Keyword: drought

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • New groundwater laws to have ripple effect on agriculture (w/video)

    09/18/2014 5:48:49 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 8 replies
    The Santa Rosa Press Democrat ^ | September 16, 2014 | Angela Hart
    Gov. Jerry Brown signed historic groundwater legislation Tuesday, imposing new rules in the Golden State that could limit how much water commercial and residential users are allowed to pump from underground aquifers — a move decades in the works, spurred this year by California’s drought. The new laws, which take effect in January, will require local government officials to ensure use of groundwater basins is sustainable, protecting underground reserves and averting other environmental damage. The regulations could have a ripple effect on thousands of farmers and ranchers across the North Coast.
  • Leftist Lawmakers and Enviro-Extremists Created CA Water Crisis

    09/17/2014 8:13:50 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 19 replies
    Breitbart California ^ | August 30, 2014 | Assemblyman Tim Donnelly
    On Friday, the California State Assembly outdid itself. You can always count on the leftist leaders of what is supposed to be the “people’s house” never lets a crisis go to waste. With the passage of AB 1739 (Dickinson-D), SB 1168 (Pavley-D), and SB 1319 (Pavley-D), 100 years of history was reversed. The authors painted a grim picture of California’s groundwater future. Most of what they said is true. The only problem they didn’t bother to tell you two key truths: 1.It was these same so-called leaders who give up our seat—the property owner and the farmer’s place at the...
  • Rohnert Park teen comes up with novel way to store water

    09/08/2014 6:05:27 PM PDT · by MeshugeMikey · 63 replies
    Some students just want their science fair projects to earn a little extra credit. Steven McDowell wants his “water fence” to change the way people irrigate their yards. “I wanted to solve the drought,” said McDowell, a 15-year-old sophomore at Rohnert Park’s Technology High School. McDowell’s model of a fence that stores rainwater won him the top awards for his category last March at Sonoma County and Bay Area science fairs. That motivated him to form a company with his parents, pitch his idea to investors and make plans to take a section of his soon-to-be manufactured fence next month...
  • DWP To Explore Pricing Tiers Based On Residents’ Water Usage

    09/02/2014 3:05:54 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 13 replies
    CBSLA.com) ^ | September 2, 2014 8:41 AM | Jon Baird
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA.com) — Would adding a more complex pricing structure at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (DWP) encourage customers to cut back on their water usage? KNX 1070’s Jon Baird reports a recent UCLA study found that while some residents have stepped up conservation efforts, others have leveled off as the statewide drought continues to worsen. Last month, City Councilmen Felipe Fuentes and Mike Bonin introduced a motion (PDF) to have the DWP explore a number of conservation policy changes, including “an increasing block rate structure for DWP customers with more than two tiers, in which...
  • Central California residents rely on bottled water as wells run dry

    08/27/2014 3:11:09 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 22 replies
    LA Times ^ | 8-27-14 | Veronica Rocha
    Extreme drought conditions have become so harsh for the Central Valley community of East Porterville, many of its residents dependent on their own wells have run out of water.. Roughly 300 homes have received a three-week supply of bottled water after Tulare County officials discovered their wells had gone dry. In all, county officials distributed 15,552 1-gallon bottles of water, and have been filling a 2,500-gallon tank with nonpotable water so residents can flush toilets and bathe.
  • Stunning before and after images of California's drought

    08/27/2014 2:19:20 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 57 replies
    Vox ^ | August 27, 2014 | Brad Plumer
    California is currently suffering through its worst drought in at least a century, with 82 percent of the state facing "extreme" or "exceptional" drought. The before-and-after photos below offer a visual look at just how staggering the change has been.
  • Californians tear out lawns to cope with drought

    08/24/2014 10:58:22 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 73 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Aug 24, 2014 12:54 PM EDT | Amy Taxin
    Rick Blankenship was tired of an insatiable lawn he couldn’t keep green, no matter how he watered it, so he decided to tear it out. […] As California faces an historic drought, more residents are following in Blankenship’s footsteps and tearing out thirsty lawns to cut down on water use. Water agencies across the state have been encouraging the change by offering thousands of dollars in rebates to help homeowners make the switch to a drought-friendly landscape with better odds of surviving dry spells common to the local climate. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, which covers 19 million...
  • Sahara dried out slowly, not abruptly: study

