Keyword: volcanoes

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  • Yellowstone volcano: Earthquake swarm hits deadly caldera which could be sign of ERUPTION

    05/02/2019 5:51:47 PM PDT · by SJackson · 137 replies
    Express ^ | Sean Martin
    YELLOWSTONE volcano could be about to erupt and challenge humanity’s existence as a spate of mini-quakes have been felt around the fearsome caldera. During the month of April, a total of 63 earthquakes struck around the Wyoming based supervolcano. All of the tremors were relatively small, with the largest registering at 2.6 on the Richter scale, hitting on April 29. But experts have warned that it is not necessarily about the strength of an earthquake around a volcano, but more the quantity of them. Some scientists believe that tremors around a volcano could be a sign that it might blow....
  • Geologists discover a new hotspot in Yellowstone supervolcano that's killing off trees

    04/06/2019 9:10:36 AM PDT · by rktman · 82 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | 4/5/2019 | Cheyenne Macdonald
    Full Header: Geologists discover a new hotspot in Yellowstone supervolcano that's killing off trees in a patch of warm land the size of FOUR soccer fields A new thermal area has popped up in Yellowstone National Park, in yet another sign of the ever-changing magma activity beneath the surface. Satellite images have revealed an expanse of about eight acres – or the equivalent of four soccer fields – where the ground is warmer than its surroundings, causing the trees and vegetation in that patch to die off. While scientists have only just confirmed its existence, the United State Geological Survey...
  • A supervolcano caused the largest eruption in European history. Now it’s stirring again.

    12/22/2016 7:41:58 PM PST · by JimSEA · 31 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 12/21/2016 | Sarah Kaplan
    The Italian name for the caldera — Campi Flegrei, or “burning fields”— is apt. The 7.5-mile-wide cauldron is the collapsed top of an ancient volcano, formed when the magma within finally blew. Though half of it is obscured beneath the crystal blue waters of the Mediterranean, the other half is studded with cinder cones and calderas from smaller eruptions. And the whole area seethes with hydrothermal activity: Sulfuric acid spews from active fumaroles; geysers spout water and steam and the ground froths with boiling mud; and earthquake swarms shudder through the region, 125 miles south of Rome. And things seem...
  • Dating the Uluzzian

    02/15/2014 6:08:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | February 09, 2014 | Journal of Human Evolution
    Researchers have securely dated a prehistoric human stone tool industry that is thought to have been used by early modern humans, or possibly late Neanderthals, around the time when early modern humans were beginning to emerge in Europe, arguably sometime between 40,000 to 50,000 years B.P... The Uluzzian, a prehistoric stone tool techno-tradition represented by lithic artifacts unearthed by archaeologists at cave locations primarily in Italy and Greece, has been a central contender as a possible "transitional" industry between the typical stone tool types (the Mousterian) used by late European Neanderthals and those (Aurignacian, Châtelperronian) of the earliest modern human...
  • Ground Rises Near Ancient Italian Volcano

    02/25/2007 1:47:41 PM PST · by Strategerist · 30 replies · 1,098+ views
    LiveScience ^ | February 23, 2007 | Andrea Thompson
    The ground on the western edges of Naples, Italy is rising, spurring worries of a possible volcanic eruption, but scientists now think they know exactly what is causing the uplift and may be able to better predict any potential eruption. Using GPS measurements, a group of scientists at the National Institute of Geophysics and Vulcanology in Italy monitored the ground’s motions for several years, and based on the patterns they observed, they believe the uplifting is caused by magma intruding from a shallow chamber. The rising motions of the ground reached a peak rate of about three feet per year...
  • Volcanoes Killed Off Neanderthals, Study Suggests

    09/24/2010 8:52:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    National Geographic News ^ | September 22, 2010 | Ker Than
    The Neanderthals were a hardy species that lived through multiple ice ages and would have been familiar with volcanoes and other natural calamities. But the eruptions 40,000 years ago were unlike anything Neanderthals had faced before, Cleghorn and company say. For one thing, all the volcanoes apparently erupted around the same time. And one of those blasts, the Campanian Ignimbrite, is thought to have been the most powerful eruption in Europe in the last 200,000 years... The researchers acknowledge that there are gaps in the volcanoes theory. For instance, the time line needs to be better defined -- did...
  • Family of three die after falling into boiling mud as sink hole opens up in volcanic area in Italy

