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Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings August 14, 2011
USCCB.org/New American Bible ^ | August 14, 2011 | New American Bible

Posted on 08/14/2011 4:07:44 AM PDT by sayuncledave

August 14, 2011
Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading 1

Is 56:1, 6-7
Thus says the LORD:
Observe what is right, do what is just;
for my salvation is about to come,
my justice, about to be revealed.

The foreigners who join themselves to the LORD,
ministering to him,
loving the name of the LORD,
and becoming his servants-
all who keep the sabbath free from profanation
and hold to my covenant,
them I will bring to my holy mountain
and make joyful in my house of prayer;
their burnt offerings and sacrifices
will be acceptable on my altar,
for my house shall be called
a house of prayer for all peoples.

Responsorial Psalm
Ps 67:2-3, 5, 6, 8
R. (4) O God, let all the nations praise you!
May God have pity on us and bless us;
may he let his face shine upon us.
So may your way be known upon earth;
among all nations, your salvation.
R. O God, let all the nations praise you!
May the nations be glad and exult
because you rule the peoples in equity;
the nations on the earth you guide.
R. O God, let all the nations praise you!
May the peoples praise you, O God;
may all the peoples praise you!
May God bless us,
and may all the ends of the earth fear him!
R. O God, let all the nations praise you!

Reading II
Rom 11:13-15, 29-32
Brothers and sisters:
I am speaking to you Gentiles.
Inasmuch as I am the apostle to the Gentiles,
I glory in my ministry in order to make my race jealous
and thus save some of them.
For if their rejection is the reconciliation of the world,
what will their acceptance be but life from the dead?

For the gifts and the call of God are irrevocable.
Just as you once disobeyed God
but have now received mercy because of their disobedience,
so they have now disobeyed in order that,
by virtue of the mercy shown to you,
they too may now receive mercy.
For God delivered all to disobedience,
that he might have mercy upon all.

Gospel
Mt 15:21-28
At that time, Jesus withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon.
And behold, a Canaanite woman of that district came and called out,
"Have pity on me, Lord, Son of David!
My daughter is tormented by a demon."
But Jesus did not say a word in answer to her.
Jesus' disciples came and asked him,
"Send her away, for she keeps calling out after us."
He said in reply,
"I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel."
But the woman came and did Jesus homage, saying, "Lord, help me."
He said in reply,
"It is not right to take the food of the children
and throw it to the dogs."
She said, "Please, Lord, for even the dogs eat the scraps
that fall from the table of their masters."
Then Jesus said to her in reply,
"O woman, great is your faith!
Let it be done for you as you wish."
And the woman's daughter was healed from that hour.


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
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A humble effort to help our FRiend, Salvation: For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion. Any mistakes are mine. My apologies.
1 posted on 08/14/2011 4:07:49 AM PDT by sayuncledave
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be,
please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 08/14/2011 4:10:11 AM PDT by sayuncledave (A cruce salus)
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Aug 14, Invitatory for Twentieth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Lord, open my lips.
And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, worship the Lord for we are his people, the flock he shepherds, alleluia.

Psalm 95

Come, let us sing to the Lord
and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.
Let us approach him with praise and thanksgiving
and sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Ant.

The Lord is God, the mighty God,
the great king over all the gods.
He holds in his hands the depths of the earth
and the highest mountains as well
He made the sea; it belongs to him,
the dry land, too, for it was formed by his hands.

Ant.

Come, then, let us bow down and worship,
bending the knee before the Lord, our maker,
For he is our God and we are his people,
the flock he shepherds.

Ant.

Today, listen to the voice of the Lord:
Do not grow stubborn, as your fathers did in the wilderness,
when at Meriba and Massah they challenged me and provoked me,
Although they had seen all of my works.

Ant.

Forty years I endured that generation.
I said, “They are a people whose hearts go astray
and they do not know my ways.”
So I swore in my anger,
“They shall not enter into my rest.”

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, worship the Lord for we are his people, the flock he shepherds, alleluia.

3 posted on 08/14/2011 4:11:43 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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Aug 14, Morning Prayer for Sunday of the 20th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 618
Proper of Seasons: 122
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 1091

Christian Prayer (single volume)
Ordinary: 689
Proper of the Season: 625
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, 925

Morning Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

HYMN

From all that dwell below the skies,
let the Creator’s praise arise;
let the Redeemer’s name be sung,
through every land by every tongue.

Eternal are thy mercies, Lord;
eternal truth attends thy word.
Thy praise shall sound from shore to shore,
till suns shall rise and set no more.

Your lofty themes, ye mortals, bring,
in songs of praise divinely sing;
the great salvation loud proclaim,
and shout for joy the Savior’s name.

In every land begin the song;
to every land the strains belong;
in cheerful sounds all voices raise,
and fill the world with loudest praise.

From All That Dwell Below the Skies by St. Michael’s Singers; Words: Isaac Watts, 1719. Music: John Hatton, 1793.
From All That Dwell Below the Skies by St. Michael’s Singers is available from Amazon.com

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Psalm 118
Song of joy for salvation

The Lord our mighty God now reigns supreme; let us rejoice and be glad and give him praise (Revelation 19:6-7).

Give thanks to the Lord for he is good,
for his love endures for ever.

Ant.

Let the sons of Israel say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let the sons of Aaron say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let those who fear the Lord say:
“His love endures for ever.”

Ant.

I called to the Lord in my distress;
he answered and freed me.
The Lord is at my side; I do not fear.
What can man do against me?
The Lord is at my side as my helper:
I shall look down on my foes.

Ant.

It is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in men:
it is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in princes.

Ant.

The nations all encompassed me;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me, compassed me about;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me about like bees;
they blazed like a fire among thorns.
In the Lord’s name I crushed them.

Ant.

I was hard-pressed and was falling
but the Lord came to help me.
The Lord is my strength and my song;
he is my savior.
There are shouts of joy and victory
in the tents of the just.

Ant.

The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
his right hand raised me.
The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
I shall not die, I shall live
and recount his deeds.
I was punished, I was punished by the Lord,
but not doomed to die.

Ant.

Open to me the gates of holiness:
I will enter and give thanks.
This is the Lord’s own gate
where the just may enter.
I will thank you for you have answered
and you are my savior.

Ant.

The stone which the builders rejected
has become the corner stone.
This is the work of the Lord,
a marvel in our eyes.
This day was made by the Lord;
we rejoice and are glad.

Ant.

O Lord, grant us salvation;
O Lord, grant success.
Blessed in the name of the Lord
is he who comes.
We bless you from the house of the Lord;
the Lord God is our light.

Ant.

Go forward in procession with branches
even to the altar.
You are my God, I thank you.
My God, I praise you.
Give thanks to the Lord for he is good;
for his love endures for ever.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, you have given us the great day of rejoicing: Jesus Christ, the stone rejected by the builders, has become the cornerstone of the Church, our spiritual home. Shed upon your Church the rays of your glory, that it may be seen as the gate of salvation open to all nations. Let cries of joy and exultation ring out from its tents, to celebrate the wonder of Christ’s resurrection.

Ant. Praise the Lord, for his loving kindness will never fail, alleluia.

Ant.2 Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Canticle – Daniel 3:52-57
Let all creatures praise the Lord

The Creator… is blessed for ever (Romans 1:25).

Blessed are you, O Lord, the God of our fathers,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant.

And blessed is your holy and glorious name,
praiseworthy and exalted above all for all ages.

Ant.

Blessed are you in the temple of your holy glory,
praiseworthy and glorious above all forever.

Ant.

Blessed are you on the throne of your kingdom,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant.

Blessed are you who look into the depths
from your throne upon the cherubim,
praiseworthy and exalted above all forever.

Ant.

Blessed are you in the firmament of heaven,
praiseworthy and glorious forever.

Ant.

Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord,
praise and exalt him above all forever.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Alleluia! Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord, alleluia!

Ant. 3 Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

Psalm 150
Praise the Lord

Let mind and heart be in your song: this is to glorify God with your whole self (Hesychius).

Praise God in his holy place,
praise him in his mighty heavens.
Praise him for his powerful deeds,
praise his surpassing greatness.

Ant.

O praise him with sound of trumpet,
praise him with lute and harp.
Praise him with timbrel and dance,
praise him with strings and pipes.

Ant.

O praise him with resounding cymbals,
praise him with clashing of cymbals.
Let everything that lives and that breathes
give praise to the Lord.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, maker of heaven and earth and of all created things, you make your just ones holy and you justify sinners who confess your name. Hear us as we humbly pray to you: give us eternal joy with your saints.

Ant. Let everything that breathes give praise to the Lord, alleluia.

READING 2 Timothy 2:8, 11-13

Remember that Jesus Christ, a descendant of David,
was raised from the dead. You can depend on this:
If we have died with him
we shall also live with him;
If we hold out to the end
we shall also reign with him.
But if we deny him he will deny us. If we are unfaithful
he will still remain faithful, for he cannot deny himself.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.
We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.

We cry aloud how marvelous you are,
as we call upon your name.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
We give thanks to you, O God, as we call upon your name.

CANTICLE OF ZECHARIAH

Ant. I am the living bread come down from heaven. Anyone who eats this bread will live for ever, alleluia.

Luke 1:68 – 79
The Messiah and his forerunner

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel;
he has come to his people and set them free.
He has raised up for us a mighty savior,
born of the house of his servant David.

Through his holy prophets he promised of old
that he would save us from our enemies,
from the hands of all who hate us.
He promised to show mercy to our fathers
and to remember his holy covenant.

This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham:
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
free to worship him without fear,
holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life.

You, my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High;
for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way,
to give his people knowledge of salvation
by the forgiveness of their sins.

In the tender compassion of our God
the dawn from on high shall break upon us,
to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death,
and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. I am the living bread come down from heaven. Anyone who eats this bread will live for ever, alleluia.

INTERCESSIONS

Open your hearts to praise the God of power and goodness, for he loves us and knows our needs:
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

We bless you, almighty God, King of the universe, because you called us while we were yet sinners,
to acknowledge your truth and to serve your majesty.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

O God, you opened the gates of mercy for us,
let us never turn aside from the path of life.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

As we celebrate the resurrection of your beloved Son,
help us to spend this day in the spirit of joy.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

Give to your faithful, O Lord, a prayerful spirit of gratitude,
that we may thank you for all your gifts.
We praise you, Lord, and trust in you.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

God our Father,
may we love you in all things and above all things
and reach the joy you have prepared for us beyond all our imagining.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

4 posted on 08/14/2011 4:11:51 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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Aug 14, Office of Readings for Sunday of the 20th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: Page 615
Proper of Seasons: Page 118
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, Page 1087

Christian Prayer:
Does not contain Office of Readings.

Office of Readings for Sunday of the Twentieth Week in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

HYMN

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!
Early in the morning our song shall rise to thee.
Holy, holy, holy! Merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity!

Holy, holy, holy! All the saints adore thee,
casting down their golden crowns around the glassy sea;
cherubim and seraphim falling down before thee,
which wert, and art, and evermore shalt be.

Holy, holy, holy! Though the darkness hide thee,
though the eye of sinful man thy glory may not see,
only thou art holy; there is none beside thee,
perfect in power, in love and purity.

Holy, holy, holy! Lord God Almighty!
All thy works shall praise thy name, in earth and sky and sea.
Holy, holy, holy! Merciful and mighty,
God in three persons, blessed Trinity.

Melody: Nicaea 11.12.12.10; Music: John B. Dykes, 1823-1876; Text: Reginald Heber, 1783-1826
“Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty ” performed by Norwich Cathedral Choir is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Psalm 24
The Lord’s entry into his temple

Christ opened heaven for us in the manhood he assumed (St. Irenaeus).

The Lord’s is the earth and its fullness,
the world and all its peoples.
It is he who set it on the seas;
on the waters he made it firm.

Ant.

Who shall climb the mountain of the Lord?
Who shall stand in his holy place?
The man with clean hands and pure heart,
who desires not worthless things,
who has not sworn so as to deceive his neighbor.

Ant.

He shall receive blessings from the Lord
and reward from the God who saves him.
Such are the men who seek him,
seek the face of the God of Jacob.

Ant.

O gates, lift high your heads;
grow higher, ancient doors.
Let him enter, the king of glory!

Ant.

Who is the king of glory?
The Lord, the mighty, the valiant,
the Lord, the valiant in war.

Ant.

O gates, lift high your heads;
grow higher, ancient doors.
Let him enter, the king of glory!

Ant.

Who is he, the king of glory?
He, the Lord of armies,
he is the king of glory.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

When your Son was unjustly condemned, Lord God, and surrounded by the impious, he cried to you, and you set him free. Watch over your people as the treasure of your heart and guide their steps along safe paths that they may see your face.

Ant. Who can climb the Lord’s mountain, or stand in his holy place?

Ant. 2 Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Psalm 66
Eucharistic hymn

The Lord is risen and all people have been brought by him to the Father (Hesychius).

I

Cry out with joy to God, all the earth,
O sing to the glory of his name.
O render him glorious praise.
Say to God: “How tremendous your deeds!

Ant.

Because of the greatness of your strength
your enemies cringe before you.
Before you all the earth shall bow;
shall sing to you, sing to your name!”

Ant.

Come and see the works of God,
tremendous his deeds among men.
He turned the sea into dry land,
they passed through the river dry-shod.

Ant.

Let our joy then be in him;
he rules for ever by his might.
His eyes keep watch over the nations;
let rebels not rise against him.

Ant.

O peoples, bless our God,
let the voice of his praise resound,
of the God who gave life to our souls
and kept our feet from stumbling.

Ant.

For you, O God, have tested us,
you have tried us as silver is tried:
you led us, God, into the snare;
you laid a heavy burden on our backs.

Ant.

You let men ride over our heads;
we went through fire and through water
but then you brought us relief.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Bless our God, you nations of the world; he has given us life, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

II

Burnt offering I bring to your house;
to you I will pay my vows,
the vows which my lips have uttered,
which my mouth spoke in my distress.

Ant.

I will offer burnt offerings of fatlings
with the smoke of burning rams.
I will offer bullocks and goats.

Ant.

Come and hear, all who fear God.
I will tell what he did for my soul:
to him I cried aloud,
with high praise ready on my tongue.

Ant.

If there had been evil in my heart,
the Lord would not have listened.
But truly God has listened;
he has heeded the voice of my prayer.

Ant.

Blessed be God who did not reject my prayer
nor withhold his love from me.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Almighty Father, in the death and resurrection of your own Son you brought us through the waters of baptism to the shores of new life. By those waters and the fire of the Holy Spirit you have given each of us consolation. Accept our sacrifice of praise; may our lives be a total offering to you, and may we deserve to enter your house and there with Christ praise your unfailing power.

Ant. Listen to me, all you who revere God, let me tell you what great things he has done for me, alleluia.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

God’s word is alive; it strikes to the heart.
It pierces more surely than a two-edged sword.

READINGS

First reading
From the book of the prophet Isaiah
6:1-14
The call of the prophet Isaiah

In the year King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord seated on a high and lofty throne, with the train of his garment filling the temple. Seraphim were stationed above; each of them had six wings: with two they veiled their faces, with two they veiled their feet, and with two they hovered aloft.

“Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts!” they cried one to the other. “All the earth is filled with his glory!” At the sound of that cry, the frame of the door shook and the house was filled with smoke.

Then I said, “Woe is me, I am doomed! For I am a man of unclean lips, living among a people of unclean lips; yet my eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts!” Then one of the seraphim flew to me, holding an ember which he had taken with tongs from the altar.

He touched my mouth with it. “See,” he said, “now that this has touched your lips, your wickedness is removed, your sin purged.”

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send? Who will go for us?” “Here I am,” I said; “send me!” And he replied: Go and say to this people:

Listen carefully, but you shall not understand!
Look intently, but you shall know nothing!
You are to make the heart of this people sluggish,
to dull their ears and close their eyes;
Else their eyes will see, their ears hear,
their heart understand,
and they will turn and be healed.

“How long, O Lord?” I asked. And he replied:

Until the cities are desolate,
without inhabitants,
Houses, without a man,
and the earth is a desolate waste.
Until the Lord removes men far away,
and the land is abandoned more and more.
If there be still a tenth part in it,
then this in turn shall be laid waste;
As with a terebinth or an oak
whose trunk remains when its leaves have fallen.
(Holy offspring is the trunk.)

RESPONSORY Revelation 4:8; Isaiah 6:3

Holy, holy, holy is the Lord God Almighty,
he who was, and who is, and who is to come;
all the earth is full of his glory.

The seraphim cried out to one another:
Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts.
All the earth is full of his glory.

Second reading
From a homily on Matthew by Saint John Chrysostum, bishop
Salt of the earth and light of the world

You are the salt of the earth. It is not for your own sake, he says, but for the world’s sake that the word is entrusted to you. I am not sending you into two cities only or ten or twenty, not to a single nation, as I sent the prophets of old, but across land and sea, to the whole world. And that world is in a miserable state. For when he says: You are the salt of the earth, he is indicating that all mankind had lost its savor and had been corrupted by sin. Therefore, he requires of these men those virtues which are especially useful and even necessary if they are to bear the burdens of many. For the man who is kindly, modest, merciful and just will not keep his good works to himself but will see to it that these admirable fountains send out their streams for the good of others. Again, the man who is clean of heart, a peacemaker and ardent for truth will order his life so as to contribute to the common good.

Do not think, he says, that you are destined for easy struggles or unimportant tasks. You are the salt of the earth. What do these words imply? Did the disciples restore what had already turned rotten? Not at all. Salt cannot help what is already corrupted. That is not what they did. But what had first been renewed and freed from corruption and then turned over to them, they salted and preserved in the newness the Lord had bestowed. It took the power of Christ to free men from the corruption caused by sin; it was the task of the apostles through strenuous labor to keep that corruption from returning.

Have you noticed how, bit by bit, Christ shows them to be superior to the prophets? He says they are to be teachers not simply for Palestine but for the whole world. Do not be surprised, then, he says, that I address you apart from the others and involve you in such a dangerous enterprise. Consider the numerous and extensive cities, peoples and nations I will be sending you to govern. For this reason I would have you make others prudent, as well as being prudent yourselves. For unless you can do that, you will not be able to sustain even yourselves.

If others lose their savor, then your ministry will help them regain it. But if you yourselves suffer that loss, you will drag others down with you. Therefore, the greater the undertakings put into your hands, the more zealous you must be. For this reason he says: But if the salt becomes tasteless, how can its flavor be restored? It is good for nothing now, but to be thrown out and trampled by men’s feet.

When they hear the words: When they curse you and persecute you and accuse you of every evil, they may be afraid to come forward. Therefore he says; “Unless you are prepared for that sort of thing, it is in vain that I have chosen you. Curses shall necessarily be your lot but they shall not harm you and will simply be a testimony to your constancy. If through fear, however, you fail to show the forcefulness your mission demands, your lot will be much worse, for all will speak evil of you and despise you. That is what being trampled by men’s feet means.”

Then he passes on to a more exalted comparison: You are the light of the world. Once again, “of the world”: not of one nation or twenty cities, but of the whole world. The light he means is an intelligible light, far superior to the rays of the sun we see, just as the salt is a spiritual salt. First salt, then light, so that you may learn how profitable sharp words may be and how useful serious doctrine. Such teaching holds in check and prevents dissipation; it leads to virtue and sharpens the mind’s eye. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden; nor do men light a lamp and put it under a basket. Here again he is urging them to a careful manner of life and teaching them to be watchful, for they live under the eyes of all and have the whole world for the arena of their struggles.

