Vienna, yeah -- that will address concerns about the Iranian nuclear program. They also had the opportunity to discuss North Korea and the Proliferation Security Initiative.

Today Under Secretary Bolton is in Rome for discussions with Italian officials. He had met Monday, as we discussed yesterday, with Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Kislyak to address a wide range of nonproliferation issues with them as well.

It is really the latest in a series of ongoing discussions with the Russians about that. One of the subjects, obviously, is the issue of Iran and our concerns about that. He also met, I think I mentioned it yesterday, with the Russian Minister of Atomic Energy, Rumyantsev, and the purpose was, again, to consult with the Russians prior to the September 8th meeting in Vienna.

So I guess, then, to step to the next part of your question, we clearly have concerns about Iran, about their nuclear programs. There's nothing new in that. We have made that quite clear. In terms of the IAEA, the Director General's report on Iran's nuclear program has been circulated to the 35 members of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Board of Governors. It has not yet been released to the public, and even though you all think you have copies of the authentic text, I am just not in a position to really comment on it or discuss anything that is purported to be in the report. We do find Iran's nuclear activities troubling. We have talked about that for some time

We think that Iran's nuclear ambitions prevent -- present a serious challenge to the entire international community, and specifically to the International Atomic Energy Agency and the international nuclear nonproliferation regime, which is based on the Nonproliferation Treaty.

And so we have been looking forward, as we review the report, to discussing it September 8th, in Vienna, and to meeting with the other IAEA board members, and to coordinate an appropriately strong response to the report. But I am not going to try to shadow or preview that now.

We have steadfastly supported the IAEA effort to bring about the facts of Iran's nuclear program, to bring those facts to light. And until Iran has fully satisfied IAEA's questions and fully addressed the concerns of the international community, including a full, immediate and unconditional implementation of the additional protocol, which we have discussed before, then we believe that no country should be engaging in nuclear cooperation with Iran, and that is the view that we expressed to Russia as well.

A follow-up?

QUESTION: Can I just finish, because my question was actually a little more specific than that.

The fact that the Russians are saying today that Iran has agreed to sign this agreement under which they would commit to send this nuclear waste back to Moscow or back to Russia, therefore clearing the way for the Russians to continue cooperation with Iran and, in fact, to go and give them the spent fuel they need to start up Bushehr, did Under Secretary Bolton get any commitments? How do you view those reports? Do you find them accurate? Do they comport with what --

MR. REEKER: I can't -- okay. I think I answered at least half of that question. In terms of finding them accurate, I've seen the reports, you'd have to ask the Russians. I can't comment on Russians or commitments that Iran has reported to have made to Russia.

In terms of our views of the overall situation, as I just said, until Iran satisfies the IAEA's questions and fully addresses the concerns of the international community, including full, immediate, unconditional implementation of the additional protocol, to the Nonproliferation Treaty, we believe that no country should be engaging with Iran in nuclear cooperation, and that would include Russia.

So that is our concern. Iran has an opportunity to address these concerns, and it is obviously a subject we will discuss in Vienna when the Board of Governors meets.

(end excerpt)

(Distributed by the Bureau of International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State. Web site: http://usinfo.state.gov)

http://usinfo.state.gov/xarchives/display.html?p=washfile-english&y=2003&m=August&x=20030828122129namfuaks0.769253&t=usinfo/wf-latest.html
28 posted on 08/28/2003 1:24:01 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
State's Reeker Says Iran Must Satisfy IAEA's Nuclear Concerns

August 28, 2003
US Department of States
Washington File

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/971810/posts?page=28#28

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
29 posted on 08/28/2003 1:25:02 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Russia wants Iran arms proof before dumping n-aid

Reuters - World News
Aug 28, 2003

MOSCOW - Russia will only drop plans to help Iran build a nuclear reactor if the U.N. nuclear watchdog presents evidence Tehran is secretly developing banned weapons, a Russian Atomic Energy Ministry official said on Thursday.

Despite fresh U.S. pressure to back off on its nuclear aid to Iran, Russia has pressed ahead with plans to build the reactor at the port of Bushehr and may sign a key deal on this with Tehran in coming days, officials said.

"Only if the IAEA offers concrete evidence, then we would think twice about this project. So far it's pure politics," the official said on condition on anonymity.

"If proof of any such violation is presented and if the international community consequently adopts a corresponding resolution on Iran, then of course we would comply with international law and act accordingly."

The IAEA is set to hold a crucial meeting in September to decide whether Tehran has breached the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. The body said in a recent report obtained by Reuters it had found traces of weapons-grade uranium in Iran.

The United States, which has accused Iran of seeking a clandestine nuclear arms programme, again urged Russia on Wednesday to sever nuclear ties with Tehran.

State Department deputy spokesman Phillip Reeker said Washington believed no country should engage in nuclear cooperation with Iran until Tehran satisfied IAEA security requirements.

