Keyword: solarsystem

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  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Galaxy and Planets Beyond Bristlecone Pines

    06/19/2016 6:48:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | Sunday, June 19, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What's older than these ancient trees? Nobody you know -- but almost everything in the background of this picture. The trees are impressively old -- each part of the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest located in eastern California, USA. There, many of the oldest trees known are located, some dating as far back as about 5,000 years. Seemingly attached to tree branches, but actually much farther in the distance, are the bright orbs of Saturn (left) and Mars. These planets formed along with the Earth and the early Solar System much earlier -- about 4.5 billion years ago. Swooping down...
  • Planet Nine's profile fleshed out

    04/09/2016 7:29:13 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 52 replies
    BBC ^ | 4/8/2916 | Paul Rincon
    In January, researchers at Caltech in the US suggested a large, additional planet might be lurking in the icy outer reaches of the Solar System. Now, a team at the University of Bern in Switzerland has worked out what they say are upper and lower limits on how big, bright and cold it might be. The study has been accepted by the journal Astronomy and Astrophysics. Prof Mike Brown and Dr Konstantin Batygin made their case for the existence of a ninth planet in our Solar System orbiting far beyond even the dwarf world Pluto. There are no direct observations...
  • Researchers find evidence of a real ninth planet

    01/20/2016 7:52:49 PM PST · by Utilizer · 31 replies
    Phys.org ^ | January 20, 2016 | Kimm Fesenmaier
    Caltech researchers have found evidence of a giant planet tracing a bizarre, highly elongated orbit in the outer solar system. The object, which the researchers have nicknamed Planet Nine, has a mass about 10 times that of Earth and orbits about 20 times farther from the sun on average than does Neptune (which orbits the sun at an average distance of 2.8 billion miles). In fact, it would take this new planet between 10,000 and 20,000 years to make just one full orbit around the sun. The researchers, Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown, discovered the planet's existence through mathematical modeling...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- To Scale: The Solar System

    12/25/2015 7:21:35 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    NASA ^ | December 25, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Want to build a scale model Solar System? A blue marble 1.4 centimeters (about half an inch) across would be a good choice for a scale model Earth. Since the Sun is 109 times the diameter of Earth, a 1.5 meter diameter balloon could represent the Sun. But the distance between the Earth and Sun, 150 million kilometers, would translate to just under 180 meters (590 feet) at the same scale. That would mean the completed project, including the orbits of the outer planets, is probably not going to fit in your backyard. Still, you might find enough room...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- A Gegenschein Lunar Eclipse

    11/14/2015 12:50:55 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    NASA ^ | November 14, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Is there anything interesting to see in the direction opposite the Sun? One night last month, there were quite a few things. First, the red-glowing orb on the lower right of the featured image is the full moon, darkened and reddened because it has entered Earth's shadow. Beyond Earth's cone of darkness are backscattering dust particles orbiting the Sun that standout with a diffuse glow called the gegenschein, visible as a faint band rising from the central horizon and passing behind the Moon. A nearly horizontal stripe of green airglow is also discernable just above the horizon, partly blocked...
  • Why Earth is so much bigger than Mars: Rocky planets formed from 'pebbles'

    10/27/2015 11:47:58 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/27/2015 | Southwest Research Institute
    Using a new process in planetary formation modeling, where planets grow from tiny bodies called "pebbles," Southwest Research Institute scientists can explain why Mars is so much smaller than Earth. This same process also explains the rapid formation of the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn, as reported earlier this year. "This numerical simulation actually reproduces the structure of the inner solar system, with Earth, Venus, and a smaller Mars," said Hal Levison, an Institute scientist at the SwRI Planetary Science Directorate. He is the first author of a new paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...
  • New NASA images show Pluto’s moon Charon in stunning detail

    10/03/2015 7:42:02 PM PDT · by ETL · 64 replies
    FoxNews.com - Science ^ | October 03, 2015
    NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has sent incredible images of Pluto’s largest moon Charon back to Earth. The latest images reveal the moon’s complex and violent history, according to NASA. “Many New Horizons scientists expected Charon to be a monotonous, crater-battered world; instead, they’re finding a landscape covered with mountains, canyons, landslides, surface-color variations and more,” explained the space agency, in a statement. The high-resolution images, which were taken on July 14 and transmitted to Earth on Sept. 21, reveal a belt of fractures and canyons just north of the moon’s equator. Four times as long as the Grand Canyon, and...
  • Is there a Planet X, a ‘massive perturber,’ hidden beyond Pluto?