    05/08/2008 2:12:41 PM PDT · by suthener · 22 replies · 104+ views
    Reuters ^ | Thu May 8, 2008 2:10pm EDT | Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent
    OSLO (Reuters) - The once-green Sahara turned to desert over thousands of years rather than in an abrupt shift as previously believed, according to a study on Thursday that may help understanding of future climate changes. And there are now signs of a tiny shift back towards greener conditions in parts of the Sahara, apparently because of OSLO (Reuters) - The once-green Sahara turned to desert over thousands of years rather than in an abrupt shift as previously believed, according to a study on Thursday that may help understanding of future climate changes. And there are now signs of a...
  • EARTH was a BAKING LIFELESS DESERT for 5 MILLION years

    10/19/2012 9:11:14 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    The Register ^ | 10/19/2012 | By Brid-Aine Parnell
    Boffins have discovered that "lethally hot" ocean temperatures kept the Earth devoid of life for millions of years after the mass extinction that occurred 250 million years ago. The global wipeout that ended the Permian era, before dinosaurs, wiped out nearly all of the world's species. Mass extinctions like these in Earth's history are usually followed by a "dead zone", a period of tens of thousands of years before new species crop up. But the early Triassic dead zone lasted millions of years, not thousands. Boffins now reckon that the extra-long five million year dead zone was caused by screaming...
  • The Green Sahara, A Desert In Bloom

    10/03/2008 11:55:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies · 837+ views
    Science News, ScienceDaily ^ | September 30, 2008 | Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet zu Kiel
    Reconstructing the climate of the past is an important tool for scientists to better understand and predict future climate changes that are the result of the present-day global warming. Although there is still little known about the Earth's tropical and subtropical regions, these regions are thought to play an important role in both the evolution of prehistoric man and global climate changes. New North African climate reconstructions reveal three 'green Sahara' episodes during which the present-day Sahara Desert was almost completely covered with extensive grasslands, lakes and ponds over the course of the last 120.000 years. The findings of Dr....
  • Sahara Desert Was Once Lush and Populated

    07/20/2006 3:55:53 PM PDT · by Marius3188 · 61 replies · 1,744+ views
    LiveScience ^ | 20 July 2006 | Bjorn Carey
    At the end of the last Ice Age, the Sahara Desert was just as dry and uninviting as it is today. But sandwiched between two periods of extreme dryness were a few millennia of plentiful rainfall and lush vegetation. During these few thousand years, prehistoric humans left the congested Nile Valley and established settlements around rain pools, green valleys, and rivers. The ancient climate shift and its effects are detailed in the July 21 issue of the journal Science. When the rains came Some 12,000 years ago, the only place to live along the eastern Sahara Desert was the Nile...
  • Before they left Africa, early modern humans were 'culturally diverse'

    08/21/2014 9:55:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 18th, 2014 | Oxford University
    Researchers have carried out the biggest ever comparative study of stone tools dating to between 130,000 and 75,000 years ago found in the region between sub-Saharan Africa and Eurasia. They have discovered there are marked differences in the way stone tools were made, reflecting a diversity of cultural traditions. The study has also identified at least four distinct populations, each relatively isolated from each other with their own different cultural characteristics. The research paper also suggests that early populations took advantage of rivers and lakes that criss-crossed the Saharan desert. A climate model coupled with data about these ancient water...
  • Violence and climate change in prehistoric Egypt and Sudan

    07/21/2014 10:50:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    British Museum ^ | Monday, July 14, 2014 | Renée Friedman, curator
    Among the most exciting of the new acquisitions are the materials from the site of Jebel Sahaba, now in northern Sudan, which were donated to the Museum by Dr Fred Wendorf in 2002. Excavating here in 1965–66, as part of the UNESCO-funded campaign to salvage sites destined to be flooded by the construction of the Aswan High Dam, Dr Wendorf found a cemetery (site 117) containing at least 61 individuals dating back to about 13,000 years ago. This discovery was of great significance for two reasons. First, as a designated graveyard, evidently used over several generations, it is one of...
  • Mysterious Earthen Rings Predate Amazon Rainforest

