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Road Kims took was unlocked by vandal, officials say
CNN ^ | December 8, 2006 | CNN

Posted on 12/08/2006 4:35:56 PM PST by indcons

GRANTS PASS, Oregon (AP) -- The remote logging road that James Kim and his family drove down before getting stranded deep in the Rogue River Canyon is normally blocked by a locked metal gate, but it was open the night they got lost because a vandal had cut the lock, authorities said Friday.

The Kims were stranded more than a week with little food after driving 15 miles past the gate. James Kim was later found dead of exposure after setting out on foot for help. Kati Kim and their daughters, Penelope, 4, and Sabine, 7 months, were airlifted out.

"It's locked during winter so people don't mistakenly go down that road." said Patty Burel, spokeswoman for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management Medford District and the Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest. (Watch Kim's heartbreaking journey )

The gate was locked November 1, after the end of deer hunting season, but later it was cut, and searchers looking for the Kims discovered the gate was open, Burel said. An investigation is under way to find out who cut the lock.

(Excerpt) Read more at cnn.com ...


TOPICS: Local News
KEYWORDS: cnet; jameskim
From the CNN website:

• NEW: Logging road family took is usually blocked by locked metal gate • James Kim died about a mile from a fully stocked fishing lodge • Kim, 35, walked 10.24 miles in rough terrain to seek help • The CNET editor's body found about a half mile from his family's car

1 posted on 12/08/2006 4:36:00 PM PST by indcons
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ping for future.


2 posted on 12/08/2006 4:37:38 PM PST by Jedi Master Pikachu ( Warning: fuming.)
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To: indcons

Makes this story all the more tragic.


3 posted on 12/08/2006 4:39:07 PM PST by Churchillspirit (We are all foot soldiers in this War On Terror.)
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To: Howlin; Stoat; tubebender; daybreakcoming; bonfire; KoRn; Stone Mountain; madison10

Thought you might be interested in this update on the tragic James Kim story.


4 posted on 12/08/2006 4:45:03 PM PST by indcons (Think)
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To: indcons

Still doesn't relieve the responsibility of going out on mountain roads in the winter without basic survival supplies. That was the tragic error. It is not always someone else's fault, no matter how much the media would like you to believe it.

I know, we lived in Colorado for years, and never left home without proper clothes and basic survival supplies in the back, no matter where we were going. Once on the way to Denver in June, a heavy summer snow storm hit while driving up the Interstate. Within an hour we had over a foot of snow. Put it in four wheel drive, cut across a field and down a back road. Got home late that night after many hours creeping along in the Blazer. Watched the late news as thousands were stranded on the freeway in the cold and rescue workers all over the place trying to get them out.

No excuses.

Everyone who travels the roads, especially in winter, should think long and hard about what happened and make their own survival plans too avoid the same fate.


5 posted on 12/08/2006 4:54:22 PM PST by Tarpon
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To: indcons
Image hosted by Photobucket.com i guess a deadend sign or a no outlet sign just cost toooo much...
6 posted on 12/08/2006 5:08:48 PM PST by Chode (American Hedonist )
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To: Tarpon; indcons

> Still doesn't relieve the responsibility of
> going out on mountain roads in the winter
> without basic survival supplies.

Plus assuming what you read on the internet is true:

"Technology killed Technology hack"
http://www.theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=36241

"CNET EDITOR James Kim died trying to save his
family after an online mapping service gave
him a bum steer. ... unaware that no one in
their right mind would attempt that route in winter."

Assuming the Inq report is true, of course :-)


7 posted on 12/08/2006 5:19:52 PM PST by Boundless (Imagine if Fox actually had a news channel)
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To: Boundless

"... unaware that no one in
their right mind would attempt that route in winter."

A common problem in my area. Auto clubs and travel agents from out of the area mark rugged back roads and trails as though they were highways and tourists often run into trouble.