RESPONSORY Acts 1:8; Matthew 5:16

You will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes upon you,
and you will be my witnesses to the ends of the earth.

Your light must shine before men,
so that they may see your good works
and give praise to your father in heaven.
And you will be my witnesses to the ends of the earth.

TE DEUM

You are God: we praise you;
You are the Lord: we acclaim you;
You are the eternal Father:
All creation worships you.

To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
Cherubim and Seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy, Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.

The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.

Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.

You, Christ, are the King of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.

When you became man to set us free
you did not spurn the Virgin’s womb.

You overcame the sting of death,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come, and be our judge.

Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

God our Father,
may we love you in all things
and above all things
and reach the joy you have prepared for us
beyond all our imagining.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

5 posted on 08/14/2011 4:11:51 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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Aug 14, Daytime Prayer for Sunday of the 20th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: Page 623
Proper of Seasons: Page 123 (concluding prayer)
Psalter: Sunday, Week IV, Page 1097 (Midday)

Daytime Prayer for Sunday of the Twentieth Week in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

Come, Holy Ghost, who ever one
Art with the Father and the Son;
Come, Holy Ghost, our souls possess
With thy full flood of holiness.

In will and deed, in heart and tongue
With all the powers, thy praise be sung;
And love light up our mortal frame
Till others catch the living flame.

Almighty Father, hear our cry
Through Jesus Christ, our Lord most high,
Who with the Holy Ghost and thee
Doth live and reign eternally.

Melody: Saint Venantius L.M.; Music: Clausener Gesangbuch, 1653; Text: St. Ambrose (?); Translator: J. H. Newman, 1801-1890

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 He who eats this bread will live for ever, alleluia.

Psalm 23
The Good Shepherd
The Lamb himself will be their shepherd and will lead them to the springs of living waters (Revelation 7:17).

The Lord is my shepherd;
there is nothing I shall want.
Fresh and green are the pastures
where he gives me repose.
Near restful waters he leads me,
to revive my drooping spirit.

He guides me along the right path;
he is true to his name.
If I should walk in the valley of darkness
no evil would I fear.
You are there with your crook and your staff;
with these you give me comfort.

You have prepared a banquet for me
in the sight of my foes.
My head you have anointed with oil;
my cup is overflowing.

Surely goodness and kindness shall follow me
all the days of my life.
In the Lord’s own house shall I dwell
for ever and ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord Jesus Christ, shepherd of your Church, you give us new birth in the waters of baptism, anoint us with saving oil, and call us to salvation at your table. Dispel the terrors of death and the darkness of error. Lead your people along safe paths that they may rest securely in you and live for ever in your Father’s house.

Ant. He who eats this bread will live for ever, alleluia.

Ant. 2 The Lord will come in glory and show himself wonderful in his saints, alleluia.

Psalm 76
Thanksgiving for victory
They will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of heaven (Matthew 24:30).

I

God is made known in Judah;
in Israel his name is great.
He set up his tent in Jerusalem
and his dwelling place in Zion.
It was there he broke the flashing arrows,
the shield, the sword, the armor.

You, O Lord, are resplendent,
more majestic than the everlasting mountains.
The warriors, despoiled, slept in death;
the hands of the soldiers were powerless.
At your threat, O God of Jacob,
horse and rider lay stunned.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Lord will come in glory and show himself wonderful in his saints, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Pay your vows, and bring offerings to the Lord our God, alleluia.

II

You, you alone, strike terror.
Who shall stand when your anger is roused?
You uttered your sentence from the heavens;
the earth in terror was still
when God arose to judge,
to save the humble of the earth.

Men’s anger will serve to praise you;
its survivors surround you in joy.
Make vows to your God and fulfill them.
Let all pay tribute to him who strikes terror,
who cuts short the life of princes,
who strikes terror in the kings of the earth.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Your power is awesome, Father, and wonderful is your holiness. In your presence the earth both trembles and stands still, for you shattered death’s power by the cross. Rise to help your people: give your light, and grant salvation to the meek of the earth, that they may praise your name in heaven.

Ant. Pay your vows, and bring offerings to the Lord our God, alleluia.

READING Deuteronomy 10:12

What does the Lord, your God, ask of you but to fear the Lord, your God, and follow his ways exactly, to love and serve the Lord, your God, with all your heart and all your soul?

Lord, who can dwell in your sanctuary?
One whose life is blameless, and whose heart is true.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

God our Father,
may we love you in all things and above all things
and reach the joy you have prepared for us
beyond all our imagining.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

6 posted on 08/14/2011 4:11:51 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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Aug 14, Evening Prayer I – Solemnity for Twentieth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: Page 618
Proper of the Season: Page 1316
Psalter from the Common of the Blessed Virgin Mary: Page 1622

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: Page 689
Proper of Saints: Page 1225
Psalter from the Common of the Blessed Virgin Mary: Page 1368

Evening Prayer I for the Solemnity of the Assumption of Mary
Note: Sunday Evening Prayer I is prayed on Saturday

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

HYMN

Mary, crowned with living light,
Temple of the Lord,
Place of peace and holiness,
Shelter of the Word.
Mystery of sinless life
In our fallen race,
Free from shadow, you reflect
Plenitude of grace.

Virgin-mother of our God,
Lift us when we fall,
Who were named upon the
Cross Mother of us all.
Father, Son and Holy Ghost,
Heaven sings your praise;
Mary Magnifies your name
Through eternal days.

Title: Mary, crowned with living light; Music: Gossner’s Choralbuch, Leipzig, 1832; Text: Stanbrook Abbey; Sung by The Cistercian Nuns of St. Mary’s Abbey Glencairn
“Mary Crowned” by The Cistercian Nuns of St. Mary’s Abbey Glencairn is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Christ ascended into heaven and prepared an everlasting place for his immaculate Mother, alleluia.

Psalm 113
Praise the name of the Lord

He has cast down the mighty and has lifted up the lowly (Luke 1:52).

ALLELUIA!

Praise, O servants of the Lord,
praise the name of the Lord!
May the name of the Lord be blessed
both now and for evermore!
From the rising of the sun to its setting
praised be the name of the Lord!

High above all nations is the Lord,
above the heavens his glory.
Who is like the Lord, our God,
who has risen on high to his throne
yet stoops from the heights to look down,
to look down upon heaven and earth?

From the dust he lifts up the lowly,
from his misery he raises the poor
to set them in the company of princes,
yes, with the princes of his people.
To the childless wife he gives a home
and gladdens her heart with children.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Christ ascended into heaven and prepared an everlasting place for his immaculate Mother, alleluia.

Ant. 2 Through Eve the gates of heaven were closed to all mankind; through the Virgin Mother they were opened wide again, alleluia.

Psalm 147
The restoration of Jerusalem

Come, I will show you the bride of the Lamb (Revelation 21:9).

O praise the Lord, Jerusalem!
Zion praise your God!

He has strengthened the bars of your gates
he has blessed the children within you.
He established peace on your borders,
he feeds you with finest wheat.

He sends out his word to the earth
and swiftly runs his command.
He showers down snow white as wool,
he scatters hoar-frost like ashes.

He hurls down hailstones like crumbs.
The waters are frozen at his touch;
he sends forth his word and it melts them:
at the breath of his mouth the waters flow.

He makes his word known to Jacob,
to Israel his laws and decrees.
He has not dealt thus with other nations;
he has not taught them his decrees.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Through Eve the gates of heaven were closed to all mankind; through the Virgin Mother they were opened wide again, alleluia.

Ant. 3 The Virgin Mary has been exalted above all the heavens; come, let all men glorify Christ the King, whose kingdom will endure for ever, alleluia.

Canticle – Ephesians 1:3-10
God our Savior

Praised be the God and Father
of our Lord Jesus Christ,
who bestowed on us in Christ
every spiritual blessing in the heavens.

God chose us in him
before the world began
to be holy
and blameless in his sight.

He predestined us
to be his adopted sons through Jesus Christ,
such was his will and pleasure,
that all might praise the glorious favor
he has bestowed on us in his beloved.

In him and through his blood, we have been redeemed,
and our sins forgiven,
so immeasurably generous
is God’s favor to us.

God has given us the wisdom
to understand fully the mystery,
the plan he was pleased
to decree in Christ.

A plan to be carried out
in Christ, in the fullness of time,
to bring all things into one in him,
in the heavens and on earth.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Virgin Mary has been exalted above all the heavens; come, let all men glorify Christ the King, whose kingdom will endure for ever, alleluia.

READING Romans 8:30

Those God predestined he likewise called; those he called he also justified; and those he justified he in turn glorified.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

As Mary is taken up to heaven, the angels of God rejoice.
As Mary is taken up to heaven, the angels of God rejoice.

They worship the Lord and sing his praises.
The angels of God rejoice.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
As Mary is taken up to heaven, the angels of God rejoice.

CANTICLE OF MARY

Ant. All generations will call me blessed: the Almighty has done great things for me, alleluia.

Luke 1:46-55
The soul rejoices in the Lord

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers,
to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. All generations will call me blessed: the Almighty has done great things for me, alleluia.

INTERCESSIONS

Let us praise God our almighty Father, who wished that Mary, his Son’s mother, be celebrated by each generation. Now in need we ask:
Mary, full of grace, intercede for us.

O God, worker of miracles, you made the immaculate Virgin Mary share, body and soul, in your Son’s glory in heaven,
direct the hearts of your children to that same glory.
Mary, full of grace, intercede for us.

You made Mary our mother. Through her intercession grant strength to the weak, comfort to the sorrowing, pardon to sinners,
salvation and peace to all.
Mary, full of grace, intercede for us.

You made Mary full of grace,
grant all men the joyful abundance of your grace.
Mary, full of grace, intercede for us.

Make your Church of one mind and one heart in love,
and help all those who believe to be one in prayer with Mary, the mother of Jesus.
Mary, full of grace, intercede for us.

You crowned Mary queen of heaven,
may all the dead rejoice in your kingdom with the saints for ever.
Mary, full of grace, intercede for us.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Almighty God,
you gave a humble virgin
the privilege of being the mother of your Son,
and crowned her with the glory of heaven.
May the prayers of the Virgin Mary
bring us to the salvation of Christ
and raise us up to eternal life.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

7 posted on 08/14/2011 4:11:57 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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Aug 14, Night Prayer for Twentieth Sunday of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours:
Vol I, page 1169
Vol II, Page 1619
Vol III, Page 1264
Vol IV, Page 1233

Christian Prayer:
Page 1034

Night Prayer after Evening Prayer I

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

Examination of conscience:

We are called to have a clear conscience toward God and toward men, in our hearts and in our minds, in our actions and inactions. To do so, it is vital that we examine our conscience daily and to ask for God’s mercy as we fall short and to ask for His strength to do better.

Lord, Jesus you healed the sick:
Lord, have mercy
Lord have mercy

Lord Jesus, you forgave sinners:
Christ, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.

Lord Jesus, you give us yourself to heal us and bring us strength:
Lord, have mercy
Lord have mercy

HYMN

O Christ, who art the Light and Day,
Thou drivest night and gloom away;
O Light of light, whose Word doth show
The light of heaven to us below.

All-holy Lord, in humble prayer,
We ask tonight Thy watchful care.
Oh, grant us calm repose in Thee,
A quiet night, from perils free.

Our sleep be pure from sinful stain;
Let not the Tempter vantage gain,
Or our unguarded flesh surprise
And make us guilty in Thine eyes.

Asleep though wearied eyes may be,
Still keep the heart awake to Thee;
Let Thy right hand outstretched above
Guard those who serve the Lord they love.

Behold, O God, our Shield, and quell
The crafts and subtleties of hell;
Direct Thy servants in all good,
Who Thou hast purchased with Thy blood.

O Lord, remember us who bear
The burden of the flesh we wear;
Thou who dost o’er our souls defend,
Be with us even to the end.

All praise to God the Father be,
All praise, eternal Son, to Thee,
Whom with the Spirit we adore
Forever and forevermore.

O Christ Who Art the Light and Day by Cambridge Singers
Click here to purchase this hymn.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Have mercy, Lord, and hear my prayer.

Psalm 4
Thanksgiving

The resurrection of Christ was God’s supreme and wholly marvelous work (Saint Augustine).

When I call, answer me, O God of justice;
from anguish you released me, have mercy and hear me!

O men, how long will your hearts be closed,
will you love what is futile and seek what is false?

It is the Lord who grants favors to those whom he loves;
the Lord hears me whenever I call him.

Fear him; do not sin: ponder on your bed and be still
Make justice your sacrifice, and trust in the Lord.

“What can bring us happiness?” many say.
Let the light of your face shine on us, O Lord.

You have put into my heart a greater joy
than they have from abundance of corn and new wine.

I will lie down in peace and sleep comes at once
for you alone, Lord, make me dwell in safety.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Have mercy, Lord, and hear my prayer.

Ant. 2 In the silent hours of night, bless the Lord.

Psalm 134
Evening prayer in the temple

Praise our God, all you his servants, you who fear him, small and great (Revelation 19:5).

O come, bless the Lord,
all you who serve the Lord,
who stand in the house of the Lord,
in the courts of the house of our God.

Lift up your hands to the holy place
and bless the Lord through the night.

May the Lord bless you from Zion,
he who made both heaven and earth.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. In the silent hours of night, bless the Lord.

READING Deuteronomy 6:4-7

Hear, O Israel! The Lord is our God, the Lord alone! Therefore, you shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength. Take to heart these words which I enjoin on you today. Drill them into your children. Speak of them at home and abroad, whether you are busy or at rest.

RESPONSORY

Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

You have redeemed us, Lord God of truth.
I commend my spirit.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

Gospel Canticle

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Luke 2:29-32
Christ is the light of the nations and the glory of Israel

Lord, now you let your servant go in peace;
your word has been fulfilled:

my own eyes have seen the salvation
which you have prepared in the sight of every people:

a light to reveal you to the nations
and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Concluding Prayer

Lord,
be with us throughout this night.
When day comes may we rise from sleep
to rejoice in the resurrection of your Christ,
who lives and reigns for ever and ever.
Amen.

Blessing

May the all-powerful Lord grant us a restful night and a peaceful death.
Amen.

Antiphon or song in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary

8 posted on 08/14/2011 4:12:01 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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To: All

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God)

For: Sunday, August 14, 2011

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

From: Isaiah 56:1, 6-7

Worship Open to All


[1] Thus says the Lord: “Keep justice, and do righteousness, for soon my sal-
vation will come.

[6] ”And the foreigners who join themselves to the Lord, to minister to him, to
love the name of the Lord,and to be his servants, every one who keeps the sab-
bath, and does not profane it, and holds fast my covenant — [7] these I will bring
to my holy mountain, and make them joyful in my house of prayer; their burnt
offerings and their sacrifices will be accepted on my altar; for my house shall be
called a house of prayer for all peoples.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

56:1-66:24. These chapters make up the third part of the book of Isaiah, some-
times called “Third Isaiah”. It consists of prophetic visions and oracles about the
new Zion and the nations of the earth. The variety of style and content here
makes it difficult to identify any clear structure: the sacred writer seems to have
drawn these oracles together, apparently content that they are all to do with the
End and all refer to the whole world and not just to Israel. But he has carefully
positioned chapter 61 in the middle, making it the high-point of these chapters.
Also, 56:1-8 and 66:18-24, which stress the universality of justice and worship,
are very appropriately positioned at start and finish. To make this part easier to
read, we have divided it into three sections in this edition. The first (56:1-59:21)
is a series of oracles that show salvation being extended to all mankind, even
though the sins of the people of God will cause delays. In the second
(60:1-64:11), the salvation that the Lord will provide is proclaimed to all the na-
tions from Jerusalem. And the third section (65:1-66:24) has as its theme the
judgment of God, handed down to each according to his or her merits, be it
punishment for sin, or salvation.

Historically, the oracles have to do with the years following the return from exile
after Cyrus issued his decree of repatriation (539 BC). It was for Judah a time for
“beginning again”. God sent messages of hope to raise the Jews’ spirits during
their years in exile and on their return, when they were confronted by a scene
of devastation. They cannot fail to see that, from now on, peace and salvation
are linked with a return to God, conversion, the practice of righteousness, and
holiness.

This means that the horizon of divine salvation extends to include the whole
world, extending beyond the narrow limits of Jewish nationalism. When the pro-
phetic texts speak of Zion, they see it as the center of a new view of mankind,
as a source of light for all nations. The new Jerusalem stands for a new order,
as it will in the Revelation to John. Although all the energies of repatriates are
focused on the rebuilding of the temple (60:7-13), the message here is that the
ultimate goal is not material reconstruction, for the throne of God is to be found
in heaven, and the earth is only his footstool (66:1-2). Hope in a glorious future
is not measured in terms of external institutions—in the monarchy (which does
not exist), or in any other human authority, or in force of arms. Even divine wor-
ship, and the rules and regulations to do with fasting and sacrifices, will be
cleansed of the old formalism (58:1-14). God will act directly to save his people
(62:2-12). The new horizon opened up by “Third Isaiah” has its parallel in Haggai
and Zechariah, and, above all, it prepares the way for the still-distant eschatolo-
gical vision found in the Revelation to John.

56:1-59:21. The new section looks forward to a salvation that is open to everyone
who practises righteousness (56: 1-12). However, the first announcement of this
is put on hold, as it were, due to the sins of the people of God; these delay the
manifestation of God’s salvific power, for he refuses to hearken to the prayers of
the ungodly (57:1-21). Therefore, first and foremost, the prophet issues a call to
conversion (58: 1-14), while promising that the Lord, who is faithful to his Cove-
nant, will reward people according to their actions: he will punish those who are
faithless and redeem those who return to him (59:1-21).

56:1-8. In the restored Jerusalem, the temple will begin to open its doors to all
peoples. What we were told at the start of the book (cf. 2:2-5) would happen “in
the latter days” is beginning to happen: the temple of the Lord will be a house of
prayer for those who previously could not enter it; it will be open to all peoples.
The old rulings (Lev 22:25; Deut 23:2-9) did not permit eunuchs or foreigners to
take part in the assembly of Israel (a similar approach is found in Ezra 9:1-12
and Nehemiah 9:1-2); but this oracle displays a much more open and universa-
list attitude (cf. V/is 3:14):there is no objection to eunuchs and foreigners provi-
ded that they observe the sabbath and the Covenant (cf. vv. 2, 4,6) Blood ties
are no longer the criteria for membership of the community of the people of God
now it suffices that a person keep to the moral teaching laid down in the old Co-
venant, and worship the true God.

The mission of the temple, rebuilt by the exiles after their return with its open in-
vitation to all without exception to come and worship God as part of his people,
will reach its fullness in the redemption wrought by Christ Jesus.When he clean-
ses the temple (Mt 21:12-13 and par.), appealing to the words of v. 6 (along with
Jeremiah 7:11; cf. note on same), this prophecy will be fulfilled.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.