    07/10/2014 12:35:30 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 43 replies
    Live Science ^ | July 07, 2014 03:37pm ET | Stephanie Pappas
    Carson and his colleagues wanted to explore the question of whether early Amazonians had a major impact on the forest. They focused on the Amazon of northeastern Bolivia, where they had sediment cores from two lakes nearby major earthworks sites. These sediment cores hold ancient pollen grains and charcoal from long-ago fires, and can hint at the climate and ecosystem that existed when the sediment was laid down as far back as 6,000 years ago. An examination of the two cores — one from the large lake, Laguna Oricore, and one from the smaller lake, Laguna Granja — revealed a...
  • Study Confirms Ancient River Systems in Sahara 100,000 Years Ago

    09/12/2013 7:21:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, September 11, 2013 | editors
    "Previous spatial analysis of the regional topography has shown there are major watersheds that are dry today but which would drain north from these [the Ahaggar and Tibesti ranges in the south] mountains towards the Mediterranean," says Coulthard, et. al. "Satellite imagery reveals traces of major river channels linked to these watersheds, now partially buried under sand dune deposits." It "provides the first strong quantitative evidence for the presence of three major river systems flowing across the Sahara during MIS 5e [Marine Isotope Stage 5e, or 130,000 years ago]".* "Whilst we cannot state for certain that humans migrated alongside these...
  • Giant stone-age axes found in African lake basin

    09/12/2009 5:44:18 PM PDT · by decimon · 55 replies · 1,886+ views
    PhysOrg.com ^ | September 10, 2009 | Unknown
    Four giant stone hand axes were recovered from the the dry basin of Lake Makgadikgadi in the Kalahari Desert. Oxford University researchers have unearthed new evidence from the lake basin in Botswana that suggests that the region was once much drier and wetter than it is today. They have documented thousands of stone tools on the lake bed, which sheds new light on how humans in Africa adapted to several substantial climate change events during the period that coincided with the last Ice Age in Europe. Researchers from the School of Geography and the Environment at the University of Oxford...
  • The African Source Of The Amazon's Fertilizer

    11/18/2006 4:22:58 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 1,078+ views
    Science News Magazine ^ | 11-18-2006 | Sid Perkins
    The African source of the Amazon's fertilizer Sid Perkins In the winter months in the Northern Hemisphere, massive dust storms from the African Sahara waft southwest across the Atlantic to drop tons of vital minerals on the Amazon basin in South America. Now, scientists have pinpointed the source of many of those dust storms and estimated their dust content. ON THE WAY. Satellite photo shows dust (arrow), bound for the Amazon, blowing away from the Sahara's Bodélé depression. NASA The Amazonian rainforest depends on Saharan dust for many of its nutrients, including iron and phosphorus (SN: 9/29/01, p. 200: http://www.sciencenews.org/articles/20010929/bob9.asp)....
  • Amazon rainforest ‘could become a desert’

    07/24/2006 4:44:22 AM PDT · by voletti · 49 replies · 1,004+ views
    daily times pakistan ^ | 7/24/06 | daily times monitor
    LAHORE: The vast Amazon rainforest is on the verge of being turned into desert, with catastrophic consequences for the world’s climate, alarming research suggests. And the process, which would be irreversible, could begin as early as next year. Geoffrey Lean and Fred Pearce, writing for The Independent on Sunday, quote studies conducted by the blue-chip Woods Hole Research Centre in Amazonia as concluding that the forest cannot withstand more than two consecutive years of drought without breaking down. “Scientists say that this would spread drought into the northern hemisphere, including Britain, and could massively accelerate global warming with incalculable consequences,...
  • Scientists Explore Lakefront Property, in the Sahara

