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Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 02-22-06, Feast of the Chair of St. Peter, Apostle
USCCB.org/New American Bible ^ | 02-22-06 | New American Bible

Posted on 02/22/2006 7:19:36 AM PST by Salvation

February 22, 2006

Feast of the Chair of Saint Peter, Apostle

Psalm: Wednesday 11

Reading I
1 Pt 5:1-4

Beloved:
I exhort the presbyters among you,
as a fellow presbyter and witness to the sufferings of Christ
and one who has a share in the glory to be revealed.
Tend the flock of God in your midst,
overseeing not by constraint but willingly,
as God would have it, not for shameful profit but eagerly.
Do not lord it over those assigned to you,
but be examples to the flock.
And when the chief Shepherd is revealed,
you will receive the unfading crown of glory.

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 23:1-3a, 4, 5, 6

R. (1) The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want.
In verdant pastures he gives me repose;
Beside restful waters he leads me;
he refreshes my soul.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
Even though I walk in the dark valley
I fear no evil; for you are at my side
With your rod and your staff
that give me courage.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
You spread the table before me
in the sight of my foes;
You anoint my head with oil;
my cup overflows.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.
Only goodness and kindness follow me
all the days of my life;
And I shall dwell in the house of the LORD
for years to come.
R. The Lord is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.

Gospel
Mt 16:13-19

When Jesus went into the region of Caesarea Philippi
he asked his disciples,
“Who do people say that the Son of Man is?”
They replied, “Some say John the Baptist, others Elijah,
still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.”
He said to them, “But who do you say that I am?”
Simon Peter said in reply,
“You are the Christ, the Son of the living God.”
Jesus said to him in reply, “Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah.
For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father.
And so I say to you, you are Peter,
and upon this rock I will build my Church,
and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail against it.
I will give you the keys to the Kingdom of heaven.
Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven;
and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.”




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For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 02/22/2006 7:19:40 AM PST by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Siobhan; Lady In Blue; NYer; american colleen; Pyro7480; livius; ...
Alleluia Ping!

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2 posted on 02/22/2006 7:20:48 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
FEBRUARY 22, CHAIR OF PETER, APOSTLE

St. Peter's Chair at Rome

Harry Potter and the Chair of Peter (Lead us not into temptation has meaning to Benedict XVI)

Today's the Feast of the Chair of St. Peter

3 posted on 02/22/2006 7:22:20 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

4 posted on 02/22/2006 7:30:08 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

From: 1 Peter 5:1-4


To Priests



[1] So I exhort the elders among you, as a fellow elder and a witness
of the sufferings of Christ as well as a partaker in the glory that is
to be revealed. [2] Tend the flock of God that is your charge, not by
constraint but willingly, not for shameful gain but eagerly, [3] not
domineering over those in your charge but being examples to the flock.
[4] And when the chief Shepherd is manifested you will obtain the
unfading crown of glory.




Commentary:


1-4. In many New Testament text, the Greek terms "presbyteros" and
"episcopos" mean the same, being used indiscriminately to designate
pastors of local communities (cf., e.g., Acts 11:30; 20:28; and notes
on same). From the second century on, the terminology became fixed:
"episcopoi" (bishops) have the fullness of the sacrament of Order and
are responsible for local churches; "presbyteroi" (elders, later
designated as priests) carry out the priestly ministry as co-workers
of the bishops. The Acts of the Apostles tell us that Paul and
Barnabas ordained priests in the various churches of Asia Minor (cf.
Acts 14:23), to which St Peter is now writing (1 Pet 1:1).


The Prince of the Apostles here addresses them formally. Although he
refers to himself as one of them--a "fellow elder [priest]"--he is
distinguishing himself as a witness of the sufferings of Christ and "a
partaker in the glory that is to be revealed" (this is possibly an
allusion to the Transfiguration, at which he was given a foretaste of
that glory: cf. Mt 17:1ff; 2 Pet 1:16-18).


St Peter's exhortation (vv. 2-3) recall those of our Lord when he spoke
about the Good Shepherd (Jn 10:1ff) and when he told Peter after the
Resurrection, "Feed my lambs....Feed my sheep" (Jn 21:15-17). The
Magisterium of the Church has often drawn inspiration from these words
when reminding pastors of their duties: "As to the faithful, they (the
priests) should bestow their paternal attention and solicitude on them,
whom they have begotten spiritually through baptism and instruction
(cf. 1 Cor 4:15; 1 Pet 1:23). Gladly constituting themselves models of
the flock (cf. 1 Pet 5:3), they should preside over and serve their
local community in such a way that it may deserve to be called by the
name which is given to the unique People of God in its entirety, that
is to say, the Church of God (cf. Cor 1:2; 2 Cor 1:21; and passim).
They should be mindful that by their daily conduct and solicitude they
display the reality of a truly priestly and pastoral ministry both to
believers and unbelievers alike, to Catholics and non-Catholics; that
they are bound to bear witness before all men of the truth and of the
life, and as good shepherds seek after those too (cf. Lk 15:4-7) who,
whilst having been baptized in the Catholic Church, have given up the
practice of the sacraments, or even fallen away from the faith" ("Lumen
Gentium", 28; cf. No. 41).


If they approach their responsibilities in this way, they will have no
reason to fear the Judgment (v. 4); the Lord will make himself present
to them as "the chief Shepherd", whom they have tried to imitate in
their care of the flock, and they will receive "the unfading crown of
glory" (cf. note on Jas 1:12). "When the moment comes for them to enter
God's presence, Jesus will go out to meet them. He will glorify forever
those who have acted on earth in his Person and in his name. He will
shower them with that grace of which they have been ministers" (J.
Escriva, "In Love with the Church", 50).


3. St Gregory the Great teaches that the pastor of souls "should always
give the lead, to show by his example the way to life, so that his
flock (who follow the voice and the actions of the pastor) are guided
more by example than by words; his position obliges him to speak of
elevated things, and also to manifest them personally; the word more
easily gains access to the hearts of hearers when it carries with it
the endorsement of the life of him who when giving instructions assists
in their fulfillment by his own example" ("Regulae Pastoralis Liber",
2, 3).



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries". Biblical text
taken from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries
made by members of the Faculty of Theology of the University of
Navarre, Spain. Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland.


5 posted on 02/22/2006 7:31:44 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

From: Matthew 16:13-19:


Peter's Profession of Faith and His Primacy



[13] Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, He
asked His disciples, "Who do men say that the Son of Man is?" [14] And
they said, "Some say John the Baptist, others say Elijah, and others
Jeremiah or one of the prophets." [15] He said to them, "But who do
you say that I am?" [16] Simon Peter replied, "You are the Christ, the
Son of the living God." [17] And Jesus answered him, "Blessed are you,
Simon Bar-Jona! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but
My Father who is in Heaven. [18] And I tell you, you are Peter, and on
this rock I will build My Church, and the powers of death shall not
prevail against it. [19] I will give you the keys of the Kingdom of
Heaven, and whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in Heaven, and
whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in Heaven."




