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Kimchi, a well-known traditional fermented Korean food, has proven effective against influenza virus
Asia One ^ | July 26, 2018

Posted on 07/26/2018 8:14:23 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet

Kimchi, a well-known traditional fermented Korean food, is highly effective in preventing influenza virus in winter, according to the results of cell·animal experiments.

A joint research team from the Korea Food Research Institute and the World Institute of Kimchi recently announced that lactic acid bacteria and fermentation metabolites in kimchi inhibit the growth of influenza virus -- proving kimchi's effectiveness against flu for the first time in the world, along with the genetic information of strains(metagenome), fermentation metabolites, and bioactive mechanism.

Flu viruses are pathogens that cause acute respiratory conditions in winter. Swine flu (influenza A), which struck the world in 2009, and avian influenza (AI), which recently infected poultry in some countries, are two strains of influenza viruses. Due to mutation of virus, the prevention of flu from these kinds of viruses is so difficult, and infections caused by them are difficult to treat as well.

The research team, which consists of Dr. Kim, In-Ho (Korea Food Research Institute), Dr. Choi, Hak-Jong (World Institute of Kimchi), Korea University College of Medicine, and Dr. Ryu, Byung Hee (Daesang Corp., one of the leading food producers in Korea), collected kimchi samples at each fermentation stage (less-fermented, well-fermented, and over-fermented) and injected them into flu virus-infected cells and animals.

In this study, extracts from the kimchi sample at the 'well-fermented' stage (about 3-7 days after kimchi is made, when kimchi tastes best) were administered to cells infected with the influenza virus (H1N1) and the avian influenza virus (H7N9). In all of the cells, plaque formation significantly reduced, which means that the growth of the flu virus had been inhibited.

In the animal experiment where flu virus-infected mice were fed kimchi extracts, the rate of suffering from weight loss due to the flu also declined. In addition, the survival rate of the mice who consumed kimchi extracts was 30% higher than those who did not.

Dr. Kim, In-Ho of Korea Food Research Institute said, "Lactobacillus plantarum, which is produced in large quantities during the fermentation of kimchi, and its sub-ingredients such as green onion and ginger are thought to hinder the growth of influenza virus. We concluded that bioactive compounds from lactic acid bacteria produced by kimchi fermentation serve as antiviral agents by affecting the virus membrane surface or promptly activating immune cells mobilization." He added, "Our study is the world's first that scientifically verified kimchi's effectiveness against influenza viruses such as swine flu and AI viruses. In addition, we succeeded in isolating useful and safe lactic acid bacteria from kimchi, contributing to broadening its industrial applications. In other words, this can be applied not only to fermented foods including kimchi, paste, and liquors but also to animal feeds, and food and drug materials. It can also lay the milestone for the development of fermented foods and strains optimized for the constitution of Koreans, through analysis of microbial genome and metabolites in fermented foods as well as mechanism. As such, we have launched new food products in partnership with Daesang corp, aiming to contribute to safeguarding Koreans against virus threats of modern society and to strengthening Korea's competitiveness as the birthplace of kimchi."

In 2003, SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) was pandemic in many parts of the world including Hong Kong and mainland China, except for Korea where very few people were infected with the virus. Regarding this, some argued that kimchi has an antiviral effect. The results of the study (Effects of heat-killed Lactobacillus plantarum against influenza viruses in mice) were published in the February 2018 issue of the Journal of Microbiology.

Cision View original content:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/kimchi-a-well-known-traditional-fermented-korean-food-has-proven-effective-against-influenza-virus-300687023.html


TOPICS: Food; Health/Medicine; Science
KEYWORDS: dsj02; influenza; kimchee; kimchi; korea
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1 posted on 07/26/2018 8:14:23 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Interesting.

I started eating kimchi regularly a few years ago.

My tummy feels better and I rarely get the sniffles anymore.


2 posted on 07/26/2018 8:17:17 PM PDT by Eisenhower Republican (Welcome to Colorado. Now go home!)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Perhaps the strong breath and fragrant farts one emits after eating kimchee keeps sick people away? Just a thought. I really like to eat kimchee regardless...


3 posted on 07/26/2018 8:17:29 PM PDT by 43north (Its hard to stop a man when he knows what's right and he keeps on coming.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Kimchi and Chicken Soup.


4 posted on 07/26/2018 8:18:27 PM PDT by Slyfox (Not my circus, not my monkeys)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

The fact that a “World Institute of Kimchi” exists astounds me.


5 posted on 07/26/2018 8:20:38 PM PDT by NorthMountain (... the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Probably because the viruses can’t stand the smell and won’t come near...