    02/01/2004 1:36:28 PM PST · by sarcasm · 25 replies · 217+ views
    The New York Times ^ | January 27, 2004 | BRENDA FOWLER
    he paleontologists were driving across the scorched and trackless Ténéré Desert of Niger, following a low ridge of rock bearing dinosaur fossils. Suddenly, someone on the team, led by Dr. Paul Sereno of the University of Chicago, spotted something dark against the tawny dunes.Getting out of their vehicles, they stepped into sand littered with the fossilized bones of modern crocodiles, hippos, camels and birds — interesting creatures, to be sure, but not exactly the quarry of these paleontologists. "But then things got really strange," recalls Gabrielle Lyon, a member of the expedition who is Dr. Sereno's wife and the director...
  • California: Desalination Plants May Be State’s Only Solution Despite Environmental, Energy Concerns

    08/02/2014 9:28:49 AM PDT · by grundle · 52 replies
    International Business Times ^ | July 27, 2014 | Angelo Young
    Full title: California Sand Fire: Desalination Plants May Be State’s Only Solution Despite Environmental, Energy Concerns One of the solutions could be something parts of the Middle East began adopting decades ago: desalination plants, an energy-intensive process of converting seawater into drinking water. Meeting California’s water needs might not help combat the effect of global warming, but an ample supply of water would at least help keep back the dry conditions from around residential communities, and it would help the state’s massive agricultural industry meet its own water needs. Currently California is building the largest desalination plant in the Western...
  • California drought: 'May have to migrate people'[out of the State]

    08/02/2014 8:01:23 AM PDT · by Lorianne · 92 replies
    CNBC ^ | 24 July 2014 | Mark Koba
    It's going from worse to worst each week in California. Suffering in its third year of drought, more than 58 percent of the state is currently in "exceptional drought" stage, according to the latest U.S. Drought Monitor map. That marks a huge jump from just seven days ago, when about 36 percent of the state was categorized that way. Exceptional drought, the most extreme category, indicates widespread crop and pasture losses and shortages of water in reservoirs, streams and wells. If the state continues on this path, there may have to be thoughts about moving people out, said Lynn Wilson,...
  • The Drought Goes From Bad To Catastrophic

    08/02/2014 5:50:31 AM PDT · by blam · 65 replies
    Zero Hedge ^ | 8-2-2014 | Tyler Durden
    Tyler Durden 08/01/2014 As we previously commented, when scientists start using phrases such as "the worst drought" and "as bad as you can imagine" to describe what is going on in the western half of the country, you know that things are bad. However, in recent weeks the dreadful situation in California has gone from bad to catastrophic as the U.S. Drought Monitor reported that more than half of the state is now in experiencing 'exceptional' drought, the most severe category available. And most of the state – 81% – currently has one of the two most intense levels of...
  • Water Main Break Next to UCLA Prompts Flooding on Campus, Closure of Sunset Blvd.

    07/29/2014 5:22:51 PM PDT · by doug from upland · 55 replies
    abc ^ | 7/29/14
    LIVE VIDEO AT THE LINK A 102-year-old water main broke in Westwood Tuesday, sending water flooding into streets and the UCLA campus, stranding people and vehicles and prompting the closure of Sunset Boulevard on Tuesday. The water main break sent a geyser gushing into the air on July 29, 2014. (Credit: KTLA) The water main break sent a geyser gushing into the air on July 29, 2014. (Credit: KTLA) People were stranded by the rising water, according to the Los Angeles Fire Department, which was called to the incident shortly before 3:30 p.m. Three people were rescued from parking structures,...
  • America Might Soon Witness A Second Dust Bowl-Like Migration

    07/27/2014 8:36:23 PM PDT · by blam · 39 replies
    BI - The Corner Side Yard ^ | 7-27-2014 | Pete Saunders
    Pete Saunders, The Corner Side YardJuly 27, 2014 drought monitor UNL Debates still persist about the impact of climate change, but from my perspective, the early results are in. We are now reaching the point where cities, metro areas and states will have to consider taking bold and assertive measures to even maintain their current quality of life levels. And we are also reaching the point at which alternate futures for our cities must be considered. That future could very well mean fewer people in the dry West and coastal areas of the East and South, and more people in...
  • 20 Signs The Drought In The Western United States Is Starting To Become Apocalyptic