Commentary:


13-20. In this passage St. Peter is promised primacy over the whole
Church, a primacy which Jesus will confer on him after His
Resurrection, as we learn in the Gospel of St. John (cf. John
21:15-18). This supreme authority is given to Peter for the benefit of
the Church. Because the Church has to last until the end of time, this
authority will be passed on to Peter's successors down through
history. The Bishop of Rome, the Pope, is the successor of Peter.


The solemn Magisterium of the Church, in the First Vatican Council,
defined the doctrine of the primacy of Peter and his successors in
these terms:


"We teach and declare, therefore, according to the testimony of the
Gospel that the primacy of jurisdiction over the whole Church was
immediately and directly promised to and conferred upon the blessed
Apostle Peter by Christ the Lord. For to Simon, Christ had said, `You
shall be called Cephas' (John 1:42). Then, after Simon had
acknowledged Christ with the confession, `You are the Christ, the Son
of the living God' (Matthew 16:16), it was to Simon alone that the
solemn words were spoken by the Lord: `Blessed are you, Simon
Bar-Jona. For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but My
Father who is in Heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this
rock I will build My Church, and the powers of Hell shall not prevail
against it. I will give you the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven, and
whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in Heaven, and what you loose
on earth shall be loosed in Heaven' (Matthew 16:17-19). And after His
Resurrection, Jesus conferred upon Simon Peter alone the jurisdiction
of supreme shepherd and ruler over His whole fold with the words, `Feed
My lambs....Feed My sheep' (John 21:15-17) [...]


"(Canon) Therefore, if anyone says that the blessed Apostle Peter was
not constituted by Christ the Lord as the Prince of all the Apostles
and the visible head of the whole Church militant, or that he received
immediately and directly from Jesus Christ our Lord only a primacy of
honor and not a true and proper primacy of jurisdiction: let him be
condemned.


"Now, what Christ the Lord, Supreme Shepherd and watchful guardian of
the flock, established in the person of the blessed Apostle Peter for
the perpetual safety and everlasting good of the Church must, by the
will of the same, endure without interruption in the Church which was
founded on the rock and which will remain firm until the end of the
world. Indeed, `no one doubts, in fact it is obvious to all ages, that
the holy and most blessed Peter, Prince and head of the Apostles, the
pillar of faith, and the foundation of the Catholic Church, received
the keys of the kingdom from our Lord Jesus Christ, the Savior and the
Redeemer of the human race; and even to this time and forever he
lives,' and governs, `and exercises judgment in his successors' (cf.
Council of Ephesus), the bishops of the holy Roman See, which he
established and consecrated with his blood. Therefore, whoever
succeeds Peter in this Chair holds Peter's primacy over the whole
Church according to the plan of Christ Himself [...]. For this reason,
`because of its greater sovereignty,' it was always `necessary for
every church, that is, the faithful who are everywhere, to be in
agreement' with the same Roman Church [...]


"(Canon) Therefore, if anyone says that it is not according to the
institution of Christ our Lord himself, that is, by divine law, that
St Peter has perpetual successors in the primacy over the whole Church;
or if anyone says that the Roman Pontiff is not the successor of St
Peter in the same primacy: let him be condemned.


"We think it extremely necessary to assert solemnly the prerogative
which the only-begotten Son of God deigned to join to the highest
pastoral office. "And so, faithfully keeping to the tradition received
from the beginning of the Christian faith, for the glory of God our
Savior, for the exaltation of the Catholic religion, and for the
salvation of Christian peoples, We, with the approval of the sacred
council, teach and define that it is a divinely revealed dogma: that
the Roman Pontiff, when he speaks "ex cathedra", that is, when, acting
in the office of shepherd and teacher of all Christians, he defines, by
virtue of his supreme apostolic authority, doctrine concerning faith or
morals to be held by the universal Church, possesses through the divine
assistance promised to him in the person of St. Peter, the
infallibility with which the divine Redeemer willed His Church to be
endowed in defining doctrine concerning faith or morals; and that such
definitions of the Roman Pontiff are therefore irreformable because of
their nature, but not because of the agreement of the Church.


"(Canon) But if anyone presumes to contradict this our definition (God
forbid him to do so): let him be condemned" (Vatican I, "Pastor
Aeternus", Chaps. 1, 2 and 4).



Source: "The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries". Biblical text
taken from the Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries
made by members of the Faculty of Theology of the University of
Navarre, Spain. Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock,
Co. Dublin, Ireland.

Reprinted with permission from Four Courts Press and Scepter
Publishers, the U.S. publisher (see below).


6 posted on 02/22/2006 7:33:14 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Awakening Prayer

Office of Readings

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 18 (19)
Praise of God the creator
The skies tell the story of the glory of God,
 the firmament proclaims the work of his hands;
day pours out the news to day,
 night passes to night the knowledge.

Not a speech, not a word,
 not a voice goes unheard.
Their sound is spread throughout the earth,
 their message to all the corners of the world.

At the ends of the earth he has set up
 a dwelling place for the sun.
Like a bridegroom leaving his chamber,
 it rejoices like an athlete at the race to be run.
It appears at the edge of the sky,
 runs its course to the sky’s furthest edge.
Nothing can hide from its heat.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 63 (64)
A prayer against enemies
Listen, O God, to my voice;
 keep me safe from fear of the enemy.
Protect me from the alliances of the wicked,
 from the crowd of those who do evil.

They have sharpened their tongues like swords,
 aimed poisonous words like arrows,
 to shoot at the innocent in secret.
They will attack without warning, without fear,
 for they are firm in their evil purpose.
They have set out to hide their snares
 – for they say, “Who will see us?”
They have thought out plans to commit wicked deeds,
 and they carry out what they have planned.
Truly the heart and soul of a man
 are bottomless depths.

And God has shot them with his arrow:
 in a moment, they are wounded –
 their own tongues have brought them low.
All who see them will shake their heads;
 all will behold them with fear
and proclaim the workings of God
 and understand what he has done.

The just will rejoice and hope in the Lord:
 the upright in heart will give him glory.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 96 (97)
The glory of God in his judgements
The Lord reigns! Let the earth rejoice,
 let the many islands be glad.
Clouds and dark mist surround him,
 his throne is founded on law and justice.
Fire precedes him,
 burning up his enemies all around.
His lightnings light up the globe;
 the earth sees and trembles.
The mountains flow like wax at the sight of the Lord,
 at the sight of the Lord the earth dissolves.
The heavens proclaim his justice
 and all peoples see his glory.

Let them be dismayed, who worship carved things,
 who take pride in the images they make.
All his angels, worship him.
Sion heard and was glad,
 the daughters of Judah rejoiced
 because of your judgements, O Lord.
For you are the Lord, the Most High over all the earth,
 far above all other gods.

