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History (General/Chat)

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  • The Taj Mahal is wasting away, and it may soon hit the point of no return

    08/13/2018 8:55:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    The Conversation UK ^ | August 10, 2018 | Carolyn Roberts, Keele University
    The saying goes that the Taj Mahal is pinkish in the morning, milky white in the evening, and golden when the moon shines. Though this may once have been true for the famously pristine marble monument, a mixture of pollution and poor management has now burdened the Taj with a 24-hour layer of yellowy-brown. Condemning the "lethargy" of restoration efforts, India's Supreme Court recently told the government to restore the Taj or demolish it. Located in Agra, in the northern Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, the Taj Mahal is one of the most iconically beautiful buildings in the world. Built...
  • Over 2000 years later: Ancient gold earring discovered in City of David

    08/13/2018 8:48:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | August 8, 2018 | Tamara Zieve
    A Hellenistic-era golden earring that features the image of a horned animal was discovered in the Givati parking lot of the City of David National Park that encircles the Old City walls, the City of David announced Wednesday. The discovery was made during archaeological digs carried out by the Antiquities Authority and Tel Aviv University... The hoop earring bears the head of a horned animal with large eyes and a mouth... Close to the place where the earring was found, excavators also found a gold bead with intricate embroidered ornamentation resembling a thin rope pattern, dividing the beads into two...
  • Scarlet macaw DNA points to ancient breeding operation in Southwes

    08/13/2018 7:37:17 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    phys.org ^ | August 13, 2018, | Pennsylvania State University
    Historically, scarlet macaws lived from South America to eastern coastal Mexico and Guatemala, thousands of miles from the American Southwest. Previously, researchers thought that ancestral Puebloan people might have traveled to these natural breeding areas and brought birds back, but the logistics of transporting adolescent birds are difficult. None of the sites where these early macaw remains were found contained evidence of breeding—eggshells, pens or perches. "We were interested in the prehistoric scarlet macaw population history and the impacts of human direct management," said George. "Especially any evidence for directed breeding or changes in the genetic diversity that could co-occur...
  • Carbon Dioxide ‘Leak’ in Southern Ocean May Have Warmed Earth for 11,000 Years

    08/13/2018 3:01:24 PM PDT · by ETL · 40 replies
    Sci-News ^ | Aug 1, 2018 | News Staff / Source
    “We think we may have found the answer. Increased circulation in the Southern Ocean allowed carbon dioxide to leak into the atmosphere, working to warm the planet,” said Princeton University’s Professor Daniel Sigman, co-author of the study. For years, researchers have known that growth and sinking of phytoplankton pumps carbon dioxide deep into the ocean, a process often referred to as the ‘biological pump.’ “The biological pump is driven mostly by the low latitude ocean but is undone closer to the poles, where carbon dioxide is vented back to the atmosphere by the rapid exposure of deep waters to the...
  • 40,000-yo foal unearthed in Siberia’s ‘Gateway to the Underworld’ in perfect condition

    08/13/2018 1:53:32 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 40 replies
    RT ^ | Edited time: 13 Aug, 2018 17:45 | staff
    © North-Eastern Federal University ==================================================================== A three-month-old horse that lived up to 40,000 years ago has been discovered in the mysterious Batagai depression in Russia’s Yakutia region, nicknamed the ‘Gateway to the Underworld.’ The North-Eastern Federal University in Yakutsk published the first photo of the “unique” discovery, which was made together with scientists from Kindai University in Japan along with a crew from Fuji TV. The horse was unearthed in perfect condition with its mane, tail and hair well preserved, as it was trapped in the permafrost for 30,000-40,000 years, scientists say. The discovery can help scientists to learn...
  • Young Russians in Prague Find that 1968 Russian-Led Invasion Casts Long Shadow

    08/13/2018 12:07:58 PM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 14 replies
    Radio Prague ^ | August 13, 2018 | Daniela Lazarová, Libor Kukal
    The number of Russians residing and working in the Czech Republic has been steadily growing in recent years. Today Russians are the fourth strongest foreign minority in the country, after Vietnamese, Slovak and Ukrainian nationals. In the last decade their number rose from 23,000 to 37,000. For young Russians, Prague is an attractive city free of the constraints of the Putin regime, and a good place for business and entertainment. The language barrier is easily surmountable due to both nations speaking a Slavic language. However there is one barrier that is harder to cross and that is the stigma of...
  • Fifty years ago, Soviet tanks crushed the 'Prague Spring'