    09/05/2015 7:46:28 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    Washington Post ^ | September 3 | Joel Achenbach
    The paper ... noted that a number of large, very remote objects share a similar orbital angle. That's suspicious if you're an astronomer expecting to see a random distribution of objects. The key orbital feature is known, rather obtusely, as the “argument of perihelion.” We're not shy of complicated orbital concepts (we try to toss around the phrase "obliquity of the ecliptic" whenever possible), but this one is not very easy to explain. "The argument of perihelion is the angle at which an object comes to perihelion with respect to the ecliptic plane," Sheppard said in an e-mail. Mike Brown,...
  • Face the facts people, there is no life on Mars

    07/31/2015 11:20:25 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 53 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 07/24/2015 | Michael Hanlon
    Suddenly, space is getting interesting again. After decades of going boldly nowhere in low Earth orbit, Man, or rather his robotic emissaries, have made some startling discoveries in our Solar System. Cold, distant Pluto is – who would have thought it? – turning out to be one of the most interesting planets (yes, it is a planet) in the Solar System. Before the New Horizons probe turned up earlier this month, astronomers assumed it would be a dull, grey cratered rock. [SNIP] If we find life of any kind out there – whether it be Martian microbes (we have several...
  • What's That Spot On World Ceres?

    07/31/2015 8:51:48 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 21 replies
    JPL ^ | Unknown | NASA
    What's the spot on World Ceres? Can you guess what's creating those unusual bright spots on Ceres? On March 6, NASA's Dawn spacecraft began orbiting Ceres, the largest body in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Even before the spacecraft arrived at the dwarf planet, images revealed mysterious bright spots that captivated scientists and observers alike. Until Dawn gets a closer look over the next few months, it's anyone's guess what those spots could be. So, go ahead! Cast your vote below. - See more at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/dawn/world_ceres/#sthash.bwDwq56N.dpuf
  • NASA's New Horizons Probe Gives Us Our First Look at the 'Person in Pluto'

    06/22/2015 6:24:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    nbc ^ | Jun 22 2015, 1:37 pm ET | Alan Boyle
    Humanity has looked up to the "Man in the Moon" for millennia, but this could be one of our first views of the "Person in Pluto." The views are getting better and better as NASA's New Horizons spacecraft approaches Pluto for its July 14 flyby — and the pictures have begun revealing surface details. Ian Regan, an image-processing enthusiast from Plymouth, England, combined four images from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager with color data from the probe's Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera to produce an eerie colorized view of Pluto and its biggest moon, Charon.
  • If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel: A tediously accurate scale model of the Solar System

    06/21/2015 6:13:32 AM PDT · by rickmichaels · 69 replies
    joshworth.com | Josh Worth
    This is a waaaaaaaaaaaaay cool scale model of the Solar System that shows just how freakin' HUGE our own "little" neck of the woods really is. Scroll to the right... If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel
  • Photos of Earth from Mars and Mars from Earth

    05/25/2015 4:24:26 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 25 replies
    ebaumsworld.com ^ | March 18, 2015
    Just saw these cool pics of opposite views of the same thing...sort of:
  • Jupiter's moon Ganymede has vast underground ocean

    03/12/2015 2:27:53 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    cbs ^ | WIlliam Harwood
    Larger than the planet Mercury, Ganymede is one of four moons discovered by Galileo in 1610, easily visible in small telescope and large binoculars. The subsurface ocean confirmed by Hubble is believed to be at least 60 miles thick, containing more water than all of Earth's ocean's combined. As such, Ganymede joins a growing list of planets and moons in Earth's solar system, including Jupiter's moon Europa and Saturn's moon Enceladus, that are known to harbor vast reservoirs of liquid water. The latest findings using the Hubble Space Telescope build on earlier observations by NASA's Galileo spacecraft that showed Ganymede...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Solar System Portrait

    02/14/2015 5:10:04 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | February 14, 2015 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: On another Valentine's Day 25 years ago, cruising four billion miles from the Sun, the Voyager 1 spacecraft looked back one last time to make this first ever Solar System family portrait. The complete portrait is a 60 frame mosaic made from a vantage point 32 degrees above the ecliptic plane. In it, Voyager's wide angle camera frames sweep through the inner Solar System at the left, linking up with gas giant Neptune, the Solar System's outermost planet, at the far right. Positions for Venus, Earth, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are indicated by letters, while the Sun is...
  • Two more planets in our Solar System, say astronomers