You who love the Lord, hate evil!
The Lord protects the lives of his consecrated ones:
 he will free them from the hands of sinners.
A light has arisen for the just,
 and gladness for the upright in heart.
Rejoice, you just, in the Lord
 and proclaim his holiness.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Reading Acts 11:1 - 18 ©
The apostles and the brothers in Judaea heard that the pagans too had accepted the word of God, and when Peter came up to Jerusalem the Jews criticised him and said, ‘So you have been visiting the uncircumcised and eating with them, have you?’ Peter in reply gave them the details point by point: ‘One day, when I was in the town of Jaffa,’ he began ‘I fell into a trance as I was praying and had a vision of something like a big sheet being let down from heaven by its four corners. This sheet reached the ground quite close to me. I watched it intently and saw all sorts of animals and wild beasts – everything possible that could walk, crawl or fly. Then I heard a voice that said to me, “Now, Peter; kill and eat!” But I answered: Certainly not, Lord; nothing profane or unclean has ever crossed my lips. And a second time the voice spoke from heaven, “What God has made clean, you have no right to call profane”. This was repeated three times, before the whole of it was drawn up to heaven again.
Just at that moment, three men stopped outside the house where we were staying; they had been sent from Caesarea to fetch me, and the Spirit told me to have no hesitation about going back with them. The six brothers here came with me as well, and we entered the man’s house. He told us he had seen an angel standing in his house who said, “Send to Jaffa and fetch Simon known as Peter; he has a message for you that will save you and your entire household”.
I had scarcely begun to speak when the Holy Spirit came down on them in the same way as it came on us at the beginning, and I remembered that the Lord had said, “John baptised with water, but you will be baptised with the Holy Spirit”. I realised then that God was giving them the identical thing he gave to us when we believed in the Lord Jesus Christ; and who was I to stand in God’s way?’
This account satisfied them, and they gave glory to God. ‘God’ they said ‘can evidently grant even the pagans the repentance that leads to life.’

Reading From a sermon by Saint Leo the Great, pope
The Church of Christ rises on the firm foundation of Peter's faith
Out of the whole world one man, Peter, is chosen to preside at the calling of all nations, and to be set over all the apostles and all the fathers of the Church. Though there are in God’s people many shepherds, Peter is thus appointed to rule in his own person those whom Christ also rules as the original ruler. Beloved, how great and wonderful is this sharing of his power that God in his goodness has given to this man. Whatever Christ has willed to be shared in common by Peter and the other leaders of the Church, it is only through Peter that he has given to others what he has not refused to bestow on them.
The Lord now asks the apostles as a whole what men think of him. As long as they are recounting the uncertainty born of human ignorance, their reply is always the same.
But when he presses the disciples to say what they think themselves, the first to confess his faith in the Lord is the one who is first in rank among the apostles.
Peter says: “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God”. Jesus replies: “Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jona, for flesh and blood has not revealed it to you, but my Father who is in heaven”. You are blessed, he means, because my Father has taught you. You have not been deceived by earthly opinion, but have been enlightened by inspiration from heaven. It was not flesh and blood that pointed me out to you, but the one whose only-begotten Son I am.
He continues: And I say to you. In other words, as my Father has revealed to you my godhead, so I in my turn make known to you your pre-eminence. You are Peter: though I am the inviolable rock, the cornerstone that makes both one, the foundation apart from which no one can lay any other, yet you also are a rock, for you are given solidity by my strength, so that which is my very own because of my power is common between us through your participation.
And upon this rock I will build my Church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. On this strong foundation, he says, I will build an everlasting temple. The great height of my Church, which is to penetrate the heavens, shall rise on the firm foundation of this faith.
The gates of hell shall not silence this confession of faith; the chains of death shall not bind it. Its words are the words of life. As they lift up to heaven those who profess them, so they send down to hell those who contradict them.
Blessed Peter is therefore told: To you I will give the keys of the kingdom of heaven. Whatever you bind on earth is also bound in heaven. Whatever you lose on earth shall be loosed also in heaven.
The authority vested in this power passed also to the other apostles, and the institution established by this decree has been continued in all the leaders of the Church. But it is not without good reason that what is bestowed on all is entrusted to one. For Peter received it separately in trust because he is the prototype set before all the rulers of the Church.

Canticle Te Deum
God, we praise you; Lord, we proclaim you!
You, the Father, the eternal –
all the earth venerates you.
All the angels, all the heavens, every power –
The cherubim, the seraphim –
unceasingly, they cry:
“Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God of Hosts:
heaven and earth are full of the majesty of your glory!”

The glorious choir of Apostles –
The noble ranks of prophets –
The shining army of martyrs –
all praise you.
Throughout the world your holy Church proclaims you.
– Father of immeasurable majesty,
– True Son, only-begotten, worthy of worship,
– Holy Spirit, our Advocate.

You, Christ:
– You are the king of glory.
– You are the Father’s eternal Son.
– You, to free mankind, did not disdain a Virgin’s womb.
– You defeated the sharp spear of Death, and opened the kingdom of heaven to those who believe in you.
– You sit at God’s right hand, in the glory of the Father.
– You will come, so we believe, as our Judge.

And so we ask of you: give help to your servants, whom you set free at the price of your precious blood.
Number them among your chosen ones in eternal glory.
Bring your people to safety, Lord, and bless those who are your inheritance.
Rule them and lift them high for ever.

Day by day we bless you, Lord: we praise you for ever and for ever.
Of your goodness, Lord, keep us without sin for today.
Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy on us.
Let your pity, Lord, be upon us, as much as we trust in you.
In you, Lord, I trust: let me never be put to shame.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

7 posted on 02/22/2006 7:36:43 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Wednesday, February 22, 2006
The Chair of St. Peter, Apostle (Feast)
First Reading:
Psalm:
Gospel:
1 Peter 5:1-4
Psalm 23:1-6
Matthew 16:13-19

Prayer reveals to souls the vanity of earthly goods and pleasures. It fills them with light, strength and consolation; and gives them a foretaste of the calm bliss of our heavenly home.

-- St Rose of Viterbo


8 posted on 02/22/2006 7:38:43 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Thanks!


9 posted on 02/22/2006 7:41:02 AM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: All
American Catholic’s Saint of the Day



February 22, 2006
Chair of Peter the Apostle

This feast commemorates Christ’s choosing Peter to sit in his place as the servant-authority of the whole Church (see June 29).

After the “lost weekend” of pain, doubt and self-torment, Peter hears the Good News. Angels at the tomb say to Magdalene, “The Lord has risen! Go, tell his disciples and Peter.” John relates that when he and Peter ran to the tomb, the younger outraced the older, then waited for him. Peter entered, saw the wrappings on the ground, the headpiece rolled up in a place by itself. John saw and believed. But he adds a reminder: “..[T]hey did not yet understand the scripture that he had to rise from the dead” (John 20:9). They went home. There the slowly exploding, impossible idea became reality. Jesus appeared to them as they waited fearfully behind locked doors. “Peace be with you,” he said (John 20:21b), and they rejoiced.