    08/13/2018 9:55:21 AM PDT · by CondoleezzaProtege · 25 replies
    Economic Times ^ | Aug 2018 | AFP
    In August 1968 Soviet tanks rolled into communist Czechoslovakia to crush a burgeoning democratic reform movement known as the Prague Spring. Here is a recap of the shock intervention that reined in the Soviet satellite state, its aspirations for democracy warded off for another 20 years. "At 11:00 pm, Soviet, Polish, East German, Bulgarian and Hungarian troops crossed the Czechoslovak border," AFP reported early on August 21, picking up Radio Prague's announcement of the overnight invasion. Tensions had been mounting between then Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev and the reformist government that had taken over in the Central European state. In...
  • vanity: Chickens coming home to roost....FBI, Loser, Peter Strzok is fired!!!

    08/13/2018 9:14:32 AM PDT · by JLAGRAYFOX · 44 replies
    Well, well...the chickens are coming home to roost and, soon, the remaining Democrat scum and vermin in the DOJ/FBI will begin to sing loud & clear, and drop unending dime...across the board, so that they can move to save and protect their own butts. Let us be honest folks....the ex-POTUS, Barack Hussein Obama is the true, one and only leader of this pack of DOJ/FBI, traitors, turn coats and criminals. You can start with his beloved, criminal, lock-steppers, Eric Holder & Loretta Lynch, and go right on down the list of Democrat trash from A-Z!!! I could go on.....but, I...
  • Democratic Socialism is a Scam

    08/13/2018 8:04:56 AM PDT · by Heartlander · 9 replies
    Quillette ^ | August 6, 2018 | Giancarlo Sopo
    Democratic Socialism is a Scam When I attended a rally with my family in Little Havana for then-Senator Barack Obama in 2007, our old neighborhood greeted both us and the future 44th president as if we were traitors. Older, conservative protestors yelled “Comunistas!” at us from across the Miami-Dade County Auditorium. We brushed off the attacks because we knew they came from understandably traumatized exiles and, to paraphrase the late Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart, as Cuban Americans, we know socialism when we see it. Obama was no socialist. In fact, his message resonated with us, in part, because of...
  • The Nastiest Feud in Science

    08/12/2018 7:56:38 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 56 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | Sept 2018 | BIANCA BOSKER
    ...But Keller doesn’t buy any of it. “It’s like a fairy tale: ‘Big rock from sky hits the dinosaurs, and boom they go.’ And it has all the aspects of a really nice story,” she said. “It’s just not true.” ...Keller’s resistance has put her at the core of one of the most rancorous and longest-running controversies in science. “It’s like the Thirty Years’ War,” says Kirk Johnson, the director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Impacters’ case-closed confidence belies decades of vicious infighting, with the two sides trading accusations of slander, sabotage, threats, discrimination, spurious data, and...
  • New Mexico has seen its share of fringe groups

    08/12/2018 6:23:31 PM PDT · by CedarDave · 31 replies
    The Albuquerque Journal ^ | August 11, 2018 | Mike Gallagher
    There are plenty of wide open spaces in New Mexico where people seeking to live off the grid can find starry nights, ... – and few prying eyes. Some of those folks are loners. Others are just checking out of the urban rat race. Others come to practice their religion in monasteries or remote farms in ways that harm no one. But New Mexico’s remote areas have also attracted groups on the fringe of society who end up in the crosshairs of law enforcement – and often it’s because of their treatment of the children who live in the communes....
  • Pros & Cons of sawed-off shotgun (18 inch or longer barrel) and appropriate use(s)

    08/12/2018 5:38:29 PM PDT · by MeneMeneTekelUpharsin · 123 replies
    Gun Project | 12 August 2018 | Mene Mene Tekel Upharsin
    Well, we did it. We took my Spanish 12ga shotgun with the 27.5" barrel and cut it off. Now, it has a 19" barrel and the end has been filed and finished and it is ready to go. The intended purpose is for home defense, or in a still rare case, if some group of people are causing a problem/rioting out in society as a secondary weapon. In some literary circles, such is called a "Coach Gun". It appears some characters in history over 100 years ago determined that a cut down shotgun would be an effective weapon a close...
  • What did King Louis XIV of France eat and How did the Sun King dine?