    01/20/2015 8:54:04 AM PST · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    www.businessinsider.com ^ | Jan. 19, 2015, 8:40 AM | Richard INGHAM, AFP
    Paris (AFP) - The Solar System has at least two more planets waiting to be discovered beyond the orbit of Pluto, Spanish and British astronomers say. The official list of planets in our star system runs to eight, with gas giant Neptune the outermost. Beyond Neptune, Pluto was relegated to the status of "dwarf planet" by the International Astronomical Union in 2006, although it is still championed by some as the most distant planet from the Sun. In a study published in the latest issue of the British journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, researchers propose that "at...
  • New Examination of Trans-Neptunian Objects Suggests Two Planets Lurk in Outer Solar System

    01/16/2015 11:06:16 AM PST · by lbryce · 20 replies
    From Quarks to Quasars ^ | January 16, 2015 | James Trosper
    Presently, our solar system is known to contain 4 fully-fledged rocky worlds: Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars; 2 ice-giants: Neptune and Uranus; 2 gas-giants, Saturn and Neptune; 5 dwarf-planets, Ceres. Pluto, Eris, MakeMake, Haumea; around 100 moons; and an unknowable number of comets, asteroids and minor planets. Indeed, we’ve only begun to understand the full scope of our local corner of our galaxy, and new information emerges on a monthly-basis, yet there a number of seemingly obvious things that remain unknown. For instance, long before Pluto’s existence was deduced, astronomers scoured the outer solar system in search of another large...
  • Water on Earth predates the solar system, and even the sun

    09/27/2014 3:49:17 AM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 61 replies
    la times ^ | 9-26-2014 | DEBORAH NETBURN
    To find out, scientists turned to chemistry. Here on Earth, about one in every 3,000 molecules of water is made with a deuterium atom instead of a hydrogen atom. A deuterium atom is similar to a hydrogen atom except that its nucleus contains a proton and a neutron, instead of a lone proton. (Both atoms also contain a single electron.) That makes deuterium twice as heavy as hydrogen, which is why water molecules made with deuterium atoms (HDO) are known as “heavy water.” At the time that our sun was born, the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen throughout the universe...
  • 3D Solar System Simulator

    04/21/2014 1:24:14 PM PDT · by lbryce · 21 replies
    Solar System ^ | April 21, 2014 | Solar System
    3D Solar system Simulator For Fun and Navigational Assistance http://solarsystem.appzend.net/
  • Mysterious Energy Ribbon at Solar System's Edge a 'Cosmic Roadmap'

    02/13/2014 9:00:18 PM PST · by 12th_Monkey · 51 replies
    Space.com ^ | February 13, 2014 | Elizabeth Howell
    A strange ribbon of energy and particles at the edge of the solar system first spotted by a NASA spacecraft appears to serve as a sort of "roadmap in the sky" for the interstellar magnetic field, scientists say. By comparing ground-based studies and in-space observations of solar system's mysterious energy ribbon, which was first discovered by NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) in 2009, scientists are learning more details about the conditions at the solar system's edge. The study also sheds light into the sun's environment protects the solar system from high-energy cosmic rays. The ribbon is roughly perpendicular to the...
  • Is The Light of God the Center of Your Spiritual Solar System?

    02/06/2014 9:06:16 AM PST · by OneVike · 4 replies
    TRC Magazine Facebook Page ^ | 2/6/14 | Chuck Ness
    When a person thinks about light, usually the first thing that will come to mind is the sun. We have been taught that the sun is the center of the solar system and thus it is the light of the world. This ball of fire that life on earth depends upon, is so massive in size that it contains 99.85% of all the matter in the Solar System, or 332,800 times that of earth. The distance from earth to the sun is 93,000,000 miles, which would take you 71 years to travel going 150 mph. The sun creates energy...
  • Amazing Solar System Icons

    06/15/2013 11:58:10 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 23 replies
    Splashnology ^ | November 3, 2009 | Stryker
    You can download the icons (zip file).
  • 'Faster-ticking clock' indicates early solar system may have evolved faster than we think

