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Interstate 68 Meetings Continue in Washington
The Wheeling News-Register ^ | July 17, 2018 | Joselyn King

Posted on 08/30/2018 10:18:15 AM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks

MOUNDSVILLE — Trump Administration officials are continuing to listen as West Virginia officials push for an expanded Interstate 68 from Morgantown through Marshall County.

Marshall County Commissioner Robert Miller led a contingent to Washington, D.C., last week to meet with Brittany Carter, the White House assistant director of the Office of Intergovernmental Affairs.

Miller said the group discussed the I-68 project’s prospects of being included within Trump’s expected $200 billion infrastructure improvement plan, which should be presented to Congress by the end of this year. The I-68 project is expected to cost at least $1 billion.

“$200 billion isn’t a lot for projects like that,” Miller said. “But if we can get the White House on our side, it can help in negotiating certain things.”

Miller said he was blessed to have with him in Washington five men he termed “well-credentialed.”

Accompanying Miller were State Sen. Charles Clements, R-Wetzel, also executive director of the West Virginia Route 2/Interstate 68 Authority; Brian Anderson, director of the West Virginia University Energy Institute; John Deskins, director of the WVU Bureau of Business and Economic Research; Greg Kucera, marketing director for Shale Crescent USA; and Bryce Custer, a broker focussing on petroleum and energy services with NAI Spring.

The group provided Carter with information on how the highway would benefit the gas and oil industries seeking to extract resources in that corridor, and how related industrial businesses would spring to life there.

The government’s investment would result in economic growth and more tax revenues, they told her.

The discussion determined the next step will be to involve representatives of the federal energy and commerce departments in the talks.

“If we can’t get this road built now, never going to get built,” Miller said. “With this much potential for economic activity, I am optimistic this will happen.”

He acknowledges the road to constructing the highway is likely to be a lengthy process.

“There are no definite plans, but there are definitely open dialogues,” Miller said.

The July 11 trip was Miller’s third to Washington to discuss with Trump administration representatives construction of the I-68 extension. The first took place Dec. 8, and the second Feb. 20.

Clements said the trip last week was his first to Washington regarding I-68.

“The meeting changed the road map on what we have to do to get something done,” he said. “We’re going to have to start working to get some of the oil and gas developers to come out and promote this anyway we can.

“It’s important to get state government, local people in on this. “The more people we can get and the more organizations, the better off we will be.”


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections; US: District of Columbia; US: West Virginia
KEYWORDS: dc; energy; funding; gas; i68; infrastructure; infrastructureplan; interstate68; lobbying; maga; marshallcounty; oil; revenues; transportation; trump; westvirginia; wv2

1 posted on 08/30/2018 10:18:15 AM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Pushing it through a lightly-populated county in the West Virginia panhandle, to dead-end at the Ohio River?

Doesn’t sound like America is getting its bang-for-the-buck on that one.


2 posted on 08/30/2018 10:28:45 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

I drove 68 yesterday for the first time in several years. My trip from Columbus to Baltimore was a fun drive.


3 posted on 08/30/2018 10:29:11 AM PDT by cyclotic ( We’re the first ones taxed, the last ones considered and the first ones punished)
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To: cyclotic

I began taking I-68 to D.C. after repeated, frustrating problems with the EZPass system on the PA Turnpike.

Amenities on that road are good, despite the fact that it passes through some very sparsely populated territory.


4 posted on 08/30/2018 10:31:05 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: Buckeye McFrog

I drive from MD to Michigan a few times a year. My kid is on the turnpike right now.

68 is a great ride but it adds too many hours to an already overly long trip


5 posted on 08/30/2018 10:40:43 AM PDT by cyclotic ( We’re the first ones taxed, the last ones considered and the first ones punished)
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To: cyclotic
My trip from Columbus to Baltimore was a fun drive.

When I used to go between NYC and WV I would refer to the stretch from I-79 to I-81 as the "fun part of the trip."

