Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $18,845
21%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 21% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Science (General/Chat)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • A Mysterious Cluster of Neatly Decapitated Skeletons Have Been Unearthed in England

    01/19/2019 3:07:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    Science Alert ^ | January 8, 2019 | Michelle Starr
    An archaeological dig in Suffolk, England has yielded up a Roman-era cemetery treasure: 52 beautifully preserved skeletons dating back to the 4th century. And of those skeletons, many had been decapitated, their disembodied heads placed neatly at their sides or feet for burial, or buried without bodies altogether. Only 17 skeletons had been buried normally... It's known that Great Whelnetham was a Roman settlement, starting around the mid- to late- first century CE, and occupied for nearly 2,000 years; but, because the ground is fine sand, it was expected that any skeletons would have long disintegrated. So when the team...
  • Scientists find...carcasses...in mysterious Antarctic lake...buried under 3,500 feet of ice

    01/18/2019 9:23:31 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 56 replies
    Daily Mail UK ^ | 18 January 2019 | Mark Prigg
    Full Title: "Scientists find preserved animal carcasses in mysterious Antarctic lake 'twice the size of Manhattan' buried under 3,500 feet of ice" Scientists in Antarctica have found preserved carcasses of tiny animals in a mysterious lake buried under more than 3,500 feet of ice. Mercer Subglacial Lake is a hydraulically active lake that lies more 1000m beneath the Whillans Ice Plain, a fast moving section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Researchers managed to drill into the lake for the first time earlier this year, and have now revealed they found signs of life. According to Nature, researchers found the...
  • Asteroids have been crushing Earth for nearly 300 million years and no one knows why

    01/18/2019 10:41:27 AM PST · by EdnaMode · 67 replies
    Fox News ^ | January 18, 2019 | Chris Ciaccia
    Asteroids have been hitting the Earth for nearly 1 billion years, but the atmosphere has largely shielded the planet from some catastrophic events. However, some space rocks make their way through — including the one that wiped out the dinosaurs. But a new study notes that, over the past 290 million years, asteroids have been impacting the Earth at triple the rate they were previously and scientists aren't sure why. After looking at 1 billion years' worth of asteroid impacts on both the Earth and Moon, researchers found that dinosaurs' fate was perhaps an inevitability.
  • Devastating quakes are priming the Himalaya for a mega-disaster

    01/18/2019 7:51:08 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    nationalgeographic.com ^ | January 17, 2019 | Maya Wei-Haas
    A study published January 3 in Nature Communications provides new evidence that, rather than releasing seismic tensions in the crust, the 2015 quake likely loaded the surrounding region for an even more destructive mega-earthquake, which could clock in at magnitudes of 8.5 or higher. The study’s numerical simulations probe the conditions behind how and why moderate earthquakes trigger massive ones, helping scientists understand the accumulation of stress along faults. It's impossible to say exactly when this megaquake will actually happen, whether years, decades, or centuries from now. But understanding the risks to the region is vital for getting protections in...
  • Japan Launches Meteor-Spawning Minisatellite, 6 Other Spacecraft to Orbit

    01/17/2019 6:15:30 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    Space.com ^ | January 17, 2019 08:05pm ET | Mike Wall,
    Japan launched seven spacecraft to Earth orbit today (Jan. 17), including a little satellite designed to create dazzling artificial meteor showers. The primary payload on today's launch was the Rapid Innovative Payload Demonstration Satellite 1 (RAPIS-1), whose boxy body measures about 3.3 feet (1 meter) on a side. In a first for JAXA, the agency consigned the manufacture and operation of RAPIS-1 to a startup — the Japanese company Axelspace. RAPIS-1 carries a variety of technology demonstrations, including a thin-membrane, paddle-shaped solar array; small thrusters that use low-toxicity propellant; a low-cost particle sensor; and "deep-learning" software that will aid attitude...
  • Russian startup wants to put ads in low-Earth orbit to ruin the sky for everybody

    01/17/2019 4:07:04 AM PST · by vannrox · 25 replies
    sciencenewslab ^ | 16JAN19 | Editorial staff
    Russian startup wants to put ads in low-Earth orbit to ruin the sky for everybody January 16, 2019Will there be no end to people trying to muck up the night sky? Around this time last year it was a disco ball sent into low-Earth orbit. Now a Russian startup has had the colossally dense idea of sticking beaming billboards up there, to shine advertising back down to Earth.Putting aside the fact that advertising is already ubiquitous, the notion of adding a significant source of light pollution to the night sky has astronomers – professional and amateur alike – fuming.The...
  • US to Launch Secret Spy Satellite Saturday