    05/03/2012 3:05:41 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 39 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | 05/01/2012
    Our solar system is four and a half billion years old, but its formation may have occurred over a shorter period of time than we previously thought, says an international team of researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and universities and laboratories in the US and Japan. Establishing chronologies of past events or determining ages of objects require having clocks that tick at different paces, according to how far back one looks. Nuclear clocks, used for dating, are based on the rate of decay of an atomic nucleus expressed by a half-life, the time it takes for half of...
  • Uranus auroras glimpsed from Earth

    04/13/2012 2:26:59 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 50 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | 04-13-2012 | Provided by American Geophysical Union
    For the first time, scientists have captured images of auroras above the giant ice planet Uranus, finding further evidence of just how peculiar a world that distant planet is. Detected by means of carefully scheduled observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, the newly witnessed Uranian light show consisted of short-lived, faint, glowing dots – a world of difference from the colorful curtains of light that often ring Earth's poles. In the new observations, which are the first to glimpse the Uranian aurora with an Earth-based telescope, the researchers detected the luminous spots twice on the dayside of Uranus – the...
  • Jupiter is melting, scientists say

    04/05/2012 2:15:27 AM PDT · by U-238 · 52 replies
    Fox News ^ | 3/22/2012 | Fox News
    Jupiter might be having a change of heart. Literally. New simulations suggest that Jupiter's rocky core has been liquefying, melting, and mixing with the rest of the planet's innards. With this new data, astronomers hope to better explain a recent puzzling discovery of a strange planet outside of our solar system. "It's a really important piece of the puzzle of trying to figure out what's going on inside giant planets," said Jonathan Fortney, a planetary scientist at the University of California Santa Cruz who was not affiliated with the research. Conventional planetary formation theory has modeled Jupiter as a set...
  • The Moon’s Long Lost Twin Found

    03/24/2012 12:57:47 AM PDT · by U-238 · 79 replies · 2+ views
    International Business Times ^ | 8/11/2011 | International Business Times
    The moon maybe palely alone in the night sky today but according to scientists it is possible that the there was a second, smaller moon 4.4 billion years ago. A paper published in the journal Nature theorized that there was a smaller moon created in the same impact that created the moon. Astronomers, Martin Jutzi and Erik Asphaug of the University of California at Santa Cruz have long wondered why the moon had two incongruous sides, one smooth with flat plains and another side full of rugged mountains and craters. The astronomers started thinking that the mountainous region had been...
  • How Many Unbound Planets in Milky Way?

    03/23/2012 8:43:25 PM PDT · by U-238 · 21 replies · 4+ views
    Sky and Telescopeha ^ | 2/29/2012 | Monica Young
    Life as we know it exists on a cozy planet in a stable orbit around a sun shining brightly in its sky. But a new study hints that the most common life in the universe might exist deep inside eternal-night worlds far from any star, adrift in the icy dark of interstellar space. Researchers at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC) at Stanford University estimate that "nomad" planets, ejected from their home stellar system and now free-floating through the Milky Way, could outnumber stars by as many as 100,000 to 1. Earlier estimates were more like a...
  • How Big is the Sun, Really?

    03/23/2012 1:29:41 AM PDT · by U-238 · 28 replies · 3+ views
    Sky and Telescope ^ | 3/21/2012 | Kelly Beatty
    With all the attention that astronomers have lavished on old Sol over the centuries, you'd think that by now they'd know its diameter to, oh, 10 or 12 significant digits. During the past 40 years, astronomers have attempted to measure the Sun's sizedozens of times using various methods. The dashed line corresponds to a radius of 696,000 km, the value most often used. While the Sun's girth has indeed been measured dozens of times over the past 40 years, the results haven't converged on a single value and scatter by as much as ± 0.1%. One big reason is that,...
  • Smooth Sailing on Titan

    03/18/2012 12:25:55 AM PDT · by U-238 · 16 replies
    Sky and Telescope ^ | 3/14/2012 | Sky and Telescope
    Lakes on Saturn’s moon Titan don’t do the wave very well. Radar images from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft show glassy smooth surfaces, even on bodies like Ligeia Mare, a large sea roughly 400 kilometers (250 miles) wide. There are patterns on the shoreline of the southern hemisphere's Ontario Lacus that might be from waves, but the features aren’t definitive. Winds haven’t been too high on Titan since Cassini first arrived in Saturn's system in 2004, so the lack of waves is odd but understandable. The ESA’s Huygens probe sent back amazing surface images, including snapshots of delta-looking features, when it made...
  • The Lost Siblings of the Sun

