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Keyword: fungus

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  • Drug-resistant 'Japanese fungus' infecting hospitals across the UK

    08/15/2017 8:03:48 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 31 replies
    Sky News ^ | August 15, 2017 | By Bethany Minelle
    Hospitals across the UK have been hit by a drug-resistant Japanese fungus which has so far infected more than 200 patients. The potentially deadly superbug has spread to at least 55 hospitals and is particularly dangerous for anyone with a weakened immune system. Most worryingly, the fungus is resistant to the most commonly prescribed fungicidal drug, fluconazole, and the species has the ability to rapidly evolve to develop resistance. 'Candida auris' - which was first identified in the ear of a patient in Japan - is able to live both on the skin and inside the body. "Large" outbreaks have...
  • 'Superbug' fungus new menace in US hospitals, mostly NY, NJ

    04/25/2017 8:01:04 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 20 replies
    ap.org ^ | 4/25/17 | MIKE STOBBE
    A 'superbug' fungus is emerging as a new menace in U.S. hospitals, mostly in New York and New Jersey. First identified in Japan in 2009, the fungus has spread to more than a dozen countries around the globe. The oldest of the 66 cases reported in the U.S. dates back to 2013, but most were reported in the last year. The fungus called Candida auris is a harmful form of yeast. Scientists say it can be hard to identify with standard lab tests. U.S. health officials sounded alarms last year because two of the three kinds of commonly used antifungal...
  • Deadly fungal infection that doctors have been fearing now reported in U.S.

    03/11/2017 7:18:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 47 replies
    kansascity.com ^ | 03/11/2017 | Lena H. Sun
    The fungus, a strain of a kind of yeast known as Candida auris, has been reported in a dozen countries on five continents starting in 2009, where it was first found in an ear infection in a patient in Japan. Since then, the fungus has been reported in Colombia, India, Israel, Kenya, Kuwait, Pakistan, South Korea, Venezuela and the United Kingdom. Unlike garden variety yeast infections, this one causes serious bloodstream infections, spreads easily from person to person in health-care settings, and survives for months on skin and for weeks on bed rails, chairs and other hospital equipment. Some strains...
  • Deadly Mushrooms: Santa Cruz Protocol Is Becoming Known Internationally

    01/13/2017 10:05:06 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 21 replies
    Santa Cruz Sentinel ^ | 01/13/17 | Jondi Gumz
    Three hours after Dr. Todd Mitchell’s Dec. 3 flight from Beijing landed in San Francisco, a call demanded his immediate attention. Mitchell, 59, had spent two-and-a-half weeks in China, which has the most mushroom poisoning deaths in the world, sharing the treatment method he developed at Dominican Hospital. The call concerned a Santa Rosa hospital patient believed to have eaten deadly mushrooms. Principal investigator of an amatoxin mushroom poisoning clinical trial that has treated nearly 100 patients across North America in the past 10 years, Mitchell arranged for the patient’s overnight transfer to Dominican Hospital. This patient was the first...
  • Bright Idea: Delectable Corn Fungus

    12/03/2016 5:36:39 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 22 replies
    Maclean's ^ | November 21, 2016
    A delicious novelty food with an ugly name Sharon OosthoekGreat minds do not think alike, and thatÂ’s why universities and colleges are the mother of inventions. Click here for the rest of our Bright Ideas series. Click here for the rest of our Campus Food series.Barry Saville: Trent UniversityBarry Saville has spent much of his career figuring out how to stop fungi from infecting food crops. But for the past three years, the Trent University professor has been deliberately infecting corn with a fungus that produces large, whitish-grey kernels he believes have potential as a niche product for market farmers....
  • 10 Rotten Foods You Are Used To Eating

    07/16/2015 8:28:52 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 70 replies
    www.minq.com ^ | 07-15-2015 | Staff
    While we're taught that food that smells rotten should be thrown away, there are actually many foods that you eat whenever they've just started rotting. Of course, it's not pleasant to call these foods rotten, so we refer to them in different ways instead. Cheese Making cheese comes down to your ability to control rot. This is because milk is treated with bacteria and enzymes causing it to curdle. The curdles are then cut, formed and ripened into cheese. Stinkheads Another native Alaskan delicacy is what's known as stinkheads. These are King Salmon heads that have either been buried in...
  • A lawmaker who believes saltwater and baking soda can cure cancer

    02/28/2015 11:15:16 AM PST · by Oliviaforever · 79 replies
    Washington Post ^ | Abby Ohlheiser
    Nevada Assemblywoman Michele Fiore said recently that she will propose a "Right to Try" bill in her state. But it's not the bill itself that gained national attention. Instead, it was Fiore's statement that she believes cancer is "a fungus" that can be cured by "flushing, let’s say, saltwater, sodium carbonate" through the body.
  • Feds won't ban pesticides said to kill honeybees, despite 800 studies