9 posted on 08/14/2011 5:16:57 AM PDT by kellynla ("Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." -- St Jerome)
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To: All

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God)

For: Sunday, August 14, 2011

Solemnity: Vigil of the Assumption of Mary

From: 1 Corinthians 15:54b-57

The manner of the resurrection of the dead


[54b] [When] the mortal puts on immortality, then shall come to pass the saying
that is written:
“Death is swallowed up in victory.”
[55] “O death, where is thy victory?
O death, where is thy sting?”
[56] The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law. [57] But thanks
be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

54-58. The chapter ends with the words of joy and thanksgiving to God for the tre-
mendous benefits bought by the death and resurrection of our Lord, benefits which
result from his victory over those enemies which had made man their slave – sin,
death and the devil. Jesus Christ, by dying on the cross – offering himself to God
the Father in atonement for all the offences of mankind – has conquered sin and
the devil, who attained power through sin. And his victory was completed by his
resurrection, which routed death. This has made it possible for his elect to be
raised in glory, and is the cause of their resurrection. “In Christ”, Bl. John Paul
II explains, “justice is done to sin at the price of his sacrifice, of his obedience
‘even to death’ (Phil 2:8). He who was without sin, ‘God made him to be sin for
our sake’ (2 Cor 5:21). Justice is also brought to bear upon death, which from the
beginning of man’s history has been allied to sin. Death has justice done to it at
the price of the death of the one who was without sin and who alone was able –
by means of his own death – to inflict death upon death (cf. 1 Cor 15:54f) […]. In
this way the cross, the Cross of Christ, in fact, makes us understand the deepest
roots of evil, which are fixed in sin and death; thus the Cross becomes an escha-
tological sign. Only in the eschatological fulfillment and definitive renewal of the
world will love conquer, in all the elect, the deepest sources of evil, bringing as its
fully mature fruit the kingdom of life and holiness and glorious immortality.

The foundation of this eschatological fulfillment is already contained in the Cross
of Christ and in his death. The fact that Christ ‘was raised the third day’ (1 Cor 15:
4) constitutes the final sign of the messianic mission, a sign that perfects the en-
tire revelation of merciful love in a world that is subject to evil. At the same time it
constitutes the sign that foretells ‘a new heaven and a new earth’ (Rev 21:1) when
God ‘will wipe away every tear from their eyes and death shall be no more, neither
shall there be mourning nor crying nor pain any more, for the former things have
passed away’ (Rev 21:4)” (Dives in misericordia, 8).

56-57 The Apostle here provides a summary of his teaching on the connections
between death, sin and the Mosaic Law, a teaching which is given in a much
more elaborate form in chaps 5-7 of his Letter to the Romans. Sin is the sting
of death in the sense that death entered the world through sin (cf. Rom 5:12) to
do harm to men. Sin, in its turn, grew as a result of and was reinforced by the
Mosaic Law: the Law did not induce people to sin but it was the occasion of in-
crease in sin in the sense that made it plainer where good lay and yet did not
provide the grace to enable man to avoid sin (cf. Commentary on 1 Cor, ad loc.).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.


10 posted on 08/14/2011 5:17:57 AM PDT by kellynla ("Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." -- St Jerome)
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To: All

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God)

For: Sunday, August 14, 2011

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

From: Romans 11:13-15, 29-32

The New Chosen People


[13] Now I am speaking to you Gentiles. Inasmuch then as I am an apostle to
the Gentiles, I magnify my ministry [14] in order to make my fellow Jews jealous,
and thus save some of them. [15] For if their rejection means the reconciliation
of the world, what will their acceptance mean but life from the dead?

The Conversion of the Jews (Continuation)


[29] For the gifts and the call of God are irrevocable. [30] Just as you were once
disobedient to God but now have received mercy because of their disobedience,
[31] so they have now been disobedient in order that by the mercy shown to you
they may also receive mercy. [32] For God has consigned all men to disobe-
dience, that he may have mercy upon all.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

25-32. We all yearn for the fulfillment of these words—threatening yet consoling —
which Christ addressed to the scribes and Pharisees: “For I tell you, you will not
see me again, until you say ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord”’
(Mt 23:39). “Together with the prophets and the Apostle, the Church awaits the
day, known to God alone, when all peoples will call on God with one voice and
‘serve him with one accord’ (Zeph 3:9)” (Vatican II, “Nostra Aetate”, 4). The con-
version of the Jews is a secret — a mystery, the text says (v. 25) — hidden in the
future, which will come about when the Incarnation of the Word achieves its
ultimate purpose.

This conversion will follow on that of the Gentiles, which will be as it were a pre-
lude to it. Jesus has foretold that “Jerusalem will be trodden down by the Gen-
tiles, until the times of the Gentiles are fulfilled” (Lk 21:24; cf. note on same),
which in some way suggests that the Jews will be converted at the end of time.

However, when the Church in its preaching touches on the main signs of the end
of the world, it only refers to the proclamation of the Gospel throughout the world,
to apostasy and to the Antichrist, but it has nothing to say about the conversion
of the Jews (cf. “St Pius V Catechism”, I, 8, 7). What the Church does do, and
what we should do, is to pray the Lord to listen to its prayers “that the people
you first made your own may arrive at the fullness of redemption” (”Roman Mis-
sal”, Good Friday Liturgy, Prayer of the Faithful).

“The same thing is happening, St Paul explains, now that the Gospel is being
preached. The people of Israel in general are not accepting it and are not beco-
ming part of the Church; only a small number of Jews have believed, and these
are the “remnant.’ of Israel, chosen by God so that in them the promises might
be kept. The conversion of Paul himself is an example and an earnest of this
return of the people of Israel to their God, in line with the invitation that Hosea
addressed to them: “Return, O Israel, to the Lord your God, for you have stum-
bled because of your iniquity” (Hos 14:2).

Throughout the history of the Church lapses of this type have occurred, with
a consequent breakdown in morality. Whenever this happens, those Christians
who stay true to the faith may, like Elijah, feel inclined to despair; but they should
react with a realistic and vigilant optimism and not indulge in useless lamentation.
In the presence of God, they should reflect on the fact that God actually wants to
use them and their holy lives to turn the situation around: “A secret, an open se-
cret: these world crises are sanctity crises. God wants a handful of men ‘of his
own’ in every human activity. And then...’”pax Christi in regno Christi”—the peace
of Christ in the kingdom of Christ” (St. J. Escriva, The Way, 301).

29. God never goes back on anything he promises; therefore he continues to call
the Jews to enter the chosen people. He does not take account of their disobe-
dience or their sins: he will love them with an everlasting love, as he promised the
patriarchs and in line with the merits accruing to them for their fidelity (cf. Rom 9:
4-5). It is this very immutability of God’s love that makes it possible for all Israel”
(v. 26) to be saved. God’s calling, which is eternal, cannot cease; but we for our
part can reject his call. The immutability of God’s plan is reassuring to us: it
means that even if we abandon him at any point, we can always return to our
earlier fidelity: he is still there, waiting for us.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.


11 posted on 08/14/2011 5:20:58 AM PDT by kellynla ("Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." -- St Jerome)
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To: All

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God)

For: Sunday, August 14, 2011

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time

From: Matthew 15:21-28

The Canaanite Woman


[21] And Jesus went away from there and withdrew to the district of Tyre and
Sidon. [22] And behold, a Canaanite woman from that region came out and
cried, “Have mercy on me, O Lord, Son of David; my daughter is severely pos-
sessed by a demon.” [23] But He did not answer her a word. And His disciples
came and begged Him, saying, “Send her away, for she is crying after us.” [24]
He answered, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” [25] But
she came and knelt before Him, saying, “Lord, help me.” [26] And He answered,
“It is not fair to take the children’s bread and throw it to the dogs.” [27] She said,
“Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their master’s table.”
[28] Then Jesus answered her, “O woman, great is your faith! Be it done for you
as you desire.” And her daughter was healed instantly.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

21-22. Tyre and Sidon were Phoenician cities on the Mediterranean coast, in
present-day Lebanon. They were never part of Galilee but they were near its
north-eastern border. In Jesus’ time they were outside the territory of Herod Anti-
pas. Jesus withdrew to this area to escape persecution from Herod and from the
Jewish authorities and to concentrate on training His Apostles.

Most of the inhabitants of the district of Tyre and Sidon were pagans. St. Mat-
thew calls this woman a “Canaanite”; according to Genesis (10:15), this district
was one of the first to be settled by the Canaanites; St. Mark describes the wo-
man as a “Syrophoenician” (Mark 7:26). Both Gospels point out that she is a
pagan, which means that her faith in our Lord is more remarkable; the same
applies in the case of the centurion (Matthew 8:5-13).

The Canaanite woman’s prayer is quite perfect: she recognizes Jesus as the
Messiah (the Son of David)—which contrasts with the unbelief of the Jews; she
expresses her need in clear, simple words; she persists, undismayed by obsta-
cles; and she expresses her request in all humility: “Have mercy on me.” Our
prayer should have the same qualities of faith, trust, perseverance and humility.

24. What Jesus says here does not take from the universal reference of His tea-
ching (cf. Matthew 28:19-20; Mark 16:15-16). Our Lord came to bring His Gos-
pel to the whole world, but He Himself addressed only the Jews; later on He will
charge His Apostles to preach the Gospel to pagans. St. Paul, in his missionary
journeys, also adopted the policy of preaching in the first instance to the Jews
(Acts 13:46).

25-28. This dialogue between Jesus and the woman is especially beautiful. By
appearing to be harsh He so strengthens the woman’s faith that she deserves
exceptional praise: “Great is your faith!” Our own conversation with Christ should
be like that: “Persevere in prayer. Persevere, even when your efforts seem barren.
Prayer is always fruitful” (St. J. Escriva, “The Way”, 101).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.


12 posted on 08/14/2011 5:21:52 AM PDT by kellynla ("Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." -- St Jerome)
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To: All

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God)

For: Sunday, August 14, 2011

Solemnity: Vigil of the Assumption of Mary

From: 1 Chronicles 15:3-4, 15-16; 16:1-2

Enthronement of the ark in Jerusalem


[3] And David assembled all Israel at Jerusalem, to bring up the ark of the Lord
to its place, which he had prepared for it. [4] And David gathered together the
sons of Aaron and the Levites. [15] And the Levites carried the ark of God upon
their shoulders with the poles, as Moses had commanded according to the word
of the Lord.

[16] David also commanded the chiefs of the Levites to appoint their brethren as
the singers who should play loudly on musical instruments, on harps and lyres
and cymbals, to raise sounds of joy.

The ark is placed in the tent


[1] And they brought the ark of God, and set it inside the tent which David had
pitched for it; and they offered burnt offerings and peace offerings before God. [2]
And when David had finished offering the burnt offerings and the peace offerings,
he blessed the people in the name of the Lord.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

15:1-24. The preparations for the transfer of the ark involve leading figures in the
life of the people and in the priesthood. Firstly, David himself, who makes arran-
gements about where it will be lodged (v. 1), calls the people together (v. 3), and
gives all the necessary instructions (vv. 4, 11-12, 16); secondly, the Levites, cho-
sen to be the only ones to carry the ark (vv. 2, 12) and organize the liturgical
chant (v. 19); thirdly, the priests, particularly those appointed by David – Zadok
and Abiathar (cf. 2 Sam 8:17; 15:24-27; 17:15; 19:12), who are sanctified along
with the Levites (vv. 11, 14); and finally the entire people gathered in liturgical
assembly.

The liturgy of the Church uses much of this passage in the Mass of the Vigil of
the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin, thereby teaching that Mary is the true ark
of the Covenant, the temple of God’s enduring Presence on earth. Apropos of
the Assumption, St John Damascene says, in a meaningful play on words, “To-
day, she who was the temple of the Lord is at rest in the divine temple that was
not built by human hand” (In Assumptionem, 2).

16:1-43. The Levites who brought the ark to Jerusalem are charged by David
himself with organizing the liturgy and its music. This definition of their role will
be a point of reference for those who succeed them, including those who were
alive when this book was written.

“To invoke, to thank and to praise the Lord” (v. 4), three essential elements of the
liturgy, are spelt out also in the psalm that follows. Invocation includes the joyful
remembrance of the wonders worked by the Lord (vv. 12, 15); thanksgiving means
acknowledging God in all his works (vv. 8, 34, 35); and praise of the Lord means
sharing in his glory, glorying in him (vv. 10, 25, 36). In Christian liturgy, as a res-
ponse of faith and love to the spiritual blessings God gives us, “the Church, uni-
ted with her Lord and ‘in the Holy Spirit (Lk 10:21), blesses the Father ‘for his in-
expressible gift (2 Cor 9:15) in her adoration, praise and thanksgiving” (Catechism
of the Catholic Church, 1083).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.


13 posted on 08/14/2011 5:23:09 AM PDT by kellynla ("Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." -- St Jerome)
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To: All

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God)

For: Sunday, August 14, 2011

Solemnity: Vigil of The Assumption of Mary

From: Luke 11:27-28

Responding to the Word of God


[27] As He (Jesus) said this, a woman in the crowd raised her voice and said to
Him, “Blessed is the womb that bore You, and the breasts that You sucked!”
[28] But He said, “Blessed rather are those who hear the word of God and keep
it!”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

27-28. These words proclaim and praise the Blessed Virgin’s basic attitude of
soul. As the Second Vatican Council explains: “In the course of her Son’s prea-
ching she [Mary] received the words whereby, in extolling a Kingdom beyond the
concerns and ties of flesh and blood, He declared blessed those who heard and
kept the word of God (cf. Mark 3:35; Luke 11:27-28) as she was faithfully doing
(cf. Luke 2:19-51)” (”Lumen Gentium”, 58). Therefore, by replying in this way
Jesus is not rejecting the warm praise this good lady renders His Mother; He ac-
cepts it and goes further, explaining that Mary is blessed particularly because
she has been good and faithful in putting the word of God into practice. “It was a
complement to His Mother on her “fiat”, ‘be it done’ (Luke 1:38). She lived it sin-
cerely, unstintingly, fulfilling its every consequence, but never amid fanfare, rather
in the hidden and silent sacrifice of each day” (St. J. Escriva, “Christ Is Passing
By”, 177). See the note on Luke 1:34-38.

[Note on Luke 1:34-38 states:

34-38. Commenting on this passage Bl. John Paul II said: “’Virgo fidelis’, the faith-
ful virgin. What does this faithfulness of Mary mean? What are the dimensions of
this faithfulness? The first dimension is called search. Mary was faithful first of
all when she began, lovingly, to seek the deep sense of God’s plan in her and for
the world. ‘Quomodo fiet?’ How shall this be?, she asked the Angel of the An-
nunciation [...].”

“The second dimension of faithfulness is called reception, acceptance. The ‘quo-
modo fiet?’ is changed, on Mary’s lips, to a ‘fiat’: Let it be done, I am ready, I ac-
cept. This is the crucial moment of faithfulness, the moment in which man per-
ceives that he will never completely understand the ‘how’: that there are in God’s
plan more areas of mystery than of clarity; that is, however he may try, he will
never succeed in understanding it completely [...].”

“The third dimension of faithfulness is consistency to live in accordance with what
one believes; to adapt one’s own life to the object of one’s adherence. To accept
misunderstanding, persecutions, rather than a break between what one practises
and what one believes: this is consistency [...].”

“But all faithfulness must pass the most exacting test, that of duration. Therefore,
the fourth dimension of faithfulness is constancy. It is easy to be consistent for
a day or two. It is difficult and important to be consistent for one’s whole life. It is
easy to be consistent in the hour of enthusiasm, it is difficult to be so in the hour
of tribulation. And only a consistency that lasts throughout the whole life can be
called faithfulness. Mary’s ‘fiat’ in the Annunciation finds its fullness in the silent
‘fiat’ that she repeats at the foot of the Cross” (”Homily in Mexico City Cathedral”,
26 January 1979).]

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.


14 posted on 08/14/2011 5:24:30 AM PDT by kellynla ("Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." -- St Jerome)
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To: All
Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time
15 posted on 08/14/2011 8:47:46 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Mass Readings


First reading Isaiah 56:1,6-7 ©
Thus says the Lord: Have a care for justice, act with integrity, for soon my salvation will come and my integrity be manifest.
  Foreigners who have attached themselves to the Lord to serve him and to love his name and be his servants – all who observe the sabbath, not profaning it, and cling to my covenant – these I will bring to my holy mountain. I will make them joyful in my house of prayer. Their holocausts and their sacrifices will be accepted on my altar, for my house will be called a house of prayer for all the peoples.

Psalm Psalm 66:2-3,5-6,8

Second reading Romans 11:13-15,29-32 ©
Let me tell you pagans this: I have been sent to the pagans as their apostle, and I am proud of being sent, but the purpose of it is to make my own people envious of you, and in this way save some of them. Since their rejection meant the reconciliation of the world, do you know what their admission will mean? Nothing less than a resurrection from the dead!
  God never takes back his gifts or revokes his choice.
  Just as you changed from being disobedient to God, and now enjoy mercy because of their disobedience, so those who are disobedient now – and only because of the mercy shown to you – will also enjoy mercy eventually. God has imprisoned all men in their own disobedience only to show mercy to all mankind.

Gospel Matthew 15:21-28 ©
Jesus left Gennesaret and withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon. Then out came a Canaanite woman from that district and started shouting, ‘Sir, Son of David, take pity on me. My daughter is tormented by a devil.’ But he answered her not a word. And his disciples went and pleaded with him. ‘Give her what she wants,’ they said ‘because she is shouting after us.’ He said in reply, ‘I was sent only to the lost sheep of the House of Israel.’ But the woman had come up and was kneeling at his feet. ‘Lord,’ she said ‘help me.’ He replied, ‘It is not fair to take the children’s food and throw it to the house-dogs.’ She retorted, ‘Ah yes, sir; but even house-dogs can eat the scraps that fall from their master’s table.’ Then Jesus answered her, ‘Woman, you have great faith. Let your wish be granted.’ And from that moment her daughter was well again.

16 posted on 08/14/2011 8:57:39 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
17 posted on 08/14/2011 8:59:01 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
18 posted on 08/14/2011 8:59:44 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.

19 posted on 08/14/2011 9:00:44 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


20 posted on 08/14/2011 9:01:36 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

21 posted on 08/14/2011 9:02:31 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

Psalm 109:8

    "Let his days be few; and let another take his place of leadership."

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


22 posted on 08/14/2011 9:04:19 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

August Devotion -- The Immaculate Heart [of Mary]

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. The month of August is traditionally dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. The physical heart of Mary is venerated (and not adored as the Sacred Heart of Jesus is) because it is united to her person: and as the seat of her love (especially for her divine Son), virtue, and inner life. Such devotion is an incentive to a similar love and virtue.

This devotion has received new emphasis in this century from the visions given to Lucy Dos Santos, oldest of the visionaries of Fatima, in her convent in Tuy, in Spain, in 1925 and 1926. In the visions Our Lady asked for the practice of the Five First Saturdays to help make amends for the offenses given to her heart by the blasphemies and ingratitude of men. The practice parallels the devotion of the Nine First Fridays in honor of the Sacred Heart.

On October 31, 1942, Pope Pius XII made a solemn Act of Consecration of the Church and the whole world to the Immaculate Heart. Let us remember this devotion year-round, but particularly through the month of August.

INVOCATIONS

O heart most pure of the Blessed Virgin Mary, obtain for me from Jesus a pure and humble heart.

Sweet heart of Mary, be my salvation.