    07/17/2014 1:12:09 PM PDT · by Maudeen · 171 replies
    Prophecy Newswatch ^ | July 17, 2014 | Michael Snyder
    20 Signs The Drought In The Western United States Is Starting To Become Apocalyptic July 17, 2014 | Michael Snyder When scientists start using phrases such as "the worst drought" and "as bad as you can imagine" to describe what is going on in the western half of the country, you know that things are bad. Thanks to an epic drought that never seems to end, we are witnessing the beginning of a water crisis that most people never even dreamed was possible in this day and age. The state of California is getting ready to ban people from watering...
  • California Approves Fines for Wasting Water During Drought

    07/15/2014 7:03:55 PM PDT · by Up Yours Marxists · 28 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | July 16, 2014 01:12 GMT | Bettina Boxall
    Cities throughout California will have to impose mandatory restrictions on outdoor watering under an emergency state rule approved Tuesday. Saying that it was time to increase conservation in the midst of one of the worst droughts in decades, the State Water Resources Control Board adopted drought regulations that give local agencies the authority to fine those who waste water up to $500 a day. Many Southern California cities, including Los Angeles, Santa Barbara and Long Beach, already have mandatory restrictions in place. But most communities across the state are still relying on voluntary conservation, and Californians in general have fallen...
  • How Texas could buy Louisiana water [aquaduct(s)]

    07/15/2014 8:34:33 AM PDT · by topher · 23 replies
    July 15, 2014 | Vanity
    This might be some background reading on this: FoxNews: California expected to set mandatory water curbs for first time Over one hundred years ago, folks in California were planning their future by planning on aquaducts. Occasionally, Louisiana has too much water (flooding) and Texas too little. The key number in all of this is that Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas is at about 400-500 feet above sea level. That means an aquaduct system could be built such there could be four to five stations that raise the water 100 feet or more. Louisiana has a number of river systems (besides the Mississippi...
  • Drought Shaming Pitting Neighbors Against Neighbors On Social Media

    07/14/2014 5:32:02 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 27 replies
    CBS Sacramento ^ | July 11, 2014 | Anjali Hemphill
    SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — Neighbors are tattling on neighbors for wasting water and some are taking their drought shaming to social media. If you’ve ever had the feeling you’re being watched while you water your lawn, there’s a good chance you are during this historic drought. In Sacramento, water wasters can face fines, and the enforcer may be someone who lives right next door. Terrance Davis with the city department of utilities says he’s seeing a trend of drought shaming. “Our water use complaint calls have gone up exponentially from the last 2 years,” he said. Karen Halbo lives in River...
  • Water-Guzzling Pot Plants Draining Drought-Wracked California

    07/07/2014 9:40:48 PM PDT · by Steelfish · 44 replies
    NBCNews ^ | July 7, 2014 | HARRIET TAYLOR
    Water-Guzzling Pot Plants Draining Drought-Wracked California BY HARRIET TAYLOR California cannabis growers may be making millions, but their thirsty plants are sucking up a priceless resource: water. Now scientists say that if no action is taken in the drought-wracked state, the consequences for fisheries and wildlife will be dire. "If this activity continues on the trajectory it's on, we're looking at potentially streams going dry, streams that harbor endangered fish species like salmon, steelhead," said Scott Bauer of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. Studying aerial photographs of four watersheds within northern California's so-called Emerald Triangle, Bauer found that...
  • California Flooded With People Tattling on 'Water Wasters'

    07/06/2014 7:16:53 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 64 replies
    Newsmax.com ^ | July 5, 2014 | Sandy Fitzgerald
    California's drought is creating a deluge of tattletales, after government officials encouraged residents to snitch on their neighbors for wasting water. The state declared a drought emergency five months ago, but residents have only cut their water usage by about 5 percent, reports The New York Times, cutting back much less than the 20 percent Gov. Jerry Brown asked for in January. And since people aren't heeding the warnings from the state, cities in the state are asking residents to report their neighbors for wasting water, and are finding that people are all too willing to tell on each other....
  • Coffee Is About To Get More Expensive Everywhere