"But so far no one has presented any concrete evidence to us. Our talks with the Iranians are under way, and our position is unchanged. We can't adjust it every time the Americans say something on the subject," the Russian official said.

Interfax news agency quoted an Atomic Energy Ministry official as saying Moscow expected no "unpleasant surprises" from the forthcoming meeting of the IAEA board.

"We can only hope the situation normalises soon," he said. The IAEA office in Vienna was unavailable for comment.

Moscow said earlier this week Russia and Iran may sign in September an agreement requiring Tehran to return nuclear waste to Moscow -- a move some see as aimed at alleviating U.S. pressure ahead of a key Russia-U.S. summit next month.

Itar-Tass news agency, quoting Atomic Energy Ministry spokesman Nikolai Shingaryov, said Russia and Iran intended to sign the agreement in Moscow before the IAEA meeting in Vienna.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1999.shtml
30 posted on 08/28/2003 1:30:50 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Freed regime "diplomat" escapes to Iran due to Belgium's complicity

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Aug 28, 2003

Saeed Baghban one of the Islamic regime's diplomats who was involved in the Argentina bombings was able to escape toward Iran. The latter's escape follows his controversial and speedy release due to the intervention of the Belge Government.

Baghban was detained, briefly, yesterday on the request of the Argentinean justice.

Belgium is known for hosting the transaction center of the Rafsanjani clan, in Brussels, and keeping close financial relations with the Islamic regime.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2008.shtml

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

31 posted on 08/28/2003 1:32:05 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
"Iran has admitted doing work on enrichment centrifuges at a second site, known as the Kalaye Electric Co., according to Mr. Albright of ISIS.
The existence of this facility was revealed by an Iranian resistance group, and, until recently, Tehran rebuffed IAEA efforts to enter what it first called a watch factory."

Don't want those IAEA guys snooping around your watch factory.

"Inspectors found fresh paint and other signs of hurried refurbishment upon their visit.""...refurbishment is to hide past uranium-enrichment activities,"

Probably say they were working on new "glow-in-the dark " watches.
32 posted on 08/28/2003 2:13:02 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: F14 Pilot
I'm hoping Mortazavi has become too much of a nuisance for the gov't and public embarrassment, that they decide he's baggage they need to dispose of before the elections in Feb.'04.
33 posted on 08/28/2003 2:44:40 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
Caught Red-handed? Iran Adjusts its Nuclear Story a Bit

August 28, 2003
The Economist
The Economist Print Edition

HAS Iran enriched uranium as part of a clandestine effort to build a nuclear bomb? When inspectors from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) visited a previously undeclared enrichment plant at Natanz earlier this year, they came away worried by the sophistication of its centrifuge machines. In June they told the agency's board of Iran's failure to report a series of nuclear-related activities that should have been declared under its existing safeguards agreement. Since then, swipes taken at Natanz have shown traces of two types of uranium enriched to 20% or more—a by-product of a weapons effort, not the peaceful power programme (which needs enrichment to no more than 3%) that Iran insists is the limit of its nuclear ambition.

Caught red-handed? On September 8th, the IAEA's board will hear that it is still too early to tell. But Iran has been forced to change its story to account for the tell-tale traces of uranium. It first claimed it had had no outside help. Now it says the errant uranium arrived on imported equipment. In the past China supplied Iran with natural uranium, and the plans for a conversion plant to produce uranium gas for its centrifuges (and Iran has now owned up to past conversion experiments that should have been reported). But Pakistan is the likeliest source for the enrichment technology. Iran, however, insists it bought it from “intermediaries”. The IAEA will be checking.

There are other discrepancies. Iran claims that it built its enrichment plant at Natanz without any previous experiments to see if its centrifuge designs worked, and that it has done no enrichment anywhere else (Natanz is not yet fully working). That strikes centrifuge experts as implausible, and heightens suspicion that other nuclear work is under way somewhere. Results from other samples will not be ready until the November IAEA board meeting.

Meanwhile, Iran says that other suspect experiments to produce uranium metal are part of its plans for a heavy-water research reactor. But the metal is used in bomb-building, and such reactors produce lots of bomb-useable plutonium too. Iran's civilian power plans anyway call for more light-water reactors, like the one the Russians are building at Bushehr.

America has long seen Bushehr as cover for nuclear co-operation of a dodgier sort. The Russians deny that and say they will manage all the fuel from Bushehr too, to prevent extraction of plutonium from the spent fuel-rods. But Iran says it will eventually make its own fuel, thank you.