ACT OF CONSECRATION
Queen of the most holy Rosary, help of Christians, refuge of the human race, victorious in all the battles of God, we prostrate ourselves in supplication before thy throne, in the sure hope of obtaining mercy and of receiving grace and timely aid in our present calamities, not through any merits of our own, on which we do not rely, but only through the immense goodness of thy mother's heart. In thee and in thy Immaculate Heart, at this grave hour of human history, do we put our trust; to thee we consecrate ourselves, not only with all of Holy Church, which is the mystical body of thy Son Jesus, and which is suffering in so many of her members, being subjected to manifold tribulations and persecutions, but also with the whole world, torn by discords, agitated with hatred, the victim of its own iniquities. Be thou moved by the sight of such material and moral degradation, such sorrows, such anguish, so many tormented souls in danger of eternal loss! Do thou, O Mother of mercy, obtain for us from God a Christ-like reconciliation of the nations, as well as those graces which can convert the souls of men in an instant, those graces which prepare the way and make certain the long desired coming of peace on earth. O Queen of peace, pray for us, and grant peace unto the world in the truth, the justice, and the charity of Christ.

Above all, give us peace in our hearts, so that the kingdom of God may spread its borders in the tranquillity of order. Accord thy protection to unbelievers and to all those who lie within the shadow of death; cause the Sun of Truth to rise upon them; may they be enabled to join with us in repeating before the Savior of the world: "Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men of good will."

Give peace to the nations that are separated from us by error or discord, and in a special manner to those peoples who profess a singular devotion toward thee; bring them back to Christ's one fold, under the one true Shepherd. Obtain full freedom for the holy Church of God; defend her from her enemies; check the ever-increasing torrent of immorality; arouse in the faithful a love of purity, a practical Christian life, and an apostolic zeal, so that the multitude of those who serve God may increase in merit and in number.

Finally, even as the Church and all mankind were once consecrated to the Heart of thy Son Jesus, because He was for all those who put their hope in Him an inexhaustible source of victory and salvation, so in like manner do we consecrate ourselves forever to thee also and to thy Immaculate Heart, O Mother of us and Queen of the world; may thy love and patronage hasten the day when the kingdom of God shall be victorious and all the nations, at peace with God .and with one another, shall call thee blessed and intone with thee, from the rising of the sun to its going down, the everlasting "Magnificat" of glory, of love, of gratitude to the Heart of Jesus, in which alone we can find truth, life, and peace. — Pope Pius XII

IN HONOR OF THE IMMACULATE HEART
O heart of Mary, mother of God, and our mother; heart most worthy of love, in which the adorable Trinity is ever well-pleased, worthy of the veneration and love of all the angels and of all men; heart most like to the Heart of Jesus, of which thou art the perfect image; heart, full of goodness, ever compassionate toward our miseries; deign to melt our icy hearts and grant that they may be wholly changed into the likeness of the Heart of Jesus, our divine Savior. Pour into them the love of thy virtues, enkindle in them that divine fire with which thou thyself dost ever burn. In thee let Holy Church find a safe shelter; protect her and be her dearest refuge, her tower of strength, impregnable against every assault of her enemies. Be thou the way which leads to Jesus, and the channel, through which we receive all the graces needful for our salvation. Be our refuge in time of trouble, our solace in the midst of trial, our strength against temptation, our haven in persecution, our present help in every danger, and especially) at the hour of death, when all hell shall let loose against u its legions to snatch away our souls, at that dread moment; that hour so full of fear, whereon our eternity depends. An,; then most tender virgin, make us to feel the sweetness of thy motherly heart, and the might of thine intercession with Jesus, and open to us a safe refuge in that very fountain of mercy, whence we may come to praise Him with thee in paradise, world without end. Amen.

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Sacred Heart Of Jesus

Sacred Heart Of Jesus image

Immaculate Heart of Mary

Immaculate Heart of Mary image

Blessed be the Most Loving Heart and Sweet Name of Our Lord Jesus Christ and the most glorious Virgin Mary, His Mother, in eternity and forever. Amen.

....Only the Heart of Christ who knows the depths of his Father's love could reveal to us the abyss of his mercy in so simple and beautiful a way ----From the Catechism. P:1439

From the depth of my nothingness, I prostrate myself before Thee, O Most Sacred, Divine and Adorable Heart of Jesus, to pay Thee all the homage of love, praise and adoration in my power.
Amen. - -
St. Margaret Mary Alacoque

The prayer of the Church venerates and honors the Heart of Jesus just as it invokes his most holy name. It adores the incarnate Word and his Heart which, out of love for men, he allowed to be pierced by our sins. Christian prayer loves to follow the way of the cross in the Savior's steps.-- >From the Catechism. P: 2669

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes) The Salutation to the Heart of Jesus and Mary

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)   An Offering of the Hearts of Jesus and Mary

 

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes) Novena Prayer to Sacred Heart  of Jesus

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes) Prayer to the Wounded Heart of Jesus

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  Act of Consecration to the Sacred Heart

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  Meditation & Novena Prayer on the Sacred Heart

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes) Beads to the Sacred Heart

 

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  Novena Prayer to the Immaculate Heart of Mary

 WB01539_.gif (682 bytes) A Solemn Act of Consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  The Daily Offering to the  Immaculate Heart of Mary

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  Exaltation of the Immaculate  Heart of Mary

WB01539_.gif (682 bytes)  Prayer to the Blessed Virgin

The Holy Heart of Mary Is, After the Heart of Jesus, the Most Exalted Throne of Divine Love
Let us recollect that God has given us the feast of the most pure Heart of the Blessed Virgin so that we may render on that day all the respect, honor and praise that we possibly can. To enkindle this spirit within us let us consider our motivating obligations.

The first is that we ought to love and honor whatever God loves and honors, and that by which He is loved and glorified. Now, after the adorable Heart of Jesus there has never been either in heaven or on earth, nor ever will be, a heart which has been so loved and honored by God, or which has given Him so much glory as that of Mary, the Mother of Jesus. Never has there been, nor will there ever be a more exalted throne of divine love. In that Heart divine love possesses its fullest empire, for it ever reigns without hindrance or interruption, and with it reign likewise all the laws of God, all the Gospel maxims and every Christian virtue.

This incomparable Heart of the Mother of our Redeemer is a glorious heaven, a Paradise of delights for the Most Holy Trinity. According to St. Paul, the hearts of the faithful are the dwelling place of our Lord Jesus Christ, and Jesus Christ Himself assures us that the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost take up Their abode in the hearts of those who love God. Who, therefore, can doubt that the Most Holy Trinity has always made His home and established the reign of His glory in an admirable and ineffable manner in the virginal Heart of her who is the Daughter of the Father, the Mother of the Son, the Spouse of the Holy Ghost, who herself loves God more than all other creatures together?

How much then are we not obliged to love this exalted and most lovable Heart?

St. John Eudes

Today: Immaculate Heart of Mary [DEVOTIONAL]
The Immaculate Heart of Mary [Devotional] Catholic/Orthodox Caucus

IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY THE MEANING OF THE WORD "HEART" (Catholic Caucus or by invitation only)
Devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
Saturdays and the Immaculate Heart of Mary [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
The Brown Scapular (Catholic Caucus)
The History of Consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Homilies preached by Father Robert Altier on the Feast of the Immaculate Heart of Mary
Marian Associations Unite to Celebrate Immaculate Heart
Solemnity Most Sacred Heart of Jesus and Immaculate Heart of Mary
FEAST OF THE IMMACULATE HEART OF MARY, AUGUST 22ND
Devotion to the Immaculate Heart of Mary

fatimamary.jpg (14780 bytes)7_sorrows.jpg (66800 bytes)ihm.jpg (15545 bytes)marylily.jpg (17424 bytes)maryjesus.jpg (16542 bytes)

23 posted on 08/14/2011 9:05:10 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

August 2011

Pope Benedict XVI's Intentions

General Intention: That the World Youth Day taking place in Madrid may encourage all the young people of the world to root and found their lives in Christ.

Missionary Intention: That Christians of the West, docile to the action of the Holy Spirit, may re-encounter the freshness and enthusiasm of their faith.


24 posted on 08/14/2011 9:06:05 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A saint's day is always superseded by the Sunday Liturgy.



Information:
St. Maximilian Mary Kolbe
Feast Day: August 14
Born:

7 January 1894 at Zdunska Wola, Poland

Died: August 14, 1941, Auschwitz concentration camp, Poland
Canonized: 10 October 1982, Rome, Italy by Pope John Paul II
Major Shrine: Basilica of the Immaculate Mediatrix of Grace, Niepokalanów, Poland
Patron of: 20th century, Pro-Life Movement, drug addiction, drug addicts, families, amateur radio


25 posted on 08/14/2011 9:09:54 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: sayuncledave
Matthew
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Matthew 15
21 And Jesus went from thence, and retired into the coasts of Tyre and Sidon. Et egressus inde Jesus secessit in partes Tyri et Sidonis. και εξελθων εκειθεν ο ιησους ανεχωρησεν εις τα μερη τυρου και σιδωνος
22 And behold a woman of Canaan who came out of those coasts, crying out, said to him: Have mercy on me, O Lord, thou son of David: my daughter is grieviously troubled by the devil. Et ecce mulier chananæa a finibus illis egressa clamavit, dicens ei : Miserere mei, Domine fili David : filia mea male a dæmonio vexatur. και ιδου γυνη χαναναια απο των οριων εκεινων εξελθουσα εκραυγασεν αυτω λεγουσα ελεησον με κυριε υιε δαυιδ η θυγατηρ μου κακως δαιμονιζεται
23 Who answered her not a word. And his disciples came and besought him, saying: Send her away, for she crieth after us: Qui non respondit ei verbum. Et accedentes discipuli ejus rogabant eum dicentes : Dimitte eam : quia clamat post nos. ο δε ουκ απεκριθη αυτη λογον και προσελθοντες οι μαθηται αυτου ηρωτων αυτον λεγοντες απολυσον αυτην οτι κραζει οπισθεν ημων
24 And he answering, said: I was not sent but to the sheep that are lost of the house of Israel. Ipse autem respondens ait : Non sum missus nisi ad oves, quæ perierunt domus Israël. ο δε αποκριθεις ειπεν ουκ απεσταλην ει μη εις τα προβατα τα απολωλοτα οικου ισραηλ
25 But she came and adored him, saying: Lord, help me. At illa venit, et adoravit eum, dicens : Domine, adjuva me. η δε ελθουσα προσεκυνησεν αυτω λεγουσα κυριε βοηθει μοι
26 Who answering, said: It is not good to take the bread of the children, and to cast it to the dogs. Qui respondens ait : Non est bonum sumere panem filiorum, et mittere canibus. ο δε αποκριθεις ειπεν ουκ εστιν καλον λαβειν τον αρτον των τεκνων και βαλειν τοις κυναριοις
27 But she said: Yea, Lord; for the whelps also eat of the crumbs that fall from the table of their masters. At illa dixit : Etiam Domine : nam et catelli edunt de micis quæ cadunt de mensa dominorum suorum. η δε ειπεν ναι κυριε και γαρ τα κυναρια εσθιει απο των ψιχιων των πιπτοντων απο της τραπεζης των κυριων αυτων
28 Then Jesus answering, said to her: O woman, great is thy faith: be it done to thee as thou wilt: and her daughter was cured from that hour. Tunc respondens Jesus, ait illi : O mulier, magna est fides tua : fiat tibi sicut vis. Et sanata est filia ejus ex illa hora. τοτε αποκριθεις ο ιησους ειπεν αυτη ω γυναι μεγαλη σου η πιστις γενηθητω σοι ως θελεις και ιαθη η θυγατηρ αυτης απο της ωρας εκεινης

(*) τοις κυναριοις -- "to the dogs". It is sometime remarked that κυναριοι is really more like "puppies". However, I have it on the authority of my former priest, a biblical scholar, that the diminutive was not contemplated in this passage.

26 posted on 08/14/2011 10:38:35 AM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
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To: annalex
21. Then Jesus went thence, and departed into the coasts of Tyre and Sidon.
22. And, behold, a woman of Canaan came out of the same coasts, and cried to him, saying, Have mercy on me, O Lord, you Son of David; my daughter is grievously vexed with a devil.
23. But he answered her not a word. And his disciples came and besought him, saying, Send her away, for she cries after us.
24. But he answered and said, I am not sent but to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.
25. Then came she and worshipped him, saying, Lord, help me.
26. But he answered and said, It is not meet to take the children's bread, and to cast it to dogs.
27. And she said, Truth, Lord: yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their masters' table.
28. Then Jesus answered and said to her, O woman, great is your faith: be it to you even as you will. And her daughter was made whole from that very hour.

JEROME; Leaving the Scribes and Pharisees and those cavilers, He passes into the parts of Tyre and Sidon, that He may heal the Tyrians and Sidonians; And Jesus went thence, and departed into the coasts of Tyre and Sidon.

REMIG; Tyre and Sidon were Gentile towns, for Tyre was the metropolis of the Chananaeans, and Sidon the boundary of the Chananaeans towards the north.

CHRYS; It should be observed, that when He delivered the Jews from the observance of meats, He then also opened the door to the Gentiles, as Peter was first bidden in the vision to break this law, and was afterwards sent to Cornelius. But if any should ask, how it is that He bade His disciples go not into the way of the Gentiles, and yet now Himself walks this way; we will answer, first, that that precept which He had given His disciples was not obligatory on Him; secondly, that He went not to preach, whence Mark even says, that He purposely concealed Himself.

REMIG; He went that He might heal them of Tyre and Sidon; or that He might deliver this woman's daughter from the demon, and so through her faith might condemn the wickedness of the Scribes and Pharisees. Of this woman it proceeds And, behold, a woman, a Chananite, came out from those parts.

CHRYS; The Evangelist says that she was a Chananaean, to show the power of Christ's presence. For this nation, which had been driven out that they might not corrupt the Jews, now showed themselves wiser than the Jews, leaving their own borders that they might go to Christ. And when she came to Him, she asked only for mercy, as it follows, She cried to Him, saying, Have mercy on me, Lord, you Son of David.

GLOSS; The great faith of this Chananaean woman is herein showed. She believes Him to be God, in that she calls Him Lord; and man, in that she calls Him Son of David. She claims nothing of her own desert, but craves only God's mercy. And she says not, Have mercy on my daughter, but Have mercy on me; because the affliction of the daughter is the affliction of the mother. And the more to excite His compassion, she declares to Him the whole of her grief, My daughter is grievously vexed by a demon; thus unfolding to the Physician the wound and the extent and nature of the disease; its extent, when she says is grievously vexed; its nature, by a demon.

CHRYS; Note the wisdom of this woman, in she went not to men who promised fair, she sought not useless bandages, but leaving all devilish charms, she came to the Lord. She asked not James, she did not pray John, or apply to Peter, but putting herself under the protection of penitence, she ran alone to the Lord. But, behold, a new trouble. She makes her petition, raising her voice into a shout, and God, the lover of mankind, answers not a word.

JEROME; Not from pharisaic pride, or the superciliousness of the Scribes, but that He might not seem to contravene His own decision, Go not into the way of the Gentiles. For He was unwilling to give occasion to their cavils, and reserved the complete salvation of the Gentiles for the season of His passion and resurrection.

GLOSS; And by this delay in answering, He shows us the patience and perseverance of this woman. And He answered not for this reason also, that the disciples might petition for her; showing herein that the prayers of the Saints are necessary in order to obtain any thing; as it follows, And his disciples came to him, saying, Send her away, for she cries after us.

JEROME; The disciples, as yet ignorant of the mysteries of God or moved by compassion, beg for this Chananean woman; or perhaps seeking to be rid of her importunity.

AUG; A question of discrepancy is raised upon this, that Mark says the Lord was in the house when the woman came praying for her daughter. Indeed Matthew might; have been understood to have omitted mention of the house and yet to have been relating the same event; but when he says, that the disciples suggested to the Lord, Send her away, for she cries after us, he seems to indicate clearly that the woman raised her voice in supplication, in following the Lord who was walking. We must understand then, that as Mark writes, she entered in where Jesus was, that is, as he had noticed above, in the house; then, that as Matthew writes, He answered her not a word, and during this silence of both sides, Jesus left the house; and then the rest follows without any discordance.

CHRYS; I judge that the disciples were sorry for the woman's affliction, yet dared not say, Grant her this mercy, but only Send her away as we, when we would persuade any one, oftentimes say the very contrary to what we wish. He answered and said, I am not sent but to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.

JEROME; He says that He is not sent to the Gentiles but that He is sent first to Israel, so that when they would not receive the Gospel, the passing over to the Gentiles might have just cause.

REMIG; In this way also He was sent specially to the Jews, because He taught them by His bodily presence.

JEROME; And He adds of the house of Israel, with this design, that we might rightly interpret by this place that other parable concerning the stray sheep.

CHRYS; But when the woman saw that the Apostles had no power, she became bold with commendable boldness; for before she had not dared to come before His sight but, as it is said, She cries after us. But when it seemed that she must now retire without being relieved, she came nearer, But she came and worshipped him.

JEROME; Note how perseveringly this Chananaean woman calls Him first Son of David, then Lord, and lastly came and worshipped him, as God.

CHRYS; And therefore she said not Ask, or Pray God for me, but Lord, help me. But the more the woman urged her petition, the more He strengthened His denial; for He calls the Jews now not sheep but sons, and the Gentiles dogs; He answered and said to her, It is not meet to take the children's bread, and give it to dogs.

GLOSS; The Jews were born sons, and brought up by the Law in the worship of one God. The bread is the Gospel, its miracles and other things which pertain to our salvation. It is not then meet that these should be taken from the children and given to the Gentiles, who are dogs, till the Jews refuse them.

JEROME; The Gentiles are called dogs because of their idolatry; who, given to the eating of blood, and dead bodies, turn to madness.

CHRYS; Observe this woman's prudence; she does not dare to contradict Him, nor is she vexed with the commendation of the Jews, and the evil word applied to herself; But she said, Yea, Lord, yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their masters' table. He said, It is not good; she answers, 'Yet even so, Lord;' He calls the Jews children, she calls them masters; He called her a dog, she accepts the office of a dog; as if she had said, I cannot leave the table of my Lord.

JEROME; Wonderful are shown the faith, patience, and humility of this woman; faith, that she believed that her daughter could be healed; patience, that so many times overlooked, she yet perseveres in her prayers; humility, that she compares herself not to the dogs, but to the whelps. I know, she says, that I do not deserve the children's bread, and that I cannot have whole meat, nor sit at the table with the master of the house, but I am content with that which is left for the whelps, that through humble fragments I may come to the amplitude of the perfect bread.

CHRYS; This was the cause why Christ was so backward, that He knew what she would say, and would not have her so great excellence hid; whence it follows, Then Jesus answered and said to her, O woman, great is your faith, be it to you according to your will. Observe how the woman herself had contributed not a little to her daughter's healing; and therefore Christ said not to her, 'Let your daughter be healed', but, Be it to you according to your will; that you may perceive that she had spoken in sincerity, and that her words were not words of flattery, but of abundant faith. And this word of Christ is like that word which said, Let there be a firmament and it was made; so here, And her daughter was made whole from that hour. Observe how she obtains what the Apostles could not obtain for her; so great a thing is the earnestness of prayer. He would rather that we should pray for our own offenses ourselves, than that others should pray for us.