    06/21/2014 4:33:09 AM PDT · by blam · 53 replies
    BI, The Wire ^ | 6-21-2014 | DANIELLE WIENER-BRONNER
    DANIELLE WIENER-BRONNER, The WireJun. 20, 2014 ï‚‚Months after we all started fretting over the prospect of a global coffee shortage, it seems we might actually start to feel the caffeine-related effects of Brazil's massive drought and Central America's coffee fungus, in the form industry-wide retail price increases. The Washington Post reported back in February that coffee costs were expected to rise later in the year: For now, retail prices for coffee are stable. Roasters typically have enough supplies to cover themselves for a few months. But if the price of the Arabica (pronounced uh-RAB-ick-uh) beans continues to rise, consumers could...
  • Kim Jong Un Is Really Mad at His Weathermen

    06/12/2014 8:02:18 AM PDT · by Enterprise · 11 replies
    Newser ^ | June 12, 2014 | Arden Dier
    "The meteorological service needs to "provide accurate data for weather forecast and meteorological and climatic information required by various fields of national economy in good time," Kim said, though he appeared to place blame on outdated equipment and scientific method. The Washington Post notes, however, that the "strain on the faces of those being lectured is quite evident" per Rodong Sinmun's photos; CNN describes Kim as appearing "red-faced."
  • Firewise Landscaping

    06/06/2014 5:31:47 AM PDT · by orsonwb · 9 replies
    The How Do Gardener ^ | June 4, 2014 | Rick Bickling
    With the severe drought that has been blanketing most of the country, and the wildfires ravaging Colorado this summer, now is the time to take steps to prepare for the unexpected...
  • Dust Bowl Conditions Have Returned To Kansas, Oklahoma And North Texas

    05/29/2014 11:30:32 AM PDT · by blam · 21 replies
    Zero Hedge ^ | 5-29-2014 | Tyler Durden
    Tyler Durden 05/29/2014 In early 1978, a song entitled "Dust in the Wind" by a rock band known as Kansas shot up the Billboard charts. When Kerry Livgren penned those now famous lyrics, he probably never imagined that Dust Bowl conditions would return to his home state just a few short decades later. Sadly, that is precisely what is happening. When American explorers first traveled through north Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas, they referred to it as "the Great American Desert" and they doubted that anyone would ever be able to farm it. But as history has shown, when that area...
  • California’s flawed water system can’t track usage

    05/26/2014 9:51:02 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 16 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 27, 2014 12:02 AM EDT | Jason Dearen and Garance Burke
    Call them the fortunate ones: Nearly 4,000 California companies, farms and others are allowed to use free water with little oversight when the state is so bone dry that deliveries to nearly everyone else have been severely slashed. Their special status dates back to claims made more than a century ago when water was plentiful. But in the third year of a drought that has ravaged California, these “senior rights holders” dominated by corporations and agricultural concerns are not obliged to conserve water. Nobody knows how much water they actually use, though it amounts to trillions of gallons each year,...
  • How The Coming El Niño Will Change The World's Weather

    05/22/2014 12:45:13 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies
    BI - Live Science ^ | 5-22-2014 | Becky Oskin, LiveScience
    Becky Oskin May 22, 2014, 12:56 PM The forecast for a drought-busting El Niño this winter has Californians as giddy as kids at Christmas. An El Niño is the warm phase of a natural Pacific Ocean climate cycle driven by sea surface temperatures. The redistribution of hotter versus colder surface water triggers changes in atmospheric circulation that influences rainfall and storm patterns around the world. Warm water is piling up in the equatorial eastern Pacific Ocean right now, similar to the pattern that preceded the strong 1997-1998 El Niño, when California was drenched by a series of winter storms. The...
  • Feinstein: Enviros no help on California drought

