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Keyword: film

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  • The 13 Alfred Hitchcock movies you need to watch in your lifetime

    08/14/2017 7:08:42 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 65 replies
    Business Insider ^ | August 9, 2017 | Jason Guerrasio
    Alfred Hitchcock is more than just the master of suspense. Throughout his career, the legendary director transformed cinema as we know it today through his unique visual eye, masterful storytelling, and incredible showmanship. In celebration of his birthday on Sunday, we look back on his most memorable works -- ranging from the crowd-pleasing "Psycho" to a movie regarded as one of the best ever made, "Vertigo." Here are the 13 Alfred Hitchcock movies you need to watch in your lifetime:
  • Joseph Bologna, 'My Favorite Year' Actor and Oscar-Nominated Screenwriter, Dies at 82

    08/14/2017 8:05:20 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 21 replies
    The Hollywood Reporter ^ | August 13, 2017 | Mike Barnes
    Joseph Bologna, an actor, playwright and screenwriter who was so memorable as the egotistical King Kaiser in the 1982 comedy classic My Favorite Year, has died. He was 82. Bologna died Sunday morning at City of Hope hospital in Duarte, Calif. He was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer three years ago, said his wife of 52 years, actress and screenwriter Renee Taylor. Bologna received an Oscar nomination for adapted screenplay, shared with his wife and David Zelag Goodman, for his work on Lovers and Other Strangers (1970). The couple had first written it for Broadway in a 1968 production directed by...
  • 'Bonnie and Clyde' at 50: Ultraviolent gangster film changed American cinema

    08/13/2017 6:07:30 PM PDT · by Borges · 88 replies
    Cleveland.com ^ | 8/13/2017 | John Petkovic
    <p>So proclaimed the trailer for "Bonnie and Clyde" when it hit the theaters in Aug. 1967.</p> <p>On the surface, the tagline to Arthur Penn's groundbreaking gangster film about young lovers on the run from authority snugly fit into the Summer of Love. Well, at least two-thirds of it.</p>
  • 'The Dark Tower' is getting poor reviews, here's 7 great Stephen King movies

    08/04/2017 12:57:40 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 85 replies
    Canoe ^ | August 4, 2017 | Steve Tilley
    ... The Dark Tower is taking a serious drubbing, and many diehard King fans are similarly displeased with how the movie turned out. But let’s be honest, this isn’t exactly the first film adaptation of a Stephen King book to lay an egg. Children of the Corn, anyone? Maximum Overdrive? The Lawnmower Man? Fortunately, King’s cinematic oeuvre is chockablock with movies that are actually good. If you were let down by The Dark Tower – or you plan to give it a miss entirely – here are seven great Stephen King movies that you can stream or digitally rent from...
  • Fast Times at Ridgemont High: A Conservative Sex Comedy

    07/25/2017 8:58:17 AM PDT · by Skooz · 120 replies
    NRO ^ | 07/25/2017 | Kyle Smith
    Upon its release in 1982, no one would have expected Fast Times at Ridgemont High ever to receive the imprimatur of classic. The movie was engineered to make a quick buck at a moment when Hollywood was giddy about its latest easy-money formula: Take some horny teens, put them in a broad, dumb comedy that invited teen boys to ogle bare breasts, and load the soundtrack with hit rock songs. Low-budget movies like Private Lessons (1981), The Last American Virgin (1982), Goin’ All the Way (1982), Private School (1983), Losin’ It (1983), Spring Break (1983), Bachelor Party (1984), and especially...
  • Looking for Film Recommendations, More Cerebral and Less Violent?

    07/23/2017 4:56:36 AM PDT · by Chickensoup · 164 replies
    chickensoup | 07.23.17 | chickensoup
    This is a slow Sunday morning. I am not much of a vid watcher. And for over 25 years we didn't have a TV. Back a few years ago I found a TV, with Freeper input and have Netflix. To me the TV is a great going to the theater experience. I have been watching different things on the TV for occasional entertainment for the past couple of years, Netflix both streaming and DVD. I have discovered that most shows that I have watched, both the compelling ones that I have enjoyed like Longmire, Bluebloods, and even Father Brown have...
  • Second Big Film Studio Set For Fayette County (5,000 jobs in Georgia)

    07/10/2017 9:07:41 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    WABE-FM ^ | July 10, 2017 | Ellie Hensley
    A $58 million film studio is in the works for Fayette County, just minutes from Pinewood Atlanta Studios. This week’s Atlanta Business Chronicle reports the 24-acre, six-stage complex in north Fayetteville would be called Cinema South Studios. The team behind the venture includes Alvin Williams, a film producer with more than 30 years of experience in the film industry; Jim Viviano of 5G Studio Collaborative, the architect behind the project; and Todd Brooks, president at Brooks Real Estate Development Inc. Winter Construction will build the studios once funding is in place. The partners plan to break ground this December with...
  • Italian actress Elsa Martinelli dead aged 82