    11/27/2014 5:42:39 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 66 replies
    The Washington Examiner ^ | November 26, 2014 | Paul Bedard
    Over 100 scientists worldwide, citing 800 studies, are demanding that the Obama administration follow Europe’s lead and put a moratorium on the use of a new-style pesticide blamed for the deaths of 30 percent of American honeybees every year. In a letter to the EPA and Agriculture Department, the scientists said there is overwhelming evidence from 800 studies that the pesticide family called neonicotinoids are to blame for the substantial declines in honeybees, bumblebees and butterflies, all pollinators needed to help farmers produce billions of dollars worth of food every year. “The 108 signers of this letter therefore urge you...
  • Fungal Parasitism Marked by Gene Loss, Not Gain

    09/09/2014 9:06:37 AM PDT · by fishtank · 25 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 9-5-14 | Jeffrey Tomkins PhD
    Fungal Parasitism Marked by Gene Loss, Not Gain by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. * Certain types of fungi can be parasitic to both plants and animals. Two new studies show that this has developed, in part, by a loss of genetic information—not a gain as predicted by evolution.1,2 In the creationist model of origins, the world was not fraught with death, disease, and violence until after Adam and Eve’s rebellion. The whole of creation was then subjected to a negative turn of events, including the emergence of fungal pathogens that cause death and disease in plants and animals.
  • New Weapon in Fight Against 'Superbugs'

    07/02/2014 9:48:19 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    WSJ ^ | June 30, 2014 8:47 p.m. ET | By Ann Lukits
    Some harmful bacteria are increasingly resistant to treatment with antibiotics. A discovery might be able to help the antibiotics treat the disease. A soil sample from a national park in eastern Canada has produced a compound that appears to reverse antibiotic resistance in dangerous bacteria. Scientists at McMaster University in Ontario discovered that the compound almost instantly turned off a gene in several harmful bacteria that makes them highly resistant to treatment with a class of antibiotics used to fight so-called superbug infections. The compound, called aspergillomarasmine A, or AMA, was extracted from a common fungus found in soil and...
  • Vitamin B3 May Help Kill Superbugs

    10/07/2012 11:17:41 AM PDT · by CutePuppy · 43 replies
    Medical News Today (MNT) ^ | August 25, 2012 | Catharine Paddock, PhD
    Nicotinamide, commonly known as vitamin B3, may help the innate immune system kill antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria, the so-called "superbugs". In lab work done with mice and human blood, researchers found high doses of the vitamin increased the ability of immune cells to kill the bacteria by 1,000 times.The discovery opens the door to a new arsenal of tools for dealing with antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, such as those caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA, that have killed thousands of people around the world. They are increasing in hospitals and nursing homes, and also rising in prisons, among athletes, people in...
  • Disease-causing strains of Fusarium prevalent in plumbing drains

    12/21/2011 9:50:44 AM PST · by decimon · 42 replies
    Penn State ^ | December 21, 2011
    A study examining the prevalence of the fungus Fusarium in bathroom sink drains suggests that plumbing systems may be a common source of human infections. In the first extensive survey of its kind, researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences sampled nearly 500 sink drains from 131 buildings -- businesses, homes, university dormitories and public facilities -- in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and California. They analyzed fungal DNA to compare the spectrum of Fusarium species and sequence types found in drains with those recovered from human infections. The study identified at least one Fusarium...
  • Mushrooms Join Growing List of Radioactive Threats to Japan’s Food Chain

    08/14/2011 4:47:37 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 7 replies
    Businessweek ^ | August 14, 2011 | Naoko Fujimura and Chris Cooper
    Mushrooms Join Growing List of Radioactive Threats to Japan’s Food Chain Mushrooms joined the threats to Japan’s food chain from radiation spewed by Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant, as the country expands efforts to limit the effects of the disaster. Japan is under pressure to enhance food inspections as it has no centralized system for detecting radiation contamination. About two-thirds of Japan’s prefectures now plan to check rice crops, the Mainichi newspaper reported yesterday, citing its own survey. Half of Japan’s rice is grown within range of emissions from the crippled nuclear plant, and farmers are awaiting...
  • Dying bats called No. 1 mammal crisis in U.S.

