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Keyword: revolutionarywar

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  • From Henry Livingston, Jr.'s Music Manuscript - "Yanky Doodle" - late 1700's

    09/21/2017 2:29:13 PM PDT · by mairdie · 38 replies
    "Yanky Doodle" as originally played, from Major Henry Livingston, Jr.'s music manuscript book. Major Livingston joined the 3rd New York in 1775 and was part of General Richard Montgomery's Revolutionary Army that went north to invade Canada. He was also the actual author of the Christmas poem, "The Night Before Christmas."
  • Patrick K. O’Donnell: How an Elite Unit of Iron Men Saved [G] Washington’s Army and Changed History

    07/04/2017 10:37:08 AM PDT · by huldah1776 · 14 replies
    Breitbart ^ | July 4, 2017 | John Hayward
    snip... Washington’s Immortals tells the story of a heroic regiment that saved the Continental Army from destruction at the Battle of Brooklyn by holding the British at bay. Despite the pivotal importance of their sacrifice, the regimental dead are buried in a mass grave with only the most minimal markings, their story largely unknown to the modern public. “About 2010, I was in New York City, and the regimental commander I was with in the Battle of Fallujah, Colonel Willie Buell, is assigned there. He’s part of the Council on Foreign Relations. He just called me up and he said,...
  • T'was the eighteenth of April in 75: The midnight ride of Dawes, Prescott, and Paul Revere

    04/18/2017 3:14:24 AM PDT · by harpygoddess · 37 replies
    http://vaviper.blogspot.com ^ | 04/17/2017 | Harpygoddess
    On the evening of April 18, 1775, General Thomas Gage, the British commander in Boston, dispatched a contingent of troops to seize a supply of arms and powder that the colonial insurgents had stored at Lexington and Concord, as well as to arrest two leading patriots, Samuel Adams and John Hancock, who were also hidden in the area. As every schoolchild knows, Paul Revere's ensuing midnight ride called the local militia to arms, and the battles of Lexington and Concord followed the next day. Largely obscured by the great renown of Longfellow's poem, "Paul Revere's Ride", is the fact that...
  • Battle of Cowpens: January 17, 1781

    01/10/2017 3:37:44 PM PST · by imardmd1 · 30 replies
    fold3|||HQ bkig ^ | January 1, 2017 | Trevor
    THE BATTLE OF COWPENS In the early morning of January 17, 1781, in South Carolina, American troops under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan defeated a force under British Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton in one of the more decisive victories for the Americans in the south during the Revolutionary War (snip) The British infantry had been stunned by the fire from the American’s first two lines and now faced the third line, predominately composed of experienced Continental troops overseen by Lieutenant Colonel John Howard. Meanwhile, Tarleton sent his reserve infantry and additional dragoons to try to outflank their opponents on the Americans’...
  • A Revolutionary Christmas: The Battle of Trenton, 1776

    12/27/2016 9:07:35 AM PST · by Oldpuppymax · 6 replies
    The Coach's Team ^ | 12/27/16 | Susan Frickey
    Try to picture it. Try to feel it. It’s brutally cold. East Coast cold, where the humidity makes the bitterness cut right through to the bone. You’re freezing, even with a thick parka and snow boots. Your fingers are numb in your designer gloves. Holding your hot chocolate, you’re thankful for the warmth making its way down your throat as you walk down the paved and de-iced sidewalk. Travel back in time to 1776. You don’t have a parka, or boots, or a hat or gloves. You’re lucky if you have a shirt on your back and something between your...
  • Sons of Liberty dump British tea (12/16/1773)

    12/16/2016 7:40:03 AM PST · by NonValueAdded · 21 replies
    On this day [12/16] in 1773, a group of Massachusetts colonists disguised as Mohawk Indians board three British tea ships moored in Boston Harbor and dump 342 chests of tea into the water. Now known as the “Boston Tea Party,” the midnight raid was a protest of the Tea Act of 1773, a bill enacted by the British parliament to save the faltering British East India Company by greatly lowering its tea tax and granting it a virtual monopoly on the American tea trade. The low tax allowed the company to sell its tea even more cheaply than that smuggled...
  • Professors call Founding Fathers ‘terrorists,’ founding ideals a ‘fabrication’