    07/09/2017 9:35:50 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 15 replies
    Daily Mirror ^ | July 8, 2017 | Emmeline Saunders and Vicki Newman
    Italian film star Elsa Martinelli has died today at the age of 82. She passed away in Rome after a long and glamorous career as a star of the silver screen. Elsa was best known for her roles in Le Rouge Et Le Noir in 1954 and for The Indian Fighter the following year, in which she starred opposite Kirk Douglas.
  • Reagan Derangement Syndrome Is Alive and Well

    06/28/2017 6:05:53 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 12 replies
    National Review ^ | June 28, 2017 | Kyle Smith
    To believe, in the 1980s, that Ronald Reagan was going to blow up the world may have been merely peculiar. To believe so today is a symptom of raging Reagan Derangement Syndrome. And yet here we are, with The Reagan Show, a new documentary rehashing the paranoid style of Reaganography, set for limited theatrical release on June 30 and video-on-demand release shortly thereafter. The continuing popularity of President Reagan is a source of profound irritation and unease to liberals. To assuage their pain, they have gone back to their initial rationalization for how Reagan became so beloved: He cheated. Though...
  • NY lawmakers eye tax credits for minority filmmakers

    06/15/2017 7:29:19 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 20 replies
    New York Post ^ | June 15, 2017 | Kirstan Conley and Carl Campanile
    Lawmakers want to create $5 million in new tax credits for TV and film directors and producers who work in New York — but only if they’re minorities or women. Legislation introduced in both the Assembly and state Senate would require the state to set aside the funds from the existing $420 million Empire State Film Production Tax Credit.
  • Jennifer Lawrence Is OK After Her Private Jet Lost Both Its Engines

    06/12/2017 11:12:45 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 124 replies
    cosmpolitan ^ | 6/11/17 | Laura Beck
    Forbes is reporting that Jennifer Lawrence's survived her private jet performing an emergency landing after losing both its engines. Yikes! JLaw's plane, which departed from her hometown of Louisville, Kentucky, lost one of its engines at 31,000 feet. The pilot decided to make an emergency landing in Buffalo, New York, but then things got even scarier when the second engine shut down.
  • Salma Hayek Confronts John Lithgow in ‘Beatriz at Dinner’ [White Bashing Flick Out Soon]

    06/06/2017 7:03:41 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 15 replies
    variety.com | 4/12/17 | Dave McNary
    Salma Hayek blisters John Lithgow’s self-satisfied real-estate mogul at a dinner party that goes off the rails... Hayek plays an immigrant from a poor town in Mexico... Lithgow’s appropriately named Doug Strutt mistakes Hayek for the help...As she’s talking about coming to the U.S., Lithgow blurts out, “Did you come legally?” Later, Lithgow is showing off photos of a rhinoceros he’s killed in Africa, insisting, “I don’t consider it murder” because it supposedly helps preservation efforts. It’s too much for Hayek, who throws her phone at him and says, “You think it’s funny? I think it’s sick.” “Beatriz at Dinner”...
  • The Politically Incorrect Guide to Memorial Day Movies

    05/27/2017 11:43:44 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 83 replies
    National Review ^ | May 27, 2017 | Arthur Herman
    Unlike many of today's 'anti-war' duds, these seven works honor Americans who served in war. Memorial Day is of course when we remember those who died serving their country in our armed services. There was a time when America's movie industry took pride in honoring American servicemen, both the living and the dead; there are a few actors and directors in Hollywood who still do. But since movies about Americans at war have largely gone in the opposite direction since Vietnam, this weekend it might be worthwhile going back to see seven movies that deal with war in an honest...
  • We Ranked the 40 Greatest Star Wars Moments

    05/24/2017 5:42:06 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 76 replies
    Time ^ | May 23, 2017 | Eliana Dockterman, Alex Fitzpatrick, Megan McCluskey, Matt Vella
    No science fiction franchise has been more influential than Star Wars. (Sorry, Star Trek fans!) Over the last 40 years, the space opera saga created by George Lucas has delivered 1,062 minutes of lightsaber duels, intergalactic dogfights and dynastic drama. Even non-fans are likely to immediately recognize iconic imagery like Darth Vader’s helmet, the Millennium Falcon, or Luke Skywalker’s lightsaber. Which begs the question: of the hundreds, maybe thousands, to choose from which Star Wars moments are the best? The series, now owned by Disney, turns 40 on May 25. So TIME's entertainment team and sundry Star Wars super fans...
  • Is this the most violent movie year in history?