    01/17/2019 10:09:03 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    Space.com ^ | January 16, 2019 05:17pm ET | Mike Wall,
    The NROL-71 spacecraft is scheduled to launch atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Delta IV Heavy rocket from California's Vandenberg Air Force Base on Saturday (Jan. 19) at 2:05 p.m. EST (1905 GMT; 11:05 a.m. local California time), ULA representatives announced yesterday (Jan. 15). ULA had originally targeted early December for NROL-71's liftoff, but bad weather and technical issues pushed the launch back multiple times. The most recent attempt, on Dec. 19, was nixed because of a slight hydrogen leak on the Delta IV Heavy — an issue that has taken several weeks to resolve. NROL-71 will be operated by...
  • You absolutely must see these videos of the farthest object we’ve ever reached

    01/17/2019 3:59:40 AM PST · by vannrox · 42 replies
    sciencenewslab ^ | 17JAN19 | Editorial staff
    The most distant object humanity has ever visited looks something like a spinning snowman or hourglass that’s lost in space.Researchers who work on NASA’s nuclear-powered New Horizons mission released a movie on Tuesday showing the rotation of the mountain-size rock, which is known formally as (486958) 2014 MU69.(It’s more commonly referred to as “Ultima Thule”.)Mu69 is about 4 billion miles (6 billion kilometres) from Earth and 1 billion miles (2 billion kilometres) beyond Pluto.New Horizons flew by the object on New Year’s Day at a speed of 32,200 miles per hour (52,000 kilometres per hour), and came within about 2,200 miles...
  • Scientists accidentally engineer mice with unusually short and long tails

    01/17/2019 10:03:52 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    phys.org ^ | 01/17/2019
    "The same regulatory networks that control mechanisms regulating how a body pattern is formed are often coopted for other developmental processes," says Moisés Mallo, a researcher at Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência in Lisbon, Portugal, and senior author of one of the two papers. "Studying these networks can give us relevant information for understanding other developmental, or even pathological, processes." Both groups' findings are related to a gene called Lin28, which was already known to have a role in regulating body size and metabolism, among other functions. "We were trying to make mouse models of Lin28-driven cancer, but we were surprised...
  • Total lunar eclipse meets supermoon Sunday night

    01/17/2019 9:38:33 PM PST · by blueplum · 19 replies
    AP ^ | MARCIA DUNN
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Here comes a total lunar eclipse and supermoon, all wrapped into one. The moon, Earth and sun will line up this weekend for the only total lunar eclipse this year and next. At the same time, the moon will be ever so closer to Earth and appear slightly bigger and brighter than usual — a supermoon. "This one is particularly good," said Rice University astrophysicist Patrick Hartigan. "It not only is a supermoon and it's a total eclipse, but the total eclipse also lasts pretty long. It's about an hour." The whole eclipse starts Sunday...
  • Size matters—to livebearer fish, big fins are a big deal

    01/17/2019 12:22:47 PM PST · by ETL · 2 replies
    Phys.org ^ | January 17, 2019 | University of California - Riverside
    To female molly and Limia fish, nothing is hotter than a male with a large dorsal fin. But these fins aren't just decorations to attract females. Males also use them to fight or intimidate rivals. For scientists who study evolution, the fins present a chicken-and-egg dilemma. Which came first—ornamental fins for courtship displays, or fighting fins only later used in displays?In a new paper, biologists from the University of California, Riverside, studied the evolution of 40 molly and Limia species, and concluded dorsal fin displays arose first for males to compete with other males, only later being used in courtship...
  • Amazon sets conference on robotics, artificial intelligence

    01/17/2019 11:03:37 AM PST · by ETL · 18 replies
    Phys.org ^ | January 17, 2019
    Amazon announced plans Thursday to hold a conference open to the public on robotics, space and artificial intelligence, as well as to discuss future applications of emerging technologies. The re:MARS conference in Las Vegas will include "visionary talks, interactive workshops, technical deep dives, roundtables, hands-on demos, and more," an Amazon statement said.The conference called Machine learning, Automation, Robotics and Space on June 4-7 grew out of a private, invite-only event hosted by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos in recent years."We're at the beginning of a golden age of AI," Bezos said in the statement."Recent advancements have already led to invention that...
  • Hail the Perovskite Transistors

    01/17/2019 10:56:19 AM PST · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    Spectrum.ieee.org ^ | 16 Jan 2019 | 21:39 GMT | By David Schneider
    Researchers have created a field-effect transistor using a single-crystal, “paint-on” perovskite Illustration: North Carolina State University =================================================================== Transistors, and the conductive traces that connect them, are routinely created by the billions on the surface of silicon wafers, which are later cut into the individual “chips” that power our computers, phones, watches, and countless other electronic gadgets. But few people think much about how those silicon wafers are made in the first place. It’s quite tricky. Very pure sand (silicon dioxide) has to be melted, at which point a seed crystal of elemental silicon is brought in contact with the melt,...
  • Opal-filled fossils reveal timid, dog-size dinosaur that lived down under