    03/12/2012 3:32:13 PM PDT · by U-238 · 28 replies · 1+ views
    Sky and Telescope ^ | 3/10/2009 | Alan MacRobert
    Most stars are born in clusters rather than singly, and there’s plenty of evidence that the Sun was too. For one thing, the material of the infant solar system (as preserved in the earliest meteorites) was enriched by fresh supernova debris from at least one very young, massive star (having 15 to 25 solar masses) that exploded less than 5 light-years away, no more than 2 million years after the Sun's formation. Today no such massive star exists within 300 light-years of the Sun. Clearly, the early solar system had stars close around it. But that was 4.57 billion years...
  • Water not so squishy under pressure

    03/06/2012 1:09:39 AM PST · by U-238 · 11 replies
    Science News ^ | 3/5/2012 | Nadia Drake
    When squeezed to pressures and temperatures like those inside giant planets, water molecules are less squeezable than anticipated, defying a set of decades-old equations used to describe watery behavior over a range of conditions. Studying how molecules behave in such environments will help scientists better understand the formation and composition of ice giants like Uranus and Neptune, as well as those being spotted in swarms by planet hunters. The new work, which appears in the March 2 Physical Review Letters, also suggests that textbooks about planetary interiors and magnetic fields may need reworking. “At this point, it’s worth putting together...
  • NASA Probe Discovers 'Alien' Matter From Beyond Our Solar System (4 types of alien atoms)

    01/31/2012 2:13:25 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 24 replies
    SPACE.com ^ | 1/31/12 | Denise Chow
    NASA / GSFC: Using the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), NASA has sampled the galactic wind that has traveled from outside our solar system. Four types of atoms were found to be different from what we have in our Solar System.
  • Asteroid YU55 radar images

    11/07/2011 10:35:18 PM PST · by djf · 35 replies
    Closest approach to be 3:28 PST Tuesday afternoon.
  • Something Has Exploded In a Spectacular Fashion On Uranus

    10/31/2011 10:21:14 PM PDT · by PJ-Comix · 85 replies · 1+ views
    Gizmodo.com ^ | October 30, 2011
    Quit snickering! Something on Uranus has erupted and now scientists are all in a tizzy about what and why it might be.The news is exciting for a number of reasons. The simplest being we know very little about Uranus, mostly due to its incredible distance form Earth and because it's, well, frankly one of the more "boring" planets out there.But now, apparently, it's amazing again, all because of a mystery explosion in its atmosphere. Why is the explosion important? Mostly because Uranus's unique axis (on its side), amongst other things:"The reason we care about the clouds on the planet Uranus...
  • Series of bumps sent Uranus into its sideways spin

    10/10/2011 12:38:05 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 32 replies
    http://www.astronomy.com ^ | 07 OCT 2011 | Staff
    If Uranus was not tilted in one blow, as is commonly thought, but rather was bumped in at least two smaller collisions, there is a much higher probability of seeing its moons orbit in the direction we observe. By European Planetary Science Congress, AAS Division for Planetary Science — Uranus’ highly tilted axis makes it something of an oddball in our solar system. The accepted wisdom is that Uranus was knocked on its side by a single large impact, but new research rewrites our theories of how Uranus became so tilted and also solves fresh mysteries about the position and...
  • New solar system formation models indicate that Jupiter's foray robbed Mars of mass

    06/05/2011 2:52:59 PM PDT · by decimon · 15 replies
    Southwest Research Institute ^ | June 5, 2011 | Unknown
    Planetary scientists have long wondered why Mars is only about half the size and one-tenth the mass of Earth. As next-door neighbors in the inner solar system, probably formed about the same time, why isn't Mars more like Earth and Venus in size and mass? A paper published in the journal Nature this week provides the first cohesive explanation and, by doing so, reveals an unexpected twist in the early lives of Jupiter and Saturn as well. Dr. Kevin Walsh, a research scientist at Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®), led an international team performing simulations of the early solar system, demonstrating...
  • Strongest evidence yet indicates Enceladus hiding saltwater ocean

    06/22/2011 10:38:22 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    PhysOrg.com ^ | 06-22-2011 | Provided by University of Colorado at Boulder
    Samples of icy spray shooting from Saturn's moon Enceladus collected during Cassini spacecraft flybys show the strongest evidence yet for the existence of a large-scale, subterranean saltwater ocean, says a new international study led by the University of Heidelberg and involving the University of Colorado Boulder. The new discovery was made during the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn, a collaboration of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. Launched in 1997, the mission spacecraft arrived at the Saturn system in 2004 and has been touring the giant ringed planet and its vast moon system ever since. The plumes...
  • Solar system edge 'bunches' in magnetic bubbles: NASA