    05/19/2017 9:36:04 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 20 replies
    Los Angeles Daily News ^ | May 16, 2017 | Bob Strauss
    The new “Alien: Covenant” boasts stellar production design, Michael Fassbender’s subtly masterful dual performance and thoughtful musings about the creation of life. But that’s not why anyone is going to see it. They want to see how Ridley Scott’s prequel to his groundbreakingly gory, 1979 “Alien” — a film that delivered on its pitch line “In space no one can hear you scream” — tops the chest-bursting slaughter of the original sci-fi classic. “I think Ridley’s first line was, ‘We’re going to make a hard R-rated film, and we’re going to need a lot of claret,’ which is a term...
  • When Alfred Hitchcock Cried After Receiving Holy Communion

    04/30/2017 3:47:40 PM PDT · by NYer · 24 replies
    NC Register ^ | April 28, 2017 | Kathy Schiffer
    On April 29, 1980, the world lost a great storyteller when Alfred Hitchcock, the “Master of Suspense,” died in his Bel Aire home at the age of 81. His repertoire included more than 50 films in the suspense genre – films such as “The Birds,” “Psycho,” “North by Northwest” and others. The 2012 film “Hitchcock”, which purported to tell the director's life story, gave little attention to his faith. Instead, it spotlighted Hitch's alleged behind-the-scenes discord with his wife of 54 years, screenwriter Alma Reville, and his domineering approach to actors on the set of his films. Two biographies...
  • The Godfather cast discuss Al Pacino's height and Marlon Brando's ***** at Tribeca reunion

    04/30/2017 2:34:56 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 24 replies
    Entertainment Weekly ^ | April 29, 2017 | Kevin P. Sullivan
    The closing night of the Tribeca Film Festival brought together the cast from two of the most important and influential movies ever made: The Godfather and The Godfather: Part II. Led by the festival’s co-founder, Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, Diane Keaton, James Caan, Robert Duvall, and Talia Shire took the stage with their director, Francis Ford Coppola, to look back on the iconic films after they screened back to back for the audience. The discussion, which was led by director Taylor Hackford, focused mainly on the first film, which allowed De Niro — who only appeared in Part II...
  • Jonathan Demme, Oscar-Winning Director, Is Dead at 73

    04/26/2017 10:27:35 AM PDT · by Cecily · 52 replies
    New York Times ^ | April 26, 2017 | Bruce Weber
    Jonathan Demme, the Oscar-winning filmmaker who observed emphatically American characters with a discerning eye, a social conscience and a rock ’n’ roll heart, achieving especially wide acclaim with “The Silence of the Lambs” and “Philadelphia,” died on Wednesday at his home in Manhattan. He was 73. His publicist, Leslee Dart, confirmed the death. Mr. Demme disclosed that he had cancer in 2015. Mob wives, CB radio buffs and AIDS victims; Hannibal Lecter, Howard Hughes and Jimmy Carter: Mr. Demme (pronounced DEM-ee) plucked his subjects and stories largely from the stew of contemporary American subcultures and iconography. He created a body...
  • Clifton James, Sheriff in James Bond Films, Dies at 96

    04/15/2017 4:25:36 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 48 replies
    Variety ^ | April 15, 2017 | Lawrence Yee
    Clifton James, a veteran actor who appeared as Sheriff J.W. Pepper in two James Bond films, died Saturday morning at age 96... James most famous role came on film. He appeared in two James Bond films opposite Roger Moore: “Live and Let Die” (1973) and “The Man with the Golden Gun” (1974). He portrayed the crowing Louisiana sheriff, J.W. Pepper (pictured). James would play similar Southern lawman in numerous other roles during his career, including “Silver Streak” and “Superman II” Among his other film credits included “Cool Hand Luke,” “Eight Men Out” and “The Bonfire of the Vanities.” ...
  • Film Review: ‘The Case for Christ’

    04/08/2017 9:07:28 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 27 replies
    Variety.com ^ | 4/6/17 | Joe Leydon
    An intriguing faith-based detective story in which an investigative reporter becomes a true believer. Although it sporadically errs on the side of sentimentality and simplification, “The Case for Christ” sustains interest, and even generates mild suspense, while offering a faith-based spin on the template of an investigative-journalism drama. Director Jon Gunn and screenwriter Brian Bird have shrewdly reconstituted Lee Strobel’s best-selling book about his road-to-Damascus transition from outspoken atheist to devout Christian as a kind of theological detective story. Of course, there’s never any real doubt as to how the story will be resolved.