REMIG; In these words is given us a pattern of catechizing and baptizing children; for the woman says not 'Heal my daughter,' or 'Help her,' but, Have mercy upon me, and help me. Thus there has come down in the Church the practice that the faithful are sponsors to God for their young children, before they have attained such age and reason that they can themselves make any pledge to God. So that as by this woman's faith her daughter was healed, so by the faith of Catholics of mature age their sins might be forgiven to infants. Allegorically; This woman figures the Holy Church gathered out of the Gentiles. The Lord leaves the Scribes and Pharisees, and comes into the parts of Tyre and Sidon; this figures His leaving the Jews and going over to the Gentiles. This woman came out of her own country, because the Holy Church departed from former errors and sins.

JEROME; And the daughter of this Chananean I suppose to be the souls of believers who were sorely vexed by a demon, not knowing their Creator, and bowing down to stones.

REMIG; Those of whom the Lord speaks as children are the Patriarchs and Prophets of that time. By the table is signified the Holy Scripture, by the fragments the best precepts, or inward mysteries on which Holy Church feeds; by the crumbs the carnal precepts which the Jews keep. The fragments are said to be eaten under the table, because the Church submits itself humbly to fulfilling the Divine commands.

RABAN; But the whelps eat not the crust only, but the crumbs of the children's bread, because the despised among the Gentiles on turning to the faith, seek out in Scripture not the outside of the letter, but the spiritual sense, by which they may be able to profit in good acts.

JEROME; Wonderful change of things! Once Israel the son, and we the dogs; the change in faith has led to a change in the order of our names. Concerning them is said, Many dogs have come about me; while to us is said, as to this woman, your faith has made you whole.

RABAN; Great indeed was her faith; for the Gentiles, neither trained in the Law, nor educated by the words of the Prophets, straightway on the preaching of the Apostles obeyed with the hearing of the ear, and therefore deserved to obtain salvation.

GLOSS; And if the Lord delays the salvation of a soul at the first tears of the supplicating Church, we ought not to despair, or to cease from our prayers, but rather continue them earnestly.

AUG; And that to heal the Centurion's servant, and the daughter of this Chananean woman, He does not go to their houses, signifies that the Gentiles, among whom He Himself went not, should be saved by His word. That these are healed on the prayer of their parents, we must understand of the Church, which is at once mother and children; the whole body of those who make up the Church is the mother, and each individual of that body is a son of that mother.

HILARY; Or, This mother represents the proselytes, in that she leaves her own country, and forsakes the Gentiles for the name of another nation; she prays for her daughter, that is, the body of the Gentiles possessed with unclean spirits; and having learned the Lord by the Law, calls Him the Son of David.

RABAN; Also whosoever has his conscience polluted with the defilement of any sin, has a daughter sorely vexed by a demon. Also whosoever has defiled any good that he has done by the plague of sin, has a daughter tossed by the furies of an unclean spirit, and has need to fly to prayers and tears, and to seek the intercessions and aids of the saints.

Catena Aurea Matthew 15
27 posted on 08/14/2011 10:39:12 AM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
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To: annalex


The Canaanite Woman

Jean Colombe

Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry
Illumination
1485-89
Musée Condé, Chantilly

28 posted on 08/14/2011 10:40:06 AM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
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To: All
The Priest Who Knew St. Maximilian Kolbe
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] No Greater Love (Meditation on St Maximilian Kolbe)
St. Maximilian Kolbe, priest and martyr, (1894-1941) [Catholic Caucus]

Maximillian Kolbe, Apostle of Mary [Catholic Caucus]
Saint Maximilian Kolbe's 'Secret' Weapon (Catholic Caucus)
[Father Maximillian Mary] Kolbe, Saint of Auschwitz
The Crusade of Mary Immaculate - St. Maximilian Kolbe (Catholic Caucus)
Poland: Auschwitz martyr Kolbe remembered
The Man Who Stepped Out of Line (St. Maximilian Kolbe and Christian Masculinity)
St. Maximilian Kolbe VOLUNTEERED To Be Starved To Death; Terri Schiavo Did NOT
St Maximilian Kolbe-Priest, Martyr, Saint
August 14 - Memorial, St. Maximilian Mary Kolbe
Blessed[Saint]Maximilian Kolbe-Priest Hero Of A Death

29 posted on 08/14/2011 2:01:38 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe, Priest & Martyr

Saint Maximilian Mary Kolbe,
Priest & Martyr
Memorial
August 14th


Photo

St. Maximillian was born in the Poland in 1894. He entered the novitiate of the Conventual Franciscans in 1910. In 1914 and three years later help organized the association The Militia of the Immaculate Virgin Mary. He was ordained in Rome in 1918. In 1922, he began publishing the magazine, "Knight of the Immaculate," first in Polish and then in other languages.

In 1927, he began building a whole town with property donated by a wealthy nobleman, called the "Town of the Immaculate," outside of Warsaw. There he began training people with vocations among the laity and prospective Religious and Priests, to become apostles of Mary. The first Marian Missionaries to Japan were trained in the "Town of the Immaculate." In 1930, Maximillian opened a Marian publication apostolate in Nagasaki, Japan one of the two cities in Japan which would later be ravaged by a nuclear bomb during the Second World War. As popes have been saying ever since, God chose His most faithful people as a sacrifice to insure future peace in the world.

In 1939, Maximillian was arrested by the Nazis who had taken over Poland and sent to Auschwitz. Two years later, in July of 1941, at Block Fourteen, where Saint Maximilian was being kept, revealed that a prisoner had escaped. The policy was to assemble all the prisoners from the block in the yard where they would stand at attention the whole day. If, by the end of the day, the escapee had not been recovered, ten others would be chosen at random to die in his place.

By three o'clock the prisoner was still not found. One of the ten chosen to die was Francis Gajowniczek. Mr. Gajowniczek cried out, "My poor wife, my poor children! What will happen to my family!" That is when Fr. Kolbe came forward, asked to exchange places with Gajowniczek and took the place of the condemned man.

Father Kolbe was sent to the starvation bunker. He lead those with him in prayer. After two weeks, he was still alive. On the morning of August 14, 1941 a lethal dose of carbolic acid was injected into him.

He was canonized by Pope John Paul II on October 10, 1982.


 

Collect:
Gracious God,
you filled your priest and martyr,
St. Maximilian Kolbe,
with zeal for souls
and love for his neighbor.
Through the prayer of this devoted servant of Mary Immaculate,
grant that in our efforts to serve others for your glory
we too may become like Christ your Son,
who loved his own in the world even to the end,
and now lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

 

First Reading: Wisdom 3:1-9
But the souls of the righteous are in the hand of God,
and no torment will ever touch them.
In the eyes of the foolish they seemed to have died,
and their departure was thought to be an affliction,
and their going from us to be their destruction;
but they are at peace.
For though in the sight of men they were punished,
their hope is full of immortality.
Having been disciplined a little,
they will receive great good,
because God tested them and found them worthy of Himself;
like gold in the furnace He tried them,
and like a sacrificial burnt offering He accepted them.
In the time of their visitation they will shine forth,
and will run like sparks through the stubble.
They will govern nations and rule over peoples,
and the Lord will reign over them for ever.
Those who trust in Him will understand truth,
and the faithful will abide with Him in love,
because grace and mercy are upon His elect,
and He watches over His holy ones.


Alternative First Reading 1John 3:14-18
We know that we have passed out of death into life, because we love the brethren. He who does not love abides in death. Any one who hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life abiding in him. By this we know love, that He laid down His life for us; and we ought to lay down our lives for the brethren. But if any one has the world's goods and sees his brother in need, yet closes his heart against him, how does God's love abide in him? Little children, let us not love in word or speech but in deed and in truth.


Gospel Reading John 15:12-16
"This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. Greater love has no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. You are my friends if you do what I command you. No longer do I call you servants, for the servant does not know what his master is doing; but I have called you friends, for all that I have heard from my Father I have made known to you. You did not choose me, but I chose you and appointed you that you should go and bear fruit and that your fruit should abide; so that whatever you ask the Father in my name, he may give it to you.



Militia Immaculata Prayer of Marian Consecration
(Composed by St. Maximilian Kolbe)

O Immaculata, Queen of Heaven and earth, refuge of sinners and our most loving Mother, God has willed to entrust the entire order of mercy to you. I, (name), a repentant sinner, cast myself at your feet, humbly imploring you to take me with all that I am and have, wholly to yourself as your possession and property. Please make of me, of all my powers of soul and body, of my whole life, death and eternity, whatever most pleases you.

If it pleases you, use all that I am and have without reserve, wholly to accomplish what was said of you: "She will crush your head," and "You alone have destroyed all heresies in the whole world." Let me be a fit instrument in your immaculate and merciful hands for introducing and increasing your glory to the maximum in all the many strayed and indifferent souls, and thus help extend as far as possible the blessed kingdom of the most Sacred Heart of Jesus. For wherever you enter you obtain the grace of conversion and growth in holiness, since it is through your hands that all graces come to us from the most Sacred Heart of Jesus.

V. Allow me to praise you, O Sacred Virgin
R. Give me strength against your enemies


Related Link on the Vatican Website:

Benedict XVI, General Audience, Papal Summer Residence, Castel Gandolfo, Wednesday, 13 August 2008, St Edith Stein and St Maximilian Mary Kolbe


30 posted on 08/14/2011 2:05:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Maximilian Kolbe

St. Kolbe
Feast Day: August 14
Born: 1894 :: Died: 1941

Raymond Kolbe was born in Poland. When he was just a teenager, he joined the Franciscan order and took the name Maximilian. Maximilian loved his work and enjoyed studying to become a priest, and he especially loved the Blessed Mother.

Before he became a priest, he started the Militia of Mary Immaculate or the Immaculata Movement devoted to Our Lady.

Then when he took his vows to become a priest he added "Mary" to his name. Father Maximilian Mary knew that the world which was so full of sin, needed their Heavenly Mother to guide and protect them.

He started a magazine called "The Knight of the Immaculata" so that more people would know about Mother Mary. He and his Franciscan priests published two monthly newsletters that were sent to people around the world.

The Mother of God blessed Father Maximilian's work. He built a large center in Poland. This center was called "City of the Immaculate."

In about fifteen years, a large community of eight hundred Franciscans lived there and worked hard to make the love of Mary known. Father Kolbe also started another City of the Immaculate in Nagasaki, Japan and yet another one in India.

In 1938, the Nazis invaded the Polish City of the Immaculate. They stopped the wonderful work going on there. In 1941, the Nazis arrested Father Kolbe. They sentenced him to hard manual labor at Auschwitz.

Three months after he arrived at Auschwitz a prisoner managed to escape. The Nazis became very angry and decided to punish the rest of the prisoners.

They decided to choose ten prisoners and put them in a bunker without food or water so that they would starve to death. All the prisoners stood straight, while ten men were pulled out of line.

One prisoner they chose was a married man with a family. He begged and pleaded to be spared for the sake of his children. Father Kolbe, who was listening, felt deeply moved and decided to help that suffering prisoner. He stepped forward and asked the commander if he could take the man's place. The commander agreed.

Father Kolbe and the other prisoners were sent into the bunker and they remained alive without food or water for many days. One by one, as they died, Father Kolbe helped and comforted them. He was the last to die on August 14, 1941.


31 posted on 08/14/2011 2:10:38 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday, August 14, 2011
Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Isaiah 56:1, 6-7
Psalm 67:2-3, 5-6, 8
Romans 11:13-15, 29-32
Matthew 15:21-28

The only reason for my being killed is that I have taught the doctrine of Christ. I thank God it is for this reason that I die. I believe that I am telling the truth before I die. I know you believe me and I want to say to you all once again: Ask Christ to help you become happy. I obey Christ. After Christ's example, I forgive my persecutors. I do not hate them. I ask God to have pity on all, and I hope my blood will fall on my fellow men as a fruitful rain.

-- St Paul Miki



32 posted on 08/14/2011 2:14:35 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


33 posted on 08/14/2011 2:16:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Foreign Woman Who Stopped Jesus in His Tracks, Biblical Reflection for the 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time A by Father Thomas Rosica, CSB

The Foreign Woman Who Stopped Jesus in His Tracks


Biblical Reflection for the 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time A

By Father Thomas Rosica, CSB

TORONTO, AUG. 9, 2011 (Zenit.org).- Today's watershed Gospel story of Jesus' meeting with the Syro-Phoenician woman (Matthew 15:21-28) presents us with a break in Jesus' usual procedure of ministering only to Israelites and anticipates his great mission to the Gentiles. Jesus' provocative encounter with the woman is set outside the land of Israel in the territory of Tyre and Sidon (near Beirut in modern-day Lebanon).

The woman's commanding presence

Let us look closely at the story. This foreign woman approaches a Jewish man, does him homage and begs a favor she has no right to. She bursts into Jesus' space and pleads with him: "Lord, son of David, have pity on me! My daughter is terribly troubled by a demon." She commands Jesus' attention to her very personal and specific request to help her daughter. 

Jesus refuses to give in to the disciples' pleading to remove this nuisance from their midst. He refuses to act on their reasoning. Instead, he directs the discussion in a way that the woman ought to accept his hesitation to cure. He says quite forcefully: "I am a stranger here; I should not interfere." Is this out of character, or perhaps is Jesus merely testing her? Or in the worst case, is he just profoundly rude, insensitive, and harsh?

"Help me!" the woman pleads. Jesus' next words seem excessively harsh: "It is not right to take the food of children and throw it to the dogs!" "Dogs" was a term used for outsiders who encroach upon another's holy place. It is an insult, a metaphor that sees others not as human beings, but as animals eating leftovers. We have every good reason to be troubled and even scandalized at Jesus' terrible rudeness to this needy woman.   

2 needy people meet

Both Jesus and the woman are outside of their native territories. Both are looking for something, both are in need, both are strangers to the area and to one another. They are different in race, nationality, gender, religion, and probably in politics, economics and spirituality as well. Is it not true that our reactions to this story most frequently center on Jesus: what he's doing and saying (or not doing or saying) and why? It is disturbing that Jesus doesn't respond to her in the right way. The disciples view her intervention as a problem; they do not wish to be caught up in something that has nothing to do with them or with Jesus.  

A longing for an ordinary life

Let us consider for a moment the reactions and purposes of the woman and of Jesus. The Syro-Phoenician woman is desperate, along with her daughter who suffers from a demon -- a disease that isolates and makes people afraid and causes others to assume that they have sinned. Does she fear that her daughter's illness is connected to something she has done or failed to do? Does she fear a pagan deity who deals with everyone vindictively? This woman and her sick daughter have a need to live an ordinary life -- without being tormented. How much have she and her daughter suffered from the mean talk and dismissive glances of her neighbors and friends? How great was their exclusion from their society because of the daughter's condition?

A deeper understanding of Jesus' mission

Jesus seems impatient and annoyed at being interrupted. Can it be that the Messiah has prejudices, nationalistic tendencies, and problems with those who aren't Jews? Was Jesus affected by being born in a specific locality, time frame, history and cultural background? He was truly divine and human, yet as a human being like us, he struggled with the sense of who he is: a prophet sent to the lost sheep of the house of Israel and the dawning of the difficult and painful realization that they do not want him; they were not listening, and were even beginning to reject and oppose him and his message. His identity as a prophet, a preacher, a teacher and as Messiah, was clearly at stake.

2 worlds collide

These two strangers have much in common in that both Jesus and the woman live on behalf of others. They are both hurting; both are looking for help, insight, and a way to survive in their respective worlds. Both are seeking and looking for acceptance, hope, a future and some compassion. The woman has a mother's love for her child, and Jesus, the prophet, bears God's love for all God's children. In this unique Gospel encounter, the world of the troubled woman whose daughter is dying and the world of Jesus, the Jewish prophet who is being rejected, collide. There are profound lessons in today's Gospel account. It is the promise of an ever-deepening identity not just for Jesus, but also for Matthew's community and for the Church throughout the ages that listens to his story that is truly Good News.

Breaking down barriers

The Syro-Phoenician calls Jesus Lord, refers to him as master, and humbly says that she, like dogs at the table in the household, will gladly take the leftovers of his mission and power. She receives from him what his own people will not accept. And Jesus is astounded at her faith (28). This woman stopped Jesus in his divine tracks and forced him to rethink his whole mission to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. Together they broke down the barrier that existed between them.

The courageous heroine of today's story could not accept the premise that salvation did not include all people. She is allowed to participate in the messianic salvation that is offered to all who believe in the Lord and keep his commandments, regardless of origin or social condition. She proclaims that the love of God cannot be bound.

Jesus' universal mission and message

In Jesus, the prophetic words of Isaiah in today's first reading (Isaiah 56:1, 6-7) are realized: "The foreigners who join themselves to the LORD, ministering to him, loving the name of the LORD, and becoming his servants -- all who keep the Sabbath free from profanation and hold to my covenant, them I will bring to my holy mountain and make joyful in my house of prayer; their burnt offerings and sacrifices will be acceptable on my altar, for my house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples."

Immediately following this Gospel scene, Jesus crosses over to the other side of the lake. Now his mission is to the world -- to all peoples of the earth and all the lost children of God. Because of the Syro-Phoenician woman's persistence, Jesus gains new insights into universalism, love, and service and extends his mission past his own people, his own religion, his own nation.

Any encounter or understanding of the Word changes our way of seeing God, of relating to him and to others. Who knows what will happen to us when we open ourselves up to God and allow his Word to work within us? We will meet strangers and outsiders who interrupt our lives, stop us in our tracks, and force us to ask deeper questions. We may end up, like Jesus, praising the still greater faith in strangers and outsiders.

Paul glories in his ministry

In today's second reading from St. Paul's letter to the Romans (11:13-15, 29-32) the unbelief of the Jews has paved the way for the preaching of the gospel to the Gentiles and for their easier acceptance of it outside the context of Jewish culture. Through his mission to the Gentiles, Paul also hopes to fill his fellow Jews with jealousy. Therefore he hastens to fill the entire Mediterranean world with the gospel. In God's design, Israel's unbelief is being used to grant the light of faith to the Gentiles. Meanwhile, Israel remains dear to God, always the object of special providence, the mystery of which will one day be revealed. Israel, together with the Gentiles who have been handed over to all manner of vices (Romans 1), has been delivered … to disobedience. The conclusion of Romans 11:32 repeats the thought of Romans 5:20, "Where sin increased, grace overflowed all the more."

Being Christian means being missionary

In the Lineamenta (preparatory document) for next October's synod of bishops on the new evangelization, one passage resonated clearly with today's provocative Gospel story. Under section No. 10 "The First Evangelization Pastoral Solicitude and the New Evangelization," we read:

"The missionary mandate which concludes the Gospel (Mk 16:15ff; Mt 28:19ff; Lk 24:48ff; Acts 1:8) is far from being fully carried out; it has simply entered a new phase. Pope John Paul II stated that 'the boundaries between pastoral care of the faithful, new evangelization and specific missionary activity are not clearly definable, and it is unthinkable to create barriers between them or to put them into watertight compartments. [...] The Churches in traditionally Christian countries, for example, involved as they are in the challenging task of new evangelization, are coming to understand more clearly that they cannot be missionaries to non-Christians in other countries and continents, unless they are seriously concerned about the non-Christians at home. Hence missionary activity ad intra is a credible sign and a stimulus for missionary activity ad extra, and vice versa.' Being Christian and 'being Church' means being missionary; one is or is not. Loving one's faith implies bearing witness to it, bringing it to others and allowing others to participate in it. The lack of missionary zeal is a lack of zeal for the faith. On the contrary, faith is made stronger by transmitting it."