8 posted on 12/08/2006 5:38:29 PM PST by Inyo-Mono (If you don't want people to get your goat, don't tell them where it's tied.)
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To: Boundless

Kati Kim said they were using a hard copy of a Oregon Map. I believe it was a Rand McNally


9 posted on 12/08/2006 5:42:41 PM PST by tubebender (Growing old is mandatory...Growing up is optional)
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To: surfer

Ping


10 posted on 12/08/2006 5:44:38 PM PST by tubebender (Growing old is mandatory...Growing up is optional)
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To: Chode
i guess a deadend sign or a no outlet sign just cost toooo much.

As I've stated in other threads, we're never going to get to the point where every single one of hundreds of forest service roads and thousands of stub roads are gated, chained or signed, at least until the whole thing is paved over (I hope many stay unimproved). The "troublesome" ones, however, should get some kind of barrier or cautionary signage.

11 posted on 12/08/2006 6:28:33 PM PST by steve86 (Acerbic by nature, not nurture)
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To: indcons
Thanks for the followup on this tragedy. I will be driving down I-5 (Roseburg/Grant's Pass) next week which will probably bring this even closer to home for me. I went on Mapquest to map out our own evacuation from Hurricane Rita. We left at midnight and before our destination was reached - we were on a very narrow poorly maintained road out in the middle of nowhere for a time. However Mapquest showed it to be a major rural highway. Spooky for a while - especially with a hurricane bearing down on us. :o)

Do you suppose this vandalism happened within the last 6 weeks or so? If so, I would bet they find who did it.

My thoughts go to Mrs Kim as she makes her path through this.

12 posted on 12/08/2006 8:02:51 PM PST by daybreakcoming
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To: Boundless
Nothing absolves the person from the responsibility to protect their family and themselves. If you do not think you are competent to go out in the mountains, don't go. If you do not have a proper vehicle, don't go. If you do not have the proper equipment, don't go. It is far better to be safe than dead.

There is a lot to be learned from this tragic situation. I would advise people to take it seriously, study what happened and prepare so it doesn't happen to you. The less experienced you are, the more food, clothing and equipment you should take. California is one of those areas where we lived for quite a while that lure you into thinking nature isn't there. When in fact, it is within 2 hours drive, a Sunday picnic to the Serra's, and you are in another world.

I have done off road wilderness travel for many years, maps are wrong, cell phones don't work, roads get washed out, locked gates get opened, anything that can will go wrong. Even on paved roads it can be hazardous, especially in winter.

I had both engine mounts fail on my 4x4 truck once while at 12,000 feet on a mountain in Colorado. The engine went through the radiator. We were climbing hard on a trail on the side of the mountain, scary stuff when the engine came loose -- Instant no power steering, no power brakes. Luckily I had a creeper low range manual trans truck. It was July, started to snow, which is what happens at that altitude in the rockies. We were well prepared and everything worked out fine.

Be safe not sorry.
13 posted on 12/08/2006 9:05:15 PM PST by Tarpon
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To: Tarpon
Everyone who travels the roads, especially in winter, should think long and hard about what happened and make their own survival plans too avoid the same fate.

My Mom's family came from Ohio, and one of the little bits of family lore I got from them was that they never drove anywhere during the winter without a set of snow chains, a few blankets ( they called them Car Coats ) in the trunk- and you always told somebody where you were going, and when you expected to be there. So if you didn't make it, someone would track you down.

14 posted on 12/09/2006 5:07:00 AM PST by backhoe (Just an Old Keyboard Cowboy, Ridin' the Trakball into the Dawn of Information)
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To: indcons
Thought you might be interested in this update on the tragic James Kim story.

Thank you very much for going to the trouble of doing this....that was very nice of you.   :-)

15 posted on 12/09/2006 4:10:17 PM PST by Stoat (Rice / Coulter 2008: Smart Ladies for a Strong America)
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To: Tarpon
California is one of those areas where we lived for quite a
while that lure you into thinking nature isn't there. When in
fact, it is within 2 hours drive


IIRC, one lady in Los Angeles found it was only about a 20 minute
drive/hike into the local "mountains".

She found they had an "appointment with destiny" and a deadly cougar
a few years ago.
16 posted on 12/09/2006 4:16:12 PM PST by VOA
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