All kidding aside, kimchi is delicious and goes great with lots of food—even on hamburgers.


6 posted on 07/26/2018 8:21:16 PM PDT by dinodino
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Indeed the stage of fermemtation often determines the taste. Some first timers who try it for the first time do not realize that not all kimchi tastes the same. So much depend on ingredients chosen, stage and technique of fermentation, spice level, how long it’s been refrigerated for...etc...


7 posted on 07/26/2018 8:23:32 PM PDT by CondoleezzaProtege
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

It’s an acquired taste, but once you’re hooked you’ll always have plenty of personal space. I had a Korean classmate whose wife came over to join him, and cook for him, after the first semester. We could smell the garlic vapors coming off him in the classroom as he came down the hall the first day of second semester.


8 posted on 07/26/2018 8:24:50 PM PDT by katana
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

I’ve never had kimchi, but love sauerkraut. I wonder if traditionally fermented sauerkraut would have the same effect.


9 posted on 07/26/2018 8:26:41 PM PDT by NorthstarMom
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Kimchi or take my chances with Spanish Flu.

They’re both lethal.


10 posted on 07/26/2018 8:27:54 PM PDT by Snickering Hound
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

The last kimchi thread made me search kimchi and stomach cancer. I dig kimchi, what does everyone think? Hopefully someone will explain it is all made up or something or I already eat stuff that is way worse. Or the Koreans are just genetically predisposed or smoke and drink too much? Maybe the fresher stuff is better than the long-fermented really stank fishy kimchi?

Freegards


11 posted on 07/26/2018 8:28:28 PM PDT by Ransomed
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Kimchi, sauerkraut, kombucha all should theoretically have similar beneficial effects.


12 posted on 07/26/2018 8:29:54 PM PDT by montag813
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

I ought to get back to eating Kimchi.

There are a few pickled / fermented foods that are good for you. Sauerkraut is one that I remember.


13 posted on 07/26/2018 8:30:52 PM PDT by Fhios (♫ Oh Where have you been Jeffy boy Jeffy boy oh where have you been charming Jeffy?)
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To: katana

Now imagine being on a transit bus with 50 people plus the driver and ticket girl who all just had kimchi for breakfast.


14 posted on 07/26/2018 8:34:08 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (You cannot invade the mainland US. There'd be a rifle behind every blade of grass.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

If the kimchi does not kill you it will damn sure kill the virus. Actually it is pretty good if it is not spiced up to inferno temps. I like it, if mild.

I live near Fort Hood, Texas and there are a bunch of Korean Restaurants run by ex Korean soldiers and brides of American soldiers. Pretty good eats at a fair price.

Odd, but because of the many nationalities these soldiers have brought home there is a wide variety of international cuisine in this Army town. Pretty good food at a good price. If it was to expensive, the enlisted could not afford it. The enlisted men are what drive the economy of the town.


15 posted on 07/26/2018 8:34:11 PM PDT by cpdiii (Cane Cutter, Deckhand,Roughneck, Geologist, Pilot, Pharmacist: THE CONSTITUTION IS WORTH DYING FOR!)
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To: Fhios

I always thought it was good for you—probiotics. But don’t eat too much or you’ll biotic often and painfully the next day. Like if you haven’t had kimchi for a while, go easy with it.

Freegards


16 posted on 07/26/2018 8:34:26 PM PDT by Ransomed
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Hmm, reminds me I haven’t made any in a while......

While I like mine after it has set up for a week or so, my daughter (who lived in Korea for a year) likes hers to sit for at least 3 weeks. She likes it rather pungent.

I love the way my house smells after I make a batch.


17 posted on 07/26/2018 8:35:38 PM PDT by ChildOfThe60s (If you can remember the 60's....You weren't really there)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

There are hundreds of types of kimchi. Fermented cabbage referred to is just one type 9f kimchi.


18 posted on 07/26/2018 8:36:31 PM PDT by TexasGator (Z1)
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To: CondoleezzaProtege

I’ve made a lot of kimchi and it never comes out the same twice.


19 posted on 07/26/2018 8:37:24 PM PDT by ChildOfThe60s (If you can remember the 60's....You weren't really there)
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To: NorthstarMom
I wonder if traditionally fermented sauerkraut would have the same effect.

Yes. Sauerkraut and kimchi are both just fermented cabbage. Koreans just tend to add chili paste for spice and anchovy or dried shrimp for more seafood "umami" flavor.

Just watch you don't buy sauerkraut at the big-box stores with any preservatives or high fructose corn syrup added. Get it local and naturally fermented.

20 posted on 07/26/2018 8:37:29 PM PDT by PGR88
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