The Pope's words on the new evangelization can be translated into a rather direct and crucial question: "Are we interested in transmitting the faith and bringing non-Christians to the faith?" "Are we truly missionary at heart?"

Questions for reflection this week

1) How does the Church fulfill her missionary role of taking part in people's everyday lives, "in the midst of the homes of her sons and daughters"?

2) How has the new evangelization been able to revitalize and reanimate the first evangelization or the pastoral programs already taking place? How has the new evangelization helped to overcome the weariness and toil arising in the everyday life of our local Churches?

* * *

[The readings for Aug. 14 are Isaiah 56:1, 6-7; Psalm 67:2-3, 5, 6, 8; Romans 11:13-15, 29-32; and Matthew 15:21-28]


34 posted on 08/14/2011 6:00:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Work of God

 Woman, you have great faith Catholic Gospels - Homilies - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit

Year A

 -  20th Sunday in ordinary time

Woman, you have great faith

Woman, you have great faith Catholic Gospels - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit Matthew 15:21-28

21 Jesus left that place and went away to the district of Tyre and Sidon.
22 Just then a Canaanite woman from that region came out and started shouting, "Have mercy on me, Lord, Son of David; my daughter is tormented by a demon."
23 But he did not answer her at all. And his disciples came and urged him, saying, "Send her away, for she keeps shouting after us."
24 He answered, "I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel."
25 But she came and knelt before him, saying, "Lord, help me."
26 He answered, "It is not fair to take the children's food and throw it to the dogs."
27 She said, "Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters' table."
28 Then Jesus answered her, "Woman, great is your faith! Let it be done for you as you wish." And her daughter was healed instantly.
(NRSV)

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

20th Sunday in ordinary time - Woman, you have great faith I reward faith, therefore have faith in me. I came to my own people and they rejected me, with the exception of the humble, who recognized the value of the gift from God. Only those open to the Holy Spirit accepted me as the son of David, the Messiah who was empowered to save the people of God.

All my miracles were granted to those who had faith; I wanted to impress upon everyone the importance of believing in me the Son of the Living God. It is only by accepting me that you can accept the Heavenly Father, it is only by believing in me and having faith in me, that even now you can expect the power of God to manifest in your life through a miracle.

Miracles are not as popular now as in my time, because there is no faith. To pray for a miracle is the perfect prayer, but it must come from a heart full of faith, otherwise the petition remains a prayer and is not answered as a miracle.

Many people during the profession of my healing ministry were attracted to me by my miracles, not by their faith; they were curious people in search of the supernatural. However there was also a large number of people who were genuine, they accepted the dignity of my presence among them, they firmly believed in the power of God at my disposal and they merited all the miracles that I performed.

It is in my power to grant any petition I like, but I desire to cultivate faith in human hearts. A prayer to me is most attractive when it comes from a humble and contrite heart. If I were to grant miracles for every petition, men would become very proud and would sin thinking that they had the power to control God’s power.

The true saint prays very humbly for a miracle, echoing my prayer in Gethsemane, “Father, not my will, but yours be done”. The man of faith puts all his trust in the Lord, not in his human effort, and he is prepared to give all the credit to God for every good thing that he receives.

The one who desires a miracle must first acknowledge that he is not worthy to be in my presence, and that he does not even deserve to be heard. Yet, by confessing his sinfulness, his unworthiness, and by acknowledging my holiness, he calls on my compassion for his good desires and may be fortunate to receive.

Do not underestimate the great power of God that is at your disposal if you have faith. Pray for your faith to increase. Believe that I can grant you any good desire of your heart, pray in accordance to my will and wait patiently for my answer.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


35 posted on 08/14/2011 6:04:32 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Sacred Page

Who Let All the Riffraff Into the Covenant? The Readings for the Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time


According to Wikipedia (that source than which none more authoritative can be thought), “Riffraff is a term for the common people or hoi polloi, but with negative connotations. The term is derived from Old French ‘rif et raf’ meaning ‘one and all, every bit.’”

My ancestors are Dutch, and—like many other ethnic groups—the Dutch think they're pretty special.  The saying is, “If yah ain’t Dutch, yah ain’t much.”

However one may assess the muchness of the Dutch in modern times, from the perspective of the people of Israel in antiquity, the Dutch were riffraff, nameless illiterate Germanic tribes eking out a living on the cold shoreline and humid forests of northwestern Europe.  How could such people ever enter into the fullness of God’s covenant?

The extension of God’s covenant to all the “nations” or “Gentiles” (from the Latin gentes, “races, peoples”) is the unifying theme of the Readings for Mass this weekend.

We begin with one of the classic passages from the second half of the Book of Isaiah that indicates a change in the covenant economy under which the people of God were living.

In the days of Isaiah, the people of Israel were living—or should have been living—according to the stipulations of the Mosaic Covenant (that is, the covenant with Israel mediated by Moses, not a covenant God made with Moses).  This covenant, summarized in its final form in the Book of Deuteronomy, did not have much room for the Gentiles, except perhaps as subjugated vassals of the People of Israel:

Deut. 28:1   “And if you obey the voice of the LORD your God, being careful to do all his commandments which I command you this day, the LORD your God will set you high above all the nations of the earth.... “The LORD will cause your enemies who rise against you to be defeated before you; they shall come out against you one way, and flee before you seven ways. 10 And all the peoples of the earth shall see that you are called by the name of the LORD; and they shall be afraid of you.  12 ... you shall lend to many nations, but you shall not borrow.  13 And the LORD will make you the head, and not the tail; and you shall tend upward only, and not downward; if you obey the commandments of the LORD your God ....

In Jesus’ day, the different sects of Judaism had varying stances toward the Gentiles.  The Pharisees were at least interested in making proselytes of them (Matt 23:15), but the Essenes (who left us the Dead Sea Scrolls) had no use for them, as we'll see in a moment.

However, the prophets of Israel foresaw a coming age where the negative attitude toward the Gentiles based on the Mosaic Covenant would be undone.  Our First Reading is one of the more famous passages from the second half of the Book of Isaiah that anticipates such a situation:

Is 56:1, 6-7
Thus says the LORD:
Observe what is right, do what is just;
for my salvation is about to come,
my justice, about to be revealed.

The foreigners who join themselves to the LORD,
ministering to him,
loving the name of the LORD,
and becoming his servants-
all who keep the sabbath free from profanation
and hold to my covenant,
them I will bring to my holy mountain
and make joyful in my house of prayer;
their burnt offerings and sacrifices
will be acceptable on my altar,
for my house shall be called
a house of prayer for all peoples.

Strikingly, some of the language used to describe the relationship of these foreigners to the Lord is priestly terminology.  These foreigners will “minister” (Heb. shereth) to the LORD and become his “servants” (Heb. ebadim).  The verb shereth is usually employed to describe priestly labor (cf Exod 28:35 etc.), and the priests themselves are called “servants of the LORD” (cf. Ps 134:1; Ps 135:1).  This oracle of Isaiah makes it sound as though, in the latter days, foreigners will not only be able to worship God, but also serve in a priestly capacity.  As Christians, we can understand this as an early intimation of the restoration of priestly status to all the people of God, which we call the "common" or "royal" priesthood of the faithful (see Lumen Gentium §10).

Isaiah’s promise that the “burnt offerings and sacrifices” of foreigners would be acceptable on the altar of the LORD could scarcely be more at odds with the perspective of the Essenes of Jesus’ day.  In the famous work “4QMMT,” a letter on legal issues apparently sent from the Essenes at Qumran to the Pharisees in Jerusalem, the Essenes criticize perceived abuses taking place in the Temple:

[Concerning the offering of ] the [gentile gr]ain [that they are …]  7  and allowing their […] to touch it and [become] def[iled. No one should eat]  8  from [Gent]ile grain [nor] bring it into the sanctuary […] ... Concerning the Gentile sacrifice, [we have determined that they are] sacrifici[ng]  12  to the […] which is [like a woman] who has fornicated with him. (4Q394 frags. 3-7, col. I, lines 6-12 [excerpted])

Although the text is fragmentary, it seems clear that the Essenes objected even to the grain of Gentiles being brought into the sanctuary—much less the Gentiles themselves entering and offering sacrifice to God!

According to Mark 11, Jesus entered the temple and drove out the money changers.  The area of the Temple that Jesus “cleansed” is usually understood to be the outer court, or “court of the Gentiles”—the external area that was the closest Gentiles were allowed to come into God’s presence in the Second Temple period.  After driving out the merchants, Our Lord quotes from today’s First Reading: “And he taught, and said to them, “Is it not written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer for all the nations? But you have made it a den of robbers” (Mark 11:17).  Part of the purpose of the Temple cleansing was to restore to the Gentiles what access to God was permissible for them under the current system.  We can see that Jesus' attitude was very much at odds with that of many of his contemporaries, especially the Essenes.

The Responsorial continues the theme of the Gentiles (Nations) entering into relationship with God:

Ps 67:2-3, 5, 6, 8
R. (4) O God, let all the nations praise you!
May God have pity on us and bless us;
may he let his face shine upon us.
So may your way be known upon earth;
among all nations, your salvation.
R. O God, let all the nations praise you!
May the nations be glad and exult
because you rule the peoples in equity;
the nations on the earth you guide.
R. O God, let all the nations praise you!
May the peoples praise you, O God;
may all the peoples praise you!
May God bless us,
and may all the ends of the earth fear him!
R. O God, let all the nations praise you!

There are many psalms that call on the “peoples” or “nations” to bless the LORD.  Is this all empty rhetoric, invented in antiquity when no one but Jews came to the Temple?  I think not.  According to the Books of Samuel and Kings, the kingdom of Israel under David and Solomon expanded to become an empire including the surrounding non-Israelite nations as vassal states.  During this period, Jerusalem probably saw a steady stream of Gentile officials coming on diplomatic business with the royal court, which would likely include worshipping the God of their suzerain.  It seems to me likely that several psalms were originally written with this context in mind, in which Israelites would be mixed with visiting foreigners in the Solomonic Temple (e.g. Ps 47:9).

Of course, this ancient kingdom of David and Solomon—really an international empire—is a type and image of the Church, in which Jew and Gentile can gather to worship under the leadership of the Son of David.

St. Paul, the great “Apostle to the Gentiles,” takes up this theme directly in the Second Reading:

Rom 11:13-15, 29-32
Brothers and sisters:
I am speaking to you Gentiles.
Inasmuch as I am the apostle to the Gentiles,
I glory in my ministry in order to make my race jealous
and thus save some of them.
For if their rejection is the reconciliation of the world,
what will their acceptance be but life from the dead?

For the gifts and the call of God are irrevocable.
Just as you once disobeyed God
but have now received mercy because of their disobedience,
so they have now disobeyed in order that,
by virtue of the mercy shown to you,
they too may now receive mercy.
For God delivered all to disobedience,
that he might have mercy upon all.

It is a shame that this reading from Paul is so highly excerpted, such that St. Paul’s beautiful analogy of the Gentiles being grafted into Israel like wild olive branches grafted onto a cultured olive tree (Rom. 11:17-24; strikingly, the exact reverse of usual agricultural practice!).  With such a fragmentary text as we have in the liturgical reading, it is difficult to see St. Paul’s argument.  Nonetheless, we can summarize the main point of Romans 11 as the mysterious interrelationship of the salvation of Israel and the Nations.  Though Jew and Gentile seem to have different “paths to God,” in reality, St. Paul points out, the salvation of both groups is inextricably united in God’s plan.  Nowhere is this more evident than the enigmatic verses Rom 11:25-26, where St. Paul states: “Lest you be wise in your own conceits, I want you to understand this mystery, brethren: a hardening has come upon part of Israel, until the full number of the Gentiles come in, and in this way all Israel will be saved ....”  Commentators struggle over how it can be that the “full number of the Gentiles” coming in will be the means by which “all Israel will be saved.”  While we cannot enter into a full treatment of this passage, I would just mention the possibility that Paul is influenced here by Isaiah once again—specifically Isaiah 66:18-21, which envisions an eschatological ingathering of the Gentiles, which will bring large numbers of Israelites along with it.

The Gospel reading tells of a Gentile woman—and not any Gentile woman, but a descendant of the Canaanites, about whom the Old Covenant as summarized in Deuteronomy had nothing good to say at all (see Deut 20:16-18)—who finds salvation through Jesus:

Gospel Mt 15:21-28
At that time, Jesus withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon.
And behold, a Canaanite woman of that district came and called out,
“Have pity on me, Lord, Son of David!
My daughter is tormented by a demon.”
But Jesus did not say a word in answer to her.
Jesus’ disciples came and asked him,
“Send her away, for she keeps calling out after us.”
He said in reply,
“I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”
But the woman came and did Jesus homage, saying, “Lord, help me.”
He said in reply,
“It is not right to take the food of the children
and throw it to the dogs.”
She said, “Please, Lord, for even the dogs eat the scraps
that fall from the table of their masters.”
Then Jesus said to her in reply,
“O woman, great is your faith!
Let it be done for you as you wish.”
And the woman’s daughter was healed from that hour.

Many are troubled by the Lord’s apparently harsh way of dealing with this woman, at least initially.  Shouldn’t Jesus have immediately offered to heal this poor woman’s daughter?  Yet we need to remember that the Lord had prophetic insight into the hearts of the people with whom he interacted.  He knew what people were thinking and the state of their heart (Matt 9:4; 12:25; John 2:25; 6:61).  Jesus adapts his way of dealing with people to their individual situations and needs.  For example, he doesn’t challenge everyone to sell all that they have and give to the poor (cf. Matt 19:21 and Luke 19:8-10), but he knew that was what the rich young man needed to do. 

So, in the case of this Sunday’s Gospel, we need to understand Jesus’ actions as tailored to the faith of this woman.  He sees that she has faith—he puts her faith to the test, to elicit more faith.  Untested faith is no faith at all.

“It is not right to take the food of the children and throw it to the dogs,” Jesus says, a painful reminder that Gentile pagans have no covenantal claim on the God of Israel, no right to call him to be faithful to his obligations toward them (hesed), only the ability to throw themselves (ourselves!) on the mercy of God the creator.

The woman has both tremendous faith, and tremendous humility.  Not taking insult from Jesus’ words, humbly acknowledging her lack of any covenant claim on the God of Israel, she asks for unmerited mercy: “Yes Lord, but even the dogs eat the scraps that fall from the table of their masters.”

We recall that Jacob himself, father of all the sons of Israel, was not the direct heir of God’s covenant, but connived and struggled his way in.  We recall Rahab’s family and the Gibeonites, both Canaanite groups that should have been wiped out in the conquest, but who tricked and struggled their way into the people of the covenant.  We recall Ruth the Moabitess and Uriah the Hittite, who renounced their ethnicity and swore oaths to the God of Israel, and entered his covenant.  And we realize that throughout salvation history, God has been finding a place in his covenant for people who, in some way or other, didn’t belong there, but wanted to be there. 

We are reminded of St. Paul’s words elsewhere:

1Cor. 1:26   For consider your call, brethren; not many of you were wise according to worldly standards, not many were powerful, not many were of noble birth;  27 but God chose what is foolish in the world to shame the wise, God chose what is weak in the world to shame the strong,  28 God chose what is low and despised in the world, even things that are not, to bring to nothing things that are ...

At Mass this Sunday, look around.  You are surrounded by the riffraff of the earth.  You may be the riffraff of the earth yourself.  Go out to the highways and hedges, and compel people to come in, that my house may be filled!”  What kind of God is this, that lets all the riffraff into his covenant?

36 posted on 08/14/2011 6:07:36 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Archdiocese of Washington

Here is a Gospel that teaches us to pray always and not lose heart. Here is a Gospel about having tenacity in prayer and, even when the results seem discouraging, continuing to beseech the Lord. This is also a gospel about the Lord’s will to extend the Gospel to all the nations and to make the Church truly Catholic.

Lets look at this Gospel in Five stages.

STAGE I – TRAVELS - The text says, At that time, Jesus withdrew to the region of Tyre and Sidon. Thus Jesus goes north of Israel into the territory we know today as Lebanon.

Now Matthew is not just giving us a quick travelogue here. We are not interested merely in Jesus physical location but, even more, what this location signifies. Jesus has gone up north to Pagan territory. Other things being equal, this is a rather an odd destination for a Jewish preacher. But we need to recall that Jesus is preparing the Church for a mission to all the nations. So it makes sense that he pushes the boundaries of the Jewish world. Jesus interacted with Gentiles and Samaritans as if to say, “The racism of a Jewish only world must now end….The Gospel must break the boundaries of nation and race and be truly universal, truly catholic.”

This vision of the Gentiles being drawn to the Lord was actually well attested in the Old Testament. But, just like today, there were texts in the Scriptures that were popular and well known, and other texts that were conveniently “forgotten” or made little impact. Consider a few examples of texts which announced the entry of the Gentiles into the holy People of God:

  1. The foreigners who join themselves to the LORD, ministering to him, loving the name of the LORD, and becoming his servants– all who keep the sabbath free from profanation and hold to my covenant, them I will bring to my holy mountain and make joyful in my house of prayer; their burnt offerings and sacrifices will be acceptable on my altar, for my house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples. (Isaiah 56:6-9)
  2. I will give you as a light to the nations, that my salvation may reach to the end of the earth.” (Isa 49:6)
  3. Babylon and Egypt I will count among those who know me, Philistia, Tyre and Ethiopia, these will be her children and Zion shall be called “mother” for all shall be her children. (Psalm 87:4-5)
  4. I come to gather nation of every language; they shall come and see my glory. Some of these I will take as priests and Levites says the Lord….All mankind shall come to worship before me says the Lord. (Is 66:18; 23)

Hence we can see that the Jewish people’s own Scriptures spoke of a day when Jews and Gentiles together would worship the Lord and be his people.

This introductory note about Jesus’ location is essential to understanding the text that will follow. We must grasp here Jesus’s will to reach out to the Gentiles. We do this in order to appreciate that some of the harsh tone he exhibits later can likely be understood as a rhetorical means of calling the question of racial and national division, rather than as an affirmation of racial and national division. In effect he is tweaking his disciples, and the Church and giving voice to their fears and hostility. In so doing he also calls out the Canaanite woman in order to show forth one who is willing to set aside these racist notions for a greater good.

Lets watch it unfold.

Stage II. TORMENT – The text says, And behold, a Canaanite woman of that district came and called out, “Have pity on me, Lord, Son of David! My daughter is tormented by a demon.

It is a sure fact that Canaanites were despised by Jews. And Canaanites returned the favor and despised Jews. What is it that would make a Canaanite woman reach out to a Jewish Messiah? In a word, desperation. In her torment and desperation this woman no longer cares who helps her daughter, as long as some one helps her!

She has likely heard of Jesus power to save and heal. She looks past her likely racial hatred and, risking terrible and personal rebuke, she calls on Jesus. Her sorrow crosses boundaries. The only enemy she cares about is the demon afflicting her daughter.

It is a true, but sad fact that a common enemy can often unite factions. It should not take this, but the Lord will take whatever he can get to unite us.

So, torment has lowered the barriers.