    09/12/2017 9:20:16 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 49 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | 12 September 2017 • 4:18pm | Nick Squires, Rome
    An Italian couple and their 11-year-old son died in a freak accident on Tuesday when they fell into a 10ft-deep hole that suddenly opened up in a highly active volcanic area near Naples. Police said the child strayed beyond safety barriers and was swallowed up by the pit, plunging into boiling hot mud at the Solfatara Crater in Pozzuoli, part of a huge volcanic area known as the Campi Flegrei or Phlegrean Fields. His father, 45, reportedly rushed to his rescue but also fell into the sink-hole. The boy’s mother, 42, then went to their aid, but she too was...
  • Europe’s Most Dangerous Supervolcano Is Waking Up; 500,000 Lives At Risk

    01/10/2017 5:16:20 AM PST · by gaggs · 49 replies
    When Mount Vesuvius erupted and buried the Italian city of Pompeii in ash, killing 2,000 people, it was regarded as one of the most catastrophic natural disasters and is still studied heavily today. By comparison, a nearby supervolcano called Campi Flegrei, which means “burning fields,” would put the lives of 500,000 Italians at risk and cause damage that would extend to the surrounding nations.
  • Massive Volcano Near Naples Begins Rumbling

    12/23/2016 2:45:57 PM PST · by marshmallow · 45 replies
    A volcanic field off the shore of Sicily, near Naples, has become active, scientists report. The Campi Flegrei volcano is much larger than nearby Mt. Vesuvius, the volcano whose eruption destroyed the ancient city of Pompei. An eruption of this “supervolcano” could endanger much of Europe. News of the volcanic activity was made public less than a week after the blood of St. Januarius failed to liquefy when displayed in the Naples cathedral. Sicilians have long believed that when the miracle of St. Januarius does not occur, disaster will follow for the people of Naples. A supervolcano caused the largest...
  • The Supervolcano That Caused One Of The Biggest Eruptions In History Has Started To Stir

    12/22/2016 11:17:19 AM PST · by blam · 56 replies
    Science Alert ^ | 12-22-2016 | BEC Crew
    BEC CREW 22 DEC 2016 It's dangerously close to hitting a critical pressure point. A 12-km wide cauldron that forms a vast supervolcano on the coast of Italy is showing signs of reawakening after almost 500 years of inactivity. Not only is this site rumoured to be responsible for the extinction of the Neanderthals, it’s got 500,000 people living around it right now, and researchers say it appears to be approaching a critical pressure point that could lead to an eruption. You might imagine a supervolcano as like a regular volcano, only supersized, rising up out of the ground and...
  • Naples astride a rumbling mega-volcano

    12/21/2016 7:32:05 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 27 replies
    phys.org ^ | 12/20/2016
    A slumbering Campi Flegrei volcano under the Italian city of Naples shows signs of "reawakening" and may be nearing a critical pressure point, according to a study published Tuesday. Italian and French scientists have for the first time identified a threshold beyond which rising magma under the Earth's surface could trigger the release of fluids and gases at a 10-fold increased rate. This would cause the injection of high-temperature steam into surrounding rocks, said lead author Giovanni Chiodini, a researcher at Italy's National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Bologna. "Hydrothermal rocks, if heated, can ultimately lose their mechanical resistance,...
  • Volcanic eruption near Naples may have killed Neanderthals

    02/16/2014 8:28:50 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Gazetta Delsud ^ | 3/06/2013 | unattributed
    'Catastrophic' event at Campi Flegrei 39,000 years ago Volcanic eruption near Naples may have killed Neanderthals Some researchers are suggesting that Neanderthals were driven to extinction by a massive volcanic eruption near Naples. The suggestion is one of the topics under debate this week at a conference at London's British Museum examining what forces led to the destruction of the Neanderthals and what led to the triumph of the homo sapiens. One new theory holds that a gigantic eruption of the volcano in the Campi Flegrei area near Naples 39,000 years ago was catastrophic for the Neanderthals. That was the...
  • Volcanic Evidence Opens New Maya Mystery

    01/05/2016 12:43:59 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    LiveScience ^ | May 30, 2014 | Becky Oskin
    Potters at Maya cities on the Caribbean side of Central America fused volcanic ash with local limestone to form household and ceremonial pottery, because the ash made their ceramics easier to fire. The distinctive recipe was a hallmark of the Late Classic Period from A.D. 600 to 900, Ford said. With thousands of people living in cities such as El Pilar and Tikal, the Mayan potters burned through several tons of volcanic ash every year, Ford has estimated. But no one can figure out where the ash came from. The mystery begins with the fact that there just aren't any...
  • Volcano in Iceland Is One of the Largest Sources of Volcanic CO2

    02/25/2019 10:37:27 AM PST · by neverevergiveup · 54 replies
    Earth & Space Science News ^ | November 8, 2018 | Terri Cook
    The emission rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) is one of the less obvious—but nevertheless significant—measures of volcanic activity. Volcanic CO2 emissions are also important for understanding the preindustrial climate balance. To date, estimates of global volcanic CO2 emissions have been extrapolated primarily from measurements collected at a small number of active sources. Ice-covered volcanic centers are prevalent, but they are often difficult to access, and their vents are difficult to discern, so they are rarely included in these calculations. High-precision airborne measurements, in combination with atmospheric modeling, suggest that the Katla subglacial caldera may be one of the planet’s biggest...
  • PATRICK MOORE: SHOULDN'T WE CELEBRATE CARBON DIOXIDE?