The Pentecost event completed Peter’s experience of the risen Christ. “...[T]hey were all filled with the holy Spirit” (Acts 2:4a) and began to express themselves in foreign tongues and make bold proclamation as the Spirit prompted them.

Only then can Peter fulfill the task Jesus had given him: “... [O]nce you have turned back, you must strengthen your brothers” (Luke 22:32). He at once becomes the spokesman for the Twelve about their experience of the Holy Spirit—before the civil authorities who wished to quash their preaching, before the council of Jerusalem, for the community in the problem of Ananias and Sapphira. He is the first to preach the Good News to the Gentiles. The healing power of Jesus in him is well attested: the raising of Tabitha from the dead, the cure of the crippled beggar. People carry the sick into the streets so that when Peter passed his shadow might fall on them.

Even a saint experiences difficulty in Christian living. When Peter stopped eating with Gentile converts because he did not want to wound the sensibilities of Jewish Christians, Paul says, “...I opposed him to his face because he clearly was wrong.... [T]hey were not on the right road in line with the truth of the gospel...” (Galatians 2:11b, 14a).

At the end of John’s Gospel, Jesus says to Peter, “Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go” (John 21:18). What Jesus said indicated the sort of death by which Peter was to glorify God. On Vatican Hill, in Rome, during the reign of Nero, Peter did glorify his Lord with a martyr’s death, probably in the company of many Christians.

Comment:

Like the committee chair, this chair refers to the occupant, not the furniture. Its first occupant stumbled a bit, denying Jesus three times and hesitating to welcome gentiles into the new Church. Some of its later occupants have also stumbled a bit, sometimes even failed scandalously. As individuals, we may sometimes think a particular pope has let us down. Still, the office endures as a sign of the long tradition we cherish and as a focus for the universal Church.

Quote:

Peter described our Christian calling in the opening of his First Letter, “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who in his great mercy gave us a new birth to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead...” (1 Peter 1:3a).



10 posted on 02/22/2006 7:41:05 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: trisham

Welcome on this Wednesday!


11 posted on 02/22/2006 7:42:05 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Lauds -- Morning Prayer

Morning Prayer (Lauds)

If this is the first Hour that you are reciting today, you should precede it with the Invitatory Psalm.

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 62 (63)
Thirsting for God
O God, you are my God, I wait for you from the dawn.
My soul thirsts for you, my body longs for you.
I came to your sanctuary,
 as one in a parched and waterless land,
 so that I could see your might and your glory.
My lips will praise you, for your mercy is better than life itself.

Thus I will bless you throughout my life,
 and raise my hands in prayer to your name;
my soul will be filled as if by rich food,
 and my mouth will sing your praises and rejoice.
I will remember you as I lie in bed,
 I will think of you in the morning,
for you have been my helper,
 and I will take joy in the protection of your wings.

My soul clings to you; your right hand raises me up.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Canticle Daniel 3
All creatures, bless the Lord
Bless the Lord, all his works, praise and exalt him for ever.

Bless the Lord, you heavens; all his angels, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, you waters above the heavens; all his powers, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, sun and moon; all stars of the sky, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, rain and dew; all you winds, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, fire and heat; cold and warmth, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, dew and frost; ice and cold, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, ice and snow; day and night, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, light and darkness; lightning and storm-clouds, bless the Lord.

Bless the Lord, all the earth, praise and exalt him for ever.

Bless the Lord, mountains and hills; all growing things, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, seas and rivers; springs and fountains, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, whales and fish; birds of the air, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, wild beasts and tame; sons of men, bless the Lord.

Bless the Lord, O Israel, praise and exalt him for ever.

Bless the Lord, his priests; all his servants, bless the Lord.
Bless the Lord, spirits of the just; all who are holy and humble, bless the Lord.

Ananias, Azarias, Mishael, bless the Lord, praise and exalt him for ever.

Let us bless Father, Son and Holy Spirit, praise and exalt them for ever.
Bless the Lord in the firmament of heaven, praise and glorify him for ever.

Psalm 149
The saints rejoice
Sing a new song to the Lord, his praise in the assembly of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in its maker, and the sons of Sion delight in their king.
Let them praise his name with dancing, sing to him with timbrel and lyre,
for the Lord’s favour is upon his people, and he will honour the humble with victory.

Let the faithful celebrate his glory, rejoice even in their beds,
the praise of God in their throats; and swords ready in their hands,
to exact vengeance upon the nations, impose punishment on the peoples,
to bind their kings in fetters and their nobles in manacles of iron,
to carry out the sentence that has been passed: this is the glory prepared for all his faithful.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A short Bible reading and responsory may follow here.
Canticle Benedictus
The Messiah and his forerunner
Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, for he has come to his people and brought about their redemption.
He has raised up the sign of salvation in the house of his servant David,
as he promised through the mouth of the holy ones, his prophets through the ages:
to rescue us from our enemies and all who hate us, to take pity on our fathers,
to remember his holy covenant and the oath he swore to Abraham our father,
that he would give himself to us, that we could serve him without fear – freed from the hands of our enemies –
in uprightness and holiness before him, for all of our days.

And you, child, will be called the prophet of the Most High: for you will go before the face of the Lord to prepare his path,
to let his people know their salvation, so that their sins may be forgiven.
Through the bottomless mercy of our God, one born on high will visit us
to give light to those who walk in darkness, who live in the shadow of death;
to lead our feet in the path of peace.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Some short prayers may follow here, to offer up the day's work to God.
Our Father, who art in Heaven,
 hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come,
 thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
 and forgive us our trespasses
 as we forgive those that trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
 but deliver us from evil.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

May the Lord bless us and keep us from all harm; and may he lead us to eternal life.
A M E N

12 posted on 02/22/2006 7:44:08 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Collect:
All-powerful Father, You have built Your Church on the rock of Saint Peter's confession of faith. May nothing divide or weaken our unity in faith and love. Grant this through our Lord Jesus Christ, Your Son, who lives and reigns with You and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Recipes:

February 22, 2006 Month Year Season

Feast of the Chair of St. Peter, apostle

This feast brings to mind the mission of teacher and pastor conferred by Christ on Peter, and continued in an unbroken line down to the present Pope. We celebrate the unity of the Church, founded upon the Apostle, and renew our assent to the Magisterium of the Roman Pontiff, extended both to truths which are solemnly defined ex cathedra, and to all the acts of the ordinary magisterium.


Chair of St. Peter
Since early times, the Roman Church has had a special commemoration of the primatial authority of St. Peter. As witness one of the most renowned of the Apostolic Fathers, the Roman See has always held a peculiar place in the affection and obedience of orthodox believers because of its "presiding in love" and service over all the Churches of God.