    01/17/2019 10:37:36 AM PST · by ETL · 22 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Jan 17, 2019 | Laura Geggel Senior Writer | LiveScience
    When Mike Poben, an opal buyer and and fossil fanatic, bought a bucket of opal from an Australian mine, he was surprised to find to find what looked like an ancient tooth in the pile. Later, he also found a fossilized jaw piece — one that was shiny and glistening with opal. After showing the two opalized specimens to paleontologists in 2014, Poben learned that they were part of a previously unknown dog-size dinosaur species, a new study finds. This dino lived about 100 million years ago in Australia, back when the landscape was lush and dotted with lakes. The...
  • Jerry Coyne and the Consequences of Denying Free Will

    01/17/2019 9:28:03 AM PST · by Heartlander · 10 replies
    Evolution News ^ | January 17, 2019 | Michael Egnor
    Jerry Coyne and the Consequences of Denying Free Will Michael Egnor January 17, 2019 Jerry Coyne is an atheist evolutionary biologist who denies libertarian free will. He believes that we are “biological automatons,” made of, and governed solely by, molecules, and incapable of contracausal free will. He believes that we cannot make choices that are not caused wholly by the matter in our brains and bodies. He denies the immateriality of the will. His reasons for this denial are unsound, in my view. But that is not the focus of my post. It is the consequences of free will denial that...
  • NASA may decide this year to land a drone on Saturn's moon Titan

    01/17/2019 8:13:56 AM PST · by ETL · 7 replies
    Space.com ^ | January 16, 2019 | Meghan Bartels, Space.com Senior Writer
    The spacecraft that have peered through the yellowish haze surrounding Saturn's moon Titan discovered a strange, yet strangely familiar world where life could theoretically take root. Now, scientists want to return — this time buoyed by Earth's fascination with drone technology. That's precisely what a team of scientists working on a proposed mission called Dragonfly want to do: combine terrestrial drone technology and instruments honed by Mars exploration to investigate the complex chemical reactions taking place on Saturn's largest moon. Later this year, NASA will need to decide between that mission and another finalist proposal, which would collect a sample...
  • CERN wants to build a particle collider that’s four times bigger than the LHC

    01/17/2019 6:58:42 AM PST · by C19fan · 9 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | January 16, 2019 | Staff
    CERN wants to go super-sized. The particle physics lab near Geneva in Switzerland has just unveiled its plans for a replacement for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The news: CERN has released a design report for the Future Circular Collider, which would be four times as big as the LHC. Colliders send particles around a loop at incredible speeds and then let researchers analyze the fallout when they smash into one another. The design for the FCC would be some 100 kilometers (62 miles) long and, when operating at full capacity, collide particles at 10 times the energy of the...
  • The World’s Most Popular Coffee Species Are Going Extinct, Study Says

    01/17/2019 5:32:47 AM PST · by Bloody Sam Roberts · 37 replies
    Geek.com ^ | 1/16/2019 | Stephanie Valera
    Coffee lovers, here’s one more reason to savor that morning cup o’ joe. Research shows 60 percent of coffee species found in the wild could soon go extinct. In a new study published in the journal Science Advances on Wednesday, researchers at Kew Royal Botanic Gardens say factors putting the future of coffee at risk include climate change, deforestation, droughts, and plant diseases. According to the study, a collaboration between scientists from the UK and Ethiopia, out of 124 types of wild coffee, 75 are at risk of extinction. About 35 of the 124 species grow in areas with no...
  • Is the fishing industry leaving enough food for Antarctica’s top predators?

    01/16/2019 3:02:39 PM PST · by ETL · 25 replies
    ScienceMag.org ^ | Jan. 15, 2019 | Erik Stokstad
    Krill, crustaceans smaller than a cigarette, play an outsize role in the ecology of the ocean around Antarctica: Penguins, whales, and other predators feast on vast swarms of the shrimplike animals. Now, researchers have launched a broad international survey of krill’s main habitat in the Scotia Sea—the first in nearly 20 years—to learn whether a growing fishing industry is leaving enough for krill’s natural predators. The effort, led by the Institute of Marine Research (IMR) in Bergen, Norway, began in earnest last week when Norway’s new polar research vessel Kronprins Haakon sailed from Punta Arenas, Chile, for the Scotia Sea....
  • World’s 'loneliest' frog, Romeo, finally has his Juliet

    01/16/2019 11:08:54 AM PST · by ETL · 38 replies
    FoxNews.com/Science ^ | Jan 16, 2019 | Christopher Carbone | Fox News
    The Sehuencas water frog has been living all alone in an aquarium in Bolivia for 10 years and researchers hadn't seen any of his species in the wild in a decade. However, during a recent expedition to a Bolivian cloud forest, Global Wildlife Conservation and the Museo de Historia Alcide d'Orbigny rediscovered the Sehuencas water frog and rescued five – three males and two females – to bring into a conservation breeding program."It is an incredible feeling to know that thanks to everyone who believes in true love and donated for Valentine’s Day last year, we have already found a mate for Romeo and...