Stage III – TEST – The text says, But Jesus did not say a word in answer to her. Jesus’ disciples came and asked him, “Send her away, for she keeps calling out after us.”He said in reply, “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”…. “It is not right to take the food of the children and throw it to the dogs.”

It is a shocking and daring thing that Jesus does here. He takes up the voice of sin, oppression, racism and nationalism. It is a very strange thing to hear come from the mouth of the Lord who has already journeyed among the Samaritans and Gentiles, healing, and often praising their faith (e.g. Lk 8:26; Mt 8:10; Lk 7:9; Matt 8:11 inter al).

The usual explanation is that he is calling out this woman’s faith and through her is summoning his disciples to repentance. The disciples what the Lord to order her away. In effect he takes up their voice and the voice of all oppression and utters the hateful sayings of the world, going so far as to use the term “dog” to refer to her.

Yes, Jesus is testing her, trying awakening something in her. He is also giving voice to the ugly thoughts of his disciples and likely to others, on both sides, Gentile and Jew, who were standing by and watching with marvel and disdain the interaction of a Gentile, and a woman at that, and a Jew.

There is a saying, Things do, by opposition grow. And thus, in this test, Jesus grows her faith, and possibly that of the bystanders. And just as an athlete grows by tougher opponents and a musician by tougher pieces so does the testing of this woman’s faith cause it to grow.

Remember, God tested Abraham, Jacob, Joseph, Job, Esther, Susannah, Judith, Gideon, and countless others. She too is being tested. And like those of old she too with grow by the test.

We too are tested. For God seems a times to be strangely silent and we are made to feel like no child of God at all. Indeed we may often conclude that even the dogs live better than we.

And the question for us remains. Will we give way on the test or hold out until our change comes? Will our faith grow or wither? Will our love grow stronger, or will it change to resentment?

Stage IV.  TENACITY – The text says, But the woman came and did Jesus homage, saying, “Lord, help me.” She said, “Please, Lord, for even the dogs eat the scraps that fall from the table of their masters.

Note here that the woman is not put off. Whatever anger, grief or discouragement may move through her, she perseveres.

She is even bold and creative. In a sense, she will not take no for an answer.

  1. She is like Mother Mary at Cana who did not pause for a moment when Jesus seemed dubious of her request (Jn 2:5)
  2. She is like the widow before the Judge in Jesus parable who never stopped pestering the judge for a favorable ruling (Lk 18:1-8).
  3. She is like the blind man at the side of the road who, though rebuked by the crowds still kept calling for Jesus (Lk 18:39)
  4. She is like the parents who brought their infants to Jesus for a blessing and who, though rebuked by the disciples, won through to the blessing (Mk 10:13-16)
  5. She is like Zacchaeus, who though hindered by height climbed a tree to see Jesus (Lk 19:1ff).
  6. She is like the widow with the hemorrhage who, though weak and ritually unclean, pressed thorough the crowd and grabbed the hem of Jesus’ garments  (Mk 5:28)
  7. She is like the lepers, who though forbidden by law to enter the town sought the Lord at the Gates and fell down before him (Luke 17).

Yes, she has tenacity. She will hold out until the change, the healing, she desires for her daughter is accomplished. She will not give up or let go of Jesus no matter how unwilling he seems, no matter how politically incorrect her request, no matter how much hostility she encounters from the disciples, the crowds or even Jesus himself. She will hold out.

Here is a woman with tenacity. How about you?

Stage V. TRIUMPH – The text says,  Then Jesus said to her in reply, “O woman, great is your faith! Let it be done for you as you wish.” And the woman’s daughter was healed from that hour.

Here is the victory. She has gone from torment to triumph, by a tenacious and tested faith. Jesus now takes away the veil of his role and shows his true self, as the merciful, wonder-working Messiah and Lord.

Jesus says of her: “Great is your faith.” But how has it become so? In the crucible of testing, that is how. We may wonder at God’s delays, at his seeming disinterest or anger. But in the end, it is our faith that is most important to him.

Our faith is more important to God than our finances, our comfort, or our needed cures. For it is by faith that we are saved. We are not saved by our health, comforts money or good fortune. And God is willing to delay, he is willing to test us and try us, if only for the sake of our stronger faith by which he will save us. God saves us, but he does it through our faith.

Why all this delay, why suffering, why trials? Stronger faith. That is why. God may not come when you want him, but he’s always right on time. For his true goal is not merely to give us what we want, but what we need. And that is stronger faith.

Having done this, the Lord gives her the triumph. We too must accept that God’s truest blessing for us is not improved health or finances, but stronger faith.

Consider well the lesson of this Gospel. Though God often seems uninterested, even cruel, he is working his purposes out and seeking to grow our faith. Hard, you say? What parent among you has not had to do the same for every child? For children untested, untried, who get their every wish, and never have to wait, are spoiled, self centered and headed for ultimate ruin. Consider well that God knows exactly what he does and consider too that most of us are hard cases. God must often work mightily to get our attention and strengthen our faith. Do not give up on God, he is up to something good, very good.

Photo Credit: Goodsalt.com used with permission

I have it on the best of authority that as this woman saw Jesus coming up the road she sang this song:

Pass me not O gentle savior
hear my humble cry
while on others thou art calling
do not pass me by

Savior, savior, hear my humble cry
while on others thou art calling
do not pass me by

Let me at a throne of mercy
find a sweet relief
kneeling there in deep contrition
help my unbelief


37 posted on 08/14/2011 6:08:47 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

A few summers back, my family was driving to Washington’s Air and Space Museum in our minivan. The parking options were pretty slim, so my wife asked our six-year old son  if he would pray for a parking spot. He did, out loud, and then to everyone’s surprise he added: “…and make sure it has a broken meter so we don’t have to pay.” Everyone laughed for a moment until, lo and behold, a perfect parking space appeared right in front of them- with a broken meter!

Now, as we all know from our own experience, not every prayer request is granted so quickly. Just consider the case of the Canaanite woman in today’s gospel. As we heard, she pleaded with Jesus that he might cure her daughter. At first, Jesus gave her no response. And then, after she continued to beg for help, Jesus quoted a proverb which referred to her people as dogs- something that might very easily have turned her away. Nevertheless, this desperate woman continued to persist, and because of her great faith, Jesus healed her little girl.

This little episode demonstrates the importance of persistence in prayer. First of all, persistence demonstrates to God that something is very important to us- and God likes to hear that sort of thing! Second, persistence teaches us patience, and reminds us of God’s infinite patience with us. And third, the need for persistence reflects the fact that we have a personal relationship wit a personal God, and that God isn’t a spigot of grace that we can simply turn on and off whenever we wish.

Persistence, however, doesn’t always translate into a prayer request being

granted, as it did for the Canaanite woman. So why is it, then, that our prayers at times seem to go unanswered? It could be that we’re praying without faith, thinking that God either can’t or won’t answer our prayer. A priest friend of mine tells a funny story about a group of farmers who, in the middle of a drought, came together to pray for rain- but not one of them brought an umbrella. They, my friend concludes, were not praying with faith.

Another possible reason a prayer seems to go unanswered is because we’re asking for the wrong thing. As I’ve heard it explained before, God is a loving parent, and what parent would give their child a knife to play with? C. S. Lewis once speculated that we’ll probably spend eternity thanking God for the prayers he did not answer!

However, sometimes the problem is not our faith, or the nature of our request, but our own inactivity. Think of it this way: As Christians, we typically end our prayers by saying, “Through Christ our Lord.” By praying through Christ, however, we include ourselves in our requests, because we are members of the Body of Christ, the Church. In other words, when we pray for something through Christ, we take upon ourselves the responsibility, as best we can, to help answer our own prayer.

Consider the experience of an elderly nun who had prayed for a younger nun in her religious community. She personally liked this young nun, and was appreciative of her enthusiasm and energy. She knew that the young nun had been wrestling over whether or not she should leave the community, or even if the community wanted her at all. So the elderly nun prayed that she might stay, prayed that she might realize that she was wanted and valued, and prayed that God might give her the strength to see beyond her doubts. However, she never went, at any time, to speak with the young nun. She never told her how much she liked her, how much her gifts were treasured, and how much she wanted her to stay in the community. When the young nun left, the elderly nun was deeply upset.

Later on, a friend pointed out that she had never tried herself to bring about what she was asking God to do. She had offered her prayers through Christ Jesus, but had forgotten that she herself was part of Christ’s body. She had tried to make God responsible for solving a problem, and hadn’t taken any responsibility herself. (1)

St. John Chrysostom once wrote that “The sincerity of our prayer is determined by our willingness to work on its behalf.” For us, this means that if we pray for peace, we need to be peacemakers in our families, and in our communities. If we pray for good health, we need to adopt a healthy lifestyle. If we pray for a lonely person, we need to reach out and touch his or her life in some way. If we pray for the Church’s mission, we need to contribute our time, talent, and treasure. If we pray for the poor, we need to be faithful and generous stewards of God’s gifts to us. If we pray for a sick relative or friend, we need to help with their care as best we can. And if we pray to pass a test, we need to crack the books, and study. The old expression, “God helps those who help themselves,” has some truth to it. Or as St. Thomas Aquinas often stressed, “Grace builds on nature.”

Now, it has to be said that God doesn’t need our help in answering prayer. Instead, God asks us for our help; it’s all part of his plan. God freely chose to enter the human scene in Jesus, and he continues his presence in the human scene though us- we who are united with Jesus in his church. In a sense, we are extensions of Jesus, and God invites us to willingly give ourselves to his service. When we pray then, we need to present ourselves as part of the answer. In the words of St. Augustine, “Pray as if everything depends on God, and act as if everything depends on you.”

Photo Credits:  zieak, Joe Shabotnik,  Xenia Antunes, via Creative Commons

(1) This illustration comes from Fr. Ronald Rolheiser’s book, The Holy Longing


38 posted on 08/14/2011 6:10:57 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Gospel Reflections

20th Sunday in Ordinary Time


Gospel
Matthew 15:21-28

21 And Jesus went away from there and withdrew to the district of Tyre and Sidon.
22 And behold, a Canaanite woman from that region came out and cried, "Have mercy on me, O Lord, Son of David; my daughter is severely possessed by a demon."
23 But he did not answer her a word. And his disciples came and begged him, saying, "Send her away, for she is crying after us."
24 He answered, "I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel."
25 But she came and knelt before him, saying, "Lord, help me."
26 And he answered, "It is not fair to take the children's bread and throw it to the dogs."
27 She said, "Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters' table."
28 Then Jesus answered her, "O woman, great is your faith! Be it done for you as you desire." And her daughter was healed instantly.


One Main Point
The extraordinary faith of the woman and her humble prayer touches Jesus.


Interesting Details
- St. Mark and St. Matthew wrote for a different public at different periods. St. Mark wrote for Gentile Christians, showing them that salvation was first for the Jews only and then for the Gentiles. St. Matthew wrote for Jewish Christians showing them that faith, and faith alone, breaks down the barrier between the Jews and the Gentiles.

- (v.21) Tyre and Sydon are two cities located on the Mediterranean coast line, they now belong to Lebanon. This area is not within the Galilee region, but close to it.

- To avoid the collective persecution by Herod's regime and the Jewish authorities, Jesus fled to Tyre and Sydon to train his apostles.

- (v.22) The woman's prayer was filled with faith, patience, humility. She recognized Jesus as the savior (descendant of David) whom the Jews did not acknowledge.

- (v.24) His first mission was to bring the Jewish people the message of their salvation. The message was later brought to the whole world.


Reflections

  1. Reflect on the woman's extraordinary faith in Jesus; how is my faith in God?

  2. What are my attitudes toward non-Catholics who live Christian values?

  3. What are my attitudes to God when my prayers are being rejected?

  4. When others seek my help persistently, how do I react?

39 posted on 08/14/2011 6:14:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic
Almanac:

Sunday, August 14

Liturgical Color: Red


Today the Church honors St. Maximilian Kolbe, priest and martyr. He was interred in a Nazi prison camp during World War II. While there, he offered his life in place of another prisoner who had a family. He was martyred in 1941.


40 posted on 08/14/2011 8:11:29 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: August 14, 2011
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: God our Father, may we love you in all things and above all things and reach the joy you have prepared for us beyond all our imagining. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Ordinary Time: August 14th

  Twentieth Sunday of Ordinary Time Old Calendar: Ninth Sunday after Pentecost

But the woman came and did him homage, saying, "Lord, help me." He said in reply, "It is not right to take the food of the children and throw it to the dogs." She said, "Please, Lord, for even the dogs eat the scraps that fall from the table of their masters." Then Jesus said to her in reply, "O woman, great is your faith! Let it be done for you as you wish." And her daughter was healed from that hour (Matt 15:25-28).

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from the Book of the Prophet Isaiah 56:1, 6-7. The theme of the prophet here is the call of the Gentiles to the service of the true God on the great day which is to come. The temple of that future messianic age will be a "house of prayer" for all peoples.

The second reading is from the Letter of St. Paul to the Romans 11:13-15, 29-32. In this reading Paul admits clearly that in the Christian Church is the fulfillment of all the hopes and promises made to Israel, yet this fulfillment of Judaism is composed of Gentiles as well as Israelites. Paul here calls himself the apostle to the Gentiles but still prays that the Israelite rejection of Jesus may one day be reversed. (Excerpted from A Celebrants Guide to the New Sacramentary - A Cycle by Kevin W. Irwin)

The Gospel is from St. Matthew 15:21-28. There is a lesson, a very necessary one, for all of us in this episode of Christ's public life. It is the necessity of perseverance in our prayers of petition. Prayer is an essential part of our Christian life, and the essential part of prayer is that of adoration and thanksgiving, but prayer of petition has a big part in our daily prayers. We have so many spiritual and temporal needs, needs which we cannot provide by ourselves. Christ himself has told us to ask Him for these needs: "ask and you shall receive."

Do we ask with the fervor and perseverance which prove that we have "great faith"? That faith is the proof which Christ needs before He grants our requests. The Canaanite woman of whom we have just heard is for us an example of that deep-seated faith and trust in Christ's power and Christ's goodness. Even though He ignored her she continued to beseech Him, and when He answered with what seemed a direct refusal, her faith and trust did not waver. She answered His reason for refusal with another statement which showed that the granting of her petition would not in any way interfere with or impede His primary task, His mission to His father's chosen people. This was the proof of great faith which He required. He granted her request.

We must imitate and learn from this pagan mother. Her love for her child made her ready to undergo every hardship or suffering for the restoration to health of her loved one. When we turn to Christ in our needs is our faith in Him as sincere and unwavering as was this woman's? No doubt it often is, and yet we do not get the desired answer. As Christians we know that our particular request may not always be for our good, or for the final good of the person for whom we are praying. In that case, the good God will not grant what would be to our eternal disadvantage. But if our prayer is sincere and persevering, we shall always get an answer, and one which is better than what we asked for.

How often do we wonder at or perhaps doubt God's mercy when we see, for example, the young father of a family being taken from his loved and helpless ones, notwithstanding the prayers and tears of his wife and children. Where is God's mercy here? Where is His answer to these sincere prayers? But who are we to question God's mercy? The answer is there and often clear enough: that death brings out in his relatives and neighbors virtues which they would otherwise never have had occasion to practice - virtues that will earn for them eternal life.

It is only when we get to heaven - and getting to heaven is our purpose in life - that we shall see how our prayers, sincere and persevering, were answered by God.

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


41 posted on 08/14/2011 8:22:48 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Matthew 15:21-28

“O woman, great is your faith!” (Matthew 15:28)

Can you imagine having your request rejected by Jesus three different times, as happened to this woman? First, Jesus ignored her. Then he says he wasn’t sent to Gentiles, only to Jews. Finally, he implies that she is not much more than a “dog” (Matthew 15:26). How discouraging this must have been! But she would not be denied, and Jesus finally grants her request.

Now do you really think that Jesus was going to leave this poor woman’s daughter in the grip of demonic possession? Isn’t it possible, instead, that he was using this opportunity to teach his disciples something?

Jesus showed his disciples that God’s mercy and love extend to everyone. In all his words in this episode, he seemed to emphasize the fact that she was a pagan. But in the end he praised her great faith, making it clear that anyone who turns to him in faith will be welcomed, not just the “right people,” not just faithful Jews.

Surely Peter remembered this episode when he was invited later to share the gospel with the Roman centurion Cornelius. Breaking with Jewish tradition, Peter enters the offi - cer’s house and tells him: “You know that it is unlawful for a Jewish man to associate with, or visit, a Gentile, but God has shown me that I should not call any person profane or unclean” (Acts 10:28). As a result of Peter’s attitude, Gentiles were baptized for the fi rst time, and the church was opened to people of all races and backgrounds.

Just as he did with Peter and the others, Jesus wants to expand our vision. He wants everyone to be saved, not just the ones we might consider worthy. So be on the lookout today for situations where you can share the love of Christ with someone you might otherwise pass by. You may be surprised at who you discover is willing to listen.

“Lord, help me to put aside anything that hinders your plan. Give me your heart so that I can bring others to yourself.”


Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

(Isaiah 56:1,6-7; Psalm 67:2-3,5-6,8; Romans 11:13-15,29-32; Matthew 15:21-28)

1. In the first reading, Isaiah says, “Observe what is right, do what is just; for my salvation is about to come, my justice, about to be revealed.” What do you think this means? How does it apply to you?

2. Also Isaiah speaks of the all-inclusiveness of God’s love; all peoples are welcome in God’s house. Who are the people you exclude from your love or God’s love? What steps can you take to change that? Take some time now to pray for these people.

3. In the responsorial psalm, the psalmist prays for God’s mercy and blessing, not just for himself but so that God’s “way be known upon earth; among all nations your salvation.” Who are some of today’s nations that need to turn back to God? Why not also take some time now to pray for these nations that need God’s blessing and knowledge of his wonderful salvation.

4. In the second reading, St. Paul prays for God’s mercy on his fellow Jewish countrymen and for their conversion. Are their any Jewish persons you know that need to come to know God’s great love for them? Why not join your prayers with Paul’s and pray for the conversion of the Jewish people, and any specific Jewish persons you know.

5. In the Gospel, why do you think Jesus praises the great faith of the Canaanite woman? Her faith can certainly be seen in her perseverance in asking Jesus to heal her daughter, in spite of the initial lack of response. What are the situations in which you struggle to persevere in prayer, because the prayers don’t seem to be answered? Take some time now to pray for these situations.

6. The meditation ends with these challenging words: “be on the lookout today for situations where you can share the love of Christ with someone you might otherwise pass by. You may be surprised at who you discover is willing to listen.” What steps can you take during the day to respond to this challenge?

7. Take some time now and pray that you would have the grace, courage, and boldness to reach out to others with the love of Christ. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point.


42 posted on 08/14/2011 8:24:07 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman

Daily Marriage Tip for August 14, 2011:

“A Canaanite woman … called out, “Have pity on me, Lord! … My daughter is tormented by a demon” (Mt 15:22). Jesus healed the daughter. Sometimes it is our intense love for our children that drives us to seek God. Let a child be a vehicle of grace for you today.