Still insisting that its nuclear drive is peaceful, Iran is talking of eventually signing a more intrusive safeguards agreement with the IAEA. That is no longer so reassuring. Unless its gives up its enrichment plans, Iran will soon have all the nuclear skills, and eventually enough uranium and plutonium, to turn nuclear at speed.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=08&d=28&a=9
34 posted on 08/28/2003 5:21:53 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Caught Red-handed? Iran Adjusts its Nuclear Story a Bit

August 28, 2003
The Economist
The Economist Print Edition

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/971810/posts?page=34#34

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
35 posted on 08/28/2003 5:23:09 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Iran in the Crosshairs

August 28, 2003
Al-Ahram Weekly
Mustafa El-Labbad

The arrest of former Iranian Ambassador to Argentina Hadi Soleimanpour in London on Friday, on the charge of complicity in the bombing of the Jewish community centre in Buenos Aires in 1994, is one more indicator of mounting international pressures on Iran over the past four months. His arrest is further proof of the media campaign to paint Tehran as a regime that flouts international law and legitimacy, the ultimate authority on which is the current US administration. Since the fall of Saddam Hussein, there has been a tangible rise in tension in Iranian government circles. Tehran appears to be hemmed in, incapable of action at home or abroad, and haunted by a relentless onslaught of criticism woven and orchestrated by Washington. Iran stands variously accused of meddling in the domestic affairs of Iraq, of obstructing the Middle East peace process through its support of the Lebanese Hizbullah and the Palestinian Hamas and Jihad movements, and, more ominously, of pursuing weapons of mass destruction (WMDs).

In tandem with these external pressures, it also faces mounting popular discontent at home, highlighted by the student demonstrations in July that led to the arrest of 4,000 protesters. This has been accompanied by several cabinet resignations in futile anger at the continued control by conservatives over power in spite of their declining popularity. Minister of Education Mustafa Moin tendered his resignation at the same time as the arrest of Soleimanpour, a gesture reflecting the growing loss of confidence in President Mohamed Khatami and his reform government's ability to peacefully transform the Iranian system.

Since the election of Khatami in 1997, the Iranian reform movement proved highly adept at handling public relations abroad. A sedate rhetoric using modernist terms of reference did much to enhance Iran's international image. On the other hand, conservatives have retained a monopoly on "revolutionary" rhetoric, which in the Iranian political lexicon is synonymous to a vehement, blanket anti- westernism. In addition to a reluctance to make even the least subtle distinctions, conservative rhetoric reflects an intransigent clinging to the past and an inability to fathom the profound changes that have taken place in the international order since the collapse of the Soviet Union and, in particular, since 11 September 2001.

Perhaps the most vigorous proponent of these attitudes is Hussein Shariatmudari, editor-in-chief of the right-wing Kahan newspaper. In a recent editorial in response to the arrest of Soleimanpour he demanded "Why do we not exercise our right to punish the reactionary British government, which according to the members of the British parliament, is playing the tail of the dog in international affairs." The "dog", of course, refers to US President George W Bush. The journalist's appeal was translated into action when the Iranian minister of foreign affairs announced his country was cutting cultural and economic ties with Argentina, which had issued the warrant against the former Iranian diplomat. Argentina has millions of dollars worth of export contracts to Iran in wheat, sunflower oil, rice and other foodstuffs.

Of little avail was the response of British charge d'affaires in Tehran, when summoned to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to receive an official protest, which claimed that the arrest was not a political, but rather a purely criminal matter. Officials in Tehran could have easily pointed to the fact that London, via Britain's High Court, had refused to extradite former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet accused of crimes against humanity in connection with the deaths and disappearances of thousands of his opponents during his nearly two decades of rule.

It has been nine years since the bombing of the Jewish community centre in Buenos Aires. As deplorable as that incident was, regardless of who the perpetrator was, it is remarkable that Soleimanpour's arrest took place only two weeks before the International Atomic Energy Agency is scheduled to submit its report on Iranian WMD to the Security Council. Clearly this is more than mere coincidence. There can be little doubt that the Soleimanpour case was deliberately revived in order to help set the international stage for punitive measures, including military action, against Iran. However, the Iranian regime, still dominated by the increasingly unpopular conservative forces, continues to react against this campaign with angry, defensive outbursts. This rhetoric only facilitates a mission bent on abusing international institutions and contrived facts and figures to back Tehran into a corner. From there, an eddy of endless international demands is ultimately designed to serve as the pretext for toppling the regime.

The arrest of the former Iranian diplomat also indicates that Britain, historically the European nation with the closest connections to Iran, has made up its mind to join Washington's steamrolling operation against Tehran. That the Bush administration is determined to overthrow the Iranian regime has been made abundantly clear in the months following the fall of Baghdad. This belligerency is in spite of the fact that Washington had held secret negotiations with Tehran, via the good offices of Switzerland, Afghanistan and Britain to reach understandings over the situations in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Khatami demanded an apology from the British government over the arrest of the former Iranian diplomat. Although in keeping with internationally recognised diplomatic norms, the request is certain to be drowned out by the bombast of Iranian conservatives and by the din of the anticipated protest demonstrations that are expected to converge on the British Embassy.