    05/15/2014 4:06:24 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 28 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | May 15, 2014 | By Carolyn Lochhead
    Sen. Dianne Feinstein will try to fast-track farm-friendly drought legislation through the Senate over the objections of environmentalists, who the senator complains have done nothing to help her adapt California's aging water system to deal with climate change and the addition of millions of thirsty residents. Feinstein's bill alarms both environmentalists and Bay Area House Democrats, who fear she would tilt California water policy away from the state's devastated salmon runs. Asked about opposition from environmental groups, Feinstein said, "Well, that's really too bad, isn't it? I would be very happy to know what they propose. ... I have not...
  • Half Of The US Is In A Drought

    05/14/2014 3:01:40 PM PDT · by blam · 39 replies
    BI ^ | mike Carlowicz
    Half Of The US Is In A Drought Mike Carlowicz, NASA Earth ObservatoryMay 14, 2014 Drought - NASA Earth Observatory U.S. Drought Monitor. As of May 6, 2014, half of the United States was experiencing some level of drought. Nearly 15 percent of the nation was gripped by extreme to exceptional drought. For the Plains and the Southwest, it's a pattern that has been persistent for much of the past several years. The map above was developed by the U.S. National Drought Monitor, a partnership of U.S. Department of Agriculture, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the University of...
  • Study Links California Drought To Global Climate Change

    04/24/2014 8:02:17 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 34 replies
    CBS Local Sacramento ^ | April 24, 2014
    While researchers have sometimes connected weather extremes to man-made global warming, usually it’s not done in real time. Now a study is asserting a link between climate change and both the intensifying California drought and the polar vortex blamed for a harsh winter that mercifully has just ended in many places. The Utah State University scientists involved in the study say they hope what they found can help them predict the next big weird winter.
  • Hydraulic Fracturing: Staying Afloat in Times of Tightening Water Supply

    04/16/2014 4:53:49 PM PDT · by thackney · 7 replies
    Rig Zone ^ | April 16, 2014 | Gene Lockard|
    One of the criticisms levied against hydraulic fracturing, particularly during recent periods of drought, is the amount of water used in the process. However, energy companies are seeking to reduce water use during hydraulic fracturing, even as research shows more water is used in other activities. The numbers put things into perspective. The amount of water used to frack a well varies, but most reporting entities put the figure in a range of about 3 to 6 million gallons of water. In Pennsylvania, the average amount of water per well is about 4.4 million gallons, according to State Impact Pennsylvania,...
  • Sticker shock at the steak house; beef prices highest in 27 years

    04/15/2014 3:08:00 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 67 replies
    Edd Hendee reached into the chilled glass case containing cold cuts of steak, the classic Texas entrée upon which he built his restaurant and his fortune, proudly showing off his merchandise like a jeweler displaying his diamonds. “This is a center cut filet,” he said. “It’s the very best filet you can possibly buy. And that’s why it’s expensive.” And lately, at the Taste of Texas restaurant in west Houston, it’s become even more expensive. “When the price goes from just under $20 a pound to us wholesale to almost $25 a pound, that’s almost a $5 increase in this...
  • North Texas city awaits word on wastewater re-use

    04/14/2014 12:18:05 PM PDT · by topher · 59 replies
    My SanAntonio.com ^ | 13-April-2014 | AP - By BETSY BLANEY
    UBBOCK, Texas (AP) — Wichita Falls is so far behind on rainfall that city leaders are asking state regulators for permission to use treated toilet flushes as drinking water.
  • Drought May Be Forcing Rabid Skunks Into Populated Areas

    03/23/2014 5:24:06 AM PDT · by rktman · 21 replies
    sacramento.cbslocal.com ^ | 3/21/2014 | Ian Schwartz
    Rabid skunks are on the rise and have been spotted in high numbers in El Dorado County. Hold that leash a little tighter, because your furry friend now has more furry foes to worry about. We all know skunks carry a unique smell, but there are more and more reports of them carrying the deadly rabies virus.
  • Some California cities seek water independence

    03/16/2014 9:25:12 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 11 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Mar 16, 2014 11:41 AM EDT | Alicia Chang
    … California is gripped by historic parched conditions that have desiccated farmland, dried up reservoirs and forced rural communities to ration water. A welcome dousing late last month did little to break the arid spell. Even before this latest drought emergency, some agencies that historically draw their water from the overtapped Colorado River and Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta have taken steps to slash their dependence on water from outside sources and boost their own supplies. Past drought woes, particularly in the late 1980s and early 1990s, have forced some communities to rethink where their water comes from, and they’re increasingly...
  • Disaster That Struck The Ancients