43 posted on 08/14/2011 8:28:32 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Scripture Study

Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle A

August 14, 2011

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Isaiah 56:1,6-7

Psalm: 67:2-3,5-6,8

Second Reading: Romans 11:13-15,29-32

Gospel Reading: Matthew 15:21-28

  • This Sunday’s Gospel takes place right after a discussion between Jesus and his opponents, the Pharisees, who are critical of Jesus’ disciples for not following their interpretations of the minute details of the Jewish purity laws (Matthew 15:1-20).
  • Many of these Pharisees (the name means “separated ones”) made it a point to not associate with those whom they felt did not live up to these laws. They also distanced themselves from Gentiles (non-Jews) whom they considered unclean. They would not even enter their house for fear of defilement (John 18:28-29).
  • After this confrontation, Jesus takes a nearly 100-mile round trip “detour” to the Gentile region of Tyre and Sidon (present day Lebanon). Sidon was named after the son of Canaan (see Genesis 10:15-19), forefather of the original inhabitants of the Holy Land who were traditional bitter enemies of the Jews.
  • Though Jesus is sometimes seen to be taking a cold approach to the Canaanite woman seeking his aid, he is in fact mimicking the “separateness” of the Pharisees to highlight their blindness and to make a point about how God, on the other hand, shows no partiality (Acts 10:34; Romans 2:11; Colossians 3:25; James 2:1,9).

 

QUESTIONS:

  • Regarding the 2nd Reading: from what religious roots does Christianity come? If you are not ethnically Jewish, what do those roots make you, as a believer in Christianity? With what kind of awe, then, should you regard Judaism? With what kind of awe should you regard the grace of God in you?
  • In the 1st Reading, the prophet Isaiah foretells the inclusion of Gentiles in the kingdom of God, and the enthusiasm and sincerity of their worship. How well are you fulfilling this prophecy?
  • Look at a map of Israel in Jesus’ time. Where is Tyre and Sidon in relation to Jerusalem?
  • How would Jesus’ accusers in verses 1-20 have viewed his 100-mile “detour” to the region of Tyre and Sidon? Would they have likely done the same? Why or why not?
  • What do we learn about the Canaanite woman? How are you like her? Not like her?
  • What do we learn about Jesus? About Jesus’ attitude toward non-Jews?
  • When you deal with needy people or “outsiders,” are you more like the disciples or Jesus? Why? How has God gone a long distance to heal you?
  • Do you ever feel “put off” by the Lord? What happens to your faith when God appears not to answer? Do you give up, or do you persist? Do you seek Jesus with expectant faith?

Closing Prayer

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 528, 781, 439, 448, 2610

 

Persevere in prayer. Persevere, even when your efforts seem barren. Prayer is always fruitful.

St. Josemaria Escriva


44 posted on 08/14/2011 8:31:40 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Sin of Lazarus
Pastor’s Column
August 21, 2011
Father Gary is on sabbatical.  In his absence we are printing
some of his favorite columns. This one was originally printed
on September 26, 2004.

 
Here’s a bible trivia question for you: In the gospel of the rich man and Lazarus, what was the rich man’s name? The answer, of course, is that the gospel doesn’t say, but tradition gives him the name of “Dives”. Dives was a guy who had it all. He lived well, ate well, dressed well. It doesn’t appear that he was an obvious sinner either.
 
This leads us to the second Bible trivia question: what was the sin of Dives? (Not so trivial since he seems to have ended up in torment). What got Dives in trouble was not so much a sin he committed as one he omitted. In other words, Dives saw someone in need, day after day,
and did nothing. Dives did nothing and that was his sin!!
 
This must have been a shocking gospel for the people of Jesus’ time. They believed that the more money, wealth, health, success and good food you had, the more God loved you. We can sometimes tend to fall into the same trap. The incredible thing is that although Lazarus has infirmities, is a beggar, has little to eat, and wears rags for clothes; he is the one who is really blessed by God, and not the man who had it all. What Lazarus lacked in life turned out to be the best thing possible.
 
This gospel always makes me stop and pray about my response. When I encounter someone in need in my life, school, work, and church, do I pretend not to notice? I can’t respond to every needy person, but how often do I notice others? Sometimes all we need to give is a willing ear! The moral of the story is: God notices every act of kindness and he always remembers! 
                                                                   Father Gary

45 posted on 08/14/2011 8:50:12 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-religion/2763421/posts?page=45#45

August 14


46 posted on 08/14/2011 8:52:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

20th Sunday - "Have pity on me Lord...."

 

Jean Drouais
"Woman, great is your faith . . ."


Is 56: 1, 6-7
Rm 11: 13-15, 29-32
Mt 15: 21-28

The United States has been referred to as a melting pot of cultures and languages. Indeed it is true the history of this nation is one of welcoming the stranger among us. The famous poem by Emma Lazarus on the base of the Statue of Liberty in New York reads “. . . Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,The wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, . .” It is a beautiful image of hope and tolerance for the oppressed and frightened. My grandparents, as so many millions, came to this country hoping for a better life and they found it.

But the reality is that this nation once was divided by the scourge of slavery and torn apart by a war. Many of us are old enough to remember race riots between black and white in American cities. Today the issue of the illegal immigrant continues to wear away at our Nation’s psyche. Though we are a generally peaceful and tolerant people we also, deep down, are more comfortable with those who are like us rather than different from us.

This Sunday’s Gospel is a moment in the cultural insight of ancient times. Both the Apostles and Jesus himself recognize this difference in the woman who “cries out” for Jesus to heal her daughter. While the Apostles would rather she just leave them alone, “Send her away for she keeps calling out after us.. .” Jesus takes the time to listen to her plea – albiet in a surprising way.

What may seem on the surface to be a kind of put down of the woman, totally out of character for how we imagine Jesus would deal with others who plead for his help, could also be interpreted as loyalty and insight. Though the Caananite woman is clearly not Jewish, her heart wrenching plea for her daughter’s healing moves Jesus to go beyond cultural restrictions. The first reading from Isaiah indicates this as the will of God.

In Isaiah we read, “The foreigners who join themselves to the Lord, ministering to him, loving the name of the Lord, and becoming his servants . . . and hold to my covenant, them I will bring to my holy mountain . . .” (Is 56: 6). It seems that the woman was one of those foreigners who joined herself to the Lord with total faith and trust that God in Jesus could do something for her daughter. So, this is more than a healing story. It is also a foreshadow of the mission to the Gentiles, to the world as a whole, that the Holy Spirit would empower the Apostles and Paul after the resurrection.

A wise person once said: “We all have prejudices. What we do with them is the important issue.” Jesus was just reflecting the focus of his mission to the Jews but did not let that mission prevent him from the higher value of compassion and love. To her loyalty, her faith in him, Christ granted her request to heal her daughter: “O woman, great is your faith,” Jesus acclaimed.

So, the readings this Sunday call us to reflect not only on our own prejudices, or at least our resistance to seek out or respond to those different from us. Jesus’ belief in the dignity of every human person moved him to reach out to lepers, the blind, to women, to the multitude of the poor, to this Caananite woman, and to recognize that all deserve a hearing.

Our laws, and correctly so, say that one must enter this country by legal means. This is clearly one of the most emotional social issues today. But the Church also recognizes the human needs of people. The need for food, for shelter, for clothing, for safety and that principle, which puts the human person as a greater good drives the mission of the Church to reach out to all who are in need. But, it is a tough call as we hold the value of due process and the law as a great good.

The Gospel today recognizes the dignity of the person, regardless of social status or cultural limitation, as a great good that Jesus’ responds to. It was not just her need for a healthy child but an encounter with faith in Jesus. God made us all in his image and our call is to form our lives with Gospel values.

When we find ourselves uncomfortable with people different from us, what choice do we make? Do we ignore them? Mumble behind their backs about “those kind?” Avoid them all together? Or do we make an effort to see those who are different as a reflection of the living God?

The Eucharist is a moment of unity between all who celebrate it. With Christ in our midst, we proclaim our loyalty to him, we seek his healing and forgiveness, and we say to those around us that we are brothers and sisters in the Lord. Let’s not be afraid to push the envelope and go beyond our comfort level knowing that if we plead with the Lord for our own needs, as the Caananite woman, that our loyalty will be acknowledged: "Great is your faith!"
 
Fr. Tim

47 posted on 08/14/2011 9:12:41 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Insight Scoop

Lost sheep, silver spoons, and "the mother of the Gentiles"

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, August 14, 2011 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Isa 56:1, 6-7
• Ps 67:2-3, 5, 6, 8
• Rom 11:13-15, 29-32
• Mt 15:21-28

Those raised in privilege and wealth are said to have been “born with a silver spoon in their mouth.” Money and status can certainly be an advantage when it comes to one’s career, education, and relationships. But there are no spiritual silver spoons. Our social connections, incomes, and talents cannot put us in right relationship with God.

This fact should be obvious to us. But human nature, fallen and proud, is tempted to rely on temporal advantages when it comes to eternal realities.

One of the great challenges Jesus faced was the deeply rooted belief, held by many of his fellow Jews, that because they were Jewish, they had it made—that is, they were right with God, while Gentiles were not. Contact with Gentiles, or pagans—who did not worship the one true God—was kept to a minimum; too much contact could result in physical and spiritual impurity. “The Jews are extremely loyal toward one another,” observed the first-century Roman historian Tacitus (ca. 56-ca. 117), “and always ready to show compassion, but toward every other people they feel only hate and enmity” (The Histories, 5.5). The enmity was so strong that Gentiles were sometimes called “dogs.”

Jesus did not, of course, downplay the false beliefs and immoral actions of pagans. Rather, he pointed out that they also were invited to enter into a saving covenant with Yahweh, the God of all men. As today’s reading from the prophet Isaiah demonstrates, this was not a new idea: “for my house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples.” But it was not a popular idea due, in part, to the brutal mistreatment Jews sometimes endured at the hands of certain Gentiles. Yet it was also due to spiritual blindness and an unwillingness to accept the words of the prophets. 

Matthew’s Gospel, written for a Jewish audience, described how and why Jesus, after meeting stiff resistance from his fellow Jews, began preaching to Gentiles. Today’s Gospel is a dramatic example of how Jesus bridged the great chasm between the two groups.

Having had yet another clash with the Pharisees, who he described as “blind guides” (Matt 15:14), Jesus left Galilee and went into pagan territory on the Phoenician coast, which is modern-day Lebanon. At the same time, a Canaanite woman came to meet him. We don’t know how she knew of Jesus, which makes her greeting all the more audacious and remarkable: “Have pity on me, Lord, Son of David!”

In speaking so boldly to a Jewish man, she trampled upon the social norms of the day. But her boldness seemed, at first, to be counter-productive. Jesus ignored her. Or did he? Is it not true that God sometimes seems to be silent and to ignore us? Jesus’ lack of response was, it appears, meant to do two things: elicit her remarkable public statement of faith and show his disciples what is most important in the Kingdom of God.

“This woman,” wrote Epiphanus the Latin, a late fifth-century Christian commentator, “is the mother of the Gentiles, and she knew Christ through faith.” Confronted with divine silence, she did not waver, but pleaded a second time, “Lord, help me.” Then, having been rebuffed by the standard Jewish perspective of the time, she demonstrated profound humility and faith, readily accepting the label of a dog. “Faith accepts what work does not merit,” remarked Epiphanus, “and through faith the Gentiles were made children out of dogs.”

Jesus’ response was equally surprising, for his acclamation—“O woman, great is your faith!”—was filled with respect and affection. By saying, “Let is be done for you as you wish,” he acknowledged the purity of her faith and intentions, something he could not do for the Pharisees, despite their education, position, and power. As he stated later, “Whoever exalts himself will be humbled; but whoever humbles himself will be exalted” (Matt 23:13). The Canaanite woman, humble is spirit, had no need for silver spoons, being blessed beyond measure with divine love and communion with God.

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in the August 17, 2008, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


48 posted on 08/14/2011 9:25:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

Ask and You Shall Receive
INTERNATIONAL | SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time (Aug. 14, 2011)

August 14, 2011
Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Matthew 15:21-28
Jesus left that place and went away to the district of Tyre and Sidon. Just then a Canaanite woman from that region came out and started shouting, "Have mercy on me, Lord, Son of David; my daughter is tormented by a demon." But he did not answer her at all. And his disciples came and urged him, saying, "Send her away, for she keeps shouting after us." He answered, "I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel." But she came and knelt before him, saying, "Lord, help me." He answered, "It is not fair to take the children´s food and throw it to the dogs." She said, "Yes, Lord, yet even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters´ table." Then Jesus answered her, "Woman, great is your faith! Let it be done for you as you wish." And her daughter was healed instantly.

Introductory Prayer: I believe in you, my God. You called me into existence from nothingness and carefully watch over me. You have even numbered the hairs of my head. I trust in your infinite goodness, and I abandon into your loving hands my fears, my hopes, my needs, my desires, everything. I love you, Lord, and I wish to love you with all my mind, heart, soul and strength.

Petition: Lord, grant that these moments of conversation will build my trust in you.

1. Bold Prayer: We are often timid and bashful in asking others for what we need when we assume that we will be “putting them out” with our request. We put ourselves in their place and think, “I don’t want to be a bother to them.” But Christ wants us to be bold in prayer! What does it “cost” God to grant us his grace? More than what he has already freely given us — his Son? To think that we are “bothering” God when we ask him for things is to pray to a distant and unfamiliar God. Did not Christ guarantee us that if we asked the Father (“Abba”, “Daddy”) for anything in his name, it would be granted? The Canaanite woman’s loud pleas were not bothering Christ in the least. How different Christ’s reactions are to ours, which are so often like those of his disciples!

2. Prayer Unanswered? It is difficult to humble ourselves and admit that we need help, that we can’t completely take care of ourselves. Our pride and human respect often keep us from asking for what we need. The Canaanite woman didn’t seem to mind: she presented herself before Christ and others as a beggar. Now the Gospel text records, “But he did not answer her at all.” One might think Christ respondede to her act of humility with a rather cold, even degrading reception. Was Christ being insensitive? Of course not! He knew how strong this woman’s faith was, and he put it to the test precisely so that others throughout the centuries could marvel at her simple faith. There are often many hidden reasons why Christ doesn’t readily answer our prayers. Let us return to Christ humbly, with faith and hope, when we feel slighted or ignored by him.

3. Efficacious Prayer: An efficacious prayer is a humble prayer. We are super-sensitive when we are hurt. This Canaanite woman was already very hurt by the condition of her daughter and the scolding of the disciples. Had she not had such simple faith and hope, Christ’s words to her could have been enough to send her “over the top.” When we are hurt, we easily jump to conclusions and become offended. Once our pride is injured, we are often blind to the good someone wishes us or performs for us. How many souls have spent long years away from Christ because they have clung to past hurts and been blinded to God’s often mysterious pedagogy?

Conversation with Christ: Dear Jesus, too often I have given up on prayer without really trying, convinced that you don’t listen to me. I am sorry for judging you. Help me persevere in asking you for the good things I need. Help me overcome any shame or human respect, so that I can increase my faith, hope and love for you.

Resolution: I will meditate on an “unanswered” prayer in my life, trying to understand how Christ could have answered it in an unexpected, yet superior way.


49 posted on 08/14/2011 9:40:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

There are No Foreigners in the Reign of God

August 14th, 2011 by Rev. Joseph A. Pellegrino, Diocese of St. Petersburg, FL

Is 56: 1, 6-7 / Rom 11:13-15, 29-32 / Mt 15:21-28

The readings for this Sunday are among the most difficult passages in the Bible. St. Paul seems to be talking in circles when he says to the Romans: “If the rejection of the Jews has meant reconciliation for the world, what would their acceptance mean, nothing less than life from the dead.” In the Gospel, Jesus appears to be cold, even callous to the woman crying out for help. First he refuses to help her saying, ‘My mission is only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.” Then, he appears to insult her by saying, “it is not right to take the food of the sons and daughters and feed it to the dogs.” We need to spend some time trying to understand these readings so we can profit from the Church’s message to us today.

First of all, let’s look at the reading from St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans. Can you imagine the terrible opposition St. Paul had to face when he tried to convince the pagans to become Christian? Here he was, a Jew, telling gentiles or non-Jews, that salvation has come through Jesus, also a Jew. Many of Paul’s own people, the Jewish people in the area, said that Paul was insane. Still, the Gentiles followed Christ. That’s why Paul says, “If so many of the gentiles listened to me, a former pharisee, and follow Jesus despite the opposition of the Jews, imagine what would happen if the Jews were to accept Jesus. The whole world would be Christian.” Then, building on this concept, Paul reasons (in my paraphrase of his words): Well, you gentiles ignored what your consciences told you was right when you embraced pagan atrocities like orgies, etc. By going against your consciences, you were sinning; you were being disobedient to God. But your very disobedience became an occasion for you to receive God’s mercy. Now the Jews, who are the chosen people of the Lord, have also disobeyed God’s will, by rejecting the Christ. Still, their disobedience can result in God’s mercy being extended to them if they call out to God in faith. Jews and Gentiles have sinned, but God’s mercy is greater than their sins.

And God’s mercy and love is available to all. That is what is at the heart of the gospel passage. The Canaanite woman who seeks help at first receives the response she should expect from a Jew: “It is not right to take the food of the sons and daughters and throw it to the dogs.” This follows the Jewish custom of speaking about the gentiles as dogs. Jesus purposely spoke in a way that the Jews would expect a Jew to speak. Then he turns the tables on them. Because this woman has great faith and persists in pleading for her child, he heals her daughter.

In Christ all divisions and differences between people are irrelevant. You might remember Paul’s passage in Galatians: “There is neither Jew nor Greek, slave nor free, male nor female. All are one in Christ.” God’s mercy is extended to all who call upon him in faith.

As obvious as this seems, there have been people throughout the world and throughout history who do not recognize the equality of all people before the Lord. We have just concluded a century that was dominated by the events leading to and resulting from the worst war mankind has ever suffered. Nazism claimed that certain people were far more blessed by God than others. For them anyone who was not part of the Aryan race was an inferior human being. Taken to its extreme, the Nazis had no difficulties in killing gypsies, Jews, and others they claimed were a burden to God’s plan for mankind.

Outside of Christianity, the world has been suffering from radical Islam. These people think that they are serving God by murdering innocent people, including children. It is shocking that these radicals behave like cowards yet think that they are courageous fighters.

Here in America there have also been people who have decided that they were more blessed by the Lord than others, as though God put them in charge of establishing a pecking order for him. There was a time when Americans believed, and some still believe, that wealth demonstrates a special relationship to the Lord. The implication was that those without wealth are a lesser part of His creation. There was a time when Americans believed, and some still believe, that their race or their ethnic background was more blessed by the Lord than others. Sadly our country is still suffering from militaristic white supremacist groups that have the gall to claim God’s blessing upon what is in fact their rejection of Christianity. How dare they sing “Onward Christian Soldiers” and speak about the Lord Jesus while they make plans to attack African-Americans, Jewish-Americans, Asian-Americans and anybody else that does not share their ethnic background?

Jesus Christ will not exclude anyone from God’s love and mercy. But those who think they have a right to focus their infantile insecurities into hatred of others have themselves excluded Christ from their own lives.

The tables have been turned. The former enemy of God’s plan, the Canaanite, has now received the blessing of God. The tables have been turned. Those who had refused to acknowledge the existence of the one God, the pagans, have now become the most fervent believers. The tables have been turned. Those from foreign continents whose ancestors never heard of Jesus have become true Christians. And those of us whose ancestors were called to follow the Lord many generations ago have been invited to share the bread of the Lord, the compassion of Christ, with all who call out to Him in mercy and love.


50 posted on 08/14/2011 9:47:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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