"We shall find in the Gospel that Jesus Christ, willing to begin the mystery of unity in His Church, among all His disciples chose twelve; but that, willing to consummate the mystery of unity in the same Church, among the twelve He chose one. He called His disciples, said the Gospel; here are all; and among them He chose twelve. Here is the first separation, and the Apostles chosen. And these are the names of the twelve Apostles: the first, Simon, who is called Peter. [Mt. 10, 1-2] Here, in a second separation, St. Peter is set at the head, and called for that reason by the name of Peter, "which Jesus Christ," says St. Mark, "had given him," in order to prepare, as you will see, the work which He was proposing to raise all His building on that stone.

"All this is yet but a beginning of the mystery of unity. Jesus Christ, in beginning it, still spoke to many: Go, preach; I send you [see Mt. 28, 19]. Now, when He would put the last hand to the mystery of unity, He speaks no longer to many: He marks out Peter personally, and by the new name which He has given him. It is One who speaks to one: Jesus Christ the Son of God to Simon son of Jonas; Jesus Christ, who is the true Stone, strong of Himself, to Simon, who is only the stone by the strength which Jesus Christ imparts to him. It is to him that Christ speaks, and in speaking acts on him, and stamps upon him His own immovableness. And I, He says, say to you, you are Peter; and, He adds, upon this rock I will build my Church, and, He concludes, the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. [Mt. 16, 18] To prepare him for that honor Jesus Christ, who knows that faith in Himself is the foundation of His Church, inspires Peter with a faith worthy to be the foundation of that admirable building. You are the Christ, the Son of the living God. [Mt. 16, 16] By that bold preaching of the faith he draws to himself the inviolable promise which makes him the foundation of the Church.

"It was, then, clearly the design of Jesus Christ to put first in one alone, what afterwards He meant to put in several; but the sequence does not reverse the beginning, nor the first lose his place. That first word, Whatsoever you shall bind, said to one alone, has already ranged under his power each one of those to whom shall be said, Whatsoever you shall remit; for the promises of Jesus Christ, as well as His gift, are without repentance; and what is once given indefinitely and universally is irrevocable. Besides, that power given to several carries its restriction in its division, while power given to one alone, and over all, and without exception, carries with it plenitude, and, not having to be divided with any other, it has no bounds save those which its terms convey."

Excerpted from The See of St. Peter, Jacques Bossuet.

Things to Do:


13 posted on 02/22/2006 7:46:45 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

 

Who Do You Say That I Am?
February 22, 2006


We can only transmit what we ourselves know and love.

The Chair of Saint Peter, apostle
Father Andrew Mulcahey, LC

Matthew 16:13-19
When Jesus went into the region of Caesarea Philippi he asked his disciples, "Who do people say that the Son of Man is?" They replied, "Some say John the Baptist, others Elijah, still others Jeremiah or one of the prophets." He said to them, "But who do you say that I am?" Simon Peter said in reply, "You are the Christ, the Son of the living God." Jesus said to him in reply, "Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah. For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father. And so I say to you, you are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of the netherworld shall not prevail against it. I will give you the keys to the kingdom of heaven. Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven."

Introductory Prayer: Heavenly Father, I know that you want to reveal yourself to me. How many times in my life have you gently guided me and enlightened me interiorly. I know too that you often choose to work through human instruments. Never are these two ways in conflict. Grant me the humility to see you guiding me through others, and especially through your Vicar on Earth.

Petition: Lord, fill my heart with zeal for you.

1. What Do Others Have to Say About Jesus?  When Christ asks us, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” he is actually asking, “Do people really know me?” In other words, “Have you helped them get to know me? Have you told them about me? Does it matter to you if they know me?” If we can sincerely answer these questions in the affirmative we are on the way to being his apostles. And it begs the question, “How well do I present him to others? Do I know him well enough to give him to others?”  We can only transmit what we ourselves know and love.

2. Peter Answers.  Peter is wonderfully clear, there is no hesitation. He shows that his time with Christ has allowed him to discover more in him than the people who only saw him in passing. “In Jesus Christ, God bends down over man to hold out a hand to him, to raise him up and to help him continue his journey with renewed strength” (Memory and Identity, John Paul II, 2005). Christ is the Anointed of God, God’s saving presence among us. Peter elsewhere says, when Christ asks him if he too will walk away from him like the rest of the crowd that cannot accept the reality of his presence in the Eucharist, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You alone have the words of eternal life.” This is Peter’s firm conviction. He knows who Christ is. When he preaches Christ, it will not be the false ideas of others, but the truth, Jesus’ understanding of himself that he will pass on to others. That is why Peter is Rock.

3. How Openly Do I Profess Him?  The Church is built on Peter’s faith, but his faith was not limited to saying Jesus was the Christ, the Son of God. Peter also showed his faith in his actions; he preached Christ throughout Palestine and as far as Rome, and there he gave witness of his faith in Christ by giving his life for him. If our homes are “Domestic Churches”, don’t they also need a Rock on which to be built? Isn’t that Rock our faith? A faith that doesn’t only pray together, that doesn’t consist in mere words but is made reality in our passing on the faith, in our service, in our “laying down our life for others”.

Dialogue with Christ: Lord, you told us that no one knows the Father except through you, and that to see you is to see the Father. Thank you for staying with us in the Eucharist till the end of time. Thank you for remaining with us in the presence of your Vicar, to guide us until the end of time. May my life be your presence for those with whom I live.

Resolution: I will visit Christ in the Eucharist today. There I will reflect on my particular call to be his apostle.


14 posted on 02/22/2006 7:48:46 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Homily of the Day


Homily of the Day

Title:   Upon This Rock
Date:   Wednesday, February 22, 2006
 


Jas 4:1-10 / Mk 9:30-37

Today the Church celebrates the feast day of the Chair of Peter. This celebration dates back to at least the fourth century. The Calendar of Philocalus, made in the year 354 and having dates going back to the year 311, marks February 22 for this feast. According to very ancient Western liturgies, February 22 was the date that Christ appointed Peter to sit in His place as the authority over His Church. What we read in the Gospel of Matthew when our Lord said to Peter, “Thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build My Church, and the gates of Hades shall not prevail against it” (Mt 16:18) is said to have occurred on this date.

The “chair” of course, is the position, the authority that was given to Peter. This can also be called the Petrine authority or the authority of the pope. Peter, alone among the Apostles, was given the keys to the kingdom. Jesus said to him, “I will give you the keys to the kingdom of heaven. Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.” The Apostles would immediately understand, as would any first-century Jew, what Jesus was referring to when He said “keys to the kingdom”. This was a reference to Isaiah 22 where it refers to a king delegating his special authority over his kingdom to his prime minister. In essence, Jesus was setting up His kingdom on earth (the Catholic Church) and he was delegating His authority to Peter to rule over it until He comes again. In giving Peter the authority to bind and loose, Jesus was essentially stating that He would back up the decisions that Peter would make. Of course, the Church teaches us that this does not refer to all Peter’s actions, but in matters of faith and morals, Peter does have the authority to speak for Christ.