    07/13/2011 9:49:34 AM PDT · by americanophile · 48 replies
    CBS News ^ | July 12, 2011 | CBS News
    (CBS News) The lightning-fast die-off of bats is being called the No. 1 crisis affecting mammals in this country. Scientists from more than 100 state and federal agencies are coordinating their efforts to learn why bats are dying. CBS News Correspondent Betty Nguyen noted on "The Early Show" that one of the consequences of the bats' deaths is more bugs. Wildlife officials now are pointing to a fungus they say is killing bats in unprecedented numbers. It's a desperate situation with no solution in sight. Nguyen reported bats often get a bad rap as creepy, blood-sucking night creatures. But farmers,...
  • Montana wheat crops hit with fungal diseases

    06/20/2011 4:56:13 PM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 23 replies
    Billings Gazette ^ | Saturday, June 18, 2011 6:30 pm
    HAVRE — Wet weather has left wheat crops in north-central Montana vulnerable to fungal diseases, officials say. Hill County Extension Agent Joe Broesder said the main battle is with stripe rust fungal infection, but tan spot and powdery mildew are also prevalent. "If the weather would straighten out, it would help with the others," Broesder said told the Havre Daily News. Arleen Rice of Taylor Aviation said the company has had to bring in more planes for aerial spraying. "You can walk out in the fields right now and the bottom of your boots turn red," she said. "We have...
  • Aggressive fungus strikes Joplin tornado victims

    06/10/2011 10:11:29 AM PDT · by SoonerStorm09 · 7 replies
    Associated Press via NewsOk.com ^ | June 10, 2011 | Associated Press
    JOPLIN, Mo. -- A Joplin doctor said Thursday his hospital treated five Joplin tornado victims for a rare, aggressive fungal infection sometimes found in survivors of other natural disasters. Dr. Uwe Schmidt, an infectious disease specialist at Freeman Health System in Joplin, said three of those patients who contracted zygomycosis have since died, but he stopped short of blaming their deaths specifically on the infections. "These people had multiple traumas, pneumonia, all kinds of problems," Schmidt said. "It's difficult to say how much the fungal infections contributed to their demise." Jacqueline Lapine, a spokeswoman for the Missouri Department of Health...
  • Caterpillar Fungus Making Tibetan Herders Rich

    04/29/2011 12:50:56 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies · 1+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 04-27-2011 | John Roach
    Profitable medicinal fungus a cash cow in rural communities. Harvesting of a parasitic fungus that grows high on the Tibetan Plateau in China is infusing hordes of cash into rural communities, scientists say. The fungus, Ophiocordyceps sinensis, takes over the bodies of caterpillar larvae then shoots up like finger-size blades of grass out of the dead insects' heads. (See related pictures: "'Zombie' Ants Found With New Mind-Control Fungi.") Known as yartsa gunbu—or "summer grass winter worm"—by Chinese consumers, the nutty-tasting fungus is highly valued for its purported medicinal benefits, for instance, as a treatment for cancer and aging and as...
  • 'Zombie ants' controlled by parasitic fungus for 48m years

    08/17/2010 7:17:15 PM PDT · by Cardhu · 43 replies
    Guardian ^ | August 18th 2010 | Ian Sample
    Earliest evidence of fungus that takes over ants' behaviour for its own ends found by scientists. The oldest evidence of a fungus that turns ants into zombies and makes them stagger to their death has been uncovered by scientists. The gruesome hallmark of the fungus's handiwork was found on the leaves of plants that grew in Messel, near Darmstadt in Germany, 48m years ago. The finding shows that parasitic fungi evolved the ability to control the creatures they infect in the distant past, even before the rise of the Himalayas. The fungus, which is alive and well in forests today,...
  • Mystery Crop Damage Threatens Hundreds Of Acres

    06/02/2010 8:06:19 AM PDT · by Kartographer · 37 replies · 1,209+ views
    WREG News3 ^ | June 1, 2010 | Shaun Chaiyabhat
    Something is killing crops, trees, even weeds and nobody can explain why. Farmers are scratching their heads and some are worried their crops may be lost to the mysterious plague. It's happening along a large swath of land near the Shelby and Tipton county border along Herring Hill Road and elsewhere near the Mississippi River bottoms. Tiny dots appear to have burned onto leaves of all types of plants, and they appear different depending on the plant. On corn stalks, the dots seem to turn white in the center. On other plants, a white dust speckles the leaves and then...
  • Killer fungus spreading in US, Canada

    04/23/2010 3:22:28 PM PDT · by James C. Bennett · 16 replies · 859+ views
    The Times of India ^ | 23 April 2010 | The Times of India
    WASHINGTON: A potentially deadly strain of fungus is spreading among animals and people in the northwestern US and the Canadian province of British Columbia, researchers reported on Thursday. The airborne fungus, called Cryptococcus gattii, usually only infects transplant and AIDS patients, but the new strain is genetically different, the researchers said. “This novel fungus is worrisome because it appears to be a threat to otherwise healthy people,” said Edmond Byrnes of Duke University in North Carolina, who led the study. “The findings presented here document that the outbreak of C gattii in Western North America is continuing to expand throughout...