    11/20/2016 2:43:59 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 77 replies
    The College Fix ^ | 11-16-16 | William Nardi - Roger Williams University
    A humanities course currently taught at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs teaches that the Founding Fathers were hypocrites, terrorists and money-hungry barons who used hyperbole and fear to rile up the colonists to revolt against England. The “Resistance and Revolution” class is co-taught by history lecturer Jared Benson and sociology instructor Nicholas Lee, who also suggest that it was Mikhail Gorbachev – not Ronald Reagan — who brought down the collapse of the Soviet Union, and that wealthy CEOs deserve to be in a “moral prison,” among many other assertions. Calling the Founding Fathers “terrorists,” Benson and Lee voice...
  • The Strange Case of George Washington’s Disappearing Sash

    11/20/2016 11:46:42 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 26 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 11-20-16 | Jared Keller
    One winter day in December 1775, months after the battles at Concord and Lexington marked the beginning of the Revolutionary War, the nascent American military formally met its commander-in-chief. A group of Virginia rifleman found themselves in the middle of a massive snowball fight with a regiment of quick-talking New Englanders who ridiculed the strangely dressed Virginians in their “white linen frocks, ruffled and fringed.” The colonies were still strangers to each other at this point: The Declaration of Independence was months away, and the ragtag army representing the rebels was far from formally “American.” The meeting of nearly 1,000...
  • This Day In History: Aug 27, 1776 - The Battle of Brooklyn (aka, Battle of Long Island)

    08/27/2016 6:00:01 AM PDT · by ETL · 13 replies
    various sources
    The Battle of Long Island, also known as the Battle of Brooklyn and the Battle of Brooklyn Heights, fought on August 27, 1776, was the first major battle of the American Revolutionary War to take place after the United States declared its independence on July 4, 1776. It was a victory for the British Army and the beginning of a successful campaign that gave them control of the strategically important city of New York. In terms of troop deployment and fighting, it was the largest battle of the entire war.After defeating the British in the Siege of Boston on March...
  • This Day In History: Aug 22, 1776 - British Invasion Of New York

    08/22/2016 5:10:38 AM PDT · by ETL · 34 replies
    various sources
    On August 22, Howe’s large army landed on Long Island, hoping to capture New York City and gain control of the Hudson River, a victory that would divide the rebellious colonies in half. On August 27, the Red Coats marched against the Patriot position at Brooklyn Heights, overcoming the Americans at Gowanus Pass and then outflanking the entire Continental Army. Howe failed to follow the advice of his subordinates and storm the redoubts at Brooklyn Heights, and on August 29 General Washington ordered a brilliant retreat to Manhattan by boat, thus saving the Continental Army from capture. At the Battle...
  • Our Independence Day; our Second American Revolution

    07/04/2016 8:22:46 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 9 replies
    The Coach's Team ^ | 7/4/16 | Kevin "Coach" Collins
    Today is the day that we Americans re-proclaim our independence. The conditions we live under today are in many ways the same as those our forefathers had to endure in 1775 when they took up arms to fight to live as free people. At that crucial point in our history we had to decide to either meekly submit to the tyranny of an unelected monarchy with its oppressive foot on our throat; or stand and fight risking everything including even more oppression if we didn’t win. When we started our First American Revolution in 1775, winning was as doubtful as...
  • How a Jewish Patriot Saved the American Revolution

    06/12/2016 8:51:25 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 21 replies
    The Coach's Team ^ | 6/12/16 | Susan Frickey
    During the Revolutionary War, our new nation faced a financial crisis. The colonies had no money to pay for the war and the prospects of raising funds were dismal, at best. Colonial troops had not been paid the money due them, so protests ensued. Some officers even surrounded the Continental Congress and held it for ransom, trying to get what was promised the troops for years of hardship, struggle and deprivation. Our young country was very near imploding after all the years of bloodshed, sacrifice and valiant commitment to the dream of liberty. Enter Robert Morris: the richest man in...
  • The Value of Virtue (II)

    05/29/2016 1:16:56 AM PDT · by Jacquerie · 1 replies
    In yesterday’s blog, I related the founding generation’s assumptions regarding the necessity of virtue in stable republics. Many conservatives today believe our early years after Independence was an idyllic era of strong private and public virtue. Some tend to disbelieve the 1787 Constitution was necessary. Resting on that belief, the same conservatives look about today, see nothing but corruption of public virtue, and throw their hands up in despair of ever returning the US to freedom. Contrary to common belief, the first dozen years after Independence were something of a governing and political mess. Right out of the chute in...
  • A Constitution Gone Wrong