    06/09/2011 8:41:13 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 19 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 6/9/11 | AFP
    WASHINGTON (AFP) – A pair of NASA probes wandering in deep space discovered that the outer edge of the solar system contains curious magnetic bubbles and is not smooth as previously thought, astronomers said Thursday. The NASA Voyager twin spacecraft, which launched in 1977, are currently exploring the furthest outlays of the heliosphere, where solar wind is slowed and warped by pressure from other forces in the galaxy, the US space agency said. "Because the sun spins, its magnetic field becomes twisted and wrinkled, a bit like a ballerina's skirt," said astronomer Merav Opher of Boston University. "Far, far away...
  • Hyperfast Star Was Booted from Milky Way

    01/19/2011 5:30:39 PM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 55 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | 7/22/2010 | ScienceDaily
    A hundred million years ago, a triple-star system was traveling through the bustling center of our Milky Way galaxy when it made a life-changing misstep. The trio wandered too close to the galaxy's giant black hole, which captured one of the stars and hurled the other two out of the Milky Way. Adding to the stellar game of musical chairs, the two outbound stars merged to form a super-hot, blue star. This story may seem like science fiction, but astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope say it is the most likely scenario for a so-called hypervelocity star, known as HE...
  • First Alien Planet From Another Galaxy Discovered

    11/18/2010 4:30:55 PM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 37 replies
    Space.com ^ | 11/18/2010 | Space.com via Yahoo News
    Astronomers have confirmed the first discovery of an alien planet in our Milky Way that came from another galaxy, they announced today (Nov. 18). The Jupiter-like planet orbits a star that was born in another galaxy and later captured by our own Milky Way sometime between 6 billion and 9 billion years ago, researchers said. A side effect of the galactic cannibalism brought a faraway planet within astronomers' reach for the first time ever. [Illustration of the extragalactic planet] "This is very exciting," said study co-author Rainer Klement of the Max-Planck-Institut fur Astronomie (MPIA) in Heidelberg, Germany. "We have no...
  • NASA: Exceptional object in our cosmic neighborhood

    11/12/2010 7:38:04 PM PST · by Flavius · 61 replies · 1+ views
    nasa ^ | 11/11/10 | nasa
    - NASA Announces Televised Chandra News Conference - NASA will hold a news conference at 12:30 p.m. EST on Monday, Nov. 15, to discuss the Chandra X-ray Observatory's discovery of an exceptional object in our cosmic neighborhood.
  • Solar System older than thought

    08/22/2010 6:45:51 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 53 replies
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 8/22/10 | AFP
    PARIS (AFP) – The Solar System could be nearly two million years older than thought, according to a study published on Sunday by the journal Nature Geoscience. The evidence comes from a 1.49-kilo (3.2-pound) meteorite, found in the Moroccan desert in 2004, that contains a "relict" mineral, which is one of the oldest solid materials formed after the birth of the Sun. ... As a result, the Solar System is likely to be between 300,000 and 1.9 million years older than previous estimates, ..
  • 'Jupiter swallowed planet 10 times the size of Earth'

    08/13/2010 12:01:53 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 36 replies · 1+ views
    Jupiter, the biggest planet in the solar system, might have gained its dominant position after swallowing up a smaller planet, scientists believe. Studies on Jupiter have revealed that the giant planet, which is more than 120 times bigger than the Earth, has an extremely small core that weighs just two to 10 Earth masses. Now scientists have claimed that Jupiter's core might have been vaporised in huge collision with a planet up to ten times the size of Earth, the New Scientist reported. Researchers led by by Shu Lin Li of Peking University in China have modelled what might have...
  • Ribbon at Edge of Our Solar System: Will the Sun Enter a Million-Degree Cloud of Interstellar Gas?