Christ promised to send the Holy Spirit to guide His Church. This promise is made to guide Peter and the popes throughout the ages, in union with the bishops, in shepherding His Church. Peter, or the pope, however, is the shepherd who watches over the flock until Christ returns. We see this in Scripture also when Christ, after His resurrection and just prior to His Ascension, says to Peter, calling him by his former name (before Christ changed it): “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” (Referring to the other apostles) Peter replied, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Feed My lambs.” He then said to him a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord, You know that I love You.” He said to him, “Feed My sheep.” He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love Me?” Peter was distressed that He had said to him a third time, “Do you love Me?” and he said to Him, “Lord, You know everything, You know that I love You.” Jesus said to him, “Feed My sheep” (Jn 21:15-17). Jesus is our true Shepherd, but He has asked Peter to watch over His flock until He returns to earth. Christ is the King of Kings and He has delegated His authority to Peter and all those after Peter who would sit in the “Chair of Peter” throughout the ages until He comes again in His glory. And so Scripture makes it very clear why the Church celebrates this special occasion.

 


15 posted on 02/22/2006 7:51:22 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
 
 
 
A Voice in the Dessert

Wednesday February 22, 2006   Chair of Saint Peter

 Reading (1 Peter 5:1-4)   Gospel (St. Mark 9:41-50)

Today as we celebrate this feast of the Chair of Saint Peter, we have to recall that we are not honoring a chair per se, but rather what this feast is about has to do with the authority that is given to Saint Peter and his successors. We see that very clearly in the Gospel reading today. Saint Peter is made by Our Lord to be the prime minister in His kingdom. Jesus is the King, but every kingdom in the ancient world had a prime minister. The symbol of the prime minister was the keys. They keys represented the fact that the prime minister had the full authority of the king to be able to speak, to be able to make laws, and to be able to dispense from laws. The keys symbolized the fact that he could open any door or lock any door.  

So Jesus says, Whatever you hold bound on earth will be held bound in heaven, whatever you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven. He gives that kind of authority to a human person. This is an astounding thing; however, it makes perfect sense at the same time because being human we have to have somebody we can look to as the head, as the leader. Jesus is in heaven. He is the Head of the Body. Yet because we cannot see Him and we cannot hear Him with our ears, we need somebody who is going to be a point of unity. We all know that. Humanity just by nature tends that way. Every culture is set up in such a way that there has to be somebody who is going to lead. That is what the purpose of the papacy is. It is to guarantee the unity of the body, because as long as we are united with the Pope we have the guarantee that we are united with Jesus. 

If we separate ourselves from the teachings and the person of the Holy Father, then we do not have that guarantee any longer. Then we are out there on our own being blown around, as Saint Paul would say, by every wind of doctrine that comes along. Then it is up to us personally to decide what is true and what is not, what the teaching of Jesus really means and what it does not. We become our own infallible authority. We become the one who is the head of the Church. We cannot do that. There can only be one head. If all of us are running around trying to be the head, we are going to get a little top heavy and collapse. It just cannot work. Knowing this, Jesus established authority within His Church and gave that authority squarely to Peter. And because the office of the prime minister is one of succession, when Peter would die, the keys would be passed on to the next one, to the one who would succeed him.  

It is very interesting to note from a historical perspective that even in the early Church they did not keep track of any of the episcopal lines of succession of any other apostle except Peter. We do not know who the bishops were that the beloved disciple ordained and who their successors were. We do not know the names even of most of the bishops that Saint Paul ordained and who their successors were. The only ones who have been kept track of right from the very beginning are Saint Peter and his successors. It demonstrates clearly that the early Church understood this. This can be found most clearly in the letters of Saint Clement, when the bishop from Corinth, one of the churches Saint Paul founded, wrote to the Bishop of Rome to ask him to intercede and to help solve the problem they were having in Corinth. He did not go to any of the bishops around him in any of the churches that Saint Paul had founded, but rather he wrote to Rome to ask the Pope to deal with their problem. That is the kind of thing we see in the early Church, and that is exactly what has carried on throughout. 

Saint Peter, in the first reading that we heard today, recognizes what this authority is about. It is to serve. It is not about power; it is about authority. Power is something which is oftentimes exercised selfishly. Authority is given for the service of others. That is exactly what Saint Peter tells the presbyters (the elders or the priests) to do: not to lord it over the flock entrusted to their care, but to serve them willingly and be a good example. That is exactly what the Pope is to do. He is called to serve. In fact, one of his titles is the Servus Servorum Dei, “The Servant of the Servants of God.” That is what he is called to do. The one who is the greatest is the one who must serve the rest, Jesus said. And so if He has elevated a person to that position, then that person has to be humble and has to serve the rest.  

Unfortunately, there are many examples throughout history where there has not been that humility or service. But, thanks be to God, in our day we have seen great examples of precisely what it ought to be: someone who is humble, someone who serves, someone at the same time who is going to be strong and corrective to discipline what needs to be disciplined within the Church, someone who is truly a father and is going to lead the flock with care, loving them and being a good example, and leading the people to the Chief Shepherd, as Saint Peter calls Him, Jesus Christ, our true King and Head of the Mystical Body. 

*  This text was transcribed from the audio recording with minimal editing.       


16 posted on 02/22/2006 10:46:26 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Faith-sharing bump.


17 posted on 02/22/2006 11:41:26 AM PST by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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To: Salvation

I've always preferred this version of the famous Bible verse: "Upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of HELL shall not prevail against it." More powerful than "netherworld", IMO.


18 posted on 02/22/2006 11:43:37 AM PST by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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To: Salvation
Mt 16:13-23
# Douay-Rheims Vulgate
13 And Jesus came into the quarters of Cesarea Philippi: and he asked his disciples, saying: Whom do men say that the Son of man is? venit autem Iesus in partes Caesareae Philippi et interrogabat discipulos suos dicens quem dicunt homines esse Filium hominis
14 But they said: Some John the Baptist, and other some Elias, and others Jeremias, or one of the prophets. at illi dixerunt alii Iohannem Baptistam alii autem Heliam alii vero Hieremiam aut unum ex prophetis
15 Jesus saith to them: But whom do you say that I am? dicit illis vos autem quem me esse dicitis
16 Simon Peter answered and said: Thou art Christ, the Son of the living God. respondens Simon Petrus dixit tu es Christus Filius Dei vivi
17 And Jesus answering said to him: Blessed art thou, Simon Bar-Jona: because flesh and blood hath not revealed it to thee, but my Father who is in heaven. respondens autem Iesus dixit ei beatus es Simon Bar Iona quia caro et sanguis non revelavit tibi sed Pater meus qui in caelis est
18 And I say to thee: That thou art Peter; and upon this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. et ego dico tibi quia tu es Petrus et super hanc petram aedificabo ecclesiam meam et portae inferi non praevalebunt adversum eam
19 And I will give to thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven. And whatsoever thou shalt bind upon earth, it shall be bound also in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth, it shall be loosed also in heaven. et tibi dabo claves regni caelorum et quodcumque ligaveris super terram erit ligatum in caelis et quodcumque solveris super terram erit solutum in caelis

19 posted on 02/22/2006 3:41:07 PM PST by annalex
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To: annalex


Apostle Communion with wine: Christ, Peter and Angel
1321
Grachanica, Serbia

20 posted on 02/22/2006 3:44:30 PM PST by annalex
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To: annalex

There is so much desire to explain these verses away. For the record, I would like to comment on the linguistic aspect of verse 18.