    05/25/2016 1:37:34 AM PDT · by Jacquerie · 4 replies
    On the eve of troubles with George III in the 1760s, His Majesty’s subjects on the North American continent regarded themselves as among the luckiest people on earth. Charles De Montesquieu praised the English constitution for its mixture of monarchy and republican spirit. Not only were colonials prosperous, they enjoyed a level of liberty not seen perhaps since the best days of the Roman Republic. To be enlightened in the 18th Century was to be interested in antiquity, and to be interested in antiquity was to be interested in republicanism. Many of the men destined to become the statesmen and...
  • The Forgotten Story of the Revolutionary War

    05/04/2016 10:34:59 AM PDT · by Academiadotorg · 38 replies
    Accuracy in Academia ^ | May 4, 2016 | Kallina Crompton
    On April 8, 2016, military historian and author Patrick K. O’Donnell spoke at the Heritage Foundation to discuss his book “Washington’s Immortals,” a book about the forgotten people and battles in the revolutionary war. The author discusses facts of the war that many schools fail to recognize; these include details of the colonists’ struggles with the loyalists, the soldiers’ shortages of clothing and food, and the sacrifices of many wealthy colonists. The stories in this book of the band of brotherhood and the sacrifices of the colonists are beneficial for students in order for them to fully understand American values....
  • History Comes on Horseback in Lexington (Reenactment Helps Kick Off Patriots Day)

    04/19/2016 2:46:35 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies
    Boston globe ^ | APRIL 18, 2016 | Joshua Miller
    History came on horseback here early Monday morning, with the breathless cries of a rider warning: “The Regulars are just down the road! They’re massing for battle.” Decked in lobster-red, marching up what’s now Massachusetts Avenue and onto the Common, the British soldiers did come, finding a ragtag band of local militiamen standing their ground, unwilling to disperse. The story of what happened next — the shot of unknown provenance, the lopsided battle, the American Revolution — has been told and retold for 241 years. But it was fresh to some of the thousands of spectators and performers at the...
  • Happy Casimir Pulaski Day, Chicago!

    03/07/2016 10:19:59 AM PST · by EveningStar · 25 replies
    Multiple links in body of thread | March 7, 2016
    Casimir Pulaski Day is a holiday observed in Chicago, Illinois on the first Monday of every March in memory of Casimir Pulaski (March 6, 1745 – October 11, 1779), a Revolutionary War cavalry officer born in Poland as Kazimierz Michał Władysław Wiktor Pułaski. He is praised for his contributions to the U.S. military in the American Revolution and known as "the father of the American cavalry". Casimir Pulaski Day Casimir Pulaski
  • New audiobook release: The Colored Patriots of the American Revolution, by William Cooper Nell

    02/20/2016 9:06:48 AM PST · by ProgressingAmerica · 16 replies
    Librivox ^ | February 18th, 2016
    One thing progressives are very, very good at is omitting facts that they find to be too difficult to deal with. So it goes for all of the black heroes who fought alongside our Founding Fathers during the American Revolution. The progressives continual racial narrative is what it is. I first learned of this book through Founders Fridays, because of the work of David Barton. After I read about 5 or 10 pages, I knew it needed to be made into an audiobook so that more people could consume it. Progressives have controlled the universities, have controlled history; for over...
  • Fife and Drum Music of the Revolutionary War

    02/03/2016 8:00:58 PM PST · by WhiskeyX · 9 replies
    YouTube ^ | 1976 | Company of Military Collectors & Historians
    Excerpts from "Fife and Drum Music of the American Revolution: Military Music in America series, vol. 1," produced by the Company of Military Collectors & Historians, Washington, D.C. with George P. Carroll, Director of Music -- from about 1976. (Improved audio from my earlier upload of this same.)
  • Looking for really good Revolutionary War resources?

    01/07/2016 9:42:45 PM PST · by Politicalkiddo · 78 replies
    I'm looking for really in-depth resources about the Revolutionary War for my own personal knowledge. Documentaries, books, etc. Thanks in advance. :)