6 posted on 08/30/2018 10:45:42 AM PDT by Roccus (When you talk to a politician...ANY politician...always say, "Remember Ceausescu")
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks
Moundsville is a pretty interesting town. There is this huge indian mound several stories tall, with an interesting museum attached to it. It might be larger than the Etowah mound.

But what is really weird is that it sits directly across the street from the old West Virginia penitentiary. And I'm telling you that is one frightening looking place. It looks like a nightmare out of some horror movie. The pictures can't even begin to convey how creepy it is in person.

This is just the place to take delinquents and "youths" for a guided tour and scare the bejesus out of them. If the indian ghosts don't get you, the prisoner ghosts will.


7 posted on 08/30/2018 10:53:10 AM PDT by Governor Dinwiddie ("Nature, Mr. Allnut, is what we are put in this world to rise above.")
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To: cyclotic

I’m going to Annapolis at the end of September and I-68 will be part of the trip.


8 posted on 08/30/2018 10:53:19 AM PDT by joesbucks
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To: Governor Dinwiddie

That prison is used as a training facility for correctional SWAT teams and also hosts an annual competion for them.

CC


9 posted on 08/30/2018 11:16:50 AM PDT by Celtic Conservative (Do you know what really burns my ass? A flame about 3 feet high.)
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To: cyclotic

It does take longer (I’ve driven from Northern Virginia to Michigan several times, and to Western Ohio as well) but on a good day, it’s such a beautiful drive.


10 posted on 08/30/2018 11:34:00 AM PDT by Crolis ("To have a right to do a thing is not at all the same as to be right in doing it." -GKC)
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To: Governor Dinwiddie

Bookmark


11 posted on 08/30/2018 11:53:39 AM PDT by silverleaf (A man who kneels for the national anthem doesn't stand for much of anything)
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To: Governor Dinwiddie

Have you ever taken the tour? Creepy place. But fun. The Lunatic Asylum is another WV creepy treasure.


12 posted on 08/30/2018 12:10:10 PM PDT by joesbucks
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To: joesbucks

I grew up on the other side of the river, and took the tour almost 20 years ago. At one point in the tour, the guide locked us all 3 into our own cells to give us a taste of how it feels. The others in my group (my parents) were released after a few seconds, but the guide couldn’t get my cell open. I was hoping he couldn’t get it open without help, and then I’d be the lead story on channel 7 (Wheeling) and channel 9 (Steubenville). I’d be famous! He managed to force it open somehow after a few minutes. Otherwise, the tour was very interesting and well worth the money.


13 posted on 08/30/2018 12:17:25 PM PDT by thesharkboy (Charter member of the Basket of Deplorables)
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To: cyclotic

Interesting road.

I went to college in WV between 1976-1980. At that time what is now I-68 was designated US 48 (or Appalachian Corridor E) which had been completed From Morgantown to somewhere In western MD just a few months earlier I think in 1975. One of the first roads I ever drove on that had rain groves in the lanes.

It had been many years after completing college that I had the opportunity to travel that route, prolly about 15 years ago. Although I-68 is a huge improvement over US 48 the old road (US 48) in the WV section was fairly nice even back then. A huge improvement over Rt. 50 between Winchester VA and I-79 interchange in Clarksburg WV.

In MD where the road cuts thru Sideling Hill, was (if I remember right) part of old US 40 in MD and was two lanes with a true hairpin at the top. I couldn’t believe how much of the mountain was cut away to upgrade that section to interstate 68 standards. Completely changed the character of that pass thru the mountain.


14 posted on 08/30/2018 1:24:20 PM PDT by fatboy
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To: Governor Dinwiddie

Been there for work when it was open and still used as a prison.


15 posted on 08/30/2018 2:21:34 PM PDT by Emmett McCarthy
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To: thesharkboy

They did the same with our tour.....except it opened on the first try. My wife wouldn’t do it. She was afraid it wouldn’t reopen.


16 posted on 08/30/2018 3:50:06 PM PDT by joesbucks
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