    05/26/2010 9:56:30 PM PDT · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 48 replies · 1,661+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 5/24/2010 | Science Daily
    Is the Sun going to enter a million-degree galactic cloud of interstellar gas soon? Scientists from the Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Southwest Research Institute, and Boston University suggest that the ribbon of enhanced emissions of energetic neutral atoms, discovered last year by the NASA Small Explorer satellite IBEX, could be explained by a geometric effect coming up because of the approach of the Sun to the boundary between the Local Cloud of interstellar gas and another cloud of a very hot gas called the Local Bubble. If this hypothesis is correct,...
  • Solar System Passing Through Interstellar Cloud (No Severe Weather Expected)

    05/23/2010 11:26:22 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 22 replies · 694+ views
    Red Orbit ^ | 12/23/2009 | Red Orbit
    The solar system is passing through an interstellar cloud that physics says should not exist. In the Dec. 24th issue of Nature, a team of scientists reveal how NASA's Voyager spacecraft have solved the mystery. "Using data from Voyager, we have discovered a strong magnetic field just outside the solar system," explains lead author Merav Opher, a NASA Heliophysics Guest Investigator from George Mason University. "This magnetic field holds the interstellar cloud together and solves the long-standing puzzle of how it can exist at all." The discovery has implications for the future when the solar system will eventually bump...
  • Jupiter loses one of its stripes and scientists are stumped as to why

    05/12/2010 4:55:35 PM PDT · by kennedy · 95 replies · 1,994+ views
    Mail Online ^ | May 12, 2010 | Claire Bates
    Jupiter has lost one of its iconic red stripes and scientists are baffled as to why. The largest planet in our solar system is usually dominated by two dark bands in its atmosphere, with one in the northern hemisphere and one in the southern hemisphere. However, the most recent images taken by amateur astronomers have revealed the lower stripe known as the Southern Equatorial Belt has disappeared leaving the southern half of the planet looking unusually bare. The band was present in at the end of last year before Jupiter ducked behind the Sun on its orbit. However, when it...
  • Al Gore and Venus Envy

    02/09/2010 9:46:59 PM PST · by kingattax · 19 replies · 596+ views
    CNSNews ^ | January 29, 2009 | Steve Milloy
    Al Gore has a new argument for why carbon dioxide is the global warming boogeyman -- and it’s simply out of this world. Testifying before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday with yet another one of his infamous slide shows, Gore observed that the carbon dioxide (CO2) in Venus’ atmosphere supercharges the second-planet-from-the-sun’s greenhouse effect, resulting in surface temperatures of about 870 degrees Fahrenheit. Gore added that it’s not Venus’ proximity to the Sun that makes the planet much warmer than the Earth, because Mercury, which is even closer to the Sun, is cooler than Venus. Based on this...
  • Blushing Pluto? Dwarf planet takes on a ruddier hue: NASA

    02/04/2010 5:24:12 PM PST · by decimon · 22 replies · 536+ views
    AFP ^ | Feb 4, 2010 | Unknown
    WASHINGTON (AFP) – Pluto, the dwarf planet on the outer edge of our solar system, has a dramatically ruddier hue than it did just a few years ago, NASA scientists said Thursday, after examining photos taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. They said the distant orb appears mottled and molasses-colored in recent pictures, with a markedly redder tone that most likely is the result of surface ice melting on Pluto's sunlit pole and then refreezing on the other pole. The remarkable color shift, which apparently took place between 2000 and 2002, confirms that Pluto is a dynamic world undergoing dramatic...
  • NASA reveals first-ever photo of liquid on another world

    12/18/2009 3:11:00 PM PST · by dragnet2 · 58 replies · 3,437+ views
    Cnn.copm ^ | 12/18/2009 | Thom Patterson
    A photo from Cassini shows sunlight reflecting from a giant lake of methane on the northern half of Saturn's moon Titan. (CNN) -- NASA scientists revealed Friday a first-of-its-kind image from space showing reflecting sunlight from a lake on Saturn's largest moon, Titan. It's the first visual "smoking gun" evidence of liquid on the northern hemisphere of the moon, scientists said, and the first-ever photo from another world showing a "specular reflection" -- which is reflection from a liquid surface. Jaumann said he was surprised when he first saw the photos transmitting from Cassini, orbiting Saturn about a billion...
  • NASA Discovers A Ring Around The Solar System

    10/18/2009 9:05:17 PM PDT · by Defiant · 45 replies · 3,624+ views
    NPR ^ | October 18, 2009 | unknown
    NASA scientists have discovered a mysterious ribbon around our solar system —- a stripe made of hydrogen —- that defies all current expectations about what the edge of the solar system might look like. Richard Fisher, the director of NASA's Heliophysics Division, tells NPR's Guy Raz that this discovery is a big moment for the scientific community. "We thought we knew everything about everything, and it turned out that there were unknown unknowns."