    08/12/2018 5:03:55 PM PDT · by SamAdams76 · 34 replies
    Zippy Facts ^ | Karen Hill
    From the moment the Sun King arose from his sumptuous gold bed, aligned with the rising sun at the centerpiece of his beloved Versailles, the château was alive with activity. The life of every courtier, minister, lovely lady, doctor, and cook was finely tuned to the rituals of the King, his dressing, shaving, dining, meetings, and evening comedie, dancing or appartement when the halls were flooded with light and the courtiers played billiards, gambled, and ate sweets. Living under a pretense of usefulness to Louis XIV and the government of France, the courtiers were largely a source of amusement...
  • Reclining and Dining (and Drinking) in Ancient Rome

    08/12/2018 4:49:25 PM PDT · by SamAdams76 · 31 replies
    The Iris ^ | Shelby Brown
    The ancient Greeks had a recumbent approach to their (male-only) dinner parties, as I discussed in a previous post: elite men reclined, propped on pillows, to drink, converse, and—sometimes—overindulge. The practice of reclining and dining continued into ancient Rome, but with a few additions—for one, respectable women were invited to join the party, and for another, drinking was not a separate, post-dinner event, but became part of the dining experience. An association of dining with luxury led to 19th-century depictions, like the one above, of Roman diners leading the soft life (here, without reclining). The Greeks used single couches onto...
  • Eating Habits in Ancient Greece

    08/12/2018 4:32:50 PM PDT · by SamAdams76 · 33 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | Philip Chrysopoulos
    The eating habits of ancient Greeks were developed after a deep and detailed study of the needs of the body and the spirit. Their diet, which was an important part of their philosophical vision, was based on rules that combined enjoyment with well-being. Unlike what many modern nutritionists believe about the benefits of a hearty breakfast, the ancient Greeks, and especially the Athenians, used to start their day with a very frugal meal that included “akratisma“, a little barley bread dipped in wine. Sometimes they were adding olives and figs. More often, however, their breakfast was limited to a boiled...
  • Florida construction workers unearth prehistoric bone fragment, likely from mammoth

    08/12/2018 10:53:25 AM PDT · by ETL · 29 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Aug 11, 2018 | Madeline Farber
    A construction crew in Cape Coral, Fla., in June discovered what is believed to be a bone fragment from a mastodon or mammoth, a report released Friday said.  The fragment was discovered underground by  crews working on the city’s utilities expansion project, The Fort Myers News-Press reported. It is believed to be a part of the animal’s humerus bone, according to The Cape Coral Daily Breeze.  It is not entirely clear how old the find is; The News-Press reported it could be more than two million years old, while NBC2 put it at somewhere between 12,000 and 250,000 years. What’s more, archaeologists think there could...
  • What Would Be The Ideal Wife? How Should She Treat Her Husband?

    08/12/2018 9:27:30 AM PDT · by Architect of Avalon · 72 replies
    Architect of Avalon ^ | 8/12/2018 | Architect of Avalon
    Please answer the title question with as many points as you can come up with. What interpersonal dynamics and actions would make the husband the happiest? Additionally, what would the ideal husband be like, and how should he treat his wife?
  • 1996 Staples "It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year" Back-to-School Commercial

    08/12/2018 7:32:33 AM PDT · by DoodleBob · 29 replies
    Youtube ^ | 1996 | Staples
    Staples 1996 Back to School commercial featuring a Christmas classic as the soundtrack, a happy parent, and glum kids.
  • On this date in 1908

    08/12/2018 6:13:12 AM PDT · by Bull Snipe · 25 replies
    The first Model T Ford is produced at the Ford plant in Detroit, MI. AKA the "tin lizzy", Ford would go on to produce over 15,000,000 of the Model T's before production ended in 1927. By the early 1920s, half of the cars in the world were Model T's.
  • Egyptian Papyrus Reveals Israelite Psalms [Papyrus Amherst 63]

    08/11/2018 9:25:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    BAR ^ | August 6, 2018 | Marek Dospel
    Containing about 35 literary texts in Aramaic that date to the seventh and sixth centuries B.C.E., Papyrus Amherst 63 is written in a cursive Egyptian script known as Demotic. This unusual combination of the Aramaic language and the Demotic script was among the main reasons why the decipherment took more than 120 years. Karel van der Toorn (University of Amsterdam), who recently published a new edition and translation of Papyrus Amherst 63, argues that besides the forerunner of Psalm 20, the Egyptian papyrus contains two other Israelite psalms... “The two other psalms of the Amherst papyrus are not in the...