    12/08/2001 2:51:43 PM PST · by blam · 206 replies · 13,091+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-26-2001 | Fekri Hassan
    Thursday, 26 July, 2001, 12:12 GMT 13:12 UK Disaster that struck the ancients The pharaohs of the Egyptian Old Kingdom had built the mightiest legacy of the ancient world - the pyramids at Giza. But after nearly a thousand years of stability, central authority disintegrated and the country collapsed into chaos for more than a 100 years. What happened, and why, has remained a huge controversy. But Professor Fekri Hassan, from University College London, UK, wanted to solve the mystery, by gathering together scientific clues. His inspiration was the little known tomb in southern Egypt of a regional governor, Ankhtifi. ...
  • Netanyahu, Gov. Brown Sign Pro-Business Pact

    03/05/2014 5:16:59 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    ap ^ | March 5, 2014 3:57 PM
    During a meeting at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View, the two emphasized their joint interests in cybersecurity, energy sources and water conservation, and suggested Israel — an arid country with a growing population — might be able to help California cope with its ongoing drought. “California doesn’t need to have a water problem,” Netanyahu said. “Israel has no water problems because we are the number one recyclers of waste water, we stop water leaks, we use drip irrigation and desalination.” Brown said he would welcome their ideas. “Israel has demonstrated how efficient a country can be, and there...
  • California farmers hire dowsers to find water

    03/03/2014 6:20:52 AM PST · by shove_it · 17 replies
    MyFoxNY ^ | 3 Mar 2014 | JASON DEAREN
    ST. HELENA, Calif. (AP) — With California in the grips of drought, farmers throughout the state are using a mysterious and some say foolhardy tool for locating underground water: dowsers, or water witches. Practitioners of dowsing use rudimentary tools — usually copper sticks or wooden "divining rods" that resemble large wishbones — and what they describe as a natural energy to find water or minerals hidden deep underground. While both state and federal water scientists disapprove of dowsing, California "witchers" are busy as farmers seek to drill more groundwater wells due to the state's record drought that persists despite recent...
  • It's the Desert, Stupid

    02/27/2014 6:30:07 AM PST · by Kaslin · 20 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | February 27, 2014 | Michael Reagan
    Someone better send John Kerry a high school geography textbook. Our brilliant Secretary of State doesn't seem to know that California is about two-thirds desert. Based on his recent statements about the cause of my home state's 13-month drought, Kerry doesn't know anything about California's history or climate, either. He thinks the state's current drought - which is draining reservoirs, raising fears of severe water shortages in small towns and already causing the usual idiots to demand the death penalty for lawn watering -- is the result of man-made climate change. If only more of Kerry's Hollywood soul mates would...
  • Severe drought? California has been here before

    02/23/2014 4:06:29 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    latimes.com ^ | February 23, 2014, 5:00 a.m. | Bettina Boxall
    "From a climate perspective, we've been here before," Martin Hoerling, a federal research meteorologist, said last week at a drought forum in Sacramento. "We shouldn't be surprised." The state dried out like a prune in 1976-77 and before that in 1924, the most parched periods in the modern record. And ancient tree-ring records show that during the last millennium, conditions have at times been even worse. Take the year 1580, which left the narrowest growth ring — or none at all — in the California trees that University of Arizona scientist David Meko used to reconstruct a 1,000-year history of...
  • California farmers won't get federal water

    02/22/2014 1:12:09 PM PST · by Robwin · 60 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | February 22, 2014 | Scott Smith
    FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Without a lot more rain and snow, many California farmers caught in the state's drought can expect to receive no irrigation water this year from a vast system of rivers, canals and reservoirs interlacing the state, federal officials announced Friday. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation released its first outlook of the year, saying that the agency will continue to monitor rain and snow fall, but the grim levels so far prove that the state is in the throes of one of its driest periods in recorded history. Farmers who rely on the federally run Central Valley...