This is the literal word-by-word for the Latin:

tu es Petrus et super hanc petram aedificabo ecclesiam meam
you are Peter and on this rock I-shall-build church my

To see the Greek original, go to

http://unbound.biola.edu/

, and select Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000) as the first version and any English translation for the second version. Select Matthew as book and chapter 16 verse 18. Leave other controls as by default. You will see the Greek original and the translation in a separate window. The Greek will be in Greek letters, but this is, roughly, what they would be transliterated into English alphabet letter-by-letter:

kago de soi lego oti su es petros kai epi taute te petra oikonomeso mou ten ekklesian kai pulai adou ou katischusousin autes

and-I to you say that you are Petros and upon this the rock I-shall-build my the church and doors of-hell not prevail against-her

Greek words have "gender". Words ending in "os" are masculine. Words ending in "a" are feminine (they also inflect, and there are other endings beside these two, but these two are sufficient for our purpose here). "Petra" is "rock"; it is a feminine noun. Accordingly, "taute" and "te" are feminine prepositions that together mean "this [feminine thing]". "epi taute te petra" means "upon this rock", straight up, -- no wordplay.

Then there is this word, "petros". It is a masculine form of "petra". You can take any Greek word ending in "-a", and make up a similar masculine word out of it replacing "-a" with "-os". We can't do so in English because we don't have gender for inanimate nouns. We have a similar effect with some names, e.g. "Brenda" and "Brendan". But in Greek we can do so systematically. Usually, if we take a regular Greek feminine word and form a masculine counterpart, we get a non-word. "Petros" is a non-word. It suggests "petra" but is wrong, masculine, gender. How can we use such non-word? We can give a man a nickname. The nickname, e.g. Petros, will follow the proper grammar for men, but will still suggest "petra", -- Rock.

There is no record of the proper name Petros used prior to the spread of Christianity. It might have been a rarely used name, or it might have been a non-word till Christ invented it. In any event, there is nothing in the text to indicate any desire on the part of Christ to make Peter a "stone" (the word for that would be "lithos") or a "pebble". There is nothing that suggests pointing away from Peter at some rock far off.

It is possible that the actual words were uttered in Aramaic, and indeed Peter is called Cephas, Aramaic for Rock, elsewhere. In this case the Greek word formation, "petros" is how Matthew rendered the renaming while making the Greek grammar still work.

Nor, of course, is there anything in the broader context to suggest irony on the part of Christ. Simon alone recognized Jesus as the messiah; Jesus indicates that Peter has a divine revelation about that, renames him (in the tradition of Old Testament patriarchs) and promises to Peter the keys to the kingdom of heaven. He also explains that the "keys" will hold the power to legislate on earth in such way that Christ Himself will enforce these laws in heaven.


21 posted on 02/22/2006 4:36:57 PM PST by annalex
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To: annalex

Excellent analysis. You explained it a lot better than many who attempt it do.


22 posted on 02/22/2006 4:57:55 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Ciexyz

I agree.


23 posted on 02/22/2006 4:58:54 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Wednesday, February 22, 2006

Meditation
Psalm 23:1-6



The Lord is my shepherd. (Psalm 23:1)

We may not often think of ourselves as sheep, but on this feast of the Chair of St. Peter, let’s take a moment to consider how we experience God caring for us as a shepherd—and how we are called to follow in his footsteps. As a church, after all, we are a kingdom of sheep and shepherds.

Of course, we have Peter’s successor, the pope, and God uses him as a representative on earth to act as our chief human shepherd. When he faithfully fulfills his role, the holy father can be a great source of courage for us, especially when the church enters a time of darkness or is confronted by its enemy the devil. Like Christ, the pope can be a figure of stability in changing times, showing us the way to heaven.

But can we experience God’s care for us in other ways? How about in our churches? We can experience the green pastures of a vibrant parish community where, like well-protected sheep, we can grow in love for Jesus and learn how to serve others. We can find refreshment through celebrations and life of worship that we share with the flock of our church family. In our brothers and sisters in Christ, we can forge relationships that will call forth self-giving, shepherd-like love from us. Even in our family life, surrounded by examples of sacrificial love, we can experience our cup running over.

There is something very powerful about the way God’s blessings come to us through the church. It’s not magic, but it is spectacular. It doesn’t come automatically just because we attend Mass, but it does flow every time we imitate the good shepherd who laid down his life for his sheep. It is this self-giving—this act of placing the needs of others first—that sets the church apart. When we care for one another in this way—and when we receive this care as well—we experience the voice of Jesus our shepherd leading us along right paths. So let’s embrace our roles as sheep and as shepherds, so that we can come to know the joy and security that this psalmist described.

“Lord, teach me the ways I receive your blessings as a member of your flock. I celebrate all the ways you care for me as my shepherd!”

1 Peter 5:1-4; Matthew 16:13-19



24 posted on 02/22/2006 5:02:22 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Vespers -- Evening Prayer

Vespers (Evening Prayer)

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.

Psalm 115 (116B)
Thanksgiving in the Temple
Still I trusted, even when I said “I am greatly afflicted”,
when I said in my terror, “all men are liars”.

How shall I repay the Lord for all he has done for me?
I will take up the cup of salvation and call on the name of the Lord.

I will fulfil my vows to the Lord before all his people.
Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of his faithful.

O Lord, I am your servant, your maidservant’s son.
You have torn apart my chains: I will make you a sacrifice of praise, I will call on the name of the Lord.

I will fulfil my vows to the Lord before all his people,
in the courts of the house of the Lord, within your walls, Jerusalem.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Psalm 125 (126)
Gladness and hope in the Lord
When the Lord gave Sion back her captives, we became like dreamers.
Our mouths were filled with gladness and our voices cried in exultation.
Among the Gentiles they were saying,
 “By his deeds the Lord has shown himself great”.
The Lord’s deeds showed forth his greatness,
 and filled us with rejoicing.

Give us back our captives, O Lord,
 as you renew the dry streams in the desolate South.
Those who sow in tears will rejoice at the harvest.

They wept as they went, went with seed for the sowing;
but with joy they will come, come bearing the sheaves.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Canticle Ephesians 1
God the Saviour
Blessed be God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ,
who has blessed us, in Christ, with every spiritual blessing in heaven.

In love, he chose us before the creation of the world,
to be holy and spotless in his sight.

He predestined us to be his adopted children through Jesus Christ,
simply because it pleased him to do so.

This he did for the praise of the glory of his grace,
of his free gift of us to his Beloved,

in whose blood we have gained redemption,
and the forgiveness of our sins.