    02/23/2019 7:17:01 AM PST · by Libloather · 40 replies
    The GWPF ^ | 10/15/15 | Patrick Moore
    **SNIP** You heard it here. “Human emissions of carbon dioxide have saved life on Earth from inevitable starvation and extinction due to lack of CO2”. To use the analogy of the Atomic Clock, if the Earth were 24 hours old we were at 38 seconds to midnight when we reversed the trend towards the End Times. If that isn’t good news I don’t know what is. You don’t get to stave off Armageddon every day. I issue a challenge to anyone to provide a compelling argument that counters my analysis of the historical record and the prediction of CO2 starvation...
  • Do volcanoes or an asteroid deserve blame for dinosaur extinction?

    02/22/2019 11:10:06 AM PST · by ETL · 38 replies
    Phys.org ^ | February 21, 2019 | University of California - Berkeley
    UC Berkeley scientists have obtained more precise dates for the Deccan Traps volcanic lava flows, linking peak activity more closely to the asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago and the coincident mass extinction. But if greenhouse gases emitted before the impact created a hothouse climate that set life up for a fall when the impact cooled the planet, those gases did not coincide with the largest lava flows from the Deccan Traps. Based on new data published today in the journal Science, it seems increasingly likely that an asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago reignited massive...
  • 'Cave of forgotten dreams' may hold earliest painting of volcanic eruption

    01/16/2016 11:37:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Nature ^ | January 15, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Chauvet-Pont D'Arc cave, in southern France, is one of the world's oldest and most impressive cave-art sites. Discovered in 1994 and popularized in the Werner Herzog documentary 'Cave of Forgotten Dreams', Chauvet contains hundreds of paintings that were made as early as 37,000 years ago. Fearsome animals such as woolly rhinoceroses, cave lions and bears dominate Chauvet's imagery. But one of its innermost galleries -- named after a giant deer species, Megaloceros, that is depicted there -- also contains a series of mysterious spray-shaped drawings, partly covered by the Megaloceros painting. A nearby gallery holds similar spray imagery, as does...
  • Italian 'Super Volcano' May Threaten Millions: Scientists plan to drill deep below Romans'...

    08/06/2012 7:54:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 35 replies
    Newser ^ | Monday, August 06, 2012 | Rob Quinn
    A hidden "super volcano" near Pompeii threatens an eruption that could make Vesuvius look like a picnic, scientists warn. The Phlegraean Fields zone of intense seismic activity -- which the ancient Romans believed was the gateway to hell -- could doom millions of people in the Naples area if it erupts, Reuters reports. Scientists plan to drill more than two miles below its surface to monitor any signs of a pending eruption in the huge chamber of molten rock, but some experts fear that the drilling itself could trigger an earthquake or eruption. Areas like the Phlegraean fields "can give...
  • Volcanoes are Fed by ‘Mush’ Reservoirs, Says New Study

    12/07/2018 10:15:20 AM PST · by ETL · 21 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Dec 5, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    In order to erupt, volcanoes need a source of magma — melted, liquid rock — containing relatively few solid crystals. Traditionally, this magma was thought to be formed and stored in a magma chamber. Recent studies of magma chemistry have challenged this view, leading to the suggestion of the 'mush' reservoir model, where smaller pools of magma sit in the small gaps between solid crystals. However, the mush reservoir model could not explain how magmas containing relatively few crystals arise and are delivered to volcanoes in order for them to erupt at the surface. Now, with sophisticated modeling of mush...
  • Scientist gets too close to boiling lava from volcano

    07/19/2011 7:36:09 AM PDT · by winoneforthegipper · 27 replies · 1+ views
    BBC ^ | 07/19/11 | staff
    19 July 2011 Last updated at 00:07 ET Help A scientist tries to get a lava sample from Mount Nyiragongo in Africa's Great Rift Valley, but gets too close to the boiling lake. Dr Dario Tedesco, from the University of Naples, one of the world's leading authorities on the volcano, tries to alert the scientist whose life is at risk. Mount Nyiragongo is one of the most active volcanoes in the world. Scientists want to take lava samples from volcanoes because it can give vital clues about what is happening deep inside the planet.