Following the victory of the Islamic revolution, worshippers in Friday prayers in the University of Tehran would chant: "Death to America! Death to Israel! Death to Britain!" When, in the mid-1990s, Iranian-British relations began to thaw, the "Britain" part vanished from the refrain. It may soon be revived, however, as part of the conservatives' response to Britain's blind loyalty to the neo-con administration in Washington.

http://weekly.ahram.org.eg/2003/653/re7.htm
36 posted on 08/28/2003 5:25:06 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Iran in the Crosshairs

August 28, 2003
Al-Ahram Weekly
Mustafa El-Labbad

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/971810/posts?page=36#36

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
37 posted on 08/28/2003 5:25:55 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
WAR IS NOT THE BEST MEANS TO DEAL WITH IRANIAN MENACE:

RICHARD PERLE

PARIS 28 Aug. (IPS) "Iranian (nuclear) weapons are certainly a very serious problem for the United States and we ought to find proper means to deal with it", according to a senior American policy analyst from the neo-conservatives.

In a lengthy interview published Thursday by the centrist French daily "Le Figaro", Mr. Richard Perle, a former Defence under secretary under former president Ronald Reagan explained that after 11 September, the United States can no more allow that "the worst kind of arms in the world be in the hands of the worst regimes in the world".

A former member of the Pentagon’s Defence Policy Board, Mr. Perle is considered one of the most hawkish voices concerning threats posed by "rogue" regimes such as the Islamic Republic, Syria or North Korea.

His comments were made as international pressures increases on Tehran over its secret plans to produce an atomic arsenal, an accusation that Iran rejects, insisting that its present nuclear powered station that are under construction with the help of Russia are purely for civilian use, primarily producing electricity.

Observed that in case Washington would have to attack Iran, no nation, even Great Britain, US’s only ally in the war against Iraq would refuse to join, Mr. Perle said he was not sure that today, war (on Iran) was the best of the means to deal with Iranian menace.

"However, I can assure you that in the US, the Congress is fully aware of the threats the regime of the Iranian mullahs presents for our nation", he added.

In his opinion, the present "chaos" in Iraq is due more to the lack of colonialist experience of the American administrations and less because of the result of the war. "Sure, we have not done all quite well (in Iraq). There has been mistakes and there will be more in the future. Invading a nation and administrate it is not in the American culture. We have no colonial experience of which we could draw a doctrine, therefore, our approach was an empiric one out of necessity", he explained.

He attributes the present widespread violence and sabotages to three groups of people: Members of the former Ba’th ruling Party that have nowhere to go; the Muslim extremists for whom attacking American soldiers is part of a global terrorist strategy and common law criminal who were freed from prison by Saddam Hoseyn. "But the great majority of the Iraqis do not support any of these groups", he stated.

Known for his mistrust of the United Nations, Mr. Perle expressed openly his objection to have the UN involved in the administration of Iraq. "This is utterly a bad idea, for the simple reason that the United Nations did not succeed in any area where it had been put in charge. The UN is not a solution (for Iraq). And what would do a French division that an American division can not?"

Nevertheless, Mr. Perle, who is finishing a book on the Iraq war in his residence in south of France, remains optimistic on the future of the war-ravaged country. "The key is to hand over the power to the Iraqis the soonest possible. We had been late, but we have realized our mistake. Now, things goes on the right direction".

ENDS PERLE 28803

http://www.iran-press-service.com/
38 posted on 08/28/2003 5:27:18 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
WAR IS NOT THE BEST MEANS TO DEAL WITH IRANIAN MENACE:

RICHARD PERLE
PARIS 28 Aug. (IPS)

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/971810/posts?page=38#38

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
39 posted on 08/28/2003 5:28:43 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: nuconvert
"America has long seen Bushehr as cover for nuclear co-operation of a dodgier sort. The Russians deny that and say they will manage all the fuel from Bushehr too, to prevent extraction of plutonium from the spent fuel-rods."

Considering the Russians can't keep track of their own stuff, this isn't very reassuring.
40 posted on 08/28/2003 6:29:00 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
Freeper prayer request for Ernest_at_the_Beach, his wife is very ill.

Ernest_at_the_Beach has been a friend of our thread from the beginning . We haven't seen much of him recently due to the extraordinary care his wife requires at this time. It appears she is now in her final days or hours with us.

If you know Ernest_at_the_Beach or have appreciated his efforts towards this or other threads I recommend visiting the following link and leaving him a ping or a message.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/972366/posts

Thank you,

DoctorZin
41 posted on 08/28/2003 7:39:34 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread

Live Thread Ping List | DoctorZin

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42 posted on 08/29/2003 12:02:38 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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