This he did according to the riches of his grace,
which he gave us in abundance,

with all wisdom and discernment,
revealing to us the mysteries of his will,
because it pleased him to do so.

In this action he has planned, in the fulfilment of time,
to bring all things together in Christ,
from the heavens and from the earth.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
A short Bible reading and responsory may follow here.
Canticle Magnificat
My soul rejoices in the Lord
My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
 and my spirit rejoices in God, my salvation.
For he has shown me such favour –
 me, his lowly handmaiden.
Now all generations will call me blessed,
 because the mighty one has done great things for me.
His name is holy,
 his mercy lasts for generation after generation
 for those who revere him.

He has put forth his strength:
 he has scattered the proud and conceited,
 torn princes from their thrones;
 but lifted up the lowly.
He has filled the hungry with good things;
 the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel,
 he has remembered his mercy as he promised to our fathers,
 to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.

Some short prayers may follow here, to offer up the day's work to God.
Our Father, who art in Heaven,
 hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come,
 thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
 and forgive us our trespasses
 as we forgive those that trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
 but deliver us from evil.
A concluding prayer may follow here.

May the Lord bless us and keep us from all harm; and may he lead us to eternal life.
A M E N

25 posted on 02/22/2006 5:05:13 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Thank you for the ping Salvation.My favorite thread bump.


26 posted on 02/22/2006 8:03:50 PM PST by fatima (Just say it if it is for love-have no regrets.)
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To: fatima

Hope you had a wonderful day!


27 posted on 02/22/2006 8:08:09 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

One Bread, One Body

 

<< Wednesday, February 22, 2006 >> Chair of St. Peter
 
1 Peter 5:1-4 Psalm 23 Matthew 16:13-19
View Readings  Similar Reflections
 
CHAIR-PERSON
 
"Jesus replied, 'Blest are you, Simon son of Jonah! No mere man has revealed this to you, but My heavenly Father. I for My part declare to you, you are 'Rock,' and on this rock I will build My Church.' " —Matthew 16:17-18
 

Only the Catholic Church would celebrate a chair. We don't need much of a reason for a party. The chair represents the authority of the Pope and the unity of the Church. We believe Jesus chose Peter as leader of the Church and intended that others succeed Peter as its leader. We rejoice in this order because it is God's way of protecting, guiding, and unifying us.

Although Satan is the master of deception and we seem too weak to deal with his attacks, we remain confident because the Lord will tell us what to do. He knows how to guard His people and "there is no snatching out of His hand" (Jn 10:29).

The Lord has chosen the Pope as the main instrument of His protection, guidance, and unity. We celebrate God's provision for the Church's needs. To benefit fully from God's plan, we should:

  1. pray for the Pope daily,
  2. read what he writes,
  3. speak well of him, and
  4. obey him.

Let's submit ourselves to God-given authority and receive God's gifts.

 
Prayer: Jesus, may I do it Your way.
Promise: "God's flock is in your midst; give it a shepherd's care...When the Chief Shepherd appears you will win for yourselves the unfading crown of glory." —1 Pt 5:2, 4
Praise: St. Peter glorified God in his life and was blessed to glorify God in his martyr's death.
 

28 posted on 02/22/2006 8:11:55 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

So good but I am looking for a good co-host on Wednesday.I ask prayers for this for all who read-important:)


29 posted on 02/22/2006 8:12:00 PM PST by fatima (Just say it if it is for love-have no regrets.)
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To: fatima; Coleus

I hope you find a cohost. What about Coleus?


30 posted on 02/22/2006 8:13:11 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Compline -- Night Prayer

Compline (Night Prayer)

O God, come to my aid.
O Lord, make haste to help me.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen. Alleluia.


This is an excellent moment for an examination of conscience. In a communal celebration of Compline, one of the penitential acts given in the Missal may be recited.

A suitable hymn may be inserted at this point.


Psalm 30 (31)
Trustful prayer in time of adversity
O God, protect me; be my refuge. Alleluia.
In you, Lord, I put my trust: may I never be put to shame.
 In your justice, set me free,
Turn your ear to me,
 make haste to rescue me.
Be my rampart, my fortification;
 keep me safe.

For you are my strength and my refuge:
 you will lead me out to the pastures,
 for your own name’s sake.
You will lead me out of the trap that they laid for me –
 for you are my strength.

Into your hands I commend my spirit:
 you have redeemed me, Lord God of truth.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
O God, protect me; be my refuge. Alleluia.

Psalm 129 (130)
Out of the depths
Out of the depths I have cried to you, Lord. Alleluia.
Out of the depths I have cried to you, Lord: Lord, hear my voice.
Let your ears listen out for the voice of my pleading.

If you took notice of our transgressions, Lord – Lord, who would be left?
But with you is forgiveness, and for this we revere you.
I rely on you, Lord, my spirit relies on your promise;
my soul hopes in the Lord, more than the watchman for daybreak.

More than the watchman for daybreak, let Israel hope in the Lord:
for with the Lord there is kindness and abundant redemption.
He himself will redeem Israel from all its transgressions.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
Out of the depths I have cried to you, Lord. Alleluia.

Reading Ephesians 4:26-27
Be angry if you must, but do not sin: do not let your anger outlast the sunset: do not give the Devil his chance.

Short Responsory ?
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
You have redeemed us, Lord, God of faithfulness.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit.
- Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

Canticle Nunc Dimittis
Keep us safe, Lord, while we are awake, and guard us as we sleep, so that we can keep watch with Christ and rest in peace. Alleluia.
Now, Master, you let your servant go in peace.
 You have fulfilled your promise.
My own eyes have seen your salvation,
 which you have prepared in the sight of all peoples.
A light to bring the Gentiles from darkness;
 the glory of your people Israel.

Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit,
 as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be,
 world without end.
Amen.
Keep us safe, Lord, while we are awake, and guard us as we sleep, so that we can keep watch with Christ and rest in peace. Alleluia.

Prayer
Let us pray.
Lord Jesus Christ, you lay a gentle yoke upon those who follow you. Meek and humble, you give them a light burden to carry. Receive the work and the prayers we have offered to you today; and give us rest, to make us more eager to serve you, who live and reign for ever and ever, Amen.

May the almighty Lord grant us a quiet night and a perfect end.
A M E N
An antiphon to Our Lady should be recited here.

31 posted on 02/22/2006 8:14:36 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation; Coleus

I might already be working with him and don't know.I work with priest's for life and don't know cover names here but your right and we are close heart wise.


32 posted on 02/22/2006 8:18:50 PM PST by fatima (Just say it if it is for love-have no regrets.)
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To: annalex
Apostle communion with wine

Bump for inspirational artwork.

33 posted on 02/22/2006 8:29:38 PM PST by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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To: annalex

A note of levity: fish fries start next week with Ash Wednesday! Yum, yum!


34 posted on 02/22/2006 